Successful Aging
INSTANT TOP 10 BESTSELLER *New York Times *USAToday *Indie List *Publisher's Weekly "Debunks the idea that aging inevitably brings infirmity and unhappiness and instead offers a trove of practical, evidence-based guidance for living longer and better."--Daniel H. Pink, author of When and Drive SUCCESSFUL AGING delivers powerful insights: - Debunking the myth that memory always declines with age - Confirming that "health span"--not "life span"--is what matters - Proving that sixty-plus years is a unique and newly recognized developmental stage - Recommending that people look forward to joy, as reminiscing doesn't promote health Levitin looks at the science behind what we all can learn from those who age joyously, as well as how to adapt our culture to take full advantage of older people's wisdom and experience. Throughout his exploration of what aging really means, using research from developmental neuroscience and the psychology of individual differences, Levitin reveals resilience strategies and practical, cognitive enhancing tricks everyone should do as they age.Successful Aging inspires a powerful new approach to how readers think about our final decades, and it will revolutionize the way we plan for old age as individuals, family members, and citizens within a society where the average life expectancy continues to rise.

Successful Aging Details

TitleSuccessful Aging
Author
ReleaseJan 7th, 2020
PublisherDutton Books
ISBN-139781524744182
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Science, Health, Biology, Neuroscience, Psychology, Self Help

Successful Aging Review

  • Natalie Fincher
    January 1, 1970
    I'm too dumb for this.
  • 혜정
    January 1, 1970
    Iam seventy one years old woman. But I'd like to read new novels and listen to good music so that I want to live by my self. When I have retired from professor five years ago I had depressed losted my punctual work. In my country many people thought as an unavailable person from retired their work. I have a complaint these conception. So I start to study regular lesson at open college and I always want to know how do I live my more older age. I hope to meet and practice my life through Iam seventy one years old woman. But I'd like to read new novels and listen to good music so that I want to live by my self. When I have retired from professor five years ago I had depressed losted my punctual work. In my country many people thought as an unavailable person from retired their work. I have a complaint these conception. So I start to study regular lesson at open college and I always want to know how do I live my more older age. I hope to meet and practice my life through Successful aging. I'm going to decide to read this book. Thank you
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  • Roxanne
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was a heavy book about how to age well. It is pretty scientific but it has good information.
  • Julius Adams
    January 1, 1970
    A lot of science to get to the same results people have known for a long time. Cicero said it all in his treatise in OLD AGE, summarized below. Same findings, just without the science. So what is new here? Don’t waste your money....Below is a link to an excellent summary written by Dr. John Messerly on his web site, where you can read his entire commentary concerning Ciceros treatise. Thank you to him, it proves this book is not new or necessary in its philosophical thinking. A lot of science to get to the same results people have known for a long time. Cicero said it all in his treatise in OLD AGE, summarized below. Same findings, just without the science. So what is new here? Don’t waste your money....Below is a link to an excellent summary written by Dr. John Messerly on his web site, where you can read his entire commentary concerning Ciceros treatise. Thank you to him, it proves this book is not new or necessary in its philosophical thinking. https://reasonandmeaning.com/2017/08/...
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  • Scott Wozniak
    January 1, 1970
    This is the best book on aging I've read yet. It covers everything from the social and emotional issues of aging to the neuroscience and even diet and supplements. The author does a great job giving you real science in a way that doesn't feel overcomplicated. Some of this confirmed things I've read before:-Your friendships matter tremendously and you have to keep investing in relationships or they will naturally fade as you and your friends age.-When designing your final chapters of life, think This is the best book on aging I've read yet. It covers everything from the social and emotional issues of aging to the neuroscience and even diet and supplements. The author does a great job giving you real science in a way that doesn't feel overcomplicated. Some of this confirmed things I've read before:-Your friendships matter tremendously and you have to keep investing in relationships or they will naturally fade as you and your friends age.-When designing your final chapters of life, think about the people you want to be with more than the places you want to be/things you want to do.-Don't retire from meaningful work. You can slow down or do a different activity, but to stop doing things that matter is to invite decline and despair.-Much of the physical decline we say is aging is really just decades of being out of shape. Stay active and push yourself. You might be surprised at what you can do (and how many aches and pains go away when you're back in shape.)-Sleep is the most important health factor--and it's harder to sleep well when you're old. That doesn't mean give up. It means get more diligent to protect your sleep quality and quantity.And there were some things that busted a lot of the myths I've read:-We still don't don't what diets are best. Nutrition is so hard to pin down (hard to isolate it from other factors and it's so different person to person). So most of the supplements we are told to take have no scientific evidence to support them. This includes popular things like Omega 3 fatty acids (we need them, but so far taking pills doesn't actually show any improvements in our blood stream) and popular diets who remove whole categories of food (from vegetarian to Atkins). The key is variety of food types (except processed/fried foods, of course) and limits on the quantity. -We still don't know how to avoid Alzheimer's and dementia. -All the studies of communities of people who live 100+ are massively scientifically flawed. They've been discussed and dismissed by all the scientists in the field. They're anecdotal stories by non-scientists. There are just too few people and the variables are so complex that there's no real patterns that hold up under scrutiny. So beware of them. -Your genes account for only 7% of your longevity (except for those cases when you have a congenital disease, such as a faulty heart valve). It's mostly how you live. A few bonus ideas:-We focus a lot on the diseases that keep us from dying (cancer, heart attack, etc.). But we don't put much attention or effort on the diseases that ruin our life enjoyment (diabetes, back injury, etc.). Don't just try not to do. Plan for a life that allows for pain-free mobility.-Purpose trumps all else. Have a plan for how you can keep learning and make a difference in the world.
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  • Karen Ng
    January 1, 1970
    The book is more technical and scientific than I expected. I find some chapters too overwhelming and tedious even though I was a scientist before retirement; read hundreds of books on neuro/ cognitive science after my brain bleed 3 years ago. The author's researches were very thorough and interesting, but attempting to educate an average reader with function and anatomy of the human brain, personality traits, memory categorization, cognitive science, as well as the effects of genes, environment, The book is more technical and scientific than I expected. I find some chapters too overwhelming and tedious even though I was a scientist before retirement; read hundreds of books on neuro/ cognitive science after my brain bleed 3 years ago. The author's researches were very thorough and interesting, but attempting to educate an average reader with function and anatomy of the human brain, personality traits, memory categorization, cognitive science, as well as the effects of genes, environment, curiosity and parenting on sucessful aging is a bit too much to jam into one book. I actually was somewhat relieved when I finished.
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  • Robert Yokoyama
    January 1, 1970
    I want to age successfully, and that is why I read this book. I can increase the neuroplasticity in my brain by learning some new things. Neuroplasticity is the ability of the brain to change and adapt over time, I can increase neuroplasticity by learning to speak a new language. I grew up speaking Chinese, but I am hopeful that I can expand my vocabulary by taking lessons. I can also increase the neuroplasticity in my brain by performing in a theater. Learning how to memorize lines and I want to age successfully, and that is why I read this book. I can increase the neuroplasticity in my brain by learning some new things. Neuroplasticity is the ability of the brain to change and adapt over time, I can increase neuroplasticity by learning to speak a new language. I grew up speaking Chinese, but I am hopeful that I can expand my vocabulary by taking lessons. I can also increase the neuroplasticity in my brain by performing in a theater. Learning how to memorize lines and movements can make the neural connections in my brain strong. I am proud of the fact that I have been working for over twenty years, and I am glad that the author says meaningful work is critical to longevity too. I will continue working, but I have been involved in pedestrian safety for people in wheelchair like myself. This secondary job sharpens my spatial, writing and speaking skills. This also increases the neuroplasticity in my brain and keeps me young. I learned that high blood pressure can lead to hearing loss because the hair cells in my ear can stiffen. This piece of news is a wake up call for me because my blood pressure is slightly elevated. I will strive to keep walking and exercising to keep my blood pressure in check though. I learned that exercise can improve my memory and creativity, so I have more incentive to exercise now. I like the information about friends in this book. Having a social network of friends improve my mood and keep my brain healthy. I have friends, but I don't see them that often. I am hopeful that I can make new friends to listen to music with and hang out with in person. I struggle to get a quality night of sleep, but I will follow Levitin's advice and make my room as dark as possible. The author also advises writing in journal to relax, so I will try this. I will strive to get out more to visit park and beaches. This activity will sharpen my senses and keep me young. This is such an insightful book.
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  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    Science, old and new, applied to aging with a breezy, positive presentation by neuroscientist Levitin. 400 pages knocking down myths of aging, applying technical information, with practical examples as well as interviews with older people, some well known, stressing growth well into the sunset years. There are an additional 100 pages of notes/appendix/index making it a truly scholarly tome with gems to uncover. Encourages the COACH principle: curiosity, openness, associations, conscientiousness Science, old and new, applied to aging with a breezy, positive presentation by neuroscientist Levitin. 400 pages knocking down myths of aging, applying technical information, with practical examples as well as interviews with older people, some well known, stressing growth well into the sunset years. There are an additional 100 pages of notes/appendix/index making it a truly scholarly tome with gems to uncover. Encourages the COACH principle: curiosity, openness, associations, conscientiousness and healthy practices. Well worth the read!
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  • Wade Self
    January 1, 1970
    Levitin does an exceptional job of summarizing an astounding amount of scientific literature to this point in history. Parts 1 and 2, those primarily based in summarizing the field, are a tight and effective communicated story. As Part 3 and more speculative sections emerge, I felt that the text read more similarly to an itemized list, with less connective fibers between the themes. Overall, if one is interested in the state of aging research, this book is definitely worth a read.
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  • Sherry Monger
    January 1, 1970
    I got a lot of good information out of this book -certainly some I have heard before, but packaged in categories that, for the most part, are easily read and understood. Conclusions arrived at by Levitin are fully backed by a hefty scientific bibliography at the end. This is an important read for those of us face to face with decline and a wish to make the most out of what is left.
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  • Patricia Stoltey
    January 1, 1970
    There is a wealth of useful information in Levitin's book on aging. It's readable for those of us who are not scientists and cites a large number of studies and discusses their validity on a wide range of topics of interest to those who want to stay physically and mentally healthy and active as long as possible.
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  • Kathryn Bagg
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating, particularly Part Two - The Choices We Make. Encouraging to learn how many ways there are to influence our own wellbeing, no matter if thirty or eighty. Levitin writes in a positive way, and provides so may examples of how to improve ones lot. Recommend it to young and old alike.
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  • ELIZABETH TIERNEY
    January 1, 1970
    Thoughtful and useful
  • Carol Cross
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone over the age of 65 should read this book.
  • Sara Goldenberg
    January 1, 1970
    It was super interesting and extremely well written.
  • Amir
    January 1, 1970
    Highly recommend this book to people of all ages. In my mid thirties my mind went kept going to my parents and older siblings while keeping in mind the habits I should be cultivating for the future.
  • Pcox
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting and not too technical but I learned a few new things and reinforced prior understandings of what i should be doing :)
  • Carlos Vasconcelos
    January 1, 1970
    Good but more of the same.
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