The Antidote For Everything
In this whip-smart and timely novel from acclaimed author Kimmery Martin, two doctors travel a surprising path when they must choose between treating their patients and keeping their jobs. Georgia Brown’s profession as a urologist requires her to interact with plenty of naked men, but her romantic prospects have fizzled. The most important person in her life is her friend Jonah Tsukada, a funny, empathetic family medicine doctor who works at the same hospital in Charleston, South Carolina and who has become as close as family to her.Just after Georgia leaves the country for a medical conference, Jonah shares startling news. The hospital is instructing doctors to stop providing medical care for transgender patients. Jonah, a gay man, is the first to be fired when he refuses to abandon his patients. Stunned by the predicament of her closest friend, Georgia’s natural instinct is to fight alongside him. But when her attempts to address the situation result in incalculable harm, both Georgia and Jonah find themselves facing the loss of much more than their careers.

The Antidote For Everything Details

TitleThe Antidote For Everything
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 20th, 2020
PublisherBerkley - Us
ISBN-139781984802835
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, LGBT

The Antidote For Everything Review

  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    BRAVA! BRAVA! BRAVA!This is powerful, provocative, brave book questions one of the most important and sensitive subjects of our modern world and it handles it meticulously. The objectivity of the thoughts balanced with the emotional progression of story-telling. It was one of the greatest works that Ive read so far with well rounded, impeccably developed characters. Georgia, smart, sarcastic, unique, tough, brave doctor. I really adored her personality and wished to befriend her. Alas there are BRAVA! BRAVA! BRAVA!This is powerful, provocative, brave book questions one of the most important and sensitive subjects of our modern world and it handles it meticulously. The objectivity of the thoughts balanced with the emotional progression of story-telling. It was one of the greatest works that I’ve read so far with well rounded, impeccably developed characters. Georgia, smart, sarcastic, unique, tough, brave doctor. I really adored her personality and wished to befriend her. Alas there are not much strong, crazily straightforward and original people in this world. And of course you also want some best and loyal friend like Jonah in your life. His story perfectly told, not with any over exaggeration or over imposing, so naturally and poignantly described and stole my heart. And hello, hello look who’s back! I hope you read the “Queen of Hearts” because two of my fave characters made cameo in this bok. Yes, that’s right, I’m talking about: Emma and Zadie.And of course we took an amazing European tour including Germany and Netherlands which are pros of the story. I have complex feelings about romance parts. Maybe Georgia was so independent, direct and unique soul to form a bounding with a guy but I have to admit it’s impossible not to resonate with Martin.This is story of equal rights, sexually, legally, humanly…It is about friendship. It’s about change and adaption. It’s about freedom and respect! It’s about awakening! It’s about real nature of true friendship!In our modern world we have some shameful, disgraceful facts show us 10 US states still discriminate in public employment only based on either sexual orientation or gender identity. And when it comes to the loves about fully protection LGBTQ Americans aren’t fully protected from discrimination in 30 states! These numbers are disturbing, frustrating acts against the human rights. So I’m happy this fantastic author chose a very crucial and effectively important subject and presented us a modern, realistic approach. Writing, characterization are good and capturing your attention from the beginning and you never get bored for a second, enjoying your reading.Special thanks to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing for sharing this amazing ARC COPY with me in exchange my honest review.
    more
  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, can we just take a moment to acknowledge the gorgeous covers on Kimmery Martins books? I didnt think they could top her cover for Queen of Hearts, and just look at this? Even incorporating the medical slant to her novels into beautiful artwork.Georgia Brown is a urologist and single. She sees lots and lots of men at work, but she wants romance. Her best friend is Jonah, a family medicine doctor who works in the same hospital with her in Charleston, South Carolina.Georgia heads out First of all, can we just take a moment to acknowledge the gorgeous covers on Kimmery Martin’s books? I didn’t think they could top her cover for Queen of Hearts, and just look at this? Even incorporating the medical slant to her novels into beautiful artwork.Georgia Brown is a urologist and single. She sees lots and lots of men at work, but she wants romance. Her best friend is Jonah, a family medicine doctor who works in the same hospital with her in Charleston, South Carolina.Georgia heads out of the country for a medical conference, and while away, Jonah finds out the hospital will no longer be providing medical care to transgender patients. Well, the hospital administration is ordering the doctors to stop. Jonah refuses to follow along and is fired.Georgia fights alongside Jonah for what’s right, but something happens. Something harmful.The Antidote for Everything is a timely and important novel. I didn’t realize this type of scenario was still happening in our nation’s hospitals, but apparently it is. I loved the characters, especially Georgia and Jonah. I wanted Jonah to be my best friend, too.There are also some adorable cameos here as a reward for those of us who have been following Martin’s books. No spoilers.I’m grateful Kimmery Martin took on this medical topic because she’s written an illuminating and provocative story that will hopefully put important issues like these in the forefront of stakeholders’ minds, so more will do what is right and treat everyone with equity as our nation’s founders would insist.I received a complimentary copy. All opinions are my own.Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader
    more
  • Berit☀️✨
    January 1, 1970
    A Beautiful timely thought provoking tale of friendship and hard choices. Kimmery Martin did a remarkable job of bringing her medical knowledge to the page and making it both readable and authentic. Living in Southern California and surrounding myself with accepting people I was shocked to find out that in over 30 states there are not laws against discriminating against the LGBTQ community. It is maddening and baffling that someone can be denied healthcare or a job based on who they choose to A Beautiful timely thought provoking tale of friendship and hard choices. Kimmery Martin did a remarkable job of bringing her medical knowledge to the page and making it both readable and authentic. Living in Southern California and surrounding myself with accepting people I was shocked to find out that in over 30 states there are not laws against discriminating against the LGBTQ community. It is maddening and baffling that someone can be denied healthcare or a job based on who they choose to love or what gender they choose to identify as. This book addresses this issue, but the story is really more of a love letter to friendship. Georgia is a urologist working in a hospital in South Carolina. Her best friend Jonah is also a doctor practicing in the same hospital. Jonah is gay and as a result tends to many members of the LGBTQ community, when some of his patients begin to leave his practice he is concerned. When he finds out that the hospital is no longer treating transgender individuals he is mad. This leads to him resigning, rumors, accusations, and a downward spiral. Georgia is determined to stand by her best friend, but this leads to some questionable actions. The story has a few twists and things I did not see coming, as well as a generous dose of romance. This was such an engaging story! Georgia and Jonah’s friendship was so strong and so special. Georgia was such a spunky, smart, sassy, and strong woman I really loved her character. The romance between Georgia and Mark was so real. I really appreciated how analytical Georgia was when it came to love, I think a lot of us (including myself) approach romance this way and it is seldom how it is portrayed in books and movies. I also really liked that Georgia and Jonah were flawed and made poor choices. Life is messy and this book does not sugarcoat it... it was real, it was raw, and it was wonderful!This book in emojis. 👩🏻‍⚕️ 🏥 👨🏼‍⚕️ 🩺 💻 👫 *** Big thank you to Berkley for my gifted copy of this book. All opinions are my own. ***
    more
  • Travel.with.a.book
    January 1, 1970
    The Antidote For Everything is so powerful and merges very sensitive topics which will make you go through mixed emotions throughout the pages! The fabulous medical prose by a doctor is always attractive to read and Kimmery is bringing a World filled with suspense and humour also complexed characters that you will love so much! 🌺❤Georgia is a bookworm doctor and her life is not alike the other womens, she has a very interesting personality and her friendship with Joah is so special and unique The Antidote For Everything is so powerful and merges very sensitive topics which will make you go through mixed emotions throughout the pages! The fabulous medical prose by a doctor is always attractive to read and Kimmery is bringing a World filled with suspense and humour also complexed characters that you will love so much! 🌺❤Georgia is a bookworm doctor and her life is not alike the other womens, she has a very interesting personality and her friendship with Joah is so special and unique that we all wish to have one in real life! Jonah's story is also incredibly elaborated! I loved Emma and Zadie cameo within the book, if you haven't read The Queen of Hearts theybare the main characters from Kimmery's first book! 🌺❤The background settings of Europe places is fascinating and I enjoyed the Frankfurt hospital scene, the romantic scenes are so emotional and mind-blowing, Martin has shown us and the perfect side of the romance prose that will keep you keen on the book! Amsterdam was also incredible and I loved the scenes there so much!🌺❤The novel is moving, revolutionary and powerful it merges topics like sexual politics, equality and friendship! How far can you go to reach your rights and to let your voice be heard, the conflict and the drama that The Antidote For Everything brings are outrageous and extremely intriguing! The book is definitely ☆☆☆☆☆ and for sure one of the biggest novel of 2020!!!🌺❤
    more
  • Mackenzie - PhDiva Books
    January 1, 1970
    The Antidote for Everything covers timely, relevant, and sometimes polarizing topics with grace, heart, and a bit of humor. The main character Georgia is fantastic! I may be biased because shes a fellow redhead, but I find her to just be pretty awesome all around. Shes a rare female urologist in the south working for a hospital founded by a fundamental church. Progressive values have no place in the institution Georgia works for. But overall, Georgia likes her coworkers, her patients, and her The Antidote for Everything covers timely, relevant, and sometimes polarizing topics with grace, heart, and a bit of humor. The main character Georgia is fantastic! I may be biased because she’s a fellow redhead, but I find her to just be pretty awesome all around. She’s a rare female urologist in the south working for a hospital founded by a fundamental church. Progressive values have no place in the institution Georgia works for. But overall, Georgia likes her coworkers, her patients, and her life.The central relationship of the novel is between Georgia and her best friend Jonah. When Jonah came out to his family at 18, he was turned away. Now, Georgia has become his family. Their friendship is completely heartwarming and filled with snappy banter and heartfelt moments.When Georgia is on her way to a conference in the Netherlands, a medical emergency onboard the aircraft calls her into service, and ultimately leads her to meet Mark. After she saves Mark, he wants to buy her a drink, a train ticket, and get to know her. And of course he is tall and hot! I liked the relationship between Mark and Georgia, but if I’m honest I was more interested in the friendship between Jonah and Georgia.So that brings us to what I would consider the main tension of the story. Georgia is at her conference while Jonah is back in Charleston worried about his job. Patients who are transgender have been notified that the hospital won’t treat them, and they’ll need to find alternate medical treatment. When Jonah refuses to abide by the hospital’s “morality” policy and turn away patients, he is fired. And it doesn’t end there. My heart went out to Jonah as he suffered character attacks. Friends and former colleagues circulate rumors that he stole medications from the hospital.Seeing the depth of Georgia’s friendship with Jonah was truly a shining part of this novel. Georgia goes to great lengths to help Jonah, including bringing Mark in. The situation in this book was one that is so timely, and is happening all around our country as political and social tensions escalate. Many feel the need to hold on even more tightly to their own moral code, and the fall out of policies such as this are devastating. Through Martin’s story, we see not only the impact on the patients, but also on the employees at the hospital. When a group has majority control, the options to stand up against something you disagree with disappear.This book manages to be both deeply thought-provoking and serious, while also being humorous and heart-warming at times. A really great book and one that I applaud for tackling tough issues that many shy away from.Thank you to Berkley Publishing for my copy. Opinions are my own.
    more
  • P.J. Vernon
    January 1, 1970
    With incredible voice and scalpel-sharp wit, Martin deftly navigates the light, the dark and the in-between of the human soul. As Southern and queer - and an early manuscript sensitivity reader - I saw myself reflected in honest pages penned by a true ally. This novel broke my heart in all the best ways.
    more
  • Lara Lillibridge
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate to be an early beta reader of The Antidote for Everything. As a member of the queer community, Im often suspicious of cis-het writers who take on queer themes or characters, but in this case, Martin did a solid job of reaching out to multiple sensitivity readers as well as engaging with several LGBTQIA+ groups as she wrote the book, and it shows. We need ally stories as well as books by queer authors. We need representation in books and we desperately need more people to use I was fortunate to be an early beta reader of The Antidote for Everything. As a member of the queer community, I’m often suspicious of cis-het writers who take on queer themes or characters, but in this case, Martin did a solid job of reaching out to multiple sensitivity readers as well as engaging with several LGBTQIA+ groups as she wrote the book, and it shows. We need ally stories as well as books by queer authors. We need representation in books and we desperately need more people to use their voices in support of the queer community. This is a strong, well-researched story about a highly relevant topic written with love and respect. Now about the book—you know, plot, character development, and all those things a GR review should address! One of my favorite aspects of Martin’s writing is the “beautiful disaster” protagonist, and she doesn’t disappoint in The Antidote for Everything. Georgia is smart, capable, and strong, but also messy and chaotic—just the way I love my characters and real-life friends. The most important relationship in her life is Jonah—her gay BFF. It reminded me so much of my old friend Jessie and the trouble we got ourselves into while being each other’s main emotional support. Many of us create our families as adults, and I loved seeing this dynamic in the story. In fact, you can tell that Martin deeply loves all the characters in the book, from the main characters to the dog to the patients. I teared up more than one time while reading this because I cared about the characters so much. Martin’s humor shines in this novel from the very first line, “Most women did not begin their days by stabbing a man in the scrotum, but Georgia Brown was not most women.” With a Urologist as the main character, you get a lot of funny situations, and I loved her descriptions of male discomfort. She also doesn’t shy away from discussions of wealth inequality and how it affects health care outcomes. I’m a long-time fan of medical dramas (and the daughter of a physician), and The Antidote for Everything strikes the right note in her attention to detail without going overboard into TMI. The tension is well-wrought throughout the book and the plot twists kept me guessing! The cover is straight-up gorgeous, but that is to be expected from Martin and Berkley. love this book and highly recommend it.
    more
  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to Berkley Publishing Group for the copy in exchange for an honest reviewthe antidote for everything is books and chocolate| Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram
  • Theresa Alan
    January 1, 1970
    3 to 3.5 stars. This topic is timely and important. I wanted to like this novel more than I did. The heroine of this novel is a doctor, so Georgia analyzes everything through a scientific lens. The problem is, that I, the reader, am now analyzing her feelings of lust and attraction toward Mark, because thats how the story is being told to me. I didn't FEEL it. Whatever novel Im reading, I want to feel something. I want to laugh, cry, fall in love with the hero along with the heroine, or feel so 3 to 3.5 stars. This topic is timely and important. I wanted to like this novel more than I did. The heroine of this novel is a doctor, so Georgia analyzes everything through a scientific lens. The problem is, that I, the reader, am now analyzing her feelings of lust and attraction toward Mark, because that’s how the story is being told to me. I didn't FEEL it. Whatever novel I’m reading, I want to feel something. I want to laugh, cry, fall in love with the hero along with the heroine, or feel so filled with suspense I can’t wait to find out what happens next and actually get stressed out until I’m sure the hero is all right. The only emotion I felt reading this was anger toward the fact that it’s still legal to discriminate against members of the LGBTQ community in jobs and healthcare and housing in many states. Holy cow, I just checked the ACLU website and it said that in 38 states it’s still legal to discriminate against LGBTQ folks. That seems wrong, statistically, and is obviously grotesquely wrong morally. There were some nice plot twists, but all in all, this just didn’t do it for me. Thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to review this novel, which RELEASES FEBRUARY 18, 2020.For more reviews, please visit http://www.theresaalan.net/blog
    more
  • Jessica Strawser
    January 1, 1970
    I was a big fan of Kimmery Martin's smart, witty debut, THE QUEEN OF HEARTS, and this follow-up does not disappoint. Her characters are fascinatingly brilliant, authentically human, and complicated in ways equally maddening and endearing. In other words, they could be your friendsand by the end of the story, they certainly feel that way. THE ANTIDOTE FOR EVERYTHING has a ripped-from-the-headlines hook: Martin's take on how doctors and corporations face down all too real stances on discrimination I was a big fan of Kimmery Martin's smart, witty debut, THE QUEEN OF HEARTS, and this follow-up does not disappoint. Her characters are fascinatingly brilliant, authentically human, and complicated in ways equally maddening and endearing. In other words, they could be your friends—and by the end of the story, they certainly feel that way. THE ANTIDOTE FOR EVERYTHING has a ripped-from-the-headlines hook: Martin's take on how doctors and corporations face down all too real stances on discrimination will make you think, feel, and ultimately stand up and cheer. (Thanks to the publisher for an opportunity to read an advance copy via Netgalley.)
    more
  • The Nerd Daily
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Beth MowbrayGeorgia is a urologist working at a hospital in Charleston, South Carolina with her best friend, Jonah. She enjoys her job and the people she works with, both patients and co-workers, until one day a scandal breaks loose. Many of Jonahs patients begin leaving the clinic with no explanation. Then Jonah himself comes under scrutiny and is at risk of losing his job. As Georgia and Jonah uncover what is going on, they learn the truth: Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Beth MowbrayGeorgia is a urologist working at a hospital in Charleston, South Carolina with her best friend, Jonah. She enjoys her job and the people she works with, both patients and co-workers, until one day a scandal breaks loose. Many of Jonah’s patients begin leaving the clinic with no explanation. Then Jonah himself comes under scrutiny and is at risk of losing his job. As Georgia and Jonah uncover what is going on, they learn the truth: the hospital intends to no longer treat transgender patients. When Jonah stands up against this injustice, he is fired. With her own job on the line as well, Georgia tries to help Jonah find a way out of a particularly sticky predicament in hopes that the hospital will not only hire him back, but will also see the error of their discriminatory ways.The Antidote for Everything is Kimmery Martin’s second fiction novel, drawing on her own experiences as a physician. A subplot of Georgia’s love interest adds another dimension to the storyline that is otherwise focused on medical and social issues. The novel also includes many aspects that are sure to draw the reader in: a strong female lead, mystery and twists in the plot, and the strong bond of friendship between the main characters, Georgia and Jonah. Martin’s writing is quite sound for one making such a drastic change in fields; however despite the solid writing the storyline feels too contrived overall. While there are compelling points throughout, by and large the novel feels too neatly planned out and structured, at least for this reviewer’s tastes. When broaching a large, complex, and currently relevant topic, such as that of gender identity which is examined here, one may be looking for more depth with the social commentary. At times it felt as if there was a pull between whether the story was truly focused on what Georgia and Jonah would risk to “save” their patients versus what they would do to “save” themselves or each other.It is particularly interesting, however, to note some of the situations which influenced and inspired Martin to write this story. For example, Martin actually knows a physician who was fired for refusing to stop treating transgender patients. Martin also lives in the state of North Carolina and has stated that her writing was influenced by the passing of an anti-discrimination ordinance for gay and transgender people in the city of Charlotte a few years back. Despite the concerns noted by this reviewer, it does seem that The Antidote for Everything has the appeal of contemporary fiction which is likely to find a broad audience out in the reading world. If you tend to enjoy a bit of a lighter, more commercial fiction novel which still contains important social references, you may want to give this one a try.
    more
  • Kerry
    January 1, 1970
    A riveting page-turner that rivals your favorite prime time medical drama. Loved it.
  • Chelsea | Thriller Book Babe 🔎
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this book a lot and thought that even though this was a controversial topic, the author did a great job with it. The subject revolves around Georgia and her friend Jonah, and how in his job as a doctor is ordered to stop providing care for people who are transgender. When Jonah refuses, he is fired and this causes Georgia to take matters into her own hands.This book causes several emotions and makes you rethink ideas such as sexual politics and LGBTQIA+ issues. I love the representation I liked this book a lot and thought that even though this was a controversial topic, the author did a great job with it. The subject revolves around Georgia and her friend Jonah, and how in his job as a doctor is ordered to stop providing care for people who are transgender. When Jonah refuses, he is fired and this causes Georgia to take matters into her own hands.This book causes several emotions and makes you rethink ideas such as sexual politics and LGBTQIA+ issues. I love the representation in this book and I love the way the characters felt real. Unlike some books, the characters feel complex and messy. Kimmery Martin is a fantastic writer and keeps you engaged from start to finish. The best part of this book were the themes of a real and deep friendship. The main characters had me reflecting on the importance of a good friend, and it made me love the book even more. 5-stars!
    more
  • Bradeigh Godfrey
    January 1, 1970
    This book captivated me from the first page! I fell in love with Georgia, a fiery female urologist, and her best friend, Jonah, a compassionate family physician, as they fight for their patients access to medical care. Filled with Martins signature wit and voice, this story made me want to be a better human being, to stand with those who are marginalized and work to make this world a better place. I adored the friendship between Georgia and Jonah and the gorgeously-drawn setting of Charleston. A This book captivated me from the first page! I fell in love with Georgia, a fiery female urologist, and her best friend, Jonah, a compassionate family physician, as they fight for their patients’ access to medical care. Filled with Martin’s signature wit and voice, this story made me want to be a better human being, to stand with those who are marginalized and work to make this world a better place. I adored the friendship between Georgia and Jonah and the gorgeously-drawn setting of Charleston. A character-driven page turner with smart writing, an important message, and a whole lot of heart. Highly, highly recommended. Don’t miss this one! I received an advance copy from the author. All my opinions are whole heartedly my own.
    more
  • Sarah Swann
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this authors first book and was so excited to read this one. I didnt enjoy this one as much. I did really like the characters and its a great conversation about equality and our flawed laws. However, I didnt like a lot of the decisions made by the main character. She did a lot of things that had me saying, But why tho? She made some decisions that ultimately hurt the people she loved, and she willingly made those decisions. Overall I liked it, but didnt love it. I loved this author’s first book and was so excited to read this one. I didn’t enjoy this one as much. I did really like the characters and it’s a great conversation about equality and our flawed laws. However, I didn’t like a lot of the decisions made by the main character. She did a lot of things that had me saying, “But why tho?” She made some decisions that ultimately hurt the people she loved, and she willingly made those decisions. Overall I liked it, but didn’t love it.
    more
  • BookGypsy
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very timely novel about two doctors, Georgia and Johah who are close friends. The hospital they work for tells the doctors not to treat transgender patients. This was a serious look at discrimination, sexuality and humanity. Heavy topics but it's also pretty witty. I loved Georgia! She had me laughing out loud. The story is powerful and very right now. I didn't like it as much as I did her last book. But it's a good read.
    more
  • Chris S.
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Berkeley Publishing for my copy of this bookIn lieu of a summary, please see the page for this book on GoodreadsI need to stop myself from blithely gushing, since I know that isn't what people want to read, but I can't stop myself, so I'll just get it all out.This book nourished me. I laughed at the jokes, I very nearly cried a few times, and I just all around loved it. I honestly think that this may be the best book I've read all year. There are occasions where you feel like the Thanks to Berkeley Publishing for my copy of this bookIn lieu of a summary, please see the page for this book on GoodreadsI need to stop myself from blithely gushing, since I know that isn't what people want to read, but I can't stop myself, so I'll just get it all out.This book nourished me. I laughed at the jokes, I very nearly cried a few times, and I just all around loved it. I honestly think that this may be the best book I've read all year. There are occasions where you feel like the writer has a connection to your very soul, and this was one of those occasions.Now, on to analysis. The plot is good, and there are several times it will blindside you, but the characters are really the heart of the story. Martin says she conceived of the characters before she wrote the current plot, and it shows. Not that the plot is bad or blase, but even if it drags in spots, you just don't care because the characters are So. Dang. Good. and you want to spend more time with them. Even though the book plays towards certain tropes and even acknowledges them point-blank at times, it never loses that feel of uncompromising realness that comes from the deep friendship between two friends.The beginning of the book does have a considerable amount of exposition, but it's not unbearable by any means, and Georgia and Jonah help guide us through it. Once it got going, though, I was hooked right up until the end, which even though it didn't quite wrap everything up neatly, still seemed appropriate and earned. People who are expecting lots of trans representation may be disappointed. Martin's view is that of an ally, but I feel that while she could write LGBT characters, she did not want to cross the line of speaking for them. Still, on this day after Transgender Day of Remembrance, I can say that it does touch on very real issues for those communities. It makes a point and explores its themes without sounding preachy, and ended up leaving me feeling fulfilled, enlightened, and a better human being, which is what I feel every good novel should do. Martin seemingly thinks her humor is hokey, but I do not share her opinion. Sure, some humor is stupid, but it's the kind of humor that is charming because it's a little stupid, not the type of humor that would make you irate. And it's hard to be mad at anyone who writes with such glistening prose and while writing with a warm heart, isn't afraid to go into the light as well as the dark with her characters.Although these words seem astoundingly inadequate for this book, I shall leave you with a few more. Buy this book when it comes out in February. You won't be sorry.
    more
  • Doris Vandruff
    January 1, 1970
    This is a wonderfully crafted book. It covers a genre of issues. It also has two super delicious, hilarious characters. Not to stop there it also cover some serious issues regarding discrimination in healthcare. I don't want to give the story away. You just have to read this book. It has intrigue, love, loyalty, body guards, hot businessmen, doctors, nurses, friendship, and being honest. Most importantly about standing up for what is right in today's society. People are people, we all need love, This is a wonderfully crafted book. It covers a genre of issues. It also has two super delicious, hilarious characters. Not to stop there it also cover some serious issues regarding discrimination in healthcare. I don't want to give the story away. You just have to read this book. It has intrigue, love, loyalty, body guards, hot businessmen, doctors, nurses, friendship, and being honest. Most importantly about standing up for what is right in today's society. People are people, we all need love, acceptance and understanding.
    more
  • mindful.librarian ☀️
    January 1, 1970
    (free review copy) Important and timely topic with extensive medical content. Crucial to note that Martin did use numerous sensitivity readers.
  • Donna Foster
    January 1, 1970
    So good making it one of the best reads in awhile with precise medical language, information and situations.
  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    January 1, 1970
    Whew! So much I want to say about this book. I adored Kimmery's first book so was beyond excited for this read - especially with the subject manner as this world and our legalities when it comes to fairness to humans across the board is diminishing. It's heartbreaking and I applaud the author for bringing this to her pages.Georgia is a very independent female who has relationship issues (girl, I feel you). While I adored her character in her loyalty to her friends (especially her friend who Whew! So much I want to say about this book. I adored Kimmery's first book so was beyond excited for this read - especially with the subject manner as this world and our legalities when it comes to fairness to humans across the board is diminishing. It's heartbreaking and I applaud the author for bringing this to her pages.Georgia is a very independent female who has relationship issues (girl, I feel you). While I adored her character in her loyalty to her friends (especially her friend who became family, Jonah), sometimes she couldn't look outside her own box. Jonah is a breath of fresh air that brings some levity to this very serious story while dealing with some extreme issues. Their friendship is fantastic and I enjoyed seeing their closeness and reading their banter. Their trip to the coffee shop in Amsterdam seriously made me laugh out loud. Mark, as Georgia's love interest, well... while I think this part of the story may not have been entirely necessary, I do think it was important in having an outside factor make Georgia realize some things about herself.In all honestly, I spent a lot of time getting angry when reading what was happening to Jonah. From the discriminatory practice of the hospital to their patients, to Jonah himself and just the overall want to yell FUCK YOU about a zillion times, I was getting LIVID. And unfortunately this is actually going on in the real world these days. The author's research and own personal experiences can be felt throughout this read. I can only hope that eventually we'll go two steps forward rather than two steps back. PLEASE.I do think some things got a little bit convoluted in how it all panned out and the actions that took place to get there but I can't get into it as I don't want to spoil anything. I also wanted more of Jonah's story - his patients, treatments, dismissals and more of his point of view. I know this is something the author couldn't write from and she touches on this in her notes but that doesn't stop me from wanting more. I do know that when I turned that last page, read the acknowledgments and author's note (and please please do read these), that I had very strong feelings and a lot of heart for this story.
    more
  • Jennifer Klepper
    January 1, 1970
    What I love about Kimmery Martin's writing is how much fun she seems to have with words. She's clever, witty, smart, well-read...sensing a theme here? She's also thoughtful. And the combination of her facility with words and her social awareness make for a book that can sweep the reader away and spark introspection and dialogue. In "The Antidote for Everything," Martin brings us the story of two doctors who face a pivot point in their careers, one forced upon them by discriminatory laws that What I love about Kimmery Martin's writing is how much fun she seems to have with words. She's clever, witty, smart, well-read...sensing a theme here? She's also thoughtful. And the combination of her facility with words and her social awareness make for a book that can sweep the reader away and spark introspection and dialogue. In "The Antidote for Everything," Martin brings us the story of two doctors who face a pivot point in their careers, one forced upon them by discriminatory laws that threaten both access to health care and the livelihood of health care providers. But there's so much more. It's a story of friendship and loyalty, with deep dives into honesty, integrity, and love, among richly drawn and memorable characters. Should be a top book club pick.
    more
  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book. I love the medical jargon, I love the friendship between Jonah and Georgia, I love their passion for their patients. I loved Mark (but I generally don't like romances because they paint such an unrealistic picture). It was just a sweet book.Thanks to the author for not going with the brain tumor story line of the earliest drafts. :)
    more
  • Jamie (jamie.bookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    When I started this book I thought it was just what the doctor ordered (see what I did there 😜). Although I did enjoy it overall, it ended up just ok for me. I LOVED the first 1/3, it reminded me of the authors first book, Queen of Hearts, which I loved. It had a similar feel, cute characters and I absolutely loved the medical aspects.The last 2/3s fell flat for me. Although a timely and important topic is the main storyline, I felt the middle dragged on and the strong message got diluted. It When I started this book I thought it was just what the doctor ordered (see what I did there 😜). Although I did enjoy it overall, it ended up just ok for me. I LOVED the first 1/3, it reminded me of the author’s first book, Queen of Hearts, which I loved. It had a similar feel, cute characters and I absolutely loved the medical aspects.The last 2/3s fell flat for me. Although a timely and important topic is the main storyline, I felt the middle dragged on and the strong message got diluted. It was really slow and it felt way longer than it needed to be. The ending did pick up again a bit thankfully, but with this being one of my most anticipated releases, I can’t help but feel a bit letdown. I will definitely read whatever the author puts out next because I truly did love her first book, and I didn’t dislike this one, I maybe just had my hopes up and expectations set high.Thanks to Penguin Random House Canada for the free book to review.
    more
  • Nicole Aquilina
    January 1, 1970
    { @berkleypub #partner } No joke, the first sentence of this book had me laughing out loud.  I even screenshot it to one of my friends because it was hilarious.  I love being roped in from the very first sentence, and that doesnt happen very often.  We start off with an intro to Dr. Georgia Brown - a urologist.  Without giving away too much, I bet you can guess that there are quite a few penis jokes ensue. Jonah, her BFF, who is gay and Georgia work at a clinic together. They love each other, { @berkleypub #partner }⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣No joke, the first sentence of this book had me laughing out loud.  I even screenshot it to one of my friends because it was hilarious.  I love being roped in from the very first sentence, and that doesn’t happen very often.  We start off with an intro to Dr. Georgia Brown - a urologist.  Without giving away too much, I bet you can guess that there are quite a few penis jokes ensue. Jonah, her BFF, who is gay and Georgia work at a clinic together. They love each other, support each other, and spend a lot of time together.  They are so close that they are each other’s medical power of attorney.  I loved watching the dynamics between these too.  It really made me yearn for a friendship of that magnitude. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣Once we get to know these two, we learn that the clinic has been turning away transgender patients behind Jonah’s back.  Here’s where the story gets really heavy.  My heart started to ache for all individuals who are denied equal rights, in this case medical treatment, because someone else thinks it’s immoral.  Jonah ends up getting fired because he refuses to abandon his patients.  Georgia puts herself on the line to fight for and protect her friend. Not everyone is willing to sacrifice themselves to take a stand for others and that is something worth talking about.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣I absolutely love Charleston, SC and was super excited that this book took place there.  It was extra fun to be able to picture the events happening in places that I have visited before. @kimmerymartin lives in Charlotte, NC which is where I live so I really enjoyed her sprinkling our city and some southern slang like “y’all and “bless your heart“ into the story. ⁣⁣She is also a doctor in real life and her experience in emergency medicine really elevated this book! ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣The subject matter is very heavy.  Discrimination, drug and alcohol abuse, and sexual harassment are just a few to name. There is some humor mixed in which is done very tastefully considering the hard topics that are at the root of the story.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣
    more
  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    I have to admit that I was not a fan of this author's first book, The Queen of Hearts. So, I had my doubts about this book. However, I am very happy to report that this book was a winner for me. Instantly, I connected with Georgia and Jonah. What Jonah was fighting for and the fact that he was willing to fight knowing he would be fired takes both heart and courage. He was lucky to have Georgia by his side. In turn, Georgia was lucky to have Jonah as a friend. She did not just have Jonah but her I have to admit that I was not a fan of this author's first book, The Queen of Hearts. So, I had my doubts about this book. However, I am very happy to report that this book was a winner for me. Instantly, I connected with Georgia and Jonah. What Jonah was fighting for and the fact that he was willing to fight knowing he would be fired takes both heart and courage. He was lucky to have Georgia by his side. In turn, Georgia was lucky to have Jonah as a friend. She did not just have Jonah but her boyfriend Mark was a winner. He was so understanding and supportive of Jonah and Georgia. I finished this book within a few days. The only "antidote" to this book is to read it. Author, Kimmery Martin pens a heartfelt story with engaging characters that will have you cheering for them the whole time.
    more
  • Tara - Running 'n' Reading
    January 1, 1970
    [Received a free copy of this book from the publisher]*4.5 stars* I fell in love with Kimmery Martin's writing, and storytelling abilities, when I read her debut novel, The Queen of Hearts. As a full-time hospital professional, I totally dig the medical jargon, the hospital environment, and the personality dynamics that usually accompany a world that is quite foreign to most. Martin combines these elements with beautifully flawed characters and great story lines and I AM A FAN. In her author's [Received a free copy of this book from the publisher]*4.5 stars* I fell in love with Kimmery Martin's writing, and storytelling abilities, when I read her debut novel, The Queen of Hearts. As a full-time hospital professional, I totally dig the medical jargon, the hospital environment, and the personality dynamics that usually accompany a world that is quite foreign to most. Martin combines these elements with beautifully flawed characters and great story lines and I AM A FAN. In her author's note, Martin explains how this story came to be (rather unexpectedly, as it turns out) and I appreciate her attention to the sensitive nature of the topics involved. I think she does a brilliant job of sharing her medical expertise in a way that both educates and enlightens her readers, without confusing language or exaggeration. Given the cultural climate in which we currently exist, the story she presents is extremely timely and completely plausible. I love that she has included a population of individuals who are often unrepresented in books! Most important, this is a story of an absolutely incredible friendship. Georgia and Jonah, the two main characters, are the embodiment of true love without any romantic attachment. I'm reminded of how thankful I am to be involved in a friendship that is very similar but, admittedly, I didn't find it until I was well into adulthood. By the time I finished - and I feel like I flew through this novel because I COULD NOT PUT IT DOWN - Georgia and Jonah were friends of mine, too.
    more
  • Genevieve Trono
    January 1, 1970
    I was very intrigued by this book after reading Kimmery Martins' debut novel The Queen of Hearts. While I enjoyed a lot of the storyline, I struggled with some of the stereotypical language the author chose to include when describing some of the patients and it was off-putting as the reader.When I read the premise of The Antidote for Everything I was very curious to see how she would handle a topic that is important but also something that I hoped would be spoken about with compassion and I was very intrigued by this book after reading Kimmery Martins' debut novel The Queen of Hearts. While I enjoyed a lot of the storyline, I struggled with some of the stereotypical language the author chose to include when describing some of the patients and it was off-putting as the reader.When I read the premise of The Antidote for Everything I was very curious to see how she would handle a topic that is important but also something that I hoped would be spoken about with compassion and understanding. The Antidote for Everything takes on the issue of discrimination against members of the LGBTQ community specifically in the healthcare world.I applaud Martin for taking on this highly relevant and important topic and it did seem as though she did her research to connect with people who are actually living this (because yes, this does still happen and without legal ramifications in place!)This is a medical drama written by someone who obviously knows her stuff as she is a medical doctor herself. There is a certain amount of medical jargon throughout the book but not so much that someone that doesn't work in this field would feel completely confused.As far as the connection with the characters, that is where it got a little lost for me. I often long for more backstory and I just wanted a little more and to feel more of an understanding of who they were as individuals and in relation to one another. I felt strongly about the topic but unfortunately, things feel a little flat with the actual plotline because I felt I was analyzing things more than getting fully pulled into the writing.So I have mixed feelings about this one. It was an intriguing storyline that just lacked a strong connection with the characters for me. I do appreciate that she took on this highly relevant and timely topic that hopefully will help raise awareness of something that is still going on right now in our non-fictional world. Thank you to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing for an advanced copy. All opinions are my own.
    more
  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    This is not a doctor-lite book; it's a serious look at how discrimination works in the real world and how physicians are sometimes caught up in it. It's also a book about male-female friendships and the extremes that friends will go to to save each other. I found it to be amusing at times, sad at times, and confusing at times. Altogether, though, it was a completely satisfying read.
    more
  • Alison Hammer
    January 1, 1970
    Kimmery Martin did it again!If you liked The Queen of Hearts, you'll love Martin's latest book. It's got friendship, it's got love and controversy, standing up for what is right and a kick-ass female urologist. Can't wait to see what Kimmery writes next!
    more
Write a review