Me and White Supremacy
"Layla Saad moves her readers from their heads into their hearts, and ultimately, into their practice. We won't end white supremacy through an intellectual understanding alone; we must put that understanding into action." —Robin DiAngelo, author of New York Times bestseller White FragilityBased off the original workbook, Me and White Supremacy teaches readers how to dismantle the privilege within themselves so that they can stop (often unconsciously) inflicting damage on people of color, and in turn, help other white people do better, too.When Layla Saad began an Instagram challenge called #meandwhitesupremacy, she never predicted it would spread as widely as it did. She encouraged people to own up and share their racist behaviors, big and small. She was looking for truth, and she got it. Thousands of people participated in the challenge, and over 90,000 people downloaded the Me and White Supremacy Workbook.The updated and expanded Me and White Supremacy takes the work deeper by adding more historical and cultural contexts, sharing moving stories and anecdotes, and including expanded definitions, examples, and and further resources.Awareness leads to action, and action leads to change. The numbers show that readers are ready to do this work—let's give it to them.

Me and White Supremacy Details

TitleMe and White Supremacy
Author
ReleaseFeb 4th, 2020
PublisherSourcebooks
ISBN-139781728209807
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Race, Social Movements, Social Justice, Audiobook, Sociology

Me and White Supremacy Review

  • Seamus BH
    January 1, 1970
    I did this for the full 28 days when Layla posted it to Instagram. Followers (mostly white women) would attack my answers to the daily questions because it didn’t fall into the ‘group think’ opinion that white = evil, and person of color = good. Which is dehumanizing and problematic for everyone. Layla herself started behaving like a cult leader, admonishing her followers in a consistent way to keep them ‘in check’. Layla clings to the belief that white supremacy is alive and well in the world I did this for the full 28 days when Layla posted it to Instagram. Followers (mostly white women) would attack my answers to the daily questions because it didn’t fall into the ‘group think’ opinion that white = evil, and person of color = good. Which is dehumanizing and problematic for everyone. Layla herself started behaving like a cult leader, admonishing her followers in a consistent way to keep them ‘in check’. Layla clings to the belief that white supremacy is alive and well in the world which she preaches from her home in Qatar, a country with a terrible record for modern slavery and trafficking. I don’t think Layla has any true experience of what racial supremacy really looks like (she grew up in Wales I believe) and I think her privilege and social standing has blinded her to her own superior and biased attitudes. I highly recommend the YouTube channel ‘For Harriet’ which dissects topics of race and culture with greater insight without making you feel like an asshole for being who you are. ContraPoints is another great channel that explores identity politics and philosophy.
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  • Ashley Holstrom
    January 1, 1970
    Whew. Get ready to do some hard, hard work, y'all. [I quickly read this before it goes to print; I'll be coming back to do the full 28-day challenge when it's published in February 2020!]
  • Asderan
    January 1, 1970
    I think white people with good intentions need to hear this from another decent person: those hunches that "something seems off" you had when you read this book weren't just your "white fragility" speaking. You aren't a white supremacist for being suspicious of the ideas in this book.I say that because you weren't given the option of considering that when you read this book, which told you how race works in western culture without ever actually feeling the need to prove it was true.When it comes I think white people with good intentions need to hear this from another decent person: those hunches that "something seems off" you had when you read this book weren't just your "white fragility" speaking. You aren't a white supremacist for being suspicious of the ideas in this book.I say that because you weren't given the option of considering that when you read this book, which told you how race works in western culture without ever actually feeling the need to prove it was true.When it comes to tackling social issues, if an author thinks she is going to show realistically what the problems are and what their solutions might be, she first needs to frame them properly within their broadest context: universal human social behavior. Saad fails to do that. I think the failure of this work to really understand its issues in the broad context of human social psychology is a weak point which leads the book into counterproductive labeling, "talk to the hand"-styled dismissiveness, and absurd expectation for people to be able to read others' minds (see: the entire concept of "micro-aggressions.") Saad and other writers in this genre would do well to compare contemporary American race relations to other "in-group/out-group" scenarios globally. If they did, they would find :a) The general classes of problems they describe are not in any way uniquely "American" or "white, " and have little to nothing to do with attitudes of racial superiority (therefore labeling it "white supremacy" is inaccurate and irresponsible).b) Comparatively, the society they are complaining about is among the most inclusive, diverse, and broadly accepting in the world, with an ever increasing number of people having a great degree of access to the center of "normality" within American culture. It certainly isn't perfect, but the notion that the structure of western democracy is a "white supremacist" institution is hyperbolic, to be polite. The problem is, Saad doesn't actually seem versed in any sort of study of human nature. She is versed in political activism, generation of propaganda, and social manipulation. The entire premise of this book is based in ignorance of general socio-cultural dynamics, and these ideas thrive and grow in an audience that stays similarly ignorant.Most of the characteristics ascribed to "whiteness" in this work, like much of the recent "anti-racist" literature, are more like general "majority privilege," from which any individual who most closely conforms to any particular culture's general center of "normality" will benefit (in any culture, anywhere on earth). Most of what Saad labels as "white supremacy" is actually just majority members of society taking their own cultural norms for granted, something which really has nothing directly to do with race, and is experienced on various scales everywhere in human society relative to various categories of identity.Is that a problem for the people displaced by it? Yes, of course! Should we be aware of it and do something about it? Yes! The problem is, this book isn't recognizing the real problems, and the "solutions" presented here, based in anger, resentment, and ignorance, actually exacerbate the problems.In committing these errors Saad actually moves us further from becoming a unified and inclusive culture, instead hardening the cultural borders, maintaining old and withering racial stratification, and enflaming resentments.My criticism of this work is not here to suggest there is no such thing as racism, nor that we should not do anything about it. My criticism is actually here because I care very much about eliminating unfair treatment of people based on superficial classifications, and it is pretty clear to me that the foundations for that goal are nowhere to be found in this work. This work provides "feel good" piety for white people via relief from its own self-constructed world of guilt, and is ultimately hollow and ineffective in improving racial relations. If you want to be a "good ancestor" learn to stop generalizing about people based on their skin color, treat people with basic respect and social boundaries, and learn to find the common ground with people of different backgrounds. Please, people, think critically. I know we white people all really want to be good white people, but there are major holes in the factual basis, logic, and methods of this work, and the results it provides are not constructive. Treating people with darker skin than you as children and victims in need of protection and special concessions is not how you elevate them to equal status with you.I think it is an atrocity that the terrible ideas in this book are being passed along as the newest fad extension of what was once a noble civil rights movement. Nobody wants to risk being called a racist for calling out how terrible and poorly informed the philosophy of this book is, but really, it needs to be done. I originally read this book in the online workbook form, and have a more specifically critical review under that edition here on goodreads.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't expect this to be a workbook, so honestly, audio isn't the way to go if you're going to do the work day by day unless you only listen to the audiobook on those days. That said, I didn't follow through the 28-day plan with the book but will certainly be revisiting the topics here and digging into them. The strength of this, I think, was how it ties together all of the pieces so many other anti-racism and race-themed nonfiction books that have released in the last few years together in a I didn't expect this to be a workbook, so honestly, audio isn't the way to go if you're going to do the work day by day unless you only listen to the audiobook on those days. That said, I didn't follow through the 28-day plan with the book but will certainly be revisiting the topics here and digging into them. The strength of this, I think, was how it ties together all of the pieces so many other anti-racism and race-themed nonfiction books that have released in the last few years together in a way that is directed exactly at and for white people.
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  • Jessica Haider
    January 1, 1970
    It all started on instagram with a 28 day challenge using the hashtag #meandwhitesupremacy. Layla F. Saad started the instagram challenge and has now published the challenge as a book. This book has a chapter for each day of the challenge where she discusses the topic at hand, gives examples of it and also gives reflective journaling prompts. The intention is for the reader to keep a journal as they read to uncover their own biases, experiences and areas for improvement. This is not a book It all started on instagram with a 28 day challenge using the hashtag #meandwhitesupremacy. Layla F. Saad started the instagram challenge and has now published the challenge as a book. This book has a chapter for each day of the challenge where she discusses the topic at hand, gives examples of it and also gives reflective journaling prompts. The intention is for the reader to keep a journal as they read to uncover their own biases, experiences and areas for improvement. This is not a book targeted at making society as whole better or taking down institutional racism, rather the book focuses on making the reader as an individual learn more about and challenge themselves.
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  • Hannah Evans
    January 1, 1970
    This was a re-read of sorts since I finished Layla’s workbook last summer. She’s right about the value of coming back to it with fresh eyes—just 6 months later, I’ve already found myself ending each chapter with new self-awareness than what I found last time.I study race academically, which means that segments of this book were things I was so familiar with that it took every impulse not to skim, but it also means that some of the self-reflective prompts were even more urgent and necessary than This was a re-read of sorts since I finished Layla’s workbook last summer. She’s right about the value of coming back to it with fresh eyes—just 6 months later, I’ve already found myself ending each chapter with new self-awareness than what I found last time.I study race academically, which means that segments of this book were things I was so familiar with that it took every impulse not to skim, but it also means that some of the self-reflective prompts were even more urgent and necessary than they would be for non-academic readers. Layla’s in-depth, journaling approach to antiracism is like nothing I’ve seen before, and I think it’s crucial to the development of emotional intelligence on race for all white people.This is the book I’m going to recommend the next time a white person asks me, “what can I do?” This is an excellent place to start.
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  • Amanda Arkans -
    January 1, 1970
    Be prepared to reflect and grow when you read Me and White Supremacy. Especially for those who are new to these concepts, this book is a true eye-opener!Thank you to NetGalley for my advanced copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
  • Carla (happiestwhenreading)
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must read, especially if you’re a white and don’t believe you’re racist and that you don’t perpetuate racist stereotypes and behaviors. It’s uncomfortable - in a good way - and helped me see where some of my blindspots are. I want to keep reading books that help open my eyes and continue to make me a better person.(The audiobook is great, but the book is good to have as well because the contents are presented in a workbook format.)
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  • Allena
    January 1, 1970
    Very thought-provoking and convicting look at the role I (all who are white) play in the continued world of racism. I really like how this book gave prompts to think about my own relationship to racism and how to help break them down. It was very helpful as I work on my own role in antiracism work.
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  • Hope
    January 1, 1970
    I think this is a really great resource for White folks who really are open to getting down and dirty with the work of unpacking their whiteness. That being said, if you are new to antiracism concepts and in the early stages of recognizing there may be gaps in your knowledge, I think I would hold off on this until learning a bit more. The book is broken into 28 days of topics and each day gives some background info on that topic of the day and then follows with journal prompt questions but it's I think this is a really great resource for White folks who really are open to getting down and dirty with the work of unpacking their whiteness. That being said, if you are new to antiracism concepts and in the early stages of recognizing there may be gaps in your knowledge, I think I would hold off on this until learning a bit more. The book is broken into 28 days of topics and each day gives some background info on that topic of the day and then follows with journal prompt questions but it's an overview and not the complete historical context, which I think is important for people early into this self work. I'd recommend a few more books (Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria, The New Jim Crow, Lies My Teacher Told Me, White Fragility), a few podcasts (Seeing White, Teaching Hard History), just to name a few resources. I think then you'd be in a place to fully open to doing the work required/needed with this particular book.
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  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    I like to consider myself liberal and informed, but this book revealed clearly how much work remains. One of my biggest weak spots seems to be family interactions, like during holidays, and Layla's advice gave me tools and language to make me more comfortable responding to various forms of racism in a meaningful way instead of being silently complicit.It's far from the only book on race out there, but it's a worthy place to begin. It's short, powerful, and worth reading again and again.
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  • Mariella
    January 1, 1970
    I typically don't go for these workbook books. But this one was eye opening. Its almost like a dictionary on the current status of macro and micro aggressions between BIPOC and white people. At the very least, its a great resource for helping facilitate difficult conversations in public discourse. She's also going to be at the library in a few weeks so I'm excited to hear her in person and get a feel from her directly the state of oppression and especially how they can be practiced in the I typically don't go for these workbook books. But this one was eye opening. Its almost like a dictionary on the current status of macro and micro aggressions between BIPOC and white people. At the very least, its a great resource for helping facilitate difficult conversations in public discourse. She's also going to be at the library in a few weeks so I'm excited to hear her in person and get a feel from her directly the state of oppression and especially how they can be practiced in the workplace where change is already frowned upon.
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  • Sonali Dabade
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.Listened to the audiobook on Libro.fm.I don't know what I was expecting when I started listening to this but it was definitely not this and I'm glad this book is now in existence.Born from Layla F Saad's 28-day Instagram challenge, #meandwhitesupremacy , in which she encouraged white people to share more of themselves and their behavior towards BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) people, this book throws light on a number of issues including but not limited to white supremacy, 4.5 stars.Listened to the audiobook on Libro.fm.I don't know what I was expecting when I started listening to this but it was definitely not this and I'm glad this book is now in existence.Born from Layla F Saad's 28-day Instagram challenge, #meandwhitesupremacy , in which she encouraged white people to share more of themselves and their behavior towards BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) people, this book throws light on a number of issues including but not limited to white supremacy, white centering, white fragility, indulging in tokenism, and optical allyship. It takes white people through 28 days of work of confronting their own behaviors and truths while talking about the ways in which racism, sexism, and intersectionalities work.The thing about this book is that it is a workbook not only for white people who want to be allies, it is also for us, to show us how things work against us in this whitewashed world. It is blunt in the face of white fragility, it is very much needed in this time and age, and will most likely be impactful if more people read it. But alas, I haven't seen a lot of people talking about this book as against that other book that rhymes with Shamerican Shirt. My only complaint with this book is that the narration is jerky and abrupt, which doesn't seem like much, given the importance of the topic being talked about. That's the only reason I lopped off a star. Otherwise, I simply love this book.
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  • Theodore Stavridis
    January 1, 1970
    Eye opening and important. Did not realize it was a daily workbook when I checked it out and I had some issue with the writing style that clearly came out of it's Instagram challenge beginnings but the content was so vital and I would highly recommend for anyone to read and participate in the workbook journalling.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    All my white lady friends? Read this.
  • Molly Huff
    January 1, 1970
    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. once said that “a mind that is stretched by new experience can never go back to its old dimensions.” Layla F Saad has proven that dictum with her astonishing workbook, “Me & White Supremacy”. With astounding gentleness and grace, she has provided white people with the tools to examine their own complicity in white supremacy and systemic racism in order to begin dismantling it. This work is tough and eminently important; such critical concepts as white-centering, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. once said that “a mind that is stretched by new experience can never go back to its old dimensions.” Layla F Saad has proven that dictum with her astonishing workbook, “Me & White Supremacy”. With astounding gentleness and grace, she has provided white people with the tools to examine their own complicity in white supremacy and systemic racism in order to begin dismantling it. This work is tough and eminently important; such critical concepts as white-centering, white feminism, and tokenism were plainly discussed in the light of day. Now is the time for those with white privilege to understand what it is our burden to do and to do the work ourselves; Layla has made that ever more possible with this incredibly important book.
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  • Emily Decker
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished and am going through each section again to answer the reflective questions at the end of each day. Currently am on day six of my own going back and answering and reflecting and unpacking my answers and white supremacy and privilege I hold. Understanding, unpacking and learning these things is hard and uncomfortable yes, but I encourage all who read this to do the work. It is enlightening, hard and going to be work but I know it can be done. I plan on coming back to this review as I Just finished and am going through each section again to answer the reflective questions at the end of each day. Currently am on day six of my own going back and answering and reflecting and unpacking my answers and white supremacy and privilege I hold. Understanding, unpacking and learning these things is hard and uncomfortable yes, but I encourage all who read this to do the work. It is enlightening, hard and going to be work but I know it can be done. I plan on coming back to this review as I follow back through further.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    This book is excellent. I learned that situations, language, ideas, and approaches I never thought of as having racist implications or overtones often (sometimes always) do. I also realized that my discomfort in discussing race stems from the white culture in which I have been raised and live in with a sense of relative safety and ease, something BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color, a new acronym for me) cannot say about living in our white privileged society. I have become more This book is excellent. I learned that situations, language, ideas, and approaches I never thought of as having racist implications or overtones often (sometimes always) do. I also realized that my discomfort in discussing race stems from the white culture in which I have been raised and live in with a sense of relative safety and ease, something BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color, a new acronym for me) cannot say about living in our white privileged society. I have become more sensitive to what constitutes white supremacy, white privilege, cultural appropriation, and more. I intend to show up, shut up, listen, and learn more from BIPOC without trying to interject my views or thoughts, tone police, or any of the other things white people do to try to keep the truth as experienced by BIPOC from being heard. Every white person should read this book to get a better understanding of how we, the white race, uphold and reinforce institutional racism every day.
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  • Jen Chaney
    January 1, 1970
    Good for perspective, for sure. I would recommend.
  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    This workbook full of thought and writing prompts encourages readers to be stop denying white supremacy, and start taking a deep look to find the unconscious and insidious racism that exists inside themselves. Saad challenges us to own up, stop excusing and ignoring, and start listening, thinking, and learning- to do more to acknowledge and dismantle the racist status quo, and don't ever stop. Uncomfortable and vital.This ARC was provided by Sourcebooks in exchange for an honest review.
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  • cat
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 - I pre-ordered this the minute it became available after both doing the Instagram 28 Day Challenge AND downloading and using the workbook that the author then made available, both individually and in a group setting. Such an important opportunity to work intentionally through my own relationship with white supremacy in a really thoughtful and concrete manner laid out by Layla F. Saad, who created the prompts and moderated an IG process FOR FREE before going back and writing a workbook of 4.5 - I pre-ordered this the minute it became available after both doing the Instagram 28 Day Challenge AND downloading and using the workbook that the author then made available, both individually and in a group setting. Such an important opportunity to work intentionally through my own relationship with white supremacy in a really thoughtful and concrete manner laid out by Layla F. Saad, who created the prompts and moderated an IG process FOR FREE before going back and writing a workbook of the same prompts that she offered FOR FREE (though you could and should donate for her work), in order to be, as she writes, 'a good ancestor' and help prompt folks with white privilege into a deeper introspection and ownership of our racism and through that, an interruption, of white supremacy. This is work that I am committed to doing and know that the book will serve as an opportunity to constantly revisit and practice the work of ant-racism.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    This is a wonderful introduction to the self-work that white people need to undertake. I lead a diversity seminar every week and I went into this book wondering if there would be anything new for me. In the first few chapters, which introduce the basic concepts of white privilege and fragility, I found myself wanting a little bit deeper work. What I came to appreciate, is that as the book goes on the material builds on itself and the reflections become progressively more complex. I have This is a wonderful introduction to the self-work that white people need to undertake. I lead a diversity seminar every week and I went into this book wondering if there would be anything new for me. In the first few chapters, which introduce the basic concepts of white privilege and fragility, I found myself wanting a little bit deeper work. What I came to appreciate, is that as the book goes on the material builds on itself and the reflections become progressively more complex. I have previously been in a place in my own white identity development where some of the concepts would have been difficult to swallow. Where some of the assumptions would have felt wrong. But having moved further into the work of anti-racism, I have come to recognize those responses as privilege. I wonder if those reviews that trash this book will still feel the same once they have moved further along their own development?
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  • Jaymie
    January 1, 1970
    [I received an electronic review copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.]4.5 stars. While I haven't completed the full 28 day journey with all of the personal reflection questions yet (I have ordered my own copy and will follow the schedule in February for Black History month), I read through all of the introductory material and at least half of the daily reading assignments. This book is excellent. I didn't feel I could give 5 stars to an [I received an electronic review copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.]4.5 stars. While I haven't completed the full 28 day journey with all of the personal reflection questions yet (I have ordered my own copy and will follow the schedule in February for Black History month), I read through all of the introductory material and at least half of the daily reading assignments. This book is excellent. I didn't feel I could give 5 stars to an interactive book without doing all the work, so I will post an update once I finish.The writing is frank, direct and conversational. The content was presented in a straightforward way without being condemning. It defines terms that are thrown about a lot in the current culture. The opening chapters of information take up about 25 pages. Then each day's assignment is about 5 pages of material followed by 5-8 reflection questions.The author is very clear - you will get out of this what you put into it. The more self-awareness you have, the deeper you can go. For that same reason, readers could revisit this material several times as they grow in their self-awareness and dig deeper to root out the impact of white supremacy.I encourage folks to give this a read, buy a notebook or a journal, and really - prayerfully - consider the questions and complete some self-examination. The world will be better for it.
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  • Mara
    January 1, 1970
    I started following Layla F. Saad on Instagram during her original "Me & White Supremacy" 28-day challenge. I was deeply moved by her words and also deeply saddened at many of the responses from white women. Yet I did not participate in the challenge. I was not ready to confront my white silence, white fragility, white exceptionalism and many other facets of my privilege. Well, this work is my responsibility and I am committed to engaging with it. She is an incredible narrator and I highly I started following Layla F. Saad on Instagram during her original "Me & White Supremacy" 28-day challenge. I was deeply moved by her words and also deeply saddened at many of the responses from white women. Yet I did not participate in the challenge. I was not ready to confront my white silence, white fragility, white exceptionalism and many other facets of my privilege. Well, this work is my responsibility and I am committed to engaging with it. She is an incredible narrator and I highly recommend the audiobook, but I will be purchasing the ebook because I know I will need to refer to it often, again and again throughout my life. For any friends who follow my reviews: I am interested in connecting about this work. Let's be accountable and support each other and make the world safer for BIPOC.
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  • Jennifer Jenkinson
    January 1, 1970
    This is not a book about the extremist groups. This is a book to ask hard questions, define issues, and make white people think.This is also not a true review because I’m still trying to wrap my mind around all the journal entries I have recorded, grasp terminology, and relearn many of the things I learned as child growing up in the South. All while trying to avoid falling into one of the biggest traps in combatting racism - perfectionism, which I struggle with every single day, in many This is not a book about the extremist groups. This is a book to ask hard questions, define issues, and make white people think.This is also not a true review because I’m still trying to wrap my mind around all the journal entries I have recorded, grasp terminology, and relearn many of the things I learned as child growing up in the South. All while trying to avoid falling into one of the biggest traps in combatting racism - perfectionism, which I struggle with every single day, in many instances that having nothing to do with race.Is this a book I think that white people should read? 𝒀𝒆𝒔. Is this book the definitive answer to all the race issues that still exist today? 𝑵𝒐. But this is a fantastic place to start.Prepare to learn, be offended, and even shocked - raise your hand if you were raised to “not see color” or have even raised your own children that way. It’s beliefs like this that will be challenged and the reasoning for why this specific belief is damaging will both shock you and then make sense... at least that was my experience.I still have more work to do and a lot more to learn and I would love recommendations on books that take things a step further and give concrete ways to help once we’ve identified the core beliefs that are wrong. So if you have any suggestions, I’d love for you to comment with them.I received a gifted copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my promotion and unbiased review.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    “You will be called out/in as you do antiracism work. Making mistakes is how you learn and do better going forward. Being called out/in is not a deterrent to the work. It is part of the work.”This is an engaging and thought provoking book. The short chapters are followed by reflection prompts / questions that are designed to be answered over the course of 28 days.I listened to the audiobook, and thought the narration was great! Thanks libro.fm for the complimentary audiobook!This is a great “You will be called out/in as you do antiracism work. Making mistakes is how you learn and do better going forward. Being called out/in is not a deterrent to the work. It is part of the work.”This is an engaging and thought provoking book. The short chapters are followed by reflection prompts / questions that are designed to be answered over the course of 28 days.I listened to the audiobook, and thought the narration was great! Thanks libro.fm for the complimentary audiobook!This is a great companion or follow-on read to White Fragility or other antiracism books. This book had one of the best explanations to white feminism I’ve read. Would highly recommend to my white friends.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This is such an essential book that every white person needs. The problem is many white people don't want to hear what Saad has to say, as evidenced by some of the "reviews" here. This short-in-length, long-in-work book is a gift to people who benefit from white supremacy, and the fact that it's hard is a good thing. This book is accessible and emphasizes intense self-examination paired with the importance of doing this work from a place of love for BIPOC people and for future generations. There This is such an essential book that every white person needs. The problem is many white people don't want to hear what Saad has to say, as evidenced by some of the "reviews" here. This short-in-length, long-in-work book is a gift to people who benefit from white supremacy, and the fact that it's hard is a good thing. This book is accessible and emphasizes intense self-examination paired with the importance of doing this work from a place of love for BIPOC people and for future generations. There are a lot of journal prompts that are difficult. This is life-long work, as Saad says, and necessary.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    I thought I was a “good white person” but this book taught me I AM part of the problem and in fact the notion of a “good white person” is actually part of the problem of white supremacy. This book is essential reading. It offers a necessary look at how ALL white people participate in white supremacy every day, in a way that is organized and easy to follow, while also deeply humbling, frustrating and soul shattering as it peels away the seemingly endless layers of our relationship to white I thought I was a “good white person” but this book taught me I AM part of the problem and in fact the notion of a “good white person” is actually part of the problem of white supremacy. This book is essential reading. It offers a necessary look at how ALL white people participate in white supremacy every day, in a way that is organized and easy to follow, while also deeply humbling, frustrating and soul shattering as it peels away the seemingly endless layers of our relationship to white supremacy.
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  • Rachel Stevenson
    January 1, 1970
    This is an excellent and intentionally uncomfortable book. I feel strongly about doing the work of Anti-Racism so that I can be a good Ancestor. I rented this as an audiobook from my local library, but that isn't enough I plan to buy it and do the journaling prompts with white friends who I hope will join me and hold me accountable for doing this work even when it gets hard and uncomfortable. This book is monumental in it's approach to Anti-Racism, it asks people to really do the work and This is an excellent and intentionally uncomfortable book. I feel strongly about doing the work of Anti-Racism so that I can be a good Ancestor. I rented this as an audiobook from my local library, but that isn't enough I plan to buy it and do the journaling prompts with white friends who I hope will join me and hold me accountable for doing this work even when it gets hard and uncomfortable. This book is monumental in it's approach to Anti-Racism, it asks people to really do the work and reflect and think about their own behaviors and thoughts that makes them a tool for white Supremacy.
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  • The Black Syllabus
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great resource for white people looking to improve their allyship (... is that a word?). This is a super interactive resource that addresses white supremacy and its symptoms from various angles, unpacks these symptoms, and walks you through writing prompts to challenge your own ways of thinking. I will say that Black people may not get much from this book unless you benefit from white passing privilege. However, I highly recommend this book to any and all non-Black people, especially This is a great resource for white people looking to improve their allyship (... is that a word?). This is a super interactive resource that addresses white supremacy and its symptoms from various angles, unpacks these symptoms, and walks you through writing prompts to challenge your own ways of thinking. I will say that Black people may not get much from this book unless you benefit from white passing privilege. However, I highly recommend this book to any and all non-Black people, especially those with explicit white privilege!
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