Nottingham
Robyn Hood didn’t set out to rob the rich, but in Nottingham, nothing ever goes according to plan....After a fateful hunting accident sends her on the run from the law, Robyn finds herself deep in the heart of Sherwood Forest. All she really wants to do is provide for her family and stay out of trouble, but when the Sheriff of Nottingham levies the largest tax in the history of England, she’s forced to take matters into her own hands. Relying on the help of her band of merry women and the Sheriff’s intriguing—and off limits—daughter, Marian, Robyn must find a way to pull off the biggest heist Sherwood has ever seen.With both heart and freedom at stake, just how much will she risk to ensure the safety of the ones she loves?

Nottingham Details

TitleNottingham
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 21st, 2020
PublisherBywater Books
ISBN-139781612941653
Rating
GenreLGBT, Retellings, GLBT, Queer, Romance

Nottingham Review

  • Jude
    January 1, 1970
    Okay. This book broke me. It tore my heart out then proceeded very slowly to put it back. Very very slowly.Nottingham is the second lesbian Robin Hood retelling I’ve read in less than six months. While Niamh Murphy’s Outlaw: A Lesbian Retelling of Robyn Hood had a definite YA feel, Anna Burke’s Nottingham is all grownup.An endless feud between the Sheriff of Nottingham and Robyn’s family sends her hiding in the Sherwood Forest, when all she was trying to do was care for her family. The woods are Okay. This book broke me. It tore my heart out then proceeded very slowly to put it back. Very very slowly.Nottingham is the second lesbian Robin Hood retelling I’ve read in less than six months. While Niamh Murphy’s Outlaw: A Lesbian Retelling of Robyn Hood had a definite YA feel, Anna Burke’s Nottingham is all grownup.An endless feud between the Sheriff of Nottingham and Robyn’s family sends her hiding in the Sherwood Forest, when all she was trying to do was care for her family. The woods are not safe for anyone, let alone a young woman, so she pretends to be a boy. When she stumbles onto John, an outlaw with his own secrets, he decides to stay with her instead of bringing her to the vicious Siward, who fancies himself the King of Sherwood. A hunting accident then leads the Sheriff’s daughter Marian to them.And that’s all I’m going to write about the story, because it’s a retelling, and you already know the story, really. What’s important here is not so much what happens as how the author tells it. And she tells it brilliantly.I don’t know what the best part is. The writing is excellent. I heard the sounds, I smelled the scents (not all were good), I felt the angst. Man, did I feel the angst… There are amazing descriptions of the woods, the camps, the food, that last one making me hungry every time even though I don’t like game – but I’d eat roasted goose any day. And some scenes I could so easily visualize I’m hoping someone turns this book into a movie. It’s not so much how detailed they are (long descriptions bore me and yes, I’m looking at you Honoré de Balzac) as Anna Burke choosing the exact right words.The characters are wonderful, they’re layered and complex and consistent. I love that there’s more than meets the eye to almost every single one, including the villains, most notably Marian’s father. I love the way Robyn and Marian – but also Willa and Midge – grow into themselves. I love Marian’s strength, Robyn’s moral sense, John’s kindness, Tuck as the most irreverent Reverend Mother. I love that everyone is queer, in one way or another.It’s a story of love and death, greed and pride, of power in the wrong hands and doing the wrong thing for the right reason. It’s wonderful and fantastic, intense and heartbreaking. If I could make up my mind on how to name my more-than-5* category, Nottingham would fit right in. But since I haven’t yet, five stars will have to do.I received a copy from the publisher and I am voluntarily leaving a review.
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  • Gaby LezReviewBooks
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Nottingham: The True Story of Robyn Hood’ is a lesbian retelling book of English folklore legendary character Robin Hood, one of the most well-known stories of the Middle Ages. This is the third published book by Ms. Burke though the author says that this is the first novel she ever wrote. For some reason, she waited some time to publish it but I’m glad that she finally did. Ms. Burke is part of a new generation of young lesfic talented authors which gives me hope for the future of the genre. I ‘Nottingham: The True Story of Robyn Hood’ is a lesbian retelling book of English folklore legendary character Robin Hood, one of the most well-known stories of the Middle Ages. This is the third published book by Ms. Burke though the author says that this is the first novel she ever wrote. For some reason, she waited some time to publish it but I’m glad that she finally did. Ms. Burke is part of a new generation of young lesfic talented authors which gives me hope for the future of the genre. I’ve read both her debut ‘Compass Rose’ and her second novel ‘Thorn‘ and both were in my favourites of each year.Robyn Hood is an archer living near Nottingham, England during the times of King Richard the Lionheart. After being caught hunting illegally to provide for her starving family, she is forced to escape to the woods and live as an outlaw. There she meets a group of other fugitives who are all victims of the malice of the patriarchal system, especially the nobility. When the Sheriff of Nottingham levies the largest tax in the history of England, Robyn and her band of outlaws are forced to take matters into their hands and rob the rich to give to the poor. She has to be clever enough to avoid the Sheriff’s persecution, but even more careful of the mutual attraction for his daughter, Marian.This is another winner by Ms. Burke. Normally pirates stories, dark fantasy or middle ages tales don’t appeal to me but I’m always happy to read her novels even though they are normally out of my comfort zone. The author manages to create dark, dangerous and hopeless places and slowly carve a crevice of light, peace, and hope in them. The characters’ journeys are full of adventure, hardship, and redemption making the stories interesting and enjoyable. Robyn is such a flawed but redeemable character, a prisoner of her own time and her personal story that your heart will go with her in her suffering and will fill with joy in her moments of happiness.The rest of the cast is very well written in its diversity and depth and shows the injustice of the patriarchal system of the Middle Ages in which women from all society levels were treated like expendable property of the powerful. Surely Middle Age experts will have criticisms to make in terms of authenticity and use of language but I get that that the author took liberties in the name of making the story readable and enjoyable for a bigger audience. I personally enjoyed it very much and will wait patiently for what Ms. Burke creates next.I normally don’t make comments about covers but let me say that this is another outstanding design by Ann McMann which truly honours the beauty of the story.Overall, an excellent (re)tale of courage, loyalty, and redemption. 5 stars.ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.See all my reviews at www.lezreviewbooks.com
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  • Angel
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my gosh!!! I’ve been anxiously awaiting this story that’s filled to the brim with awesomeness!!! I couldn’t get enough of these unique and endearing characters because I’ve spent my Christmas Day in good company with Robyn, Marian and the other badass women in this novel. I’ve had the pleasure of living vicariously through Robyn as she did her best to keep her family and her group of merry women safe and I had the time of my life just laughing at the way Robyn and her fellow outlaws did Oh my gosh!!! I’ve been anxiously awaiting this story that’s filled to the brim with awesomeness!!! I couldn’t get enough of these unique and endearing characters because I’ve spent my Christmas Day in good company with Robyn, Marian and the other badass women in this novel. I’ve had the pleasure of living vicariously through Robyn as she did her best to keep her family and her group of merry women safe and I had the time of my life just laughing at the way Robyn and her fellow outlaws did everything in their power to outsmart the sheriff. This author has done a wonderful job of representing the entire LGBT community in this novel and that means so much to me. I’ll always be on the look out for more books from this superb author because she always transports me to exciting worlds with unforgettable characters!
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    It seems like when you get a book you don't want to put down, life gets insanely busy. I didn't get to binge this one as I wanted, and it drove me nuts. I thought about getting to read it and looked forward to a break so I could get a few pages in. This is my second book by Burke (other was Thorn) and I enjoyed them both, but this one I loved. A retelling of the old tale, only so much better. The romance is good but not heavy, and the characters are amazing and well developed. I loved them all It seems like when you get a book you don't want to put down, life gets insanely busy. I didn't get to binge this one as I wanted, and it drove me nuts. I thought about getting to read it and looked forward to a break so I could get a few pages in. This is my second book by Burke (other was Thorn) and I enjoyed them both, but this one I loved. A retelling of the old tale, only so much better. The romance is good but not heavy, and the characters are amazing and well developed. I loved them all and want to know what became of them. Burke does an excellent job with the setting which made it easy to visualize it all. This book has so much to offer. I think anyone would enjoy this one, pick it up you will not be disappointed.
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  • V
    January 1, 1970
    This incarnation of Robyn and Marian surpasses the legend that inspired it. Call them star crossed lovers, but Burke gives them an emotional depth that resonated with me and kept me captivated from beginning to end. Nottingham is populated with a wonderfully queer and robust cast of characters. Burke creates side characters who are completely unique and immediately sympathetic. Burke has the amazing ability to bring a fictional world to life with her exceptional prose. She infuses every scene This incarnation of Robyn and Marian surpasses the legend that inspired it. Call them star crossed lovers, but Burke gives them an emotional depth that resonated with me and kept me captivated from beginning to end. Nottingham is populated with a wonderfully queer and robust cast of characters. Burke creates side characters who are completely unique and immediately sympathetic. Burke has the amazing ability to bring a fictional world to life with her exceptional prose. She infuses every scene with minute details that go unnoticed until readers find themselves immersed in a landscape that’s undeniably rich and full-bodied. There’s something magical about her writing.The story’s paced to perfection. It’s an action adventure, so the sense of urgency builds from the moment Robyn’s life is turned upside down. The scenes between Robyn and Marian provide a necessary break so readers can catch their breath and digest everything taking place. The crowning jewel in this story is the LGBTQ representation in the cast of characters. There are femmes, bois, non-binary, and trans individuals inhabiting this world, and the way they identify and present themselves is never questioned. Burke makes it clear these women and men have made the decision to live authentic lives. The beauty is in the way they all acknowledge each other’s choices and accept them without judgement.This is a fantastic book on every level. Burke doesn't disappoint.
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  • Rebecca Crunden
    January 1, 1970
    LGBT retelling of Robin Hood with a central f/f pairing, you say?
  • Best Lesfic Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Set in medieval England, Nottingham re-imagines the story of Robin Hood and his merry men in the Sherwood Forest with an entire female, lesbian cast. Read the full review @ https://www.bestlesficreviews.com/202...
  • Clarissa
    January 1, 1970
    Another amazing fairy tale, another amazing novel, another amazing book I couldn’t put down once I turned that first page. I managed to finish this a few minutes before the new year, and I’m completely happy that this was the last book I read before 2019 ended.While everyone is celebrating, I’m in the corner just clutching this book to my chest. This was a good way to end the year.
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  • gwendalyn _books_
    January 1, 1970
    Nottingham: The True Story of n Hoodby Anna Burke Paperback, 340 pagesJanuary 21st 2020 by Bywater BooksThis book was received from the Author, and Publisher, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own.An action packed, stunning, gender swapped retelling of Robin Hood.When an endless feud between the Sheriff of Nottingham and Robyn’s family, Robyn is into hiding deep within Sherwood Forest . The dark and treacherous woods are not safe Nottingham: The True Story of n Hoodby Anna Burke Paperback, 340 pagesJanuary 21st 2020 by Bywater BooksThis book was received from the Author, and Publisher, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own.An action packed, stunning, gender swapped retelling of Robin Hood.When an endless feud between the Sheriff of Nottingham and Robyn’s family, Robyn is into hiding deep within Sherwood Forest . The dark and treacherous woods are not safe for anyone, let alone a young woman, Robyn must disguise herself and pretends to be a boy. When she stumbles onto John, an outlaw with his own secrets, he decides to stay with her instead of bringing her to the vicious Siward, who fancies himself the King of Sherwood. A hunting accident then leads the Sheriff’s daughter Marian to them.Robyn takes matters into her own hands, relying on the help of her merry band of treasured friends and the lovely Sheriff’s daughter, Maid Marian. Robyn along with her band misfits must find a way to pull off the biggest heist Sherwood has ever seen. This is Robyn Hood, the legendary heroic outlaw. Unlike anything you’ve seen before, lesbian, transmen with quarterstaffs, noble ladies who love ladies, bisexual musicians, nonbinary outlaws & sapphic nuns.I was completely captivated by heartbreaking creative lesbian retelling of Robin Hood and Maid Marian’s fairy tale. A wonderful LGBTQ representation in the cast of characters living genuine authentic non judgmental lives. The book features femmes, bois, non-binary, and trans individuals. With both heart and freedom at stake, just how much will she risk to ensure the safety of the ones she loves?
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    An all-female retelling of the classic tale. Robyn is just trying to provide for her family when she commits a crime by accident and disappears into Sherwood Forest. There she reluctantly gains a ragtag group of followers, also forced into hiding by desperate circumstances.This has many of the familiar beats of Robin Hood, but each with a clever twist. Marian is the daughter of the prosperous, ruthless sheriff of Nottingham. She’s always been secure in her life, but now she’s starting to kick An all-female retelling of the classic tale. Robyn is just trying to provide for her family when she commits a crime by accident and disappears into Sherwood Forest. There she reluctantly gains a ragtag group of followers, also forced into hiding by desperate circumstances.This has many of the familiar beats of Robin Hood, but each with a clever twist. Marian is the daughter of the prosperous, ruthless sheriff of Nottingham. She’s always been secure in her life, but now she’s starting to kick against the bars around her life. When she has a chance encounter with a young woman outlaw in the forest, neither can stop thinking about the other. I really enjoyed this story, which has some humor and lots of pathos. The ending is satisfying but I could definitely see the door open for a sequel (please!).
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    Anna Burke has created a clever retelling of the Robin Hood legend, the outlaw of Sherwood Forest fame. In this telling, though Robyn Hood is a woman as are all the characters – Little John was a blacksmith who fled to the forest and changed her name to John; Will Scarlet – is a woman whose father is willing to give her to man known to abuse his wives; Friar Tuck – is the prioress of a small nunnery, and let us not forget Maid Marian – the daughter of the Sheriff of Nottingham, who wants to Anna Burke has created a clever retelling of the Robin Hood legend, the outlaw of Sherwood Forest fame. In this telling, though Robyn Hood is a woman as are all the characters – Little John was a blacksmith who fled to the forest and changed her name to John; Will Scarlet – is a woman whose father is willing to give her to man known to abuse his wives; Friar Tuck – is the prioress of a small nunnery, and let us not forget Maid Marian – the daughter of the Sheriff of Nottingham, who wants to marry his daughter off as well. Robyn Hood was a fletcher until the Sheriff took his vengeance on her family when the woman the Sheriff wanted married Robyn’s brother. After the Sheriff hangs her brother for poaching in the king’s forest, Robyn knows her days are numbered. She can’t support her family nor feed them. She, too, poaches in the forest, where she kills one of the Sheriff’s men when he discovers her with a dead deer. There is, of course, a romance between Marian and Robyn.What is special about this telling is the skillful writing of Burke. She develops her characters with such skill they’ll come alive and only the hard-hearted won’t be cheering them on. Burke also brings both the city of Nottingham alive as well as the forest where these characters hide in order to avoid what to each of them is a fate worse than death. She slowly develops her story, never rushing the telling nor going so slowly the reader becomes bored. Rather the reader will find herself wanting to read one more page or to the end of the chapter only to start the next chapter rather than put the book down regardless of the time.If you love historicals, this book is for you. If you love romance, this book is for you. If you like tales of swashbuckling adventure, this book is for you. If you remember enjoying reading (or seeing the various movies made about these characters), this book is for you. Regardless of the genre(s), you enjoy do not miss this book.Many thanks to Bywater Books and Edelweiss for an eArc.
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  • Paula Pergament
    January 1, 1970
    A queer retelling of the Robin Hood legend. Ms. Burke infuses her story with characters facing realistic challenges of the time that still resonate today, e.g., gender identity and politics, the risks of childbirth, and ways in which men control society and women's bodies. The writing is strong, and even though the story is familiar, Ms. Burke's pacing and prose are compelling.
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  • c, (½ of readsrainbow)
    January 1, 1970
    no one is sadder abt this turn of events than me Five Reasons You Should (Ignore my Rating And) Read This Book Galley provided by publisherRep: lesbian mcs, wlw side characters, trans side character
  • Grady
    January 1, 1970
    A delightful reimagining of a favored taleMassachusetts author Anna Burke earned her degrees in English Literature and Studio Art from Smith College and now is working toward her MFA in Creative Writing at Emerson College. Her debut novel was the successful COMPASS ROSE, followed by THORN, which continued to reinforce her stature as an important new author. Now she offers NOTTINGHAM is a fine new rendition of one of the most favored legends – Robin aka Robyn – Hood! Not only is Anna in A delightful reimagining of a favored taleMassachusetts author Anna Burke earned her degrees in English Literature and Studio Art from Smith College and now is working toward her MFA in Creative Writing at Emerson College. Her debut novel was the successful COMPASS ROSE, followed by THORN, which continued to reinforce her stature as an important new author. Now she offers NOTTINGHAM is a fine new rendition of one of the most favored legends – Robin aka Robyn – Hood! Not only is Anna in possession of a fine gift for writing in general, but also add to that her sensitivity to writing fantasy fiction in which the main characters are women. Anna knows how to write LGBT stories in such a style that the gender factor is purely additive and not the sole reason for the story. Yes, this is a lesbian-centric novel, a factor that enhances the action even more.Anna’s ability to capture the essence of the 'original’ Robin Hood story with her new cast of character once again proves that she is a write of importance. Not a parody, or an imitation, this story sings on its own, and it is right on pitch. The synopsis outlines the plot well: ‘After a fateful hunting accident sends her on the run from the law, Robyn finds herself deep in the heart of Sherwood Forest. All she really wants to do is provide for her family and stay out of trouble, but when the damnable Sheriff of Nottingham levies the largest tax in the history of England, she's forced to take matters into her own hands. Relying on the help of her merry band of misfits and the Sheriff’s intriguing—and off-limits—daughter, Marian, Robyn must find a way to pull off the biggest heist Sherwood has ever seen. With both heart and freedom at stake, just how much is she willing to risk to ensure the safety of the ones she loves?Very fine writing - a unique style of presentation and character development, the future of Anna Burke appears solidly assured. Recommended
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Move over, Disney, and take your weirdly attractive fox with you. This is now the best version of Robin Hood ever. The Sheriff of Nottingham is waging a personal vendetta against Robyn's family, leading her to hide out in Sherwood Forest in order to keep on taking care of the people she loves. But the woods aren't safe for anyone, let alone a young woman. When she meets John, an outlaw with his own secrets, Robyn disguises herself as a young boy and together they try to evade both the Sheriff Move over, Disney, and take your weirdly attractive fox with you. This is now the best version of Robin Hood ever. The Sheriff of Nottingham is waging a personal vendetta against Robyn's family, leading her to hide out in Sherwood Forest in order to keep on taking care of the people she loves. But the woods aren't safe for anyone, let alone a young woman. When she meets John, an outlaw with his own secrets, Robyn disguises herself as a young boy and together they try to evade both the Sheriff and the other outlaws who live in the forest. When a hunting trip goes wrong, Robyn ends up saving the life of Marian, the Sheriff's daughter. This is a retelling, you know what happens next. But Anna Burke has made the story her own, and she did so with brilliantly evocative writing. It was like I was standing right next to Robyn at times, feeling and experiencing everything she was. Locations and people were described so vividly, it almost felt like a movie. Every single character is complex and layered, whether they're a hero or a villain or somewhere in between. Most characters are women, most of them are queer, and for one reason of another they just don't fit into society as it is but they have hope of finding their place one day. And Robyn and her band of merry misfits grow, not just as individuals, but as a family. It is a wonderful, intense, heartbreaking story of love, pride, greed and death. It's a story about doing the wrong thing for the right reason. About ordinary people doing extraordinary things to survive. This story broke me, but it glued all the pieces of me back together again with hope and love and a whole lot of luck. (I received an arc from the publisher via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review.)
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  • Michelle Aschenbrenner
    January 1, 1970
    F/F retellings are becoming my jam!Everyone knows the story of Robin Hood and stealing from the rich to give to the poor. In this retelling, Burke writes with such exceptional prose that she made the infamous tale her own story.One of my favorite parts of this book was Marian's story. Instead of starting her out confident with her sexual identity, Marian struggles with the acceptance that perhaps she does prefer women and the shame and fear that comes with it because of what religious beliefs F/F retellings are becoming my jam!Everyone knows the story of Robin Hood and stealing from the rich to give to the poor. In this retelling, Burke writes with such exceptional prose that she made the infamous tale her own story.One of my favorite parts of this book was Marian's story. Instead of starting her out confident with her sexual identity, Marian struggles with the acceptance that perhaps she does prefer women and the shame and fear that comes with it because of what religious beliefs taught her. We see her go through the story growing more in confidence and courage, not only just with her identity, but also with standing up for herself and making decisions for herself, instead of a man doing it for her. It's a beautiful transformation of acceptance and strength that was wonderful to read!Also, did I mention the LGBTQ+ representation with different characters? This book is queer in the best way, and I'm here for all the lesbians, non-binary, and transgender characters! Burke creates this beauty in this world where people make their own choices on how they will live their lives in their own authentic identity, and it's a refreshing thing to see.I definitely prefer this version of Robyn Hood, and I can't wait to see what Burke will bless us with next!
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  • Maryjo Laupp
    January 1, 1970
    A Robyn who is a lesbian. What more do you need to know?! Oh, I almost forgot. Tuck is a prioress - a woman - not a friar and Little John? Transgendered. And the Sheriff of Nottingham isn't in love with Marian. He's her father. But Marian and Robyn are still a thing!My favorite moment in the book, hands down, is the final confrontation between Robyn and the Sheriff - "Hear me now. You will not have Marian, and you will not have me, and you will not have anyone under my protection. Hunt us if you A Robyn who is a lesbian. What more do you need to know?! Oh, I almost forgot. Tuck is a prioress - a woman - not a friar and Little John? Transgendered. And the Sheriff of Nottingham isn't in love with Marian. He's her father. But Marian and Robyn are still a thing!My favorite moment in the book, hands down, is the final confrontation between Robyn and the Sheriff - "Hear me now. You will not have Marian, and you will not have me, and you will not have anyone under my protection. Hunt us if you will. If we are captured, however, know this: you were thwarted by a woman. That will be what Nottingham remembers. Not my death, and not the justice you claim to work. They will remember that Nottingham's daughters rose up against you when no one else dared."This book is ALL about women fighting the good fight. Robyn's band, with the exception of Little John, is made up of individuals who identify as women but will dress to hide that fact while in the woods where other outlaws could make life dangerous. They are willing to take on the unscrupulous and stand up for those in need when leaders abuse their power. Well-crafted characters, excellent pacing of the plot, vivid imagery . . . Anna Burke knows how to draw a reader in and keep them engaged!
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  • Alex Lfr
    January 1, 1970
    I’m going to start saying what I enjoyed less about the book because everything else I loved. More time together for the main couple. That’s it. The only thing that I didn’t love about the book is that Marian and Robyn get to be together two hours (not really but you know what I mean). Other than that the characters are so great that I wanted all of them to have their own book and that has barely happened to me before. Full of adventure and queer characters, perfectly description of places and I’m going to start saying what I enjoyed less about the book because everything else I loved. More time together for the main couple. That’s it. The only thing that I didn’t love about the book is that Marian and Robyn get to be together two hours (not really but you know what I mean). Other than that the characters are so great that I wanted all of them to have their own book and that has barely happened to me before. Full of adventure and queer characters, perfectly description of places and emotions, a very bad guy and impossible situations to be solved. This book has almost all, and by almost I mean I needed more romance, more interaction between the MC. My first from Anna Burke and a huge and delightful surprise.
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  • Lisa R. Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Another great book by this author! Robyn and the gang of mostly women find themselves outlaws in this lesbian interpretation of the Robin Hood legend. All the characters from the original story are present but they are very different than their namesakes. For example, Tuck is Mother Superior at a convent and Little John is a women (formerly known as Joan) and experienced outlaw passing as a big man proficient with a staff (a walking stick)as a weapon. No explicit sex, just warm fuzzy feelings Another great book by this author! Robyn and the gang of mostly women find themselves outlaws in this lesbian interpretation of the Robin Hood legend. All the characters from the original story are present but they are very different than their namesakes. For example, Tuck is Mother Superior at a convent and Little John is a women (formerly known as Joan) and experienced outlaw passing as a big man proficient with a staff (a walking stick)as a weapon. No explicit sex, just warm fuzzy feelings with a HEA. This book is a satisfying read, Enjoy!
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  • Charkie
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent new take on a classic. I love Anna Burkes books. This is not my favorite, but it's still an excellent read. I like the belivability of the historic part of the fiction and how the characters emphasize some of the issues unmarried women met. Well written plot, with fun dialog and complex characters. This is a good read!
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  • CR
    January 1, 1970
    This gender swapped Robin Hood story was one that I was so excited for!! I mean who wouldn't want to read an LGBT retelling of one of my favorite stories?? But sadly this one just didn't work for me and I was bored out of my mind. Go Into This One Knowing: Boring
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  • Janie
    January 1, 1970
    Awesome!I loved both Anna Burke's previous books, but this one knocked my socks off. What a talented writer. I can't wait to see what she has in store for us next. Don't hesitate on this one. Kickback relax and enjoy the ride!
  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    I just loved this. Found family. The queerness of it all. The tension right til the end. *chefs kiss*
  • Maria Suarez
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, just wow. I preordered this book and have been looking forward to it for months and it has not disappointed in the slightest.
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