Blowout
Big Oil and Gas Versus Democracy—Winner Take All Rachel Maddow’s Blowout offers a dark, serpentine, riveting tour of the unimaginably lucrative and corrupt oil-and-gas industry. With her trademark black humor, Maddow takes us on a switchback journey around the globe—from Oklahoma City to Siberia to Equatorial Guinea—exposing the greed and incompetence of Big Oil and Gas. She shows how Russia’s rich reserves of crude have, paradoxically, stunted its growth, forcing Putin to maintain his power by spreading Russia's rot into its rivals, its neighbors, the United States, and the West’s most important alliances. Chevron, BP, and a host of other industry players get their star turn, but ExxonMobil and the deceptively well-behaved Rex Tillerson emerge as two of the past century's most consequential corporate villains. The oil-and-gas industry has weakened democracies in developed and developing countries, fouled oceans and rivers, and propped up authoritarian thieves and killers. But being outraged at it is, according to Maddow, “like being indignant when a lion takes down and eats a gazelle. You can't really blame the lion. It's in her nature.”This book is a clarion call to contain the lion: to stop subsidizing the wealthiest industry on earth, to fight for transparency, and to check the influence of predatory oil executives and their enablers. The stakes have never been higher. As Maddow writes, “Democracy either wins this one or disappears.”

Blowout Details

TitleBlowout
Author
ReleaseOct 1st, 2019
PublisherCrown
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Politics, History, Economics, Environment

Blowout Review

  • Dorie
    January 1, 1970
    Blowout! :Corrupted Democracy, Rouge State Russia, and The Richest, Most Destructuve Industry on Earthby Rachel Maddowdue 10-1-2019Crown5.0/5.0#netgalley. #BlowoutWhat the Frack is going on with the oil and gas industry? How did we, as a Democratic country, get to this point? Regardless of age, sex, race, religion, political beliefs, etc., how did we become dependent on a global industry built on corruption, greed and incompetence? Rachel Maddow brings it all together and makes this complicated Blowout! :Corrupted Democracy, Rouge State Russia, and The Richest, Most Destructuve Industry on Earthby Rachel Maddowdue 10-1-2019Crown5.0/5.0#netgalley. #BlowoutWhat the Frack is going on with the oil and gas industry? How did we, as a Democratic country, get to this point? Regardless of age, sex, race, religion, political beliefs, etc., how did we become dependent on a global industry built on corruption, greed and incompetence? Rachel Maddow brings it all together and makes this complicated issue, easy to understand. She explains the power, complexities, and political gamesmanship behind fracking. How Yeltsin literally gave the Russisn Presidency to Putin, and how and why Putin used the oil industry to maintain his power, by sending the crude oil to its biggest oil rival, the USA.From Oklahoma City to Russia to Siberia and Equatorial Guinea, we see how oil and the crude pollutants from fracking, made by unsafe drilling; an industry that has taken far more from the earth than it ever gave. ExxonMobil and Rex Tillerson are examples of the mindless incompetence that make full transparency necessary. We hold the responsibility of separating the corporate from the villains.Aubrey's Chesapeake Energy-Oklahomas earthquake outbreak of 2010 due to fracking-the Alaskan drilling fiasco- the Winter Olympics at Sochi in 2014 and Pussy Riot- Guccifer. It's all here, and so essential to understanding exactly what is happening, and why.One of the things I admire and live about Rachel Maddow is how she will lay a foundation by sharing the history and importance of issues, policies and subjects. By explaining both sides, we can decide for ourselves where we stand without being preached at and told what to believe. Her wit, candor, humility and her original spin, for me, make her a woman who uses her intelligence to make people aware, for the greater good. This book is an example of just that. I learned so much about the oil industry, the consequences of non transparency and the willingness to deceive to win. Mostly I learned we need to re-think the need vs. the greed of oil.Thank you for this exceptional, necessary and timely book, Rachel.Thank you to netgalley for sharing this requested e-book ARC for review.
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  • Bettie
    January 1, 1970
    The dedication...Blowout book tour dates and locations announced!: Rachel Maddow alerts viewers that book tour dates in connection with her forthcoming book, "Blowout," have officially been announced, with tickets available through links at MSNBC.com/BlowoutTour.Coming October 2019: BlowoutDescription: Big Oil and Gas Versus Democracy—Winner Take All: Rachel Maddow’s Blowout offers a dark, serpentine, riveting tour of the unimaginably lucrative and corrupt oil-and-gas industry. With her trademar The dedication...Blowout book tour dates and locations announced!: Rachel Maddow alerts viewers that book tour dates in connection with her forthcoming book, "Blowout," have officially been announced, with tickets available through links at MSNBC.com/BlowoutTour.Coming October 2019: BlowoutDescription: Big Oil and Gas Versus Democracy—Winner Take All: Rachel Maddow’s Blowout offers a dark, serpentine, riveting tour of the unimaginably lucrative and corrupt oil-and-gas industry. With her trademark black humor, Maddow takes us on a switchback journey around the globe—from Oklahoma City to Siberia to Equatorial Guinea—exposing the greed and incompetence of Big Oil and Gas. She shows how Russia’s rich reserves of crude have, paradoxically, stunted its growth, forcing Putin to maintain his power by spreading Russia’s rot into its rivals, its neighbors, the United States, and the West’s most important alliances. Chevron, BP, and a host of other industry players get their star turn, but ExxonMobil and the deceptively well-behaved Rex Tillerson emerge as two of the past century’s most consequential corporate villains. The oil-and-gas industry has weakened democracies in developed and developing countries, fouled oceans and rivers, and propped up authoritarian thieves and killers. But being outraged at it is, according to Maddow, “like being indignant when a lion takes down and eats a gazelle. You can’t really blame the lion. It’s in her nature.”This book is a clarion call to contain the lion: to stop subsidizing the wealthiest industry on earth, to fight for transparency, and to check the influence of predatory oil executives and their enablers. The stakes have never been higher. As Maddow writes, “Democracy either wins this one or disappears.”
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I thought I should read Blowout by Rachel Maddow. Should being the giveaway word to my motivation. Instead of a dose of medicine that's good for me but hard to swallow, it was a terrifying funhouse ride that totally engaged my attention! Maddow weaves together a narrative of how we 'got to here' that illumines the present.Maddow lays out the oil industry's history from Standard Oil to fracking to Putin's dream of Russia becoming the world's fuel provider to trolls on Facebook disseminating disco I thought I should read Blowout by Rachel Maddow. Should being the giveaway word to my motivation. Instead of a dose of medicine that's good for me but hard to swallow, it was a terrifying funhouse ride that totally engaged my attention! Maddow weaves together a narrative of how we 'got to here' that illumines the present.Maddow lays out the oil industry's history from Standard Oil to fracking to Putin's dream of Russia becoming the world's fuel provider to trolls on Facebook disseminating discord.The oil industry has always been too big and wealthy and powerful to control, starting with John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil which drove out or took over the competition. The values have not changed; anything goes in the pursuit of increased production and mindboggling wealth. And power. Don't forget the obscene power.The oil industry has always looked for better ways to get to the oil, using nuclear bombs and ocean drilling and fracking. Sure, messes happen. The best clean up tool they have developed is a big stick of paper towels.Fracking was going to save the day! Years worth of 'clean' gas. So what if Oklahoma suffered 900 earthquakes in 2017? I didn't know how Putin had gambled everything on the fossil fuel industry bringing Russia money and power across the globe. But they needed the technology to make it happen. And Rex Tillerson and Exxon/Mobile were planning to help him. Those pesky sanctions got in their way.Business and capitalism is amoral; politics and justice and fairness are irrelevant. The prime directive is making money. You lobby for the best tax deals, pay workers the lowest wages possible, make deals with the Devil--if you are killing people, or the entire planet, cover it up and carry on making the big bucks. The damage fossil fuels are doing to the planet is happening NOW, has been happening for a long time before we wised up to it. It isn't just when we take a jet or when we eat a half-pound burger or drive the kids to school. Getting that gas out of the ground it escapes. Lots of it. From the get-go, fossil fuels damage our world.Maddow writes, Coal is done, and so is gas and oil but they don't know it yet.Oh, the last desperate gasps of the old world struggling to hold on.I was given a free ebook by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    As with anything these days this novel is all about corporate and individual greed. The greed that warrants full power and full wealth under the disguise of saving others or helping the environment move towards the future goals.From Oklahoma to NW Pennsylvania and beyond Rachel tackles the truth in a powerful and dynamic fashion that will leave no stone literally and figuratively not turned."Play on emotions; the bigger the lie, the better; lies should be reported many times."These lies are what As with anything these days this novel is all about corporate and individual greed. The greed that warrants full power and full wealth under the disguise of saving others or helping the environment move towards the future goals.From Oklahoma to NW Pennsylvania and beyond Rachel tackles the truth in a powerful and dynamic fashion that will leave no stone literally and figuratively not turned."Play on emotions; the bigger the lie, the better; lies should be reported many times."These lies are what began the process especially with regard to hydraulic fracking in which it turned out many wondered if this fracking resulted in earthquakes such as in Oklahoma.Two main players you'll find discussed often throughout this game play is Rex Tillerson of Exxon Mobile and Austin Holland of Oklahoma Geological Survey.Accordingly hydraulic fracturing -breaking oil and gas out of shale rock- could cause earthquake in 1 out of every 10 fracked wells."For every 1 thousand wells in state and federal waters, there's an average of 20 uncontrolled releases or 'blowouts' every year."Energy sources and renewable energy is what this discussion should be upon not becoming richer but sadly that's where the conversation has gone.Heaven forbid the government also become involved and offer breaks or incentives for such advancements.The oil and gas industry needs regulation, oversight, and transparency not self regulation.We need to follow American interests and go through the proper channels designed to prevent such atrocities through the Committee on Foreign Investment.Coal is dead. Oil and Gas is dead. Sadly the latter just doesn't look sick yet.We cannot afford to continue the course by causing destruction to : Geological balance, governance, environmental injury and climate apocalypse.Containment obviously is needed!A fascinating read especially for me as I come from the Northeastern section of Pa near where the fracking debate continues with many friends having passed away because of it.I hope we learn there is no immediate payment that could be fulfilled when we are literally killing humanity and our environment.While the rich have may gotten richer it's at what costs that I need to remind you!Please read, educate, and stop the hate....
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  • Chelsey
    January 1, 1970
    checked mid-announcement and this wasn’t here. checked two seconds into O’Donnell and here we are. good job friends
  • Elise Musicant
    January 1, 1970
    This book was very interesting, but the problem I had through it all was that I couldn’t figure out what it was about. Was it about corruption in the oil industry? How Russia devolved into the country it is today? How oil affects politics? There were a lot of interesting threads in this book, and they all tied together, but it felt like the writer was trying to tell too many stories. I could tell this book was well researched. It was dense, however, with very long paragraphs. I found I had to re This book was very interesting, but the problem I had through it all was that I couldn’t figure out what it was about. Was it about corruption in the oil industry? How Russia devolved into the country it is today? How oil affects politics? There were a lot of interesting threads in this book, and they all tied together, but it felt like the writer was trying to tell too many stories. I could tell this book was well researched. It was dense, however, with very long paragraphs. I found I had to read very carefully, because with long paragraphs, it is easy to miss a small detail in all those words. In addition, this writer inserts her own opinions into the book. When the facts are laid out for us is a specific way, adding a snarky “Riiiiight” isn’t necessary, and it detracts from the writer’s credibility. Overall, interesting, but I would have liked to see this book have a clearer path.
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  • Jimmie
    January 1, 1970
    If you’re a regular viewer of her show (or, like me, a regular listener to her podcast) you’re aware that Rachel’s stories come with EXHAUSTIVE background, preambles, and prefatory material. But, if you’re a regular viewer of her show, you know the windup is worth it. This book takes a little while to get off the ground, but eventually it soars.
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  • Gloria
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for an eARC of this book. Rachel Maddow does not disappoint. This book goes after the oil and gas industry. It goes into details about the industry going from fracking and how they do it and what it does to the political intrigue in both the US and Russia. Sometimes there are almost too many details that become tedious but I could not stop reading. Revelations that were, to me, amazing. Everyone should read this book.
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  • Heather Bennett
    January 1, 1970
    Blowout is a fabulous and engrossing book. Rachel Maddow has written a fantastic book. A must read for the year.
  • Edwin Howard
    January 1, 1970
    The history of the oil and gas industry and how it has permeated politics, trade relations and more is chronicled in BLOWOUT, by Rachel Maddow. Maddow starts with Rockefeller and the beginning of the oil industry and continues through the beginning of the Trump administration. Maddow covers the environmental impacts of the industry, the greed and narcissistic dominance that breeds from oil and gas, and the political highs and lows that have crossed paths with desire to be master of oil and gas. The history of the oil and gas industry and how it has permeated politics, trade relations and more is chronicled in BLOWOUT, by Rachel Maddow. Maddow starts with Rockefeller and the beginning of the oil industry and continues through the beginning of the Trump administration. Maddow covers the environmental impacts of the industry, the greed and narcissistic dominance that breeds from oil and gas, and the political highs and lows that have crossed paths with desire to be master of oil and gas. Maddow does an excellent job of providing historical texture to each facet of the oil and gas industry. From the history of Oklahoma City and the state of Oklahoma, to the creation and evolution of the magnates in the industry, to the foreign, specifically Russian, approach to oil and gas collection and all of the right and wrong ways they went about it. Maddow's black humor and harsh criticism of industry and political leaders is clear; she uses those tools to point out the absurdity that all of the greed and naricissism that the industry creates. One of the best aspects of the book is the description of fracking; how it works, the benefits of it and if done improperly, the multitude of problems it creates. Well-written and compelling to read, BLOWOUT fosters a greater understanding of the entire industry and while there are moments that Maddow is clearly making her opinions known, the core of the book is refreshingly unbiased and factual. Thank you to Crown Publishing, Rachel Maddow, and Netgalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!
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  • P.S. Winn
    January 1, 1970
    This is such an important read and no one can tell a tale like this author. She is able to unravel and look into the truth unlike any other author I have read. I met an inventor who was silenced by big oil backed politicians, even wrote a book about it, so I am grateful this book was written showing the correlation between oil, gas, and other products like them with corrupt individuals and what they are willing to do to line their own pockets and stepped over the little 'guy'. Thanks to Rachel M This is such an important read and no one can tell a tale like this author. She is able to unravel and look into the truth unlike any other author I have read. I met an inventor who was silenced by big oil backed politicians, even wrote a book about it, so I am grateful this book was written showing the correlation between oil, gas, and other products like them with corrupt individuals and what they are willing to do to line their own pockets and stepped over the little 'guy'. Thanks to Rachel Maddow for this informative read on not only the history of oil, but the corruption that came with it.
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  • Sahitya
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve had this book on my TBR since the day it was announced and none of my excitement diminished when I was rejected for the ARC. It only meant I had to wait for the release day and I’m glad I did, because now I got the opportunity to both read the book and listen to the audiobook narrated by Rachel herself, which was an absolutely riveting experience.If you have read any of my reviews before, particularly the non fiction ones, you know I’m fairly liberal, so it should not come as a surprise tha I’ve had this book on my TBR since the day it was announced and none of my excitement diminished when I was rejected for the ARC. It only meant I had to wait for the release day and I’m glad I did, because now I got the opportunity to both read the book and listen to the audiobook narrated by Rachel herself, which was an absolutely riveting experience.If you have read any of my reviews before, particularly the non fiction ones, you know I’m fairly liberal, so it should not come as a surprise that I’m also a fan of Rachel Maddow’s show. And I may have to preface this review by saying that you’ll really enjoy the experience of reading or listening to this book if you like Rachel’s style of narration on her show. She is witty and snarky, but also has this meandering way of storytelling in her show everyday, where you are initially wondering where she’s going with it but ultimately she’ll draw a very full picture for you to understand. And that’s exactly how this book is written. It’s signature Rachel and I feel that you may not fully appreciate it if you are unfamiliar with her reporting. However meandering the writing may feel, she manages to give excellent historical context to the events that are being explained and the major players who are responsible for them, and even if the timeline is not always linear, I wasn’t really ever confused. The book is also full of information (and I really mean lots of information) and it can feel overwhelming for atleast the first quarter of the book, but once you get the hang of it, you become familiar with what it’s all about and then it unfolds like a very interesting and thrilling story spanning decades. Beginning with the Oil boom in the US in the late 19th century and ending with some conclusions of the Mueller report, this really is the saga of the Oil and Gas industry across the globe (and years) and how it has changed everything.It’s an undeniable reality that our current way of life depends a lot on the Oil and Gas industry. The use of fossil fuels have changed the way we live, but it has also meant the industry has become a major power player across the world in a way that threatens geopolitical stability but also the daily lives of people living across the US. The events, statements, and consequences that Rachel explains in the book show us an industry that is consumed by its greed for increasing its oil/gas production, it’s lust for money and power at absolutely any cost - as long as their bottom line is served, the rest of the world can go to hell. It is equal parts horrifying and amusing, unbelievable but also kinda obvious, and particularly scary at times because I couldn’t as a reader figure out if there was a way out of all the mess.And when we are talking about Oil and Gas, it’s impossible to avoid the major power players - the industry giants like ExxonMobil, the oil rich and utterly dependent on it countries like Russia, Ukraine, Nigeria, Equatorial Guinea or even similar states in the US like Oklahoma, Texas, North Dakota etc. The way the companies permeate every part of the power structure of a country (or state) and then do their business with impunity, while simultaneously not caring at all about the common people’s lives they’ve put at stake is terrifying to read about. Rachel particularly concentrates on the story of Oklahoma, it’s history and it’s dependence on the industry, how the governance of the whole state became essentially a puppet of the fracking industry masters and nothing could be legislated without their approval. It’s also a story of the power of democracy and people and public servants, and their resilience in the face of the brute force attack of money and power from all sides. And on a larger scale is the story of Russia - how it’s abundance of oil and gas could have propelled it to a global scale on better terms, if not for the infamous Resource curse meeting an authoritarian leader with paranoid tendencies. The story of Putin, ExxonMobil (and Rex Tillerson), the Oil companies and their owners in Russia and the few people who were brave enough to oppose the leader plays out like a gangster thriller, and while I was initially unsure what was the point of it all, by the end I realized that as long as the industry players work hand in hand with dictators and let them interfere in global democracies with impunity, the world is only gonna end up in more chaos. There are quite a few important figures whom we get to know more about in the book along with their beliefs and methods and motivations, and it was fascinating to see how the common thread across all of them was greed and some kind of narcissism. Whether it is Rex Tillerson; Putin and his right hand, the head of Russia’s biggest oil company Igor Sechin; the eternal President and his son of Equatorial Guinea; Oklahoma’s own business tycoons like Harold Hamm and Aubrey McClendon; one thing they all have is loads of money and power acquired through Oil and Gas, and one thing they all want is the freedom to exploit the nature with impunity and earn boatloads more of money. But we also get to know some unlikely heroes in the story - someone like Austin Holland, a seismologist working for the Oklahoma Geological Survey who is probably one of the key persons responsible for bringing the damage done by fracking to light; journalists like Ken Silverstein and Peter Maass who brought forth the atrocities of the leader of Equatorial Guinea and his son’s profligate tendencies; and also someone like Boris Nemtsov, who had the gall to make public the extent of Putin’s corruption and had to pay with his life. There are many more, and the “Sources” section of the book is full of information about them and their work.I probably have a lot more to say but I I’ll conclude my review by saying that it’s an important book which talks about one of the most influential industries of our times, and I highly recommend it. Rachel is neutral for the most part, giving us all the information so that we can form our own opinions, but her sarcasm does come out at times which I enjoyed. I also think the best way to enjoy this book is reading while simultaneously listening to the audio, because her narration brings a lot of life to what can feel like a very long story. I had fun listening to it, I also felt shocked and terrified and hopeless. But Rachel ends with a slightly hopeful note, remarking that it’s always possible to course correct but we (which includes people and government) need to have the courage and conviction to standup for democratic principles and the importance of transparency.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    If you are like me you never thought about the gas/oil industry. The only time I have a connection with gas is pumping gas into my car. I never give it another thought. It's a shame because we should think about the oil/gas companies' accountability and corruption that goes on here in the United States, but also abroad(Russia). I have been anticipating the book, Blowout by Rachel for months since I heard about it. The book is timely after we learned what is going on between the US President, and If you are like me you never thought about the gas/oil industry. The only time I have a connection with gas is pumping gas into my car. I never give it another thought. It's a shame because we should think about the oil/gas companies' accountability and corruption that goes on here in the United States, but also abroad(Russia). I have been anticipating the book, Blowout by Rachel for months since I heard about it. The book is timely after we learned what is going on between the US President, and the Ukraine phone call. Rachel explains Russia is a poor country. Who is Putin? How did he get into power? It doesn't make any sense if their economy is rich in oil. Why is it not trickling down to the citizens of Russia? What is the oil and gas industry connection with Russia? Why is Russia attacking Ukraine? US elections? What is with the oligarchs? What is the connection between oil, and gas, and Russia? Why are the big oil companies so interested in Russia? It's the oil in the Kara Sea. Russia thinks it needs the oil companies to extract the oil out. Do they really need them as much as they think? How is Ukraine connected to all this? What do SANCTIONS in the EU, have anything to do with it? What does it have to do with the US? And US elections? These are the questions, and answered in Blowout. PLENTY! Because Russia relies on other countries for their goods. If they are sanctioned other countries can't work with them. Russia is hoping to convince Trump to lift sanctions. That is the bottom line. Putin didn't realize interfering in our elections would work so well. It did better than expected. One thing I will say, I thought it was suspicious that every link to Trump had a finger from Russia. Was that coincidence? Flynn, Manafort, Page, and the list goes on, and on...It was also strange that Stein, an independent presidential candidate was in Russia.The book is not so much about the gas companies themselves. But the corruption that goes along with the connections of the countries and big gas corporations. What happens to certain countries when they deal with one economy, gas. The countries that only rely on gas to make money always end up corrupt. That is what happened to Russia, and Saudia Arabia, for example.It also opened up my eyes from years ago when I was a kid. At the time most of what the gas/ oil companies didn't affect me because I was a young kid. Well, I was wrong. It knows has bitten me in the butt. It has come back to haunt me, and the rest of the world( climate change). We can blame our parents, and the government then. But, blaming doesn't do much, action will. We had warnings by scientists reporting that the techniques pulling oil and gas out of the ground were not a good idea. But, because there wasn't enough outcry. The companies still extracted the oil. There is so much information in the book it overwhelms you at times. I just brushed on a few. The best part of the book is what happened to the state of Oklahoma and the gas industry. Oklahoma was allowing the gas industry to extract oil out of the ground. The process of taking the oil out was causing not just a few earthquakes, but many for a few years. There was one certain scientist that was warning the state. Finally, the state had enough, they did something about it. They made the gas companies accountable.As most of us who watch Rachel on her show, The Rachel Maddow Show. She is a storyteller and likes to mix humor into her storytelling. She likes to tell us about history, and the background info. before she talks about a certain topic. You can tell Rachel did her homework and research. I don't know how she did with her day job. I hope you will pick up the book. I will say you can't read the book at only a few sittings For me it was overwhelming and easier for me to read only a few chapters at a time instead of big chunks. Thank you, Rachel, for opening my eyes. Thank you, Random House, and Netgalley for allowing me to review.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    If you are like me you never thought about the gas/oil industry. The only time I have a connection with gas is pumping gas into my car. I never give it another thought. It's a shame because we should think about the oil/gas companies' accountability and corruption that goes on here in the United States, but also abroad(Russia). I have been anticipating the book, Blowout by Rachel for months since I heard about it. The book is timely after we learned what is going on between the US President, and If you are like me you never thought about the gas/oil industry. The only time I have a connection with gas is pumping gas into my car. I never give it another thought. It's a shame because we should think about the oil/gas companies' accountability and corruption that goes on here in the United States, but also abroad(Russia). I have been anticipating the book, Blowout by Rachel for months since I heard about it. The book is timely after we learned what is going on between the US President, and the Ukraine phone call. Rachel explains Russia is a poor country. Who is Putin? How did he get into power? It doesn't make any sense if their economy is rich in oil. Why is it not trickling down to the citizens of Russia? What is the oil and gas industry connection with Russia? Why is Russia attacking Ukraine? US elections? What is with the oligarchs? What is the connection between oil, and gas, and Russia? Why are the big oil companies so interested in Russia? It's the oil in the Kara Sea. Russia thinks it needs the oil companies to extract the oil out. Do they really need them as much as they think? How is Ukraine connected to all this? What do SANCTIONS in the EU, have anything to do with it? What does it have to do with the US? And US elections? These are the questions, and answered in Blowout. PLENTY! Because Russia relies on other countries for their goods. If they are sanctioned other countries can't work with them. Russia is hoping to convince Trump to lift sanctions. That is the bottom line. Putin didn't realize interfering in our elections would work so well. It did better than expected. One thing I will say, I thought it was suspicious that every link to Trump had a finger from Russia. Was that coincidence? Flynn, Manafort, Page, and the list goes on, and on...It was also strange that Stein, an independent presidential candidate was in Russia.The book is not so much about the gas companies themselves. But the corruption that goes along with the connections of the countries and big gas corporations. What happens to certain countries when they deal with one economy, gas. The countries that only rely on gas to make money always end up corrupt. That is what happened to Russia, and Saudia Arabia, for example.It also opened up my eyes from years ago when I was a kid. At the time most of what the gas/ oil companies didn't affect me because I was a young kid. Well, I was wrong. It knows has bitten me in the butt. It has come back to haunt me, and the rest of the world( climate change). We can blame our parents, and the government then. But, blaming doesn't do much, action will. We had warnings by scientists reporting that the techniques pulling oil and gas out of the ground were not a good idea. But, because there wasn't enough outcry. The companies still extracted the oil. There is so much information in the book it overwhelms you at times. I just brushed on a few. The best part of the book is what happened to the state of Oklahoma and the gas industry. Oklahoma was allowing the gas industry to extract oil out of the ground. The process of taking the oil out was causing not just a few earthquakes, but many for a few years. There was one certain scientist that was warning the state. Finally, the state had enough, they did something about it. They made the gas companies accountable.As most of us who watch Rachel on her show, The Rachel Maddow Show. She is a storyteller and likes to mix humor into her storytelling. She likes to tell us about history, and the background info. before she talks about a certain topic. You can tell Rachel did her homework and research. I don't know how she did with her day job. I hope you will pick up the book. I will say you can't read the book at only a few sittings For me it was overwhelming and easier for me to read only a few chapters at a time instead of big chunks. Thank you, Rachel, for opening my eyes. Thank you, Random House, and Netgalley for allowing me to review.
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  • Jason S Wrench
    January 1, 1970
    It amazes me how much of the United States' power and money has been wrapped up in oil. From the original oil Barron, John D. Rockefeller, to the most recent ones (Vladimir Putin, Kings of the Middle East, and CEOs of petroleum companies), these men have bartered and traded patriotism for money and power. Rachel Maddow's book, Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth, looks at this history and delves into the history of oil and the cor It amazes me how much of the United States' power and money has been wrapped up in oil. From the original oil Barron, John D. Rockefeller, to the most recent ones (Vladimir Putin, Kings of the Middle East, and CEOs of petroleum companies), these men have bartered and traded patriotism for money and power. Rachel Maddow's book, Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth, looks at this history and delves into the history of oil and the corruption it has left in its wake in the United States and around the world. In many ways, Maddow's book is scarily timely as we deal with politics and problems in the age of Trump and Putin. I would highly recommend this book to anyone seeking to understand how the United States has found itself in the modern quagmire that it has.I had not read Maddow's previous book, so I wasn't quite sure what her writing style would be. Her prose is both engaging and interesting. She has the ability to pack a lot of facts into a narrative that is easy to read. In many ways, Maddow's book is a graduate course in oil politics. I want to thank the publisher for letting me read this book prior to publication. Although I am thankful for the publisher's generosity, my opinion of Maddow's book is 100% mine.
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  • Sandi
    January 1, 1970
    About 3500 Tulsans out to hear Rachel Maddow. She was great. I just finished the book and highly recommend it. It's chracteristic Rachel - detailing may threads into a coheive narrative. She gives a lot of background to the oil & gas industry, especially in my home state of Oklahoma. The fracking technology that has caused so many earthquakes here and how the industry wanted the states' top geoloist/seismologist to cover up the truth about our industry induced quakes. The rise and fall of Ch About 3500 Tulsans out to hear Rachel Maddow. She was great. I just finished the book and highly recommend it. It's chracteristic Rachel - detailing may threads into a coheive narrative. She gives a lot of background to the oil & gas industry, especially in my home state of Oklahoma. The fracking technology that has caused so many earthquakes here and how the industry wanted the states' top geoloist/seismologist to cover up the truth about our industry induced quakes. The rise and fall of Chesapeake Energy and it's founder, who ultimately committed suicide. She ties in the need Russia has for Western oil technology to develop it's reserves and how the sanctions have prevented that from happening, even with Rex Tillerson and oil barron Exxon making cozy with RUssia for a buck. In the end, she champions the Oklahoma educators (my vocation!) who marched and demanded, and got funding for schools after our feckless politicionas had settled for a permanent pittance tax on the oil industry, whch was bankrupting our state. We teachers, marching for the needs of our state and students, are an example of democray working, which should give us all hope for the future of our nation. Now we know why she came to Tulsa for her 2nd stop on the book tour.
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  • Mlg
    January 1, 1970
    Once again, Maddow does her slow, connect the dots treatment of an issue to explain a complex problem. The villains here are the oil and gas industry who are in cahoots with foreign governments to subvert US foreign policy. Old Rex Tillerson is one of the villains, having been put in place strictly to lift Russian sanctions. Maddow does a number on Putin, dazzling us with his corruption and bad decision making. He hitched Russia’s star to oil and gas, raided the companies and stole them, only to Once again, Maddow does her slow, connect the dots treatment of an issue to explain a complex problem. The villains here are the oil and gas industry who are in cahoots with foreign governments to subvert US foreign policy. Old Rex Tillerson is one of the villains, having been put in place strictly to lift Russian sanctions. Maddow does a number on Putin, dazzling us with his corruption and bad decision making. He hitched Russia’s star to oil and gas, raided the companies and stole them, only to see the dream die when Exxon had to pull out of North Sea drilling due to sanctions. Since he couldn’t beat us, he hired troll farms to divide us against each other (thanks Facebook). The greed is everywhere in this book, from the frackers causing earthquakes in Oklahoma, to water pollution from drilling.Until we quit incentivizing the industry and stop exempting them from taxes, we are in deep doo. This will convince anyone that electric cars have to be the wave of the future.She never did tell us what Putin has on Rump...that is still the million dollar question.
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  • Nick Turner
    January 1, 1970
    I have always been a bit of a snob when it comes to audiobooks. I think that they are a great way of getting through those books that life is too short to read. Blowout deserved to be read, if for no other reason because Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power was so good.But For the Record by David Cameron was holding me up and IThere are lots of asides which work when read to you but I am not sure I wouldn't find annoying when on the page.I am sure that if this book were by anyone else I have always been a bit of a snob when it comes to audiobooks. I think that they are a great way of getting through those books that life is too short to read. Blowout deserved to be read, if for no other reason because Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power was so good.But For the Record by David Cameron was holding me up and IThere are lots of asides which work when read to you but I am not sure I wouldn't find annoying when on the page.I am sure that if this book were by anyone else I would be here writing things like "what is this chapter on the Sochi olympics doing here? How is this relevant?" or "this structure is insane, have they stapled this book together all wrong?"
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Maddow's terrifying account of how the oil and gas industry has shaped not just the American geopolitical landscape, but the world's geopolitical landscape is fascinating in its detail, yet horrifying in its descriptions. After every chapter, I wanted to drown (in their own concocted chemical goo) those people in power, those greedy, corrupted manipulators who shape how we all live, their only thought being how much more money will line their own pockets each day. These are the people we have el Maddow's terrifying account of how the oil and gas industry has shaped not just the American geopolitical landscape, but the world's geopolitical landscape is fascinating in its detail, yet horrifying in its descriptions. After every chapter, I wanted to drown (in their own concocted chemical goo) those people in power, those greedy, corrupted manipulators who shape how we all live, their only thought being how much more money will line their own pockets each day. These are the people we have elected to government, who are placed into positions where they are supposed to be looking out for all of us; instead, they look out for themselves. Rachel Maddow has a way of making a complicated mess straightforward, weaving together connections between the many facets of our world, from government and industry to science and corruption.
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Maddow, Rachel. Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rouge State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth. Crown, 2019.Rachel Maddow swears she will never write another book, but I am not sure I believe her. If TV had not sunk its fangs into her, she could have been a very good long-form investigative journalist. In detailing the influence of the oil and gas industry on world politics, she tells a complex story in a readable, compelling dramatic style that dials back her TV snark jus Maddow, Rachel. Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rouge State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth. Crown, 2019.Rachel Maddow swears she will never write another book, but I am not sure I believe her. If TV had not sunk its fangs into her, she could have been a very good long-form investigative journalist. In detailing the influence of the oil and gas industry on world politics, she tells a complex story in a readable, compelling dramatic style that dials back her TV snark just a little bit. Props to her for only using the term “bullpucky” once. As dystopian as things are in Russia and Equatorial Guinea, Maddow does find a ray of hope in the resurgence of grassroots politics in Oklahoma that has reduced the number of fracking-induced earthquakes. A very good read.
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  • James L. Holden
    January 1, 1970
    A must read account of why things are like they areIn light of current political realities, this book explores the manner by which the oil and gas industry has perverted the moral and ethical realities of modern society.This book is very well written and researched and clarifies our current political realities. Anyone interested in history, economics, and/or social science should read this book and discuss it with friends!
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting read. Prior to reading Blowout, I was unaware that Russia was so dependent upon its oil & gas industry. I also didn't realize the severity of our (U.S.) domestic issues related to the oil & gas industry, and those passages were eye-opening.Like Maddow's nightly cable show, Blowout meandered a bit on the way to its conclusion. Along the way, I wasn't always sure how the pieces fit together. By the conclusion, I got the point loud and clear.Recommended.
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  • Deb
    January 1, 1970
    This book was fantastic. It read like a mystery novel, bringing together numerous plot lines to come together with a conclusion at the end. It's evident that Rachel did her homework and used her superior skills as an investigative journalist. Very well done - I highly recommend - regardless of your political leanings - You will learn things you didn't know before you read the book.
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  • Dbbooks
    January 1, 1970
    Enlightening and thought provoking. Well written insight on policy that continues to resonates with dally current global affairs.I have never seen her show, but the interview on the Late Night with Steven Colbert Show prompted me to read the book.Rachel Maddow's style is entertaining,informative and fear facts are well researched.I will probably read Drift as well at some point.
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  • Faith Hurst-Bilinski
    January 1, 1970
    When you watch Rachel Maddow she tells a story. She takes a story from history and makes it relevant to whatever is happening now. This book is timely and does just that. If you didn't know better, you'd have thought she wrote this in the last month or so. It brings together current events and analyzes them in a way even the most casual news observer could understand.
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  • Karen Roth
    January 1, 1970
    An absolute must read!Exceptional! Rachel not only explains the conundrum step by step but backs it up with fact based storyline throughout. Concise and she opening as she always is this book comes at a perfect time with what is going on in our own White House!
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  • Joyce Schiff
    January 1, 1970
    Skimmed it..... more detail than I could handle. Was interesting to see the intrigue of Putin,Tillerson, Oklahoma, and Trump..... last chapter pulled it together. Glad I skimmed it but would not recommend it. And I do watch racehorse almost every night....
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  • Claudia
    January 1, 1970
    I love Rachel Maddow, I wanted to give this book a try, however I found this book frankly a little boring, It just didn't keep my attention
  • Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    What an incredible book! I was so facinated by how much Oklahoma history is in this book. Having moved to Oklahoma not too long ago it's nice to learn about what Oklahoma's modern history.
  • Fay
    January 1, 1970
    Calling all Rachel Maddow fans, this book is for you!!
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