Toward the Midnight Sun
From the bestselling author of White Rose, Black Forest comes a page-turning epic of adventure, suspense, and romance set against the rich and ruthless backdrop of the Klondike gold rush.Seattle, 1897. Anna Denton is not like the other prospectors traveling to the Yukon on the promise of riches. It’s duty—not profit—that calls her into the wild unknown. With her family nearing financial ruin, Anna has agreed to marry Henry Bradwell, the wealthy King of the Klondike.She meets Will and Silas, childhood friends, on the steamer north. After the ship docks in a lawless Alaska town, Anna’s chaperones run afoul of local criminals, leaving her stranded. Will and Silas agree to escort her the hundreds of treacherous miles to Dawson City—the gateway to the goldfields—and her betrothed, a man she doesn’t know.Upon their arrival, Bradwell warmly welcomes them all. But as a brutal winter sets in, relations sour, and Anna is caught between the promise her family made to the power-hungry Bradwell and her feelings for Will. Anna and her companions soon find themselves in a deadly game where few can be trusted and where the greatest danger in the frozen wilderness of the Klondike is man himself.

Toward the Midnight Sun Details

TitleToward the Midnight Sun
Author
ReleaseJan 1st, 2020
PublisherBrilliance Audio
ISBN-139781799716808
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Romance

Toward the Midnight Sun Review

  • Paige
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars The writing style and dialogue was extremely dry. The first half which details their trip to Dawson City was really boring. I thought that would be the exciting part, but it wasn't until Anna reached Dawson City and the drama between her and her fiance ensued that the plot started to pick up the pace; moving slow rather than dragging. There was a small twist at 65% (on a kindle) but it the plot still continued to be dull.....it isn't until 86% that anything of great interest occurs. 2.5 stars The writing style and dialogue was extremely dry. The first half which details their trip to Dawson City was really boring. I thought that would be the exciting part, but it wasn't until Anna reached Dawson City and the drama between her and her fiance ensued that the plot started to pick up the pace; moving slow rather than dragging. There was a small twist at 65% (on a kindle) but it the plot still continued to be dull.....it isn't until 86% that anything of great interest occurs.Historically, there is mention and a brief memory of the Battle of Wounded Knee. Women's inequality is discussed and seen throughout Anna's journey. The overall atmosphere for the time period in this novel is very bleak. I was expecting to learn a lot about the gold rush in Alaska, but I didn't learn a lot in this novel.Technical notes--Anna begins her journey on a ship to Skagaway for the first 10% (on a Kindle). Their stay and encampment at Skagway is detailed from 10-20%. At 20%, they reach the Dyea settlement, and at 21% they begin the Chilkhoot Trail. The Chilkhoot Trail is detailed from 21-45% and on the trail they stop at Canyon City, Sheep Camp, and the Scales. Anna reaches Dawson at 45% and the remainder of the novel happens there focusing on the romance.It is true to the blurb...a young girl named Anna is escorted to Dawson City by two men because her father has sold her as a bride to pay of his debt. She is sold to a wealthy man who has made his fortune off of the gold rush and is called "King of the Klondike". Along the way, several people doubt her ability as a woman to make the journey. Anna then falls in love with another, but knows she must stay with her fiance in order to secure her families survival.For the majority of the story, I was bored and disengaged. I was very disappointed since I really enjoyed his other novels. I will still be looking forward to his next novel, though this one was not my favorite.Initially, I was going to give this two stars, but because the ending did provide some sort of stimulating redemption I gave it 2.5 and rounded to 3.
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  • Fred Shaw
    January 1, 1970
    Anna Denton is on a steamer departing Seattle for the Klondike in the late 19th century. A wealthy gold rush prospector has purchased the right to her hand in marriage from her family, and Anna is on the way to marry him. This is the story of Anna’s trek into the northwest. I compare this story of the gold rush in the Yukon and Alaska to those written by Jack London. Eoin Dempsey has done as Mr. London did many years ago which is capture the tales of the hardships of men and women as they made Anna Denton is on a steamer departing Seattle for the Klondike in the late 19th century. A wealthy gold rush prospector has purchased the right to her hand in marriage from her family, and Anna is on the way to marry him. This is the story of Anna’s trek into the northwest. I compare this story of the gold rush in the Yukon and Alaska to those written by Jack London. Eoin Dempsey has done as Mr. London did many years ago which is capture the tales of the hardships of men and women as they made their way to Dawson over the infamous Chilkoot Pass. The stampeders, as they were called, had heard the stories of gold discoveries and unheard of riches to be had and were driven to get theirs. It was a nightmarish challenge, and many had to quit and turn around. The author did an awesome job of telling this story keeping me turning the pages with the amazing frozen backdrop, man’s lust for riches, deceit, backstabbing, and murder. It is also a tale of determination, honor, love and friendship. Highly recommended.
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  • Susan P
    January 1, 1970
    Disappointing. Really liked White Rose, Black Forest by this author and have traveled several times to Skagway, Alaska, and Dawson City, Yukon, so I thought this book would be a winner. However, because the characters were one-dimensional and many of the situations were so far-fetched, the book became a chore rather than enjoyment.
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  • Morgan Leafe
    January 1, 1970
    Fabulous! A wonderfully told story about strength and perseverance
  • Angela Juneau
    January 1, 1970
    Not what I expectedThis was a waste of time. Stupid and farfetched at best. Vile and not reflecting the timeframe. I would be embarrassed to share among my friends.
  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the depiction of life in the Klondike at the turn of the century- the author really painted a vivid picture. But the story and characters just lacked oomph for me.
  • Sarah De Beer
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed this. It's a story of two parts the first being the hard trip over the mountains and the second their exploits in the mining town. I enjoy historical fiction and this was an interesting part of history that I haven't read much about.The story wasn't hugely original however it was an easy read. Got this as part of Amazon prime first reads where the books are usually a bit rubbish. This better than some of the others that I've chosen in the past.
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  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    A simple read. I was expecting more from this because I loved White Rose Black Forest. This took place in the brutal and lawless area of the Yukon in the late 1800’s Klondike gold rush, of which I wasn’t aware of. I enjoyed the historical aspect. The plot line was sort of predictable. I’m glad I read it though
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  • Joy
    January 1, 1970
    Alaskan GoldI would have given this book 5 stars had it not been for the affair between Anna and Will, and the gay episode thrown in the story line mid way through the book. I read daily and love well written books that hold my attention. This book is interesting and well written except for the above mentioned.
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  • Carlee Forbes
    January 1, 1970
    Billed as historical fiction, this is really more of a cheesy romance book meets historical fiction meets bad thriller. The first part following the main character's trip to Dawson City on the Chilkoot Trail was interesting, but mostly I found the characters to be flat and predictable. There are few descriptions of the actual lives of those of working Klondike Gold Rush, rather it is a romanticized view of the experience. Thankfully it is a pretty short book and easy to breeze through.
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  • Dennis McClure
    January 1, 1970
    The thing is... His history sucks. It’s a fine and exciting novel, but he should have at least visited the area before he wrote about it. What do we require of an author? Maybe I’m being unfair. But this particular bit of history means too much to just let it go.
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  • Debbi
    January 1, 1970
    I've never read anything about the Klondike gold strike of 1897 so those aspects of the story were really interesting especially getting there. The romance part was ok but I thought the way the author ended it was a little flimsy.
  • Mrs
    January 1, 1970
    DisappointingNot much happens until late in the book. The first 45% of it on my Kindle was travel. I was hoping for adventures in the Klondike, but it was more like a soap opera that started out bland and became unlikely. There were comments about the rugged beauty of the area, but it was never described adequately. The conversations were stilted, and the characters changed their behavior abruptly. An attempt was made to convey passion, but there was no buildup, and it fell flat. I hated the DisappointingNot much happens until late in the book. The first 45% of it on my Kindle was travel. I was hoping for adventures in the Klondike, but it was more like a soap opera that started out bland and became unlikely. There were comments about the rugged beauty of the area, but it was never described adequately. The conversations were stilted, and the characters changed their behavior abruptly. An attempt was made to convey passion, but there was no buildup, and it fell flat. I hated the direction the relationships took. I never felt connected to any characters. I gave the story every chance, but some scenes ruined for me. Besides being poorly written, they was too lurid for my taste.
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  • Shirley
    January 1, 1970
    Gold Fever on the KlondikeI really enjoyed this book. The history of the miners and the journey they made to reach the Klondike gold fields was very interesting, especially the trek over the Chilkoot trail and the stair steps, then the dangerous trek down the half frozen river in a homemade boat. The description of the emerging mining towns with their loudness, whiskey, gambling and girls of the saloons. The mud sticking to the boots, the extreme cold and the disillusion of many. The characters Gold Fever on the KlondikeI really enjoyed this book. The history of the miners and the journey they made to reach the Klondike gold fields was very interesting, especially the trek over the Chilkoot trail and the stair steps, then the dangerous trek down the half frozen river in a homemade boat. The description of the emerging mining towns with their loudness, whiskey, gambling and girls of the saloons. The mud sticking to the boots, the extreme cold and the disillusion of many. The characters were believable as human's with all their failings. They were more true to life than many books I have read. The author wrote them as just that...people with the normal human feelings, failings that we see in everyday life with the extra ruggedness needed for such a frontier setting. Those that made it had to be the most rugged and desperate just to get to Dawson.At every step of the way people dropped out and turned back. Those that kept going and finally made it to Dawson were still unsure of their future. By the time our characters in the story made it most of the good mines had already been claimed. How they were able to establish themselves was more to the character's gambling ability than to their luck at finding a good claim. I enjoyed the characters of Will, Silas, Anna, Betsy and Mr. Bradwell, as well as all the other minor characters in between. The book describes the long winter after the miners arrival in Dawson. No contact at all with the outside world, no mail, no supplies. The passions felt, the desperation of some, the romance between Will and Anna even though she was betrothed to Mr. Bradwell. All of it was part of the way of life in that era in the Klondike. Food and supplies were scarce and women were more so as only a few were able to make it to Dawson and most that did were either married or ladies of ill repute. I applaud the author for telling the story how it must have been in those times with all the rawness of the environment. Times were hard, life was harder, it was how it was.I recommend this to anyone interested in reading about this time period in history. Thanks to Eoin Dempsey, Lake Union Publishing, and NetGalley for allowing me to read and review an advance copy of the book.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Received free Kindle version of novel from Goodreads Giveaway.3.5 stars.To be perfectly honest, I really didn't know what to expect when I first started reading Toward the Midnight Sun. Yes, I understood what the novel was going to be about from the blurb, but really I had no clue how easy or challenging, how interesting or boring this novel was going to be. Was it going to be dry and slow moving? * shrugs * I had no clue.I'm happy to say that Toward the Midnight Sun was pretty interesting. I Received free Kindle version of novel from Goodreads Giveaway.3.5 stars.To be perfectly honest, I really didn't know what to expect when I first started reading Toward the Midnight Sun. Yes, I understood what the novel was going to be about from the blurb, but really I had no clue how easy or challenging, how interesting or boring this novel was going to be. Was it going to be dry and slow moving? * shrugs * I had no clue.I'm happy to say that Toward the Midnight Sun was pretty interesting. I really enjoyed learning about the Klondike Gold Rush. I knew absolutely nothing about it and as a result found many aspects of the novel super interesting. I especially enjoyed Anna, Will, and Silas's journey from Seattle to Dawson. Dempsey did a wonderful job of describing the challenges that the group and other prospectors faced on their way up North.Unfortunately, I found the sections of the novel that took place in Dawson to be less interesting than the journey to Dawson part. Yes, the descriptions of the town and life in Dawson were interesting, but the story itself was a little boring and lacking in originality for me. Ultimately, if you enjoy historical fictions and are looking to learn something about the Klondike Gold Rush, then I say give this one a try. You might just learn something new!
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  • Astrid Turner
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars. I received this as an Amazon First Reads (free) book and found the plot to be interesting enough to finish, but the story itself was very dry and shallow. The characters are extremely flat and I didn't get the feeling that I was given more than the absolutely necessary details about any of them; he's a man with a beard, she's an attractive woman. That's about it as far as descriptions go. They are so bland that at times I actually couldn't distinguish any of them from one another 2.5 stars. I received this as an Amazon First Reads (free) book and found the plot to be interesting enough to finish, but the story itself was very dry and shallow. The characters are extremely flat and I didn't get the feeling that I was given more than the absolutely necessary details about any of them; he's a man with a beard, she's an attractive woman. That's about it as far as descriptions go. They are so bland that at times I actually couldn't distinguish any of them from one another during some of the dialogue! They all talk exactly the same, even the foreign and indigenous characters. I initially thought that the first half of the book, their journey to Dawson, was going to take a lot longer. I expected there to be a lot more character development and instead, suddenly they were there already. The rest of the book was very rushed. The ending was so predictable and cheesy that I basically skimmed through. I'm disappointed that this was my first book by this author because I have seen some excellent reviews for his other novels but after this one I am not terribly interested in reading more of his works. I feel like there was great potential for this plot but it needed much more detail and character development.
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  • Jack Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    How absolutely disgusting to throw in a sympathetic gay character and then fall so deeply into the "gay character must die" trope. And then to add insult to injury toss is a pediaphile priest and use the gay character as a catalyst for a big action sequence that is totally unbelievable. No matter how "true" to the time period the author's use of homosexuality as a plot contrivance might seem, it is deplorable but at least he can now say "My last book featured a 'sympathetic' gay man. Too bad he How absolutely disgusting to throw in a sympathetic gay character and then fall so deeply into the "gay character must die" trope. And then to add insult to injury toss is a pediaphile priest and use the gay character as a catalyst for a big action sequence that is totally unbelievable. No matter how "true" to the time period the author's use of homosexuality as a plot contrivance might seem, it is deplorable but at least he can now say "My last book featured a 'sympathetic' gay man. Too bad he had to die to further my extremely weak plot". Eoin Dempsey should be ashamed. Even if one is able to overlook or forgive this huge insult, the narrative was weak and characters were poorly developed. And the ending! Why not just admit that you don't have any idea how to end this hot mess of a book! Oh, and let us not overlook the characterization of "women as whores but with a good heart" contrivance. Such a waste of the talent evidenced in "White Rose, Black Forest".
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  • BestBooksy Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Even if you're not a big fan of historical fiction, Toward the Midnight Sun, is a book that everyone can enjoy, action-packed historical adventures through the goldfields of eighteenth-century Canada and Alaska. That's not all, throw in some gripping romance and it creates an absolute gem of a read.The author, Eoin Dempsey, has created a believable and vibrant cast of characters. The lead character Anna is the epitome of a strong woman, overcoming the harsh Klondike and the men who try to keep Even if you're not a big fan of historical fiction, Toward the Midnight Sun, is a book that everyone can enjoy, action-packed historical adventures through the goldfields of eighteenth-century Canada and Alaska. That's not all, throw in some gripping romance and it creates an absolute gem of a read.The author, Eoin Dempsey, has created a believable and vibrant cast of characters. The lead character Anna is the epitome of a strong woman, overcoming the harsh Klondike and the men who try to keep her subservient. If you enjoy the great outdoors you'll be enthralled by the prose which is like the National Geographic channel condensed into fantastic paragraphs that immersive in an utterly surreal way. It's no easy task, to sum up, the Toward the Midnight Sun, so we'll leave you with this, brace yourself for an adventure of a lifetime that is refreshing and exciting on an altogether new literary level.
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  • Carolina Firefly
    January 1, 1970
    Disappointing execution of intriguing plotI wanted to like this book, I did. The premise is excellent: woman sent to marry a man she didn’t know in the Gold Rush Klondike. Sadly, the writing never made me FEEL the dark, the isolation, the worry, the desperation, not even the cold. I know historical fiction is really a reflection of the time in which it’s written rather than when it’s set, but there were some really modern ideas in some characters. I have no issue with that at all. My problem was Disappointing execution of intriguing plotI wanted to like this book, I did. The premise is excellent: woman sent to marry a man she didn’t know in the Gold Rush Klondike. Sadly, the writing never made me FEEL the dark, the isolation, the worry, the desperation, not even the cold. I know historical fiction is really a reflection of the time in which it’s written rather than when it’s set, but there were some really modern ideas in some characters. I have no issue with that at all. My problem was with the very modern way they were expressed: stridently, with no doubt, fully formed, no hesitation, and little recognition of the fact that they weren’t the popular ideas of the day. Add to that some glaring anachronisms of speech and clothing (brassiere, really?) and I just couldn’t put my mind in this story like I wanted to.
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  • Cindy Woods
    January 1, 1970
    Pretty goodThe story of the 1897 Alaska gold rush and a young woman sent off to marry the Klondike King was a bit predictable, but good enough. I read it in a day as it was an easy read. The descriptions of travel by hundreds of hopeful prospectors began well enough, although a bit shortened. The idea that such gold fever despite the rugged conditions is hard to understand, but true. The plot, as I say, was too predictable given the relationships nurtured early on in the story.I would recommend Pretty goodThe story of the 1897 Alaska gold rush and a young woman sent off to marry the Klondike King was a bit predictable, but good enough. I read it in a day as it was an easy read. The descriptions of travel by hundreds of hopeful prospectors began well enough, although a bit shortened. The idea that such gold fever despite the rugged conditions is hard to understand, but true. The plot, as I say, was too predictable given the relationships nurtured early on in the story.I would recommend to readers of historical fiction and romance with the caveat mentioned above.
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  • Alice K.
    January 1, 1970
    We visited the Yukon last summer and learned quite a bit about the Gold Rush and the process of gold mining. We were able to see the environmental damage caused by digging through the soil looking for gold. This book seems to be very authentic in its description of Skagway and Dawson as well as the trek through the Chilkoot pass. The story deals with the journey of a young woman heroically struggling to protect her family, as she is sent as a mail-order bride to a wealthy friend of her father. We visited the Yukon last summer and learned quite a bit about the Gold Rush and the process of gold mining. We were able to see the environmental damage caused by digging through the soil looking for gold. This book seems to be very authentic in its description of Skagway and Dawson as well as the trek through the Chilkoot pass. The story deals with the journey of a young woman heroically struggling to protect her family, as she is sent as a mail-order bride to a wealthy friend of her father. She faces betrayal and abuse, but is befriended by a couple of prospectors who prove to be not only chivalrous but clever.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Toward the Midnight Sun***CONTAINS SPOILERS***Like many other people I read this novel hoping for some of the magic that was "White Rose, Black Forest" or even "Finding Rebecca"...both stellar pieces of writing by Dempsey. This. Fell. Flat. Poor, undeveloped characters. Mostly predictable story line. Random sex scenes. Killing of the sympathetic gay character and several other deaths as a result of someone "outing" a gay character. Let's throw in the cliche of the pedophile priest and hooker Toward the Midnight Sun***CONTAINS SPOILERS***Like many other people I read this novel hoping for some of the magic that was "White Rose, Black Forest" or even "Finding Rebecca"...both stellar pieces of writing by Dempsey. This. Fell. Flat. Poor, undeveloped characters. Mostly predictable story line. Random sex scenes. Killing of the sympathetic gay character and several other deaths as a result of someone "outing" a gay character. Let's throw in the cliche of the pedophile priest and hooker with a heart of gold. No thanks. Sure glad this was a free read through Kindle First Reads, I would have kicked myself if I had paid for it.
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  • Nadine Wiseman
    January 1, 1970
    Chasing the elusive colour on the frontiersThe things that men will do for the elusive promise of gold; a tale of buying cold, hardship, greed and loss with a satisfying romance at the core. Plucky Anna sets out for the Klondike to marry a much older man she met once at the age of ten, reluctant but willing to do anything to ensure her husband-to-be pays for her younger sister's cancer treatment. She meets Will and Silas on the journey and their gruelling travels forge a bond. Arriving at Chasing the elusive colour on the frontiersThe things that men will do for the elusive promise of gold; a tale of buying cold, hardship, greed and loss with a satisfying romance at the core. Plucky Anna sets out for the Klondike to marry a much older man she met once at the age of ten, reluctant but willing to do anything to ensure her husband-to-be pays for her younger sister's cancer treatment. She meets Will and Silas on the journey and their gruelling travels forge a bond. Arriving at Dawson, she soon discovers her fiancé is not the good man he claims to be and it soon becomes a fight for survival for Anna, Will and Silas. Gripping and authentically depicted.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Travel back in time to the Alaska gold rush in "Toward the Midnight Sun." I loved the strong characters, particularly Anna, and the historical information about this time period, especially the hardship prospectors faced as they sought to make their fortunes. I also appreciated the Han and the emotional healing character Will receives from his interaction with this responsible, kind and peaceful Indian tribe. However, the novel does contain domestic violence, sexual content and a love triangle Travel back in time to the Alaska gold rush in "Toward the Midnight Sun." I loved the strong characters, particularly Anna, and the historical information about this time period, especially the hardship prospectors faced as they sought to make their fortunes. I also appreciated the Han and the emotional healing character Will receives from his interaction with this responsible, kind and peaceful Indian tribe. However, the novel does contain domestic violence, sexual content and a love triangle that detracts from the story. Author Eoin Dempsey is a strong writer, and the language is vivid - I felt like I was right on the trail laboring along with Will, Silas and Anna.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free as a Amazon Prime First Read, and I read the whole thing in a few hours on one day, so I can't really complain too much. I actually liked the first half of the book detailing Anna's grueling journey through the Klondike. I'm also on a 19th and early 20th century memoir kick right now, so take that as you will. The plot boiled over into the ridiculous for me after the characters arrive in Dawson City, and yet it still managed to be very predictable. I clearly have I received this book for free as a Amazon Prime First Read, and I read the whole thing in a few hours on one day, so I can't really complain too much. I actually liked the first half of the book detailing Anna's grueling journey through the Klondike. I'm also on a 19th and early 20th century memoir kick right now, so take that as you will. The plot boiled over into the ridiculous for me after the characters arrive in Dawson City, and yet it still managed to be very predictable. I clearly have mixed feelings, but this book was an easy, quick read to keep me occupied for an afternoon. I was also inspired to do some research on the Chillkoot trail, and may be adding that to my list of arduous yet amazing trips I'd like to tackle.
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  • *StarrERauliuk
    January 1, 1970
    Three cheers to the author!Rarely do I find a historical fiction that is as note worthy as this book. I didn't enjoy it. I LOVED IT! History isn't my thing. Excitement and adventure is. This filled my objections about it being historical fiction after the chapter. I couldn't put it down. If you like action . It is all in this book. The story is fun, exciting, packed with page turning action. There is sadness and sweetness, friendships, and love of course. And every good book has to have a Three cheers to the author!Rarely do I find a historical fiction that is as note worthy as this book. I didn't enjoy it. I LOVED IT! History isn't my thing. Excitement and adventure is. This filled my objections about it being historical fiction after the chapter. I couldn't put it down. If you like action . It is all in this book. The story is fun, exciting, packed with page turning action. There is sadness and sweetness, friendships, and love of course. And every good book has to have a villain. Bad guys make the good guys look better!
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  • Paula Cadle
    January 1, 1970
    Anna has agreed to a proposal of marriage from the King of the Klondike during the gold rush. She has a little sister with cancer who needs medical treatment and her father's business is losing money. Tickets and a bit of money are sent to her and she starts her adventure on a boat north to Dawson City. On the boat, she meets brothers Silas and Will. She feels an instant pull towards Will and the brothers end up being her chaperones on the harsh trek over the Chilkoot trail to Dawson City. A Anna has agreed to a proposal of marriage from the King of the Klondike during the gold rush. She has a little sister with cancer who needs medical treatment and her father's business is losing money. Tickets and a bit of money are sent to her and she starts her adventure on a boat north to Dawson City. On the boat, she meets brothers Silas and Will. She feels an instant pull towards Will and the brothers end up being her chaperones on the harsh trek over the Chilkoot trail to Dawson City. A cute book.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    After an extremely slow start, I closed the cover on this story, utterly pleased that I didn't give up. Not that I would have. I visited Alaska last year, and had already heard of the hardships endured in the journey to the Klondike, for me it was like revisiting, so it held me captivated.This is historical, and real enough to be interesting, with tons of feels and extremely interesting main characters. The climax was satisfying and our characters got their more than well deserved HEA. Full of After an extremely slow start, I closed the cover on this story, utterly pleased that I didn't give up. Not that I would have. I visited Alaska last year, and had already heard of the hardships endured in the journey to the Klondike, for me it was like revisiting, so it held me captivated.This is historical, and real enough to be interesting, with tons of feels and extremely interesting main characters. The climax was satisfying and our characters got their more than well deserved HEA. Full of strength and perseverance, tears and heartbreak...I'm really glad I picked this one up.
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  • Mo
    January 1, 1970
    This was a good way to start this decade of reading. I did thoroughly enjoy the book. The only reason I did not love it was because we are never really given a reason as to why Mr. Bradwell is such an ass. He's an ass just to move the plot and I would have liked to know more about him so as to understand him better. But, I suppose, our heroine did not know much about him either and he avoided talking about the past and what not.
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  • Susan Kalafut
    January 1, 1970
    I completed this book as I was convinced the piece would pick up or the story would become more interesting or the characters would seem more engaging... I was sorely disappointed. The only reason I have it two stars was the historical and geographic references... I don’t know if I ever paid much attention to America’s gold rush. Now my interest is peaked. Other than that, I am afraid this book is not worth the effort.
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