The Warehouse
Cloud isn’t just a place to work. It’s a place to live. And when you’re here, you’ll never want to leave. “On the surface, The Warehouse is a thrilling story of corporate espionage at the highest level, but dig a little deeper and you’ll find a terrifying cautionary tale of the nightmare world we are making for ourselves.”—Blake Crouch, New York Times bestselling author of Dark MatterPaxton never thought he’d be working for Cloud, the giant tech company that’s eaten much of the American economy. Much less that he’d be moving into one of the company’s sprawling live-work facilities. But compared to what’s left outside, Cloud’s bland chainstore life of gleaming entertainment halls, open-plan offices, and vast warehouses…well, it doesn’t seem so bad. It’s more than anyone else is offering. Zinnia never thought she’d be infiltrating Cloud. But now she’s undercover, inside the walls, risking it all to ferret out the company’s darkest secrets. And Paxton, with his ordinary little hopes and fears? He just might make the perfect pawn. If she can bear to sacrifice him. As the truth about Cloud unfolds, Zinnia must gamble everything on a desperate scheme—one that risks both their lives, even as it forces Paxton to question everything about the world he’s so carefully assembled here. Together, they’ll learn just how far the company will go…to make the world a better place. Set in the confines of a corporate panopticon that’s at once brilliantly imagined and terrifyingly real, The Warehouse is a near-future thriller about what happens when Big Brother meets Big Business--and who will pay the ultimate price.

The Warehouse Details

TitleThe Warehouse
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 20th, 2019
PublisherCrown
ISBN-139781984823793
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Dystopia, Thriller

The Warehouse Review

  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to Crown Publishing, and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. There are moments when I really appreciate Netgalley, and this is one of them. This isn't a book that I would have spent money on, and if I had, then I probably still wouldn't have read it! I knew from the get go how this book would be, and also the end. Yep! I'm one of those crazy folk who prefers locally owned. I don't shop boxstores, and except for e-books and my kindle device, I very seldom shop Am My thanks to Crown Publishing, and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. There are moments when I really appreciate Netgalley, and this is one of them. This isn't a book that I would have spent money on, and if I had, then I probably still wouldn't have read it! I knew from the get go how this book would be, and also the end. Yep! I'm one of those crazy folk who prefers locally owned. I don't shop boxstores, and except for e-books and my kindle device, I very seldom shop Amazon! Like maybe, once or twice a decade! That's it. I started reading this book, and I got to the part where it stated that the Cloud didn't pay in money. Only credits. Everything you NEEDED could only be bought through the Cloud. These are employees. They work 10 to 12 hour days, 7 days a week. Of course, no unions. Well, anyone who knows me, knows that I'm slightly pissed off now! I've turned down promotions because I was expected to work more than 40 hours. Money is awesome. Too much time spent making that kind of money is not. At least for me! I've made a lot of money, and tiny amounts of money. I've learned to adjust! Crikey! So, living in this environment means I'm now going to have to "thermite" you! Guns, knives and other stuff? Psst! Nope. J.K! Maybe! I like thermite! I've never seen it, but I know how to make it, because....books! The thing is that this book is dystopian. From the first chapter, to the last, it screams "DYSTOPIAN." I love most Apocalyptic fiction, but dystopian makes me nauseous. From the time my favorite bookstores and funky little local shops started closing down. To the time I was allowed to interview and hire at the drugstore where I worked, and I kept hearing things about Wal-Mart especially, but many other home and office stores too! I knew that I couldn't support those wealthy, who couldn't, nay, wouldn't even give good health insurance to their employees! The first half of the book, I keep singing "in the back of my head," Tennessee Ernie Ford's song "16 Ton's." I know most people are way to young to remember the song, hell, I almost am too! Yet, the sentiment has always stuck with me. You load 16 tons, whattaya get? Another day older and deeper in debt. Saint. Peter don't ya' call me, cuz I can't go....I owe my soul to the company store...Chilling. Look up the history of what it was like before. Down with big business. Politicos with deep pockets. Also, what the hecks up with these big co. tax cuts? My squat hairy man received no refund this year. He seldom received much, but this year he did have to pay! So happy that the rich are paying their fair share! "That's sarcasm, b.t.w." Most of my Goodreads friends recognize sarcasm, but I've noticed lately that somehow ignoramuses's have taken sarcasm literally. Hey, I'm not saying your an idjit. But, yes, I'm saying, you are an effing idjit! This book just says to me, what has always been obvious. Buy locally owned. We here in my town, no longer have bookstores. No BOOKSTORE. Used? Yes. A fresh smelling bookstore? Sadly, no. I'd walk into Hastings every Tuesday morning. New release day! I always thought it smelled of puppy breath, until I realized it was freshly brewed coffee! I am not a coffee drinker! Tea, yes! Coffee? Coffee makes me high as a kite! It took me over a year to realize that fresh coffee smelled like puppy breath! Wowser! So, rambling on! I guess this is my way of saying that I received exactly what I expected from this book. I knew what it was based on. I also got the exact horror of it. There were no big surprises. It's dystopian. There are never any happy endings. I, of course would always wish for more. But, this is the way of the world. Still, this was a very readable book. I put other books aside, just to read this. Of course, it will remind you of Amazon and all internet stuff. I'm so glad that all this technological crap wasn't around in the late 70's and especially the 80's! Whew! I dodged a bullet!
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  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    Rob Hart provides a shockingly powerful and harrowing glimpse into the all too real possible realities in our future, of a ravaged world and US, this is a contemporary dystopian version of Orwell's 1984. In this near future, there is a government, but it is of little consequence, there is a desperate scramble for jobs, any job, and towering over it all is the Cloud, a monopoly with unfettered power, a thinly disguised Amazon, a monstrous behemoth with its tentacles in every pie, such as media ou Rob Hart provides a shockingly powerful and harrowing glimpse into the all too real possible realities in our future, of a ravaged world and US, this is a contemporary dystopian version of Orwell's 1984. In this near future, there is a government, but it is of little consequence, there is a desperate scramble for jobs, any job, and towering over it all is the Cloud, a monopoly with unfettered power, a thinly disguised Amazon, a monstrous behemoth with its tentacles in every pie, such as media outlets, technology, etc.. The Cloud proclaims itself as a force for all that is good, delivering goods by drone, a presence in every city, and the perfect employer shaping the nature of work and life where employees live on site, where their every need is met by the caring Cloud. It all sounds too good to be true, and as Hart's prescient novel proves, it is in fact a horror of a nightmare that we could all too easily be sleepwalking into, the seeds of it are all here in today's world.This is a well structured storytelling which excels in its world building, where the drudgery and monotony of working for the company is laid bare in all its excruciating details, the all encompassing surveillance, observation and tight monitoring of its employees, the lack of employee rights, the terrifying and sinister goings on behind the scenes at Cloud and the conspiracies. A disillusioned Paxton, a prison guard, who had his company destroyed by Cloud is now taken on by Cloud, working security for the company. Zinnia, another employee, she is a woman with her own hidden agenda, gravitates towards Paxton with an ulterior motive, his position gives him access to areas that she needs. The narrative gives their perspectives and that of the now dying CEO of Cloud, the man responsible for the Cloud from its very beginnings, Gibson Wells. He sees himself as man who has done nothing but good in the world, a self justifying hypocrite, claiming he is at the top of the corporate pile, thanks to market forces. Wells is a sickeningly deluded man, manipulative, ignoring and refusing to acknowledge just how the dice were loaded against anyone and everyone that challenged Cloud. Is it possible to challenge the Cloud now?Hart lays out his compelling premise with skill, with great characterisation and character development, giving us a painstaking portrayal of a world bereft of humanity, morality and ethics. The Cloud is a product of the unquestioning consumer wanting the lowest prices, ease of delivery, the entire convenience of the process that aided the Cloud into its unassailable position. That it decimated local stores and independent outlets are the inevitable consequences of such a corporation. This is scary and pertinently relevant reading material, so thought provoking, and with some surprising twists. I admit to not always finding it an easy read, but the subject matter kept me glued to the book right up to the end. Many thanks to Random House Transworld for an ARC.
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  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and The Publisher for asking me to read this book!! I felt like I was reading about Amazon and "The Cloud"Short and sweet here as I did the Netgalley review on my blog! Big word of advice! NEVER EATING THE FREAKING CLOUDBURGERS IN THIS WORLD!! 😳Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾
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  • Zoeytron
    January 1, 1970
    Copy furnished by Net Galley for the price of a review.Look around you.  The charming Mom & Pop shops of yesteryear are a rarity now.  Brick and mortar chain stores are closing down at an alarming rate.  It's less and less safe to leave your home.  It's the perfect storm.  Online shopping, drone delivery, instant gratification.  Can one mega-corporation really service all your needs?  'The market dictates.'  If this tale doesn't give you the shivers, then you haven't been paying attention.   Copy furnished by Net Galley for the price of a review.Look around you.  The charming Mom & Pop shops of yesteryear are a rarity now.  Brick and mortar chain stores are closing down at an alarming rate.  It's less and less safe to leave your home.  It's the perfect storm.  Online shopping, drone delivery, instant gratification.  Can one mega-corporation really service all your needs?  'The market dictates.'  If this tale doesn't give you the shivers, then you haven't been paying attention.  (view spoiler)[If you thought the recipe for Soylent Green was disturbing, get ready for the secret ingredient in the famous Cloudburger.  Gah! (hide spoiler)]
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    An endorsement from Blake Crouch was all I needed to request this book from netgalley. Imagine a world in the not so distant future where Amazon has become even more all encompassing and you have The Warehouse. Most small businesses have disappeared, driverless trucks and drones are the norm, and job choices are slim. The world is crashing and burning - climate change, minimal government, the lack of clean water, out of control migration. Of course, it’s not just Amazon this book derides. Hart h An endorsement from Blake Crouch was all I needed to request this book from netgalley. Imagine a world in the not so distant future where Amazon has become even more all encompassing and you have The Warehouse. Most small businesses have disappeared, driverless trucks and drones are the norm, and job choices are slim. The world is crashing and burning - climate change, minimal government, the lack of clean water, out of control migration. Of course, it’s not just Amazon this book derides. Hart has stolen other elements from our lives - Apple Watch, a government more on the side of corporations than humans (the Worker Responsibility Act will scare you silly). We hear from alternating narratives from our three main characters. Gibson is the founder of The Cloud. Paxton finds himself working for the Cloud after they forced his small business to fold. Zinnia is there on an undercover espionage mission. I liked that the different narratives provided us with a point/counterpoint to the capitalism vs. worker argument. If 1984 painted a picture against communism, The Warehouse goes after capitalism. In both instances, it’s the individual that gets trampled. There’s a very dry, subtle sense of humor here. Not just the names of the laws Gibson has enacted, but the commercials. But there’s also a real darkness here, especially as the book progresses. This book did a great job of keeping me engaged. It’s got a fast pace and quite a few interesting side stories. It actually spooked me. As someone who uses Amazon a lot, I really felt like part of the problem. My thanks to netgalley and Crown for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    This dystopian novel is set in the near future when Earth has been ravaged by climate change. In America, cities have been destroyed by gun violence and economic collapse. Unemployment is rife, the government is collapsing and citizens are scared to leave their homes. A behemoth Amazon-like company called the Cloud has pushed most companies out of business and supplies nearly everything to American homes, all delivered by drones so they never have to venture outside to shop. Cloud has built mega This dystopian novel is set in the near future when Earth has been ravaged by climate change. In America, cities have been destroyed by gun violence and economic collapse. Unemployment is rife, the government is collapsing and citizens are scared to leave their homes. A behemoth Amazon-like company called the Cloud has pushed most companies out of business and supplies nearly everything to American homes, all delivered by drones so they never have to venture outside to shop. Cloud has built mega live-work complexes all round the country offering accommodation and jobs to those who are prepared to work under its restrictive and draconian policies. People work 12h per day, 7 days per week in whatever job they are assigned and get paid in credits they can use on accommodation, food and other goods within Cloud. In exchange for these basic comforts, people are under constant surveillance by a personal tracking device and there every move is watched. There are no unions and they must maintain a certain star rating for performance or they are ejected back out into the world to survive as best they can. Ruling overall is Cloud's founder and CEO, Gibson Wells. Convinced he is saving the world by providing a new way of living, with green policies and refusal to sell guns, he is a man with limited time left due to his aggressive cancer. Rob Hart has created a future that is scarily plausible with consumerism taken to its extreme. Into this world enter two new recruits, Paxton, an inventor whose company was pushed out of the market by Cloud, and Zinnia, hired to infiltrate the company to hunt out its darkest secrets. Told from their points of view, as well as missives from Gibson Wells, the plot unfolds at a fast pace as Zinnia and Paxton learn the ropes in the Cloud and Zinnia tries to find weaknesses in the Cloud's security that will let her get to the heart of their operations.This is an original and thought provoking novel. In addition to writing an engaging thriller, Hart has built a credible near future world encompassing some worrying features of contemporary life, including rising economic immigration, rising gun violence, the increased incidence of workers not earning enough to live on, the effect of climate change on crops and the economy as well as competitive business practices forcing small companies and shops out of business. 4.5★With thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy to read
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    The Warehouse is a sort of 1984 or Brave New World, updated and revisited. The premise of this page-turning easy-to-read story is that perhaps we are further along that path than we care to admit and we are going there willfully gladly and without much thought about the consequences. We already live in a world where mom and pop shops are disappearing from main street, U.S.A. In fact, many cute main streets boast stores that are more welcoming to tourists than to locals' needs and the amazing thi The Warehouse is a sort of 1984 or Brave New World, updated and revisited. The premise of this page-turning easy-to-read story is that perhaps we are further along that path than we care to admit and we are going there willfully gladly and without much thought about the consequences. We already live in a world where mom and pop shops are disappearing from main street, U.S.A. In fact, many cute main streets boast stores that are more welcoming to tourists than to locals' needs and the amazing thing is you can go into almost any mall or shopping center anywhere and find pretty much the same stores and same products. And, this is both great and crappy because we get the products everyone wants but perhaps not the endless variety we might want. For that, we only have to dial up the great web and there is one company with lots of warehouses that has everything we could want and can nearly instantaneously deliver it. And, we might not be okay with governmental surveillance of everything we do, at least Big Brother style, but we seem to be okay with giving up our privacy to Google, to Amazon, to Apple. Your phone tracks wherever you go. Your internet provider and search engine knows whatever you post, whatever you read, whatever you buy, whoever you interact with. And, we know that even now, Google at least and probably the other big guys too, censors things and makes things disappear from searches. Don't like what you see, just wait till they mess with the algorithms again and point you in the preferred direction. It's happening now as you read this. Your preferences and desires are being noted. Hart gives us a story where one giant corporation controls nearly all commerce and employs thirty million people in its cloud villages where drones are sent out from warehouses every minute to everywhere to deliver product. And no other companies can survive the competition. Outside is a wasteland where global warming has baked everything beyond perfection. And, inside the Cloud village, conformity is the name of the game and go along and get along is the motto. Drudgery, being tracked by the watches, afraid to step out of line lest your star rating goes down. But, the price of giving up your freedom to roam, to think, to live, is to get a decent apartment and cloud burgers (although those are the subject of another treatise and i will not waste your time on it now). Using several alternating voices (Paxton, Zinnia, and of course Gibson) is the latest rage by all modern authors, but here it actually works well and we get to know our characters and see the world through their eyes. That being said, this is Paxton’s story and it is really through his eyes 👀 that we learn things. We can never fully trust Zinnia’s voice. She has motives we are never sure about. And, Gibson never reveals his true self and rather offers little more than a giant infomercial. Very enjoyable and easy read that makes you wonder where we are headed. Many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy for review.
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  • MissBecka
    January 1, 1970
    There were a lot of things I liked about this book...- Zinnia is a badass character that I adored!- The concept is amazing and (sadly) realistic.- It's monotony makes you feel like you are walking right alongside the characters.Things I hated...- The monotony is necessary and relatable, but it's also really hard to trudge through.- If you have read any of my reviews you know I hate unanswered questions...of this there are many when the book abruptly ends.(view spoiler)[Was Paxton hallucinating a There were a lot of things I liked about this book...- Zinnia is a badass character that I adored!- The concept is amazing and (sadly) realistic.- It's monotony makes you feel like you are walking right alongside the characters.Things I hated...- The monotony is necessary and relatable, but it's also really hard to trudge through.- If you have read any of my reviews you know I hate unanswered questions...of this there are many when the book abruptly ends.(view spoiler)[Was Paxton hallucinating at the end or was Zinnia actually there?Did the virus work?What happened to Carson?Does Paxton leave or stay? (hide spoiler)]That kind of shit drives me bananas.Thank you NetGalley and Crown Publishing for my ARC.
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  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Do you remember that scene in Idiocracy where you could walk into that small town called Costco and get your law degree and get a special Starbucks?Yeah, well this novel isn't that. But it is definitely Amazon on steroids, employing pretty much the last of humanity (or 30 million of them) as little drones send disposable products all around the world to disposable people.Sound intriguing? Make no mistake, this is definitely a dystopia. Your job performance is on a five-star rating system and if Do you remember that scene in Idiocracy where you could walk into that small town called Costco and get your law degree and get a special Starbucks?Yeah, well this novel isn't that. But it is definitely Amazon on steroids, employing pretty much the last of humanity (or 30 million of them) as little drones send disposable products all around the world to disposable people.Sound intriguing? Make no mistake, this is definitely a dystopia. Your job performance is on a five-star rating system and if you get a single star, you're FIRED. Sound slightly familiar? Just make this a company town with its own credit system, accommodations, and insular paranoid big-brother total tracking nightmare, throw the newbies into the mix, and THEN tell me whether or not YOU ALREADY LIVE THERE. :)I liked this book. It's nastily familiar and a pleasurable easy read full of twists and turns and espionage and counter-espionage. It does have a big warning as a core message, but I didn't mind how stark it was. After all, we're in COSTCO/AMAZON now, baby! :)
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  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    Mixed feelings The Warehouse gets a 👍for its satire of the US but a 👎for having more holes than a sieve. Hart takes a bunch of our current socioeconomic problems to their next steps (including unchecked capitalism, climate change, healthcare, guns, and income inequality), so the satire seems incredibly realistic. There are just *too many holes* in terms of these characters' motivations, their backstories, and what happens at the novel's abrupt ending.I guess that averages out to three stars?Than Mixed feelings The Warehouse gets a 👍for its satire of the US but a 👎for having more holes than a sieve. Hart takes a bunch of our current socioeconomic problems to their next steps (including unchecked capitalism, climate change, healthcare, guns, and income inequality), so the satire seems incredibly realistic. There are just *too many holes* in terms of these characters' motivations, their backstories, and what happens at the novel's abrupt ending.I guess that averages out to three stars?Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for giving me a DRC of this novel.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. In the not too distant future, the world is dominated by The Cloud, an online retail one-stop shop that feeds the growing demand for consumerism and controls everything, and everyone. Essentially, it’s the Amazon of the next decade. And that’s what makes this so chillingly real. This reminded me of the recent Doctor Who episode “Kerblam!” which follows a similar storyline about an all powerful, all seeing retail company that domina I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. In the not too distant future, the world is dominated by The Cloud, an online retail one-stop shop that feeds the growing demand for consumerism and controls everything, and everyone. Essentially, it’s the Amazon of the next decade. And that’s what makes this so chillingly real. This reminded me of the recent Doctor Who episode “Kerblam!” which follows a similar storyline about an all powerful, all seeing retail company that dominates the galaxy with an ulterior motive. Like that episode, the world building is really well done, with every detail about living, working and sleeping within your place of work all day, every day exposed bare. There are also subtle hints about the wider world, and the damage that’s occurred to the country and political state, but it’s never overly done - rather, it’s left open to reader interpretation without stating the obvious. There’s also a wonderful sense of dread that runs throughout, mingled in with the every day monotony of working in a warehouse, where your only form of payments come in credits for The Cloud, and your every move is monitored. You know that there’s something a little more sinister and suspect lurking around every corner, but you’re not sure what it is, and what form it’s going to take. The story is told over three POVs, from Paxton the new security employee who’s own business went bust because of The Cloud, the inquisitive and insightful Zinnia, who is working as a double agent and Gibson Wells, owner of The Cloud. Each voice is distinct from the other, and the three stories merged and blended well together to make a robust story that had a good pace and kept me interested until the end. All the characters are well developed, and in particular I enjoyed reading Gibson’s sections and the backstory that led to the creation of The Cloud. A simple idea that snowballed into an omnipotent presence. You can tell that Gibson isn’t necessarily the most reliable narrator, but this only adds to the intrigue of the story. I will say that I did find the ending a bit of a let down, as it felt rushed and not thought through well enough after all of the build up that goes before it. Great dystopian novel that hits a little too close to home with wonderful writing, world building and characters. Thought provoking.
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    A thought provoking thriller. Made me want to stop ordering from Amazon and never have grocery shopping delivered again.Full review to follow.
  • Bam
    January 1, 1970
    This new fantasy book is set in a near-future world where Black Friday massacres and extreme weather have just about wiped out in-store retail shopping. Into that gap has stepped Gibson Wells who developed a better package delivery system using drones. People can order goods online from 'The Cloud' and expect delivery virtually instantaneously from his mass distribution centers called MotherClouds. Wells is worth $304.9 billion. Yes, he's the richest man in America and the largest employer by fa This new fantasy book is set in a near-future world where Black Friday massacres and extreme weather have just about wiped out in-store retail shopping. Into that gap has stepped Gibson Wells who developed a better package delivery system using drones. People can order goods online from 'The Cloud' and expect delivery virtually instantaneously from his mass distribution centers called MotherClouds. Wells is worth $304.9 billion. Yes, he's the richest man in America and the largest employer by far. But as the book opens, he is dying from pancreatic cancer and has been told he has about one year left to live. He wants to spend that year driving around America in a motor home visiting as many of his distribution centers as he can so he can soak up the love of his happy employees. And while traveling, he's writing a blog, telling the wonderful story of his success. The MotherClouds are like mini-cities where workers live, eat, sleep and play...and never leave the building for months at a time. People are desperate to be hired to work at the MotherCloud as most other jobs have dried up. The environment is so bad that cities have become uninhabitable ghost towns. This story is also told from the point of view of two new employees and follows them from the initial hiring interview onward. One is a man named Paxton who was a prison guard at one point and would like to do anything else but work in security...and of course, that is exactly where he is assigned. The other is a woman named Zinnia who just happens to be a spy for the competition: she hopes to be assigned to tech where she can do the most damage but instead, she becomes a runner, one of those workers filling customer orders. Their two lives quickly become intertwined, headed for disaster. Of course, one can see how the marketing trends of today could lead to this kind of dehumanizing mega-business, where people are used up and discarded if they can't meet the quota, where there is really no life except that provided by the employer. So often sci-fi provides a window so we can see more clearly what's to come if nothing changes. Who is Wells most like? Bezos? The Walton family? Apple? Google? I'm sure this exciting book will make a terrific movie--it has all the required ingredients: action, intrigue, danger, villains and a touch of romance. I received an arc of this book from the publisher via NetGalley for an honest review. I thoroughly enjoyed it.
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  • Fabi
    January 1, 1970
    An eerie modern take on Orwell's 1984. What struck me the most was the plausibility. It's crossed my mind, as I'm sure it has yours, that a monopoly online retailer has the power to change the world. Is changing the world.In the USA especially, where convenience and instant gratification rule, it is easy to 'go with the flow' without looking at the possible consequences. Portrayed so well in this story.The world has become a harsh environment. We have polluted and consumed to the edge of extinct An eerie modern take on Orwell's 1984. What struck me the most was the plausibility. It's crossed my mind, as I'm sure it has yours, that a monopoly online retailer has the power to change the world. Is changing the world.In the USA especially, where convenience and instant gratification rule, it is easy to 'go with the flow' without looking at the possible consequences. Portrayed so well in this story.The world has become a harsh environment. We have polluted and consumed to the edge of extinction. There is only one escape - The Cloud - The Cloud is a behemoth online retailer that provides for all your needs including housing and medical care if you're one of the lucky ones to work for them. The conditions seem atrocious to us readers, but to the characters who have only the harsher outside world to go to it's better than nothing. It's truly scary to see how the characters are easily brainwashed into 'the system'. It's even scarier to think that it could/would happen to me.Hang on for this thrilling ride into a near future reality. The end will have you gasping and asking for more.Review ARC graciously provided by the publisher via NetGalley
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  • Kasa Cotugno
    January 1, 1970
    Not so much a thriller in the classic sense, although there are chilling elements. Really more of a cautionary tale whose reality may be closer than we think. The outside world is more Mad Max than ever -- climate change, gun violence and a disintegrating government have rendered America almost uninhabitable, except for one behemoth that controls the only viable possibility for employment and has applicants scrambling for jobs no matter how menial, meaning giving up whatever lives they may have Not so much a thriller in the classic sense, although there are chilling elements. Really more of a cautionary tale whose reality may be closer than we think. The outside world is more Mad Max than ever -- climate change, gun violence and a disintegrating government have rendered America almost uninhabitable, except for one behemoth that controls the only viable possibility for employment and has applicants scrambling for jobs no matter how menial, meaning giving up whatever lives they may have on the "outside" to live within the confines of the MotherCloud, don a color-coded polo shirt, and fit into an automaton slot (Freedom is something you have until you give it away). Insidious and creepy, focussing on two new hires each with their own agenda. Reminiscent of Dave Eggars's The Circle, but a shade better. I can even see the movie trailer, with Don LaFontaine-like voice intoning "In A World....".
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  • Sh3lly
    January 1, 1970
    Release date: August 20, 2019.In the near future, a corporation (think Amazon) eventually takes over the country, becoming so powerful, even the Government can't touch them. It's a dystopian-like scenario. This company has evolved to use drones to deliver anything and everything to customers. Its employees live at work. Eat at work. Buy their clothes from work. They have "star ratings" for their work performance. Each quarter, they cut those employees who can't and don't perform well. The law en Release date: August 20, 2019.In the near future, a corporation (think Amazon) eventually takes over the country, becoming so powerful, even the Government can't touch them. It's a dystopian-like scenario. This company has evolved to use drones to deliver anything and everything to customers. Its employees live at work. Eat at work. Buy their clothes from work. They have "star ratings" for their work performance. Each quarter, they cut those employees who can't and don't perform well. The law enforcement prefers to, ahem, handle things internally. The founder and CEO of the company is dying of pancreatic cancer, so we have him telling his story through blog-like entries. This guy seems clueless at first, like your typical conservative "capitalism rules" type, but we slowly see the insidiousness unfold.Paxton and Zinnia are the two main characters. Paxton ends up being in security and Zinnia is a "red" shirt - she picks the items and puts them into bins for packaging. There are "Cloudbands" you have to wear to get into bathrooms, elevators, anywhere. It's a worst-case scenario for what could happen with companies like Amazon and what might happen with corporations taking over the country, all small businesses being shut down, people having no jobs, etc.There also seems to be a climate change semi-disaster that happened before the story starts and some parts of the country/world are unlivable (too hot/dead). I really liked this. It was highly entertaining and kept me going the whole way through!Thank you Netgalley and publisher for providing a digital eARC to read and review!
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  • Katie Gallagher
    January 1, 1970
    Check out other fun bookish stuff on my blog!Thank you to NetGalley and Crown Publishing for sending me a free advanced reader copy of this book for an honest review. The Warehouse debuts August 20th.Let’s cut to the chase: this is a book about Amazon. If you’ve ever entertained the question of what the world would look like if Amazon continues going great guns and secures a bit more political power, then this is a must-read. This is a near-future dystopia, where devastating global warming and B Check out other fun bookish stuff on my blog!Thank you to NetGalley and Crown Publishing for sending me a free advanced reader copy of this book for an honest review. The Warehouse debuts August 20th.Let’s cut to the chase: this is a book about Amazon. If you’ve ever entertained the question of what the world would look like if Amazon continues going great guns and secures a bit more political power, then this is a must-read. This is a near-future dystopia, where devastating global warming and Black Friday massacres have ensured that consumers are unwilling to leave their houses—basically ever. Enter Cloud, who will drone-ship every product imaginable to your doorstep in the blink of an eye. Their workers live in massive company towns, where you get paid in Cloud credits, eat Cloud burgers, and sleep in Cloud-issued apartments. And if you don’t want to buy into the system, too bad, because unemployment is sky high, so how else you gonna make a buck, bro?Enter Paxton and Zinnia, two new recruits to Cloud. Paxton is an entrepreneur whose small business dreams were squashed under the weight of pressure by Cloud to lower his production costs. Zinnia is a corporate spy on the most dangerous mission of her life: to figure out how Cloud is really producing their energy. Paxton has a job on the security team, while Zinnia only manages to secure a lowly picker role. If you have any sort of plot intuition, you can kinda see where things are headed from there, and it’s a wild, compulsive read that was hard to put down.Listen, I like Amazon well enough. To give a personal example, my book is on Amazon in the KDP program, and I truly admire the innovation they have brought to the publishing industry by introducing the Kindle and an ebook marketplace to the world. Believe it or not, at least in the publishing sphere, Amazon has been great for the little guy. Print-on-demand and easy ebook distribution are threatening to topple the long-established gatekeepers of publishing, i.e., agents and publishers, allowing authors to be their own boss and have total control over their final product.But that’s not to say that everything Amazon does smells of roses; you don’t get to that level of success without trampling over others. So if you’re a fan of dystopian fiction, I would definitely pick this up—it’s a fast, thrilling read that will ironically probably be topping Amazon’s book rankings.
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  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    I was at a mystery conference recently and found an advance reading copy of The Warehouse in my gift bag. The premise sounded intriguing, so I gave it a try. Although I wouldn’t call this book a thriller as is touted on the back cover, I would call it a disturbing account of a not-too distant future where one company monopolizes a country, then pretty much holds its hostage.The backstory reveals how simply and innocently it all started, when a boy named Gibson Wells began delivering goods for hi I was at a mystery conference recently and found an advance reading copy of The Warehouse in my gift bag. The premise sounded intriguing, so I gave it a try. Although I wouldn’t call this book a thriller as is touted on the back cover, I would call it a disturbing account of a not-too distant future where one company monopolizes a country, then pretty much holds its hostage.The backstory reveals how simply and innocently it all started, when a boy named Gibson Wells began delivering goods for his neighbors. Decades later he’s the CEO of Cloud, a huge facility in every American city that uses an army of drones to deliver goods to customers everywhere. Cloud is also redefining the work-life concept while vowing to make a badly polluted and damaged planet a greener place.Enter Zinnia, a young woman who’s hired to steal intel from Cloud, and Paxton, a disillusioned prison guard who’s own small start-up company was quickly crushed by Cloud. The story is told from Gibson’s, Zinnia’s, and Paxton’s viewpoints in chapters that painfully detail the monotony of working for Cloud and living a life (employees must live where they work) where you’re pretty much monitored 24/7.In portraying the monotony of Cloud life, the storyline also becomes monotonous at times. Yet, this monotony is essential to the plot, which makes for somewhat strange and risky novel writing. The action ramps up toward the end, and there’s a great twist that I didn’t see coming. For me the most obscene part of this story is Gibson Wells’ justification for what he’s created and the way he sees himself. Needless to say, there are some really dark aspects to his empire.It made me think of how today’s corporations are changing the way we make purchases while gathering intel on each of us. If you were to look at worse-case scenario of capitalism, the story isn’t that farfetched. This compelling, well-written novel contains an important and dire message worthy of thoughtful reflection.
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  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4 starsThis latest release by Rob Hart imagines a dystopian future where climate change has radically changed the world, and an all-encompassing corporate giant has radically changed society. In "The Warehouse", most of the world’s trade is handled by a mega company named Cloud. Cloud has also taken over government functions, agricultural functions, just about any product, service or oversight you can think of is now administered by Cloud. Mom and Pop farms and stores have been driven ou Rating: 4 starsThis latest release by Rob Hart imagines a dystopian future where climate change has radically changed the world, and an all-encompassing corporate giant has radically changed society. In "The Warehouse", most of the world’s trade is handled by a mega company named Cloud. Cloud has also taken over government functions, agricultural functions, just about any product, service or oversight you can think of is now administered by Cloud. Mom and Pop farms and stores have been driven out of business.The story is told from three perspectives. First there is Gibson Wells. He is the founder of Cloud and he’s dying of cancer. We hear from him mainly via blog posts about his future, and his past. We learn what drove him to start Cloud, and what continues to drive him to ensure its success. Then we hear from Zinnia and Paxton. They meet on the day that they are hired to work at a Mega Cloud facility in an unnamed location. Zinnia is a ‘red shirt’, or order picker. Paxton wears a blue shirt, and works for Security. We learn about their history and their Cloud experiences in their alternating voices throughout the book. Is Cloud as benevolent as it seems on the surface? Each push to make an employee to work harder, and use fewer resources seems to be rooted in Wells’ patriarchal view that basically hard work is good for the soul. But how far can a person be pushed, watched, and controlled, and are the motives actually as benevolent as they seem? A group of disrupters is attempting to form a Union. As you might expect this is something that Security is tasked with stopping. Zinnia has a hidden agenda, and despite her better judgment finds herself attracted to Paxton. This book works on many levels. It’s a great dystopian novel. While I was reading this book a special came on CNN about the far reach of Amazon, which Cloud is clearly based on, and whether or not in the long run it will be good for society. I only watched the intro of the program because I didn’t want it to influence my reading and reviewing experience. It did make me ponder though. The book has a touch or romance. Not the lovey-dovey stuff, but romance based on finding camaraderie and comfort that we all needs as humans. The book is also a bit of a morality play. Will the characters ultimately do the right thing? What is the right thing? Will Cloud be taken in a new direction? Who wins?I’m still sorting out my feeling about the ending. At first I was frustrated with it, but now I applaud author's skill in the final scenes. I don’t want to say more and spoil the story. Do yourself a favor and pick this book up soon. I think this is obviously great for Sci-Fi and Dystopian readers. But that is not my go-to genre and I really enjoyed the book too. I like that it was fast-paced, talked about problems that we all could be facing in the near-future, and made me think about the choices I might make if I switched places with any of the characters. ‘Thank-You’ to NetGalley; the publisher, Crown Publishing; and the author, Rob Hart; for providing a free e-ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Karen’s Library
    January 1, 1970
    Yikes! This was an eerie look at a kind of plausible future of Amazon meets The Circle with a little of the Doctor Who Kerblam! episode thrown in. Two strangers apply for a job at Cloud. Cloud is an Amazon-like company where the consumer can order pretty much anything, and the product is whisked to them via a drone. Cloud is a self contained city within itself where the employees live, eat, and work. Paxton is hired and becomes a blue shirt, security. Zinnia is hired and becomes a red shirt, a p Yikes! This was an eerie look at a kind of plausible future of Amazon meets The Circle with a little of the Doctor Who Kerblam! episode thrown in. Two strangers apply for a job at Cloud. Cloud is an Amazon-like company where the consumer can order pretty much anything, and the product is whisked to them via a drone. Cloud is a self contained city within itself where the employees live, eat, and work. Paxton is hired and becomes a blue shirt, security. Zinnia is hired and becomes a red shirt, a picker.Interspersed with Paxton and Zinnia's POV chapters are Gibson's chapters. Gibson is the gazillionaire that invented Cloud.This story was definitely satirical, which I typically am not a big fan of, but in this case, I really enjoyed. It was a bit scary to see a possible future dystopian where this company takes over everything, including government. I found it very intriguing and inhaled this book!One last note... Cloudburgers... Nom nom nom! *Thank you to NetGalley and Crown Publishing for the advance copy!*
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  • Lauren Stoolfire
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.The Warehouse by Rob Hart is easily one of my favorite reads of 2019. Think Big Brother meets The Circle and Amazon with a dash of corporate espionage and Soylent Green. If that description doesn't make you want to pick it up I don't know what will! Anyway, I loved all three perspective characters, but I will say that Zinnia is my favorite. I following this corporate spy as she tries to infiltrate the Cloud. We don't know a whole I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.The Warehouse by Rob Hart is easily one of my favorite reads of 2019. Think Big Brother meets The Circle and Amazon with a dash of corporate espionage and Soylent Green. If that description doesn't make you want to pick it up I don't know what will! Anyway, I loved all three perspective characters, but I will say that Zinnia is my favorite. I following this corporate spy as she tries to infiltrate the Cloud. We don't know a whole lot about the wider world, but I snapped up all of the hints we get about their near future world. Overall, I highly recommend this novel especially if you're looking for a timely, thought-provoking dystopian horror. I am going to have to read more from Rob Hart in the future.
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  • Monnie
    January 1, 1970
    Think Amazon and Walmart on steroids: What would happen if either (or both) of these already giant companies went wild and, quite literally, took over the world's commerce?At first blush, the yin-yang is easy to envision; virtually all small business would be wiped out and the only "secure" jobs essentially would be low-paying gruntwork (albeit with substantial benefits). On the other hand, the convenience for consumers would be unmatched. With state-of-the-industry order technology, huge distri Think Amazon and Walmart on steroids: What would happen if either (or both) of these already giant companies went wild and, quite literally, took over the world's commerce?At first blush, the yin-yang is easy to envision; virtually all small business would be wiped out and the only "secure" jobs essentially would be low-paying gruntwork (albeit with substantial benefits). On the other hand, the convenience for consumers would be unmatched. With state-of-the-industry order technology, huge distribution centers staffed by hundreds and a sky littered with delivery drones, anything people might want would be at their fingertips almost instantly. The question then becomes - and worthy of note is that it's a question that's being asked today - to what extent are those consumers willing to overlook the exploitation of other human beings in order for their own needs to be satisfied?This entertaining yet often disturbing book gives readers some idea of what life might be like should that happen (some, of course, will argue that we're already at that point). The scene is set at the mothership of a ginormous company called Cloud, which has "campuses" all over the country complete with living quarters, health care and recreational opportunities for the thousands of employees at the facilities. During working hours, they perform jobs assigned to them by managers supposedly according to their skills; to keep them all in line, there's a rating system that, if in any way violated, would land them back in the outside world to fend for themselves (with the promise they'd never again be employed by Cloud). That outside world is dog-eat-dog - pretty much literally - and the long lines of people waiting to submit their resumes to Cloud is a testament to their desperation to escape as well as serve yet another deterrent to any employee who might consider bucking the carefully contrived system.Enter central characters Paxton and Zinnia, both of whom applied for jobs at Cloud, each for a different, nefarious reason. I won't reveal what those reasons are, but only that neither expects to be working there after their goals have been realized. They meet for the first time briefly on the tram ride that takes them to their work and living quarters. Paxton is more interested in Zinnia than she in him, but early on, she sees an advantage in cozying up to him. Meanwhile, Gibson Wells, the creator and CEO of this monster company, is dying of cancer. Considering himself to be the savior of the free world, he starts a blog to lay out the reasons - more like justifications - behind all he's done that will culminate in the announcement of his successor. He's also announced plans to personally visit all his Cloud facilities before he succumbs, ending with the MotherCloud at which Paxton and Zinnia are employed.Told through alternating perspectives of the three characters, readers begin to get the full story - complete with a few timely surprises that keep things really interesting and, in the process, provide some food for thought that carries over to the real world (as evidenced by the twinge of buyer's remorse I felt just after finishing the book as I pushed the "place order" button to get the items in my Amazon cart). Oh well, at least they haven't activated drone delivery in my neighborhood (yet).Thanks to the publisher, via NetGalley, for the opportunity to read and review an advance copy of this entertaining and thought-provoking book.
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    AH—MA—ZING!!!!Couldn’t put this one down, and when I wasn’t turning the pages, it was in my head. So relevant and thought provoking. This could easily be the not so distant future...Just read that Ron Howard already optioned this for the big screen-woohoo!ARC provided by NetGalley
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  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/08/19/...I confess, I am a big Amazon consumer; I love my Prime shipping and being able to find great prices on practically anything at “the everything store”, saving me a considerable amount of time and money over the years. But sometimes, it does feel like every time I turn around the retail giant is rolling out yet another program to break into more markets, or they’re creating their own brands to compete against the very mercha 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/08/19/...I confess, I am a big Amazon consumer; I love my Prime shipping and being able to find great prices on practically anything at “the everything store”, saving me a considerable amount of time and money over the years. But sometimes, it does feel like every time I turn around the retail giant is rolling out yet another program to break into more markets, or they’re creating their own brands to compete against the very merchants they’re partnered with. No surprise, this has led to a lot of concerns, as evidenced by the accusations of Amazon becoming a monopoly, or the news articles with headlines like “Is Amazon Getting Too Powerful?” cropping up all over the internet.And it’s a fair question to ask as well as an interesting one to ponder, which I’m pretty sure is how the inspiration for this novel came about. The Warehouse by Rob Hart is clearly riffing on the tech giant with Cloud, a megacorp in the future that has completely consumed the American economy, becoming the only thriving company in this dystopian world ravaged by recession and high unemployment. Competition for work is fierce especially since the government can no longer be relied upon for any kind of social support, so naturally, desperate jobseekers turn to Cloud en masse in the hopes of scoring a position in one of their many sprawling warehouses. These facilities, in addition to serving as the company’s distribution and fulfillment centers, are also where employees eat, sleep and live when they’re not spending the long hours working on the floor. On top of room and board, workers also get healthcare and other benefits to go along with the job.But the truth at Cloud is a lot more sinister. Through the eyes of three characters, readers are given insight into just what it’s like to work for the company. Paxton is the former owner of a once successful business which went bankrupt because it could not compete with the aggressive practices of Cloud. Now he finds himself employed by them, working as a security guard. Zinnia is another employee, though she’s at Cloud under false pretenses. Working as an undercover agent for a mysterious client, she has infiltrated Cloud to further her own agenda, one that involves getting close to Paxton to access the security privileges he has. And finally, every so often we’re also provided with a third perspective, that of Gibson Wells, the founder and CEO of Cloud himself. Delivering his messages via a series of updates to the public, he first reveals that he is dying, stricken with late stage cancer. Explaining that all he’s ever wanted was to make the world a better place, Wells begins telling his life story, describing the American Dream. From humble beginnings, he was able to become the most powerful man on the planet through sheer hard work and ingenuity. Meanwhile, the world is also holding its collective breath, waiting to see who he will name as his successor.To start, the novel’s tagline of “Big Brother meets Big Business” is highly appropriate. Rob Hart’s depiction of a dystopian future where workers no longer have any rights and everything is about the bottom line is eerily disturbing, if for no other reason than how realizable the situation is if we no longer have the regulations in place to reign in large corporations. On top of that, Cloud is everywhere—in our media, in our houses, and in our faces. Consumers put up with it for the convenience, but for Cloud employees, working the job every day and trying to keep it is a like living through a waking nightmare. Every worker in a Cloud facility is monitored at all times and rated on a five-star scale like the inventory they process and ship out. And when you also live at the place you work, this means constant surveillance and absolutely no privacy.I have to say though, for a thriller, The Warehouse did not pull me in immediately. The story is rather slow moving at the beginning, and overall very straightforward. Sure, the conditions at the Cloud facility were tense and disconcerting to read about, but they were also completely expected of a book like this which practically spells out its themes and intentions. For me, its initial appeal was mostly in the suspenseful atmosphere and mystery, of wondering what Zinnia is up to and what designs she has on Paxton. But for most of the novel, my favorite POV was Gibson Wells. You can tell Hart probably had a lot of fun writing the character. Gibson is a complicated man, and it was fun reading about his life even though you could tell there was something not quite right beneath that thick layer of charisma. He was a very well written character and surprisingly convincing, given the many aspects of his personality the author had to juggle.But the second half of The Warehouse was undoubtedly its stronger half. The pace certainly picked up at this point, though I still wouldn’t call this one a standard thriller. And in the end, that might be one of the novel’s most appealing draws. I enjoyed that it read more like a sci-fi dystopian, one that features a fascinating premise that is at once imaginative and all too feasible, and I liked how the ending revelations pulled it all together.Bottom line, a very good read, with a climax that was gripping and absolutely compulsive. I would recommend The Warehouse for fans of the genre, especially if you enjoy dystopian scenarios that get under your skin and make you think.
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  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    January 1, 1970
    Cloud is not just a place to work, but a place to live with a ranking and rating system to keep you striving to always be your best! We follow the creator of Cloud on his last tour, Paxton who thinks this is best opportunity though he’s not happy Cloud has essentially been a problem in his life and Zinnia who is undercover..but for what purpose? This takes a harsh look at where our civilization is going and how some things unfortunately never change despite the lessons we should have already lea Cloud is not just a place to work, but a place to live with a ranking and rating system to keep you striving to always be your best! We follow the creator of Cloud on his last tour, Paxton who thinks this is best opportunity though he’s not happy Cloud has essentially been a problem in his life and Zinnia who is undercover..but for what purpose? This takes a harsh look at where our civilization is going and how some things unfortunately never change despite the lessons we should have already learned. Corporate America. The want and need of those high ratings because we are now virtually trained to react to these. It's like a mix of Facebook on crack salted with an itsy bitsy bit of Black Mirror. Not gonna lie, if the world went to (further) shit and I was afforded and opportunity to work in a place like this, I would be tempted. Just remember, everything comes at a price.What an unexpected surprise! It’s written in 11 sections with chapters written in the voice of the three main characters and various chapters in the form of a message. I will say I glazed over sometimes during the owner’s chapters. I was way more intrigued with Paxton and Zinnia. Around the last couple chapters I had that “I KNEW IT!” moment, but I didn’t really know it y’all. 🤦🏻‍♀️. It’s in these last chapters that the book really captured me and I turned the last page seriously saying out loud, “Well now THAT was so good!” There’s not crazy twist but there are some verrrry interesting surprises. 🍔 And while I thought some sections dragged a tiny bit, once I finished I appreciated all the depth in the characters. Love it when a book surprises me in the unexpected ways. Anybody wanna grab a Cloudburger? 😏Thank you Crown for this copy.
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  • The Behrg
    January 1, 1970
    "Meet the new boss, same as the old boss."The Warehouse is a clever 1984-esque dystopian view of a future where corporate America is the ONLY America. The company called Cloud (with plenty of thinly veiled pot shots at Amazon) has redefined its work force by allowing its employees to live within the constructs where they work, creating a haven (or prison) from the rest of the world and in the process, of course, maximizing revenues and profits. It's an enthralling premise that simultaneously act "Meet the new boss, same as the old boss."The Warehouse is a clever 1984-esque dystopian view of a future where corporate America is the ONLY America. The company called Cloud (with plenty of thinly veiled pot shots at Amazon) has redefined its work force by allowing its employees to live within the constructs where they work, creating a haven (or prison) from the rest of the world and in the process, of course, maximizing revenues and profits. It's an enthralling premise that simultaneously acts as a warning, as the deeper in you get the more you could see this playing out somehow in our future.What really elevates this novel above the premise are the characters we're quickly introduced to--one coming to Cloud after losing his business to the company and another entering in an act of corporate espionage. Their stories are expertly intertwined to create a dynamic--and tension--the reader cares about. I also really appreciated the humanity that was brought to the founder of Cloud. Though it's easy to hate what he's done and the way he uses the system for greater gain, in lesser hands it would have been easy to make him a villain just because he's evil or wants to destroy the world. You may not agree with his philosophies, but you can see that he's sincere in what he's attempted to do, which added a nice layer to the story.I could have used a little more complexities with some of the systems in place at Cloud for tracking employees, especially for a business as sophisticated at this conglomerate, and I would have loved to have seen more of the world outside just the one hub, but ultimately this story and its characters captivated me and certainly kept me flying through the pages. A clever concept delivered with care and precision. Almost sounds like a product that could be coming to you soon from your local Cloud epicenter. A solid recommend.
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  • Blair
    January 1, 1970
    (3.5) I needed something entertaining and easy to read, and this corporate espionage thriller was just the ticket. The Warehouse is the second book I've read in a month that's set in a society dominated by an Amazon-like company (the first being Joanna Kavenna's Zed). In this version of the USA, the corporate behemoth Cloud is basically the only employer; for millions of people, the only choices are a) homelessness or b) a job in one of the company's MotherCloud facilities, where they'll work, l (3.5) I needed something entertaining and easy to read, and this corporate espionage thriller was just the ticket. The Warehouse is the second book I've read in a month that's set in a society dominated by an Amazon-like company (the first being Joanna Kavenna's Zed). In this version of the USA, the corporate behemoth Cloud is basically the only employer; for millions of people, the only choices are a) homelessness or b) a job in one of the company's MotherCloud facilities, where they'll work, live and be subjected to constant surveillance. We follow two newcomers to one particular MotherCloud. Zinnia is put to work as a warehouse picker; Paxton joins the security team, where he's assigned to the task force dealing with a highly addictive drug called oblivion. They meet at the automated 'interview' stage, and later end up dating. But Zinnia is actually a spy, infiltrating Cloud in an attempt to prove its sustainable credentials are a sham.As you might expect with that premise, The Warehouse can come off as a bit heavy-handed, but to its credit, it's not too preachy (and there's a sobering coda explaining the origins of the story). It's immaculately paced and addictive – packed with little cliffhangers that make you desperate to read the next few pages. There are some weaknesses: Paxton is a rather blank character, the CloudBurger thing is a cheap and schlocky reveal, and I was never quite sure how I was supposed to feel about Zinnia (she's positioned as a heroine in contrast to the everyday evil represented by Cloud, yet her treatment of Hadley is the most villainous thing anyone does in the whole book). But the world of the story is colourfully brought to life, the plot is perfectly engineered, and I had a lot of fun reading it.I received an advance review copy of The Warehouse from the publisher through NetGalley.TinyLetter | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr
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  • Anneke
    January 1, 1970
    Book Review: The WarehouseAuthor: Rob HartPublisher: Crown PublishingPublication Date: August 20, 2019Review Date: May 23, 2019I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.From the blurb:“Cloud isn’t just a place to work. It’s a place to live. And when you’re here, you’ll never want to leave.“On the surface, The Warehouse is a thrilling story of corporate espionage at the highest level, but dig a little deeper and you’ll find a terrifying cautionary tale of Book Review: The WarehouseAuthor: Rob HartPublisher: Crown PublishingPublication Date: August 20, 2019Review Date: May 23, 2019I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.From the blurb:“Cloud isn’t just a place to work. It’s a place to live. And when you’re here, you’ll never want to leave.“On the surface, The Warehouse is a thrilling story of corporate espionage at the highest level, but dig a little deeper and you’ll find a terrifying cautionary tale of the nightmare world we are making for ourselves.”—Blake Crouch, New York Times bestselling author of Dark Matter.”What a fantastic thriller! I gulped it down in 2 days, and could not put it down. Right away it reminded me of The Circle by Dave Eggers. But I realized very quickly that this was about Amazon, in the way The Circle was about Facebook.Everything about this book was exquisite. The plot cooked right along, hitting all the plot points, not letting down once. Good to the very last drop.The characters were very well painted. Cloud itself, was a main character, and was pictured very well, as the MotherCloud was painted in great detail. This may seem like just a fast-paced thriller, but it’s also an excellent commentary on what is currently taking place all over the world, with surveillance capitalism, the development of AI, and particularly, Amazon. Like Cloud in the book, Amazon keeps growing and expanding like some kind of science fiction monster, but what the book points to is a nightmare that’s taking place right under our noses. Here’s a link to a lengthy investigative article about working at Amazon by the New York Times, titled “Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace”. Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/te...A lot in The Warehouse sounded like Amazon in this article. I give this book 5+ stars (hah-hah, not so funny after you read the book), highly, highly recommended. Really, please make sure you read this book. Thank you to Crown Publishing for allowing me an early look at this great book. I know my review is quite early, but I was drawn to reading this book as soon as I downloaded it. I couldn’t wait until publication in August. This review will be posted on NetGalley, Goodreads, and Amazon.#netgalley #thewarehouse #robhart #crown
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  • Nicole (Read Eat Sleep Repeat)
    January 1, 1970
    The Warehouse is a dystopian thriller that feels startlingly and terrifyingly possible.This is told from three perspectives: Gibson, the man who created the giant tech company Cloud; Paxton, who was put out of business by Cloud but now is going to work there; and Zinnia, who was hired to infiltrate Cloud and discover its innermost secrets. Through these different points of view, the story unfolds to reveal that things are not always as they initially appear. Cloud is easily comparable to Amazon The Warehouse is a dystopian thriller that feels startlingly and terrifyingly possible.This is told from three perspectives: Gibson, the man who created the giant tech company Cloud; Paxton, who was put out of business by Cloud but now is going to work there; and Zinnia, who was hired to infiltrate Cloud and discover its innermost secrets. Through these different points of view, the story unfolds to reveal that things are not always as they initially appear. Cloud is easily comparable to Amazon but that’s just a reference point; The Warehouse explores a near future in which our culture relies solely on one mega-corporation because that’s what “the market dictates.”I wouldn’t call The Warehouse a true thriller as the pace starts out gradually, ramping up slowly but surely right up to the high point of the final action, but Hart uses these pages well, building up the world and characters in a way that feels realistic. The plot is reminiscent of other dystopians (most obviously The Circle, by Dave Eggers) but manages to stand quite on its own. What first seems a fairly straightforward story has many layers for the reader to peel back for a thought-provoking read.Ultimately, The Warehouse was a well written and compelling story that left me thinking about it after each time I put it down.*Thanks to the publisher for providing an arc of this edition via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Justin Brendel
    January 1, 1970
    A scary look at large big-box delivery companies and the corruption that can occur within it. There is so much more than getting packages delivered in two days. Your shift is monitored by your Cloudband. You wear the color polo that coordinates with your job. You stay in employee housing. Don't want to give spoilers with this ARC, (Thank you Netgalley), but if corporate espionage thrillers are your thing, read this book.
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