When My Time Comes
From Diane Rehm, renowned radio host--one of the most trusted voices in the nation--and best-selling author: a book of candor and compassion, addressing the urgent, hotly contested cause of the Right-to-Die movement, of which she is one of our most inspiring champions. Soon to be a public television documentary of the same name, featuring the author.Through interviews with terminally ill patients, and with physicians, ethicists, spouses, relatives, and representatives of those who vigorously oppose the movement, Rehm gives voice to a broad range of people who are personally linked to the realities of medical aid in dying. The book presents the fervent arguments--both for and against--that are propelling the current debates across the nation about whether to adopt laws allowing those who are dying to put an end to their suffering. With characteristic even-handedness, Rehm skillfully shows both sides of the argument, providing the full context for this highly divisive issue.With a highly personal foreword by John Grisham, When My Time Comes is a response to many misconceptions and misrepresentations of end-of-life care; it is a call to action--and to conscience--and it is an attempt to heal and soothe our hearts, reminding us that death, too, is an integral part of life.

When My Time Comes Details

TitleWhen My Time Comes
Author
ReleaseFeb 4th, 2020
PublisherKnopf Publishing Group
ISBN-139780525654759
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Philosophy, Politics, Science

When My Time Comes Review

  • Neelam Babul
    January 1, 1970
    I selected this book because I wanted to learn more about euthanasia and read about real-life experiences of individuals with terminal illnesses and how it affected their families. It could be the lawyer within me that wanted to gain perspective on the issue but I was touched and emotionally affected after reading this book. There was pain, suffering, bravery and courage portrayed in the book and I was impressed. I was thrilled about reading the foreword by John Grisham, whose books I have read I selected this book because I wanted to learn more about euthanasia and read about real-life experiences of individuals with terminal illnesses and how it affected their families. It could be the lawyer within me that wanted to gain perspective on the issue but I was touched and emotionally affected after reading this book. There was pain, suffering, bravery and courage portrayed in the book and I was impressed. I was thrilled about reading the foreword by John Grisham, whose books I have read and loved. It is a good starting point for beginners on the subject and I am sure will touch the hearts of many. The right to take one's own life due to terminal illness is a debate which I believe will go on and on. It is difficult to come to a consensus when there are diverse views and schools of thought about it. I am not sure I would be able to let a loved one go by plugging the plug or through a fatal dose of pills but if it was me and I was in a vegetative state, I wouldn't want to be a burden on my family and loved ones.
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  • Shirley Freeman
    January 1, 1970
    What a fascinating book about a hard topic. Using her trademark kind, direct, compassionate style, Diane Rehm interviewed many people on both sides of the 'medical aid in dying' discussion. The book is basically a series of interview transcripts with doctors and other leaders, and patients and families of former patients. The last 'interview' is the transcript of a video recording Diane did with her grandson where she describes her wishes for when her time comes. The book has given me much to What a fascinating book about a hard topic. Using her trademark kind, direct, compassionate style, Diane Rehm interviewed many people on both sides of the 'medical aid in dying' discussion. The book is basically a series of interview transcripts with doctors and other leaders, and patients and families of former patients. The last 'interview' is the transcript of a video recording Diane did with her grandson where she describes her wishes for when her time comes. The book has given me much to think about. Apparently it will also soon be a public television documentary. It should generate plenty of open discussion - always a good thing.
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  • Phyllis Barlow
    January 1, 1970
    This is not a book you can pick up and read from start to finish. At least not for me. I had to read a chapter or two, put it down and think about it for a while before reading more. This is a very controversial topic, assisted dying. I think we can all agree that we don't want heroic measures at the end; don't let me exist on a respirator if there's no chance of recovery, ect. but actually assisting someone in taking their own life? I appreciated that, even though her views are very clear on This is not a book you can pick up and read from start to finish. At least not for me. I had to read a chapter or two, put it down and think about it for a while before reading more. This is a very controversial topic, assisted dying. I think we can all agree that we don't want heroic measures at the end; don't let me exist on a respirator if there's no chance of recovery, ect. but actually assisting someone in taking their own life? I appreciated that, even though her views are very clear on this issue, she interviewed two people who are adamantly opposed to this.I realize this isn't suicide in the sense that most of us think of suicide, but as a Christian who believes that God is the one who determines when life is over, this is a hard concept. Of course, I've never had to face this issue with anyone in my family yet, and it's illegal in my state anyway.The main thing I didn't care for was the interview format. It makes it a bit harder to read but I'm glad I read this. It gives me a lot to think about.
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  • Kristina
    January 1, 1970
    I received this as part of a GoodReads giveaway. So, Ive always enjoyed listening to Dianes interviews when she was doing her radio show. And I remember hearing about how her husband hastened his death by not eating or drinking and it was a long process. As medical assisted dying laws are passed by more states, this book does a nice job of laying out multiple opinions on the matter from people on both sides of the argument, from family members of people who have chosen this option, from I received this as part of a GoodReads giveaway. So, I’ve always enjoyed listening to Diane’s interviews when she was doing her radio show. And I remember hearing about how her husband hastened his death by not eating or drinking and it was a long process. As medical assisted dying laws are passed by more states, this book does a nice job of laying out multiple opinions on the matter from people on both sides of the argument, from family members of people who have chosen this option, from organizational leaders, and doctors. This book is really set up like an interview, so I am curious how it would work as an audiobook, as reading the interview form wasn’t my favorite. It will be interesting to see as more doctors are trained in medical school of this option, if perceptions will change in the medical field.As an aside, the forward of this book by John Grisham was problematic. He made some statements about the issue that I thought were somewhat loaded and actually turned me off to the book before digging into the actual text of the book.
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  • Anne Frances
    January 1, 1970
    This book gave me a ton to think about. Its an unusual book for me to pickup, but something intrigued me. I have long thought about medical assistance in death, perhaps because of my educational background so many of the ideas werent new to me. But those ideas which were new were very thought provoking. I havent highlighted this much while reading a book in a long time. But I did not like some of the authors questions, I found them quite repetitive (but I suppose they were originally made for This book gave me a ton to think about. It’s an unusual book for me to pickup, but something intrigued me. I have long thought about medical assistance in death, perhaps because of my educational background — so many of the ideas weren’t new to me. But those ideas which were new were very thought provoking. I haven’t highlighted this much while reading a book in a long time. But I did not like some of the author’s questions, I found them quite repetitive (but I suppose they were originally made for stand alone interviews... not a series of these interviews). The author is clear from the outset, but the author didn’t even attempt to appear neutral on the subject, either. Otherwise, I enjoyed the author’s contextualization of interview subjects, which occurred at the beginning of each chapter. This act seemed to convey a common sense of humanity and attachment to life. Lastly, I wish this book was less centred on the laws of the United States.
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  • Susie Webster-toleno
    January 1, 1970
    There were a few moments as I experienced this book where I thought I would give it a higher rating, but two things held me back. First of all, I felt that Diane didnt push as hard as I wanted her to on some of the questions. But the biggest and most distracting negative for me was that I did this by audiobook. Dianes voice is what it is and I happen to like it. But the people she interviewed Whoever voiced them ... uniformly drove me nuts (except the last one her grandson). I dont know why There were a few moments as I experienced this book where I thought I would give it a higher rating, but two things held me back. First of all, I felt that Diane didn’t push as hard as I wanted her to on some of the questions. But the biggest and most distracting negative for me was that I did this by audiobook. Diane‘s voice is what it is and I happen to like it. But the people she interviewed… Whoever voiced them ... uniformly drove me nuts (except the last one — her grandson). I don’t know why they chose to have the interviews performed rather than actually have the recorded interview with the people she spoke with. It was so wooden. I suspect the experience of reading the physical book would be way better.
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  • Joanne Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Rehm does a good job asking clear and respectful but pointed questions to elicit a full spectrum of answers from a variety of people with different points of view on the medical aid in dying issue. I ran out of patience with some of the religiously biased folks, but I understand it is important for them to have their say, too. I had more appreciation for the stories of real people who used MAID to shorten their suffering.
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  • Kailin Li
    January 1, 1970
    Good selection of opinions on medical aid in dying.
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