The Love Story of Missy Carmichael
For readers of Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine and A Man Called Ove, a life-affirming, deeply moving "coming-of-old" story, a celebration of how ordinary days are made extraordinary through friendship, family, and the power of forgiving yourself--at any age.Boy meets girl. Girl meets boy. Woman meets dog...The world has changed around Missy Carmichael. At seventy-nine, she's estranged from her daughter, her son and only grandson live across the world in Australia, and her great love is gone. Missy spends her days with a sip of sherry, scrubbing the kitchen in her big empty house and reliving her past--though it's her mistakes, and secrets, that she allows to shine brightest. The last thing Missy expects is for two perfect strangers and one spirited dog to break through her prickly exterior and show Missy just how much love she still has to give. Filled with wry laughter and deep insights into the stories we tell ourselves, The Love Story of Missy Carmichael shows us it's never too late to teach an old dog new tricks. It's never too late to love.

The Love Story of Missy Carmichael Details

TitleThe Love Story of Missy Carmichael
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 7th, 2020
PublisherG.P. Putnam's Sons
ISBN-139780525542445
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Adult Fiction

The Love Story of Missy Carmichael Review

  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    Boo hoo, waahhh… Boo hoo, argghhkk! Somebody sledgehammered my heart, broke into tiny particles and buried into ground! I’m in deep pain and whining, crying like a baby! And I’m in the mall now! Everybody’s looking for me. I know you will ask me why the hell I read the final chapters of the book in the public place if it is so devastatingly sad story. Well, I was waiting my friends to have a lunch break. They occupied in work places so I carried this book not to get bored and do something useful Boo hoo, waahhh… Boo hoo, argghhkk! Somebody sledgehammered my heart, broke into tiny particles and buried into ground! I’m in deep pain and whining, crying like a baby! And I’m in the mall now! Everybody’s looking for me. I know you will ask me why the hell I read the final chapters of the book in the public place if it is so devastatingly sad story. Well, I was waiting my friends to have a lunch break. They occupied in work places so I carried this book not to get bored and do something useful while I was waiting. I knew something tear jerker, heartbreaking, soul shuttering coming, I could hear the warning “stop reading, you’re gonna frighten those people! They already posted your picture so many public places and named you as –persona non grata-, children thinks you are Melisandre and brought Jon Snow back to life!!! You cannot even visit some European places, they still call you- boogey woman- after your breakdown and scream cried after finishing –Me before you- in front of Eiffel Tower“ But yes, it happened again! My friends found interesting my raccoon make up and red, bloated eyes, running nose and took me to a visit to Santa to calm my nerves (of course later they took me early happy hour to stop my whining! Best friends ever!)You may imagine that you need so many tissues, chamomile tea or any kind of booze and Zanax cocktail before starting this sad, over emotional book. Firstly I have to admit, describing Missy Carmichael as Eleanor Oliphant could be marketing strategy but it is absolutely false information. Missy is lonely woman, lost her love of her life and her children already left the house, living alone, aimless, stressful, depressed and sometimes it’s really hard to understand or empathize with her. But her back story, her life choices are so much different than Eleanor. Only similar thing of the characters are their asocial manners but the reason behind their social shyness and being alone are really different. This book is about finding hope, friendship and purpose when you live the winter times of your life.One day Missy meets two women in the park and listens to their stories and connects with them. Finally she starts to leave home and fill her life with new responsibilities including taking care of a sweetest dog.This is slow burn, heart wrenching, poignant, lovely story and especially last parts are a little heavy. When you learn more about Missy’s past and her backstory, you start to root for her and want to know more about her life.It’s brilliant, heart felting, promising debut novel which stole a place in my heart.Special thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Group Putnam to share this marvelous ARC COPY with me in exchange my honest review.
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  • Collin
    January 1, 1970
    Missy opens her morning paper and immediately flips to the obituaries. David Bowie has died.“At my age, reading obituaries is a generational hazard, contemporaries dropping off, one by one; each announcement an empty chamber in my own little revolver. For a while I tried to turn a blind eye, as if ignoring death could somehow fob it off. But people kept dying and other people kept writing about it, and some perverse imp obliged me to keep up to date.”Missy had finally made her mind up to go to Missy opens her morning paper and immediately flips to the obituaries. David Bowie has died.“At my age, reading obituaries is a generational hazard, contemporaries dropping off, one by one; each announcement an empty chamber in my own little revolver. For a while I tried to turn a blind eye, as if ignoring death could somehow fob it off. But people kept dying and other people kept writing about it, and some perverse imp obliged me to keep up to date.”Missy had finally made her mind up to go to the park and watch them electrocute the fish, so that she will have something to talk about with Arthur, her beloved grandson. More and more these days she finds that she is doing things just to provide a story to share with her family.As she watches the fish being stunned and captured, she feels herself falling, vision fading away to blackness.Missy is awoken by a dog nuzzling her face and she finds that she has slipped from sitting on the bench to laying on the bench. A concerned group of people has gathered around her, one woman holds a wet napkin to her forehead. Missy’s embarrassment far outweighs any injury. The lady introduces herself as Sylvie, inviting her to coffee. Sylvie is the first stranger that Missy has spoken to in weeks. A serendipitous moment? No, she declines.She returns to an empty house. She laments that her darling grandson now lives in Australia and it is easy for the reader to see that Missy is very lonely and teetering on the edge of depression. We also learn that some incident with her daughter, Melanie, never leaves her mind for long and that it leaves her with a terrible feeling of guilt. Melanie has not been to visit since this incident occurred, adding to Missy’s loneliness. Sylvie returns to the narrative, bumping into Missy at the chemist the next day. Again, she offers an invitation to a cup of coffee, again Missy declines. Sylvie tells Missy that no matter, they are bound to bump into each other again.While trying to avoid one character, Missy is almost forced into friendship with another. At the coffee shop Missy witnesses a fight between two women. One of them is Angela who was invited to coffee with her by Sylvie back at the park a couple of days ago. Angela attaches herself to Missy like a limpet mine and follows her home asking questions, barging into the house, almost uninvited. She is such a wonderful character, an example of how Angela talks,“Plus she thinks I should have married Otis’s father, Sean, even though he’s a useless twat. But he’s a useless twat from our village, so ideal marriage material. And now she’s come for a visit, so I’m sleeping on the sofa and she’s asking why I haven’t bought a house yet, “Is it because of all the immigrants?” “Jesus Christ, I AM an immigrant,” I said. And she said, “Don’t take the Lord’s name in vain.”Angela asks Missy to the park with her son, Otis. At the park they run into Sylvie who invites them back to her home. The feeling of serendipity is strong again and it feels as if these women were meant to become friends and just what Milly needs.The narrative will go back in time to various points in Missy’s life. Important parts that shaped who she is today. We slowly get the complete painting of Missy, with chapters of her past like wide brushstrokes filling the canvas.Later in the novel these jumps back in time will take place mid chapter, an object, such as a blow-up swimming pool, will trigger a memory and we will be whisked back in time, usually to an important anecdote. Dreams are also used to impart vital information from Missy’s past.In a nutshell this is a story about a year in Missy’s life, and her change in attitude and confidence in her twilight years. This passage sums her changing feelings nicely as well as giving us an example of Morrey’s lovely writing style,“Sylvie had a wonderful capacity for “philautia”, that boldest of Greek loves, the love of the self – a much finer quality than narcissism, which it’s often mistaken for. The way I saw it, with narcissism, you were just gazing at your reflection in a lake, with philautia, you were frolicking in the lake and inviting people to join you. People who truly liked themselves seemed to have a greater capacity for friendship, for letting people in. Perhaps that’s why I, in the past, was always rather solitary. But I liked to think I was starting to dip a toe in the waters.”There is more to the narrative and a few surprises, however these should be left for the reader to discover as they are an integral part of the story and convey a powerful message. One message, without spoiling anything, is the incredible power of friendship, and the mountains it can move. Sadly this beautiful tale must cut to the bone, be close to heart for many elderly people who have lost partners and family, and this story shows to never give up on life. Never let your age define you, after all it’s just a number. Don’t give in, you never know what, or more importantly who, is just around the corner. 4.5 Stars. (Have your tissues ready)This novel will be published by HarperCollins on 20 January 2020.
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  • Phrynne
    January 1, 1970
    It took me a while to get into this book and I certainly had little sympathy in the beginning for Missy. All that changed however as the book progressed.The story begins when we first meet Missy. She is 79 years old, her husband is gone, her son and family live in Australia and she has fallen out with her daughter. She is sad and lonely and not really coping. As events take over and her situation changes chapters from the past are introduced and we find out exactly how much she has to deal with. It took me a while to get into this book and I certainly had little sympathy in the beginning for Missy. All that changed however as the book progressed.The story begins when we first meet Missy. She is 79 years old, her husband is gone, her son and family live in Australia and she has fallen out with her daughter. She is sad and lonely and not really coping. As events take over and her situation changes chapters from the past are introduced and we find out exactly how much she has to deal with.By the end I was reaching for the tissues and I carried on thinking about Missy and her friends and relations for a long time after I had closed the book. This is a debut novel which is very well worth reading.Thanks to Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book.
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  • Mandy White
    January 1, 1970
    Saving Missy is a book that is going to talked about a lot in 2020. It is a fantastic debut novel and I look forward to seeing what Beth Morrey has for us next. This book was a slow burn for me, it took a while for me to become fully invested in the story and characters but once I was there it was hard to put down. It did make a change from the thrillers that I usually read and I really enjoyed it - even if it did make me cry!! Missy Carmichael is 79, lives in London and is lonely. Her children Saving Missy is a book that is going to talked about a lot in 2020. It is a fantastic debut novel and I look forward to seeing what Beth Morrey has for us next. This book was a slow burn for me, it took a while for me to become fully invested in the story and characters but once I was there it was hard to put down. It did make a change from the thrillers that I usually read and I really enjoyed it - even if it did make me cry!! Missy Carmichael is 79, lives in London and is lonely. Her children have left home - her son has moved to Australia with his wife and son, and she is estranged from her daughter after a big argument. The love of her life is gone and she is still living in their large family home by herself. She knows that she has not done anything to help herself so on New Years Day she heads to the park nearby and meets Sylvie and Angela and her son Otis. Little does she know that these women are going to change her life for the better. She suddenly has friends, and a reason to leave the house. She even agrees to look after a dog. She lonely life becomes full and busy.We learn about Missy's eventful life as she reminisces about her family and her life. At 79 she has a lot of stories. In the beginning Missy was not easy to like. As we get to know her she becomes more likeable and I began to care for her and what happened to her. It is an emotional story so have your tissues ready. Her relationships with these women and especially the dog are lovely to watch flourish.Thanks so much to Harper Collins and Better Reading for my advanced copy of this book to read. All opinions are my own and are no way biased. Released in Australia in February 2020 - definitely one to look out for.
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  • Kylie H
    January 1, 1970
    Having started this book with no expectations I was very pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed it. Millicent "Missy' Carmichael is about to turn 80, and feeling very isolated and depressed. Through a series of events Missy soon discovers that in order to make friends she just needs to be herself and let people in.The characters in this book are absolutely delightful. They each bring something to Missy to help her forgive herself and to mend the relationships with her two children that Having started this book with no expectations I was very pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed it. Millicent "Missy' Carmichael is about to turn 80, and feeling very isolated and depressed. Through a series of events Missy soon discovers that in order to make friends she just needs to be herself and let people in.The characters in this book are absolutely delightful. They each bring something to Missy to help her forgive herself and to mend the relationships with her two children that appear to be very fragile if not broken.A lot of emotions play out in this book, I laughed and cried and adored Missy and her newfound friends. The moral is to be kind and open to new things.Thanks you HarperCollins Publishers Australia and Netgalley for the opportunity to read this digital ARC. I can highly recommend it.
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  • Veronica ⭐️
    January 1, 1970
    *https://theburgeoningbookshelf.blogsp...Missy Carmichael is an elderly widow feeling the desolate loneliness of a large empty house now that her husband is no longer with her and her two children have moved on with their lives. Son Alistair is living in Australia and keeps in touch via email but Missy is finding it hard to have anything interesting to email about. Whilst her daughter, Melanie, lives closer their relationship is strained after an argument and they very rarely have contact.There *https://theburgeoningbookshelf.blogsp...Missy Carmichael is an elderly widow feeling the desolate loneliness of a large empty house now that her husband is no longer with her and her two children have moved on with their lives. Son Alistair is living in Australia and keeps in touch via email but Missy is finding it hard to have anything interesting to email about. Whilst her daughter, Melanie, lives closer their relationship is strained after an argument and they very rarely have contact.There are flashbacks of a young Missy and the high profile life she had with her college professor husband. There are also hints of a terrible secret that Missy has been burdened with throughout her life.I immediately felt sympathetic towards Missy’s situation but as you get to know her you can see she is quite a negative person with words like impostor, fraud, fuddy-duddy often peppering her thoughts. She had a habit of judging people by their appearance and I think she thought other people were judging her as she was frequently humiliated, embarrassed or mortified in public.When Missy meets the exuberant Angela and her young son Otis I was sure Angela was only looking for a babysitter. She then introduces Missy to designer and fellow dog-walker Sylvie who soon makes her way into Missy’s home and life. It was easy at the start to think the worst of these two bossy and extrovert characters but meeting them proved to be the best thing that happened to Missy.Maggie and Sylvie take Missy in hand and show her that life is to be lived.Saving Missy is a beautifully written, heart-felt story about friendship, opening yourself up to new experiences and pushing yourself out of your comfort zone.I really enjoyed the way Missy slowly opened up and changed, proving you are never too old to change, grow and make new friends.*I received a copy from the publisher.
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  • Marianne
    January 1, 1970
    “Surveying the boxes, chests and trunks - the leftovers of lost lives: Fa-Fa, Jette, my mother and father, Leo, even Alistair and Mel, since they’d begun new lives elsewhere – I fancied I could hear the echo of them all in their things.”Saving Missy is the first novel by British author, Bath Morrey. Now that dear her son Alistair and her sweet little grandson Arthur have returned to Australia after their Christmas visit, Missy can admit to herself that she is desperately lonely. Their big house “Surveying the boxes, chests and trunks - the leftovers of lost lives: Fa-Fa, Jette, my mother and father, Leo, even Alistair and Mel, since they’d begun new lives elsewhere – I fancied I could hear the echo of them all in their things.”Saving Missy is the first novel by British author, Bath Morrey. Now that dear her son Alistair and her sweet little grandson Arthur have returned to Australia after their Christmas visit, Missy can admit to herself that she is desperately lonely. Their big house is so empty without Leo, and her daughter Melanie, teaching in Cambridge, no longer visits London after the row they had. But Millicent Carmichael is also a reserved English lady who does not display her feelings in public. When she spots young Otis in the park one day, that ache for her grandson intensifies. His redhead mother is obviously a terrible woman, loud, and unpleasant. Casually waiting for another glimpse of Otis, Missy meets interior designer Sylvie Riche and is invited for coffee along with Irish Angela and Otis. But do these people really want her company? It turns out that Angela needs someone to watch Otis when journalistic deadlines loom, and Missy decides she can put up with strong opinions peppered with expletives, imparted through a haze of smoke and alcohol, if it means a dose of little boy. But even more urgently required is a place for Bob, a dog whose family can’t keep her just now. Missy is quite sure she does not want a dog.A change of heart, though, sees Missy meeting dog walkers and, almost unintentionally, allowing Angela, Otis and Sylvie into her house, her attic and, eventually, her life. Inside, the house is more than “minimalist” bare: Missy has relegated clutter and anything deemed unnecessary to the attic. Triggered by exchanges with her new acquaintances, and items brought forth out of the attic, memories from Missy’s childhood, her first encounter with Leonard Carmichael, and significant incidents during their almost six decades of marriage, emerge. Thus the reader learns how Missy Carmichael arrived at this point in her life. Gradually revealed, too, are Missy’s secrets, her regrets and those things about which she feels most guilty. When Missy has unbent enough to accept the help and love and care on offer, it turns out she herself has more to offer than she ever dreamed. Missy discovers that, even in her eighty-first year, she can give comfort and support and knowledge to those who need it, something quite different from the role of a wife and mother that precluded any possible career her splendid degree might have offered. Morrey gives the reader a beautiful story with some predictable moments and a few surprises. Her depictions of London and Cambridge are evocative, and her characters feel like people you meet in real life. She gives lots of them wise words and Missy’s observation on the memory stick: “You just plugged it in, apparently. If only memories were that easy to access, and contain” is bound to resonate with readers of a certain vintage. There are plenty of wry observations and more than a few laugh-out-loud scenes. This debut novel is a wonderfully uplifting read.This unbiased review is from an uncorrected proof copy provided by NetGalley and Better Reading Preview and Harper Collins Australia
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  • Jeanette Lewis
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Harper Collins Publishers and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this electronic ARC.This is a delightful book, the demographics will mostly appeal to older readers, parents who have survived teenagers and young adults holding breath for the moment when they leave home! Ahh! the tranquility. However, the thought of the empty nest is not a joyous one for the main character, Missy (Millicent) who is similar to those women who have given up all ideas of a career after Thank you to Harper Collins Publishers and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this electronic ARC.This is a delightful book, the demographics will mostly appeal to older readers, parents who have survived teenagers and young adults holding breath for the moment when they leave home! Ahh! the tranquility. However, the thought of the empty nest is not a joyous one for the main character, Missy (Millicent) who is similar to those women who have given up all ideas of a career after having children leaving the thought of her empty large house with her rattling around in it alone only intensifying her depression and loneliness. However, it seems that Missy has really been alone all her married life propped up by alcohol. A successful husband, Leo, who as a parent did just the play thing with the children leaving Missy to do the real parenting. She has a strong relationship with her son who has to her dismay married an Australian and has moved that part of the world. Ali (Alister) and her grandson Arthur have just returned to Australia after spending Christmas with her and she is in an emotional black hole. Her relationship with her daughter, is tenuous, her daughter is successful like her father and with a similar personality. The two have had a terrible argument but the details are not revealed for sometime into the read.Missy has decided to get out of the house, Leo's voice in her head, "onward and upward", so she's off to see the fish stunning in the local park. It's here when she blacks out that Missy's life does an about face and her world begins to take on a new meaning filled with an assortment of colourful people that begin to enter her life. This is a woman who has always been a giver, never asking for much in return and is a bit of an easy target for these pushy new friends but the reward is that she begins to look at herself in a new light and it's fabulous to see how she grows, finds her own voice, flexes her muscles, opens her heart and learns to role with the punches when small disasters happen, life! Her relationship with her daughter improves, she accepts that her grandson's Australian grandparents will adore Arthur as much as she does and she is eventually able to absolve herself of the guilt of a decision made as a young woman that has been a burden all her life.
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  • Gloria Arthur
    January 1, 1970
    A touching read about a relatively common issue in our society these days, being elderly and lonely. This story gives hope because you can never tell what’s around the corner!Missy (Millicent) thought she was destined to live a lonely existence for the rest of her twilight years. Her darling husband Leo sadly isn’t with her anymore. Missy lives in their large and mostly empty house including an attic filled with fascinating things of the past and valuable pieces. It’s a home too big and lonely A touching read about a relatively common issue in our society these days, being elderly and lonely. This story gives hope because you can never tell what’s around the corner!Missy (Millicent) thought she was destined to live a lonely existence for the rest of her twilight years. Her darling husband Leo sadly isn’t with her anymore. Missy lives in their large and mostly empty house including an attic filled with fascinating things of the past and valuable pieces. It’s a home too big and lonely for one person. Missy’s very reserved but likes to indulge in a drink or two and she’s holding onto a heart wrenching, secret, one that had filled her life with grief and guilt since she was a young woman. Her son Alistair and her beloved grandson Arthur have moved to Australia and she misses them terribly. Sadly Missy has a mostly strained relationship with her daughter Melanie, who after a bad argument never visits her anymore.On a cold bitterly day, Missy is off to see the ‘fish stunning’ at the local park, why would you electrocute fish? It would be something to do after all and she needed something interesting to write about that she could put into her emails to Alistair, her son.A chance encounter and the kindness of strangers at the park suddenly turn Missy’s life around. Missy finds herself with the most unlikely of friendships that gives her life a whole new meaning and purpose.There is an unexpected twist towards the end of the story to which I’ve got to admit I didn’t see coming, I was totally surprised, brilliant! A heart warming, unique and beautiful debut novel. The story was well paced, realistic and breathtakingly enjoyable.Thank you to Better Reading, NetGalley & HarperCollins Australia for an advanced copy in return for an honest review
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  • Jo - •.★Reading Is My Bliss★.•
    January 1, 1970
    Missy is 79 years old and lives alone in the family home she lived in with her husband. He is now gone and so have her adult kids that they raised there. It no longer looks or feels like a home. It is now just a house. She is lonely. She is very alone. She is existing. ‘Such crushing silence. It seemed like my whole life had been a cacophony, a constant buzzing and background chatter, and then Leo went and there was suddenly total and absolute stillness. Stillness, and silence and space. What I’ Missy is 79 years old and lives alone in the family home she lived in with her husband. He is now gone and so have her adult kids that they raised there. It no longer looks or feels like a home. It is now just a house. She is lonely. She is very alone. She is existing. ‘Such crushing silence. It seemed like my whole life had been a cacophony, a constant buzzing and background chatter, and then Leo went and there was suddenly total and absolute stillness. Stillness, and silence and space. What I’d supposedly craved all those years, and it was the worst, most cloying thing I’d ever experienced.’ After an encounter with the vivacious Angela and her son Otis, Missy reluctantly finds herself with a new friend. The circle begins to grow a little bit more with the addition of Sylvie and eventually the thing that truly gives her a reason to keep going every day, a lovely dog to care for called Bobby. All of a sudden MIssy feels less lonely. She wasn’t looking for any of this but it seemed to find her, filling places in her that were closed off.The story flicks from the present and back into the past as we get glimpses into her marriage and childhood memories. After all, we are all products of our past and delving into Missy’s definitely gives context to the person she is today. As a wife and mother, she made a lot of sacrifices at the expense of her own personal happiness. She put everyone else first which often left her with feelings of resentment towards her husband. She never really pursued her own dreams. While her husband shined in the spotlight of his career success, she blended into the background, keeping everything at home on an even keel. ‘Mama would never have given up a career to run a household. She marched to the beat of her own drum, whereas I seemed to listen out for everyone else’s.’ To the outsider Missy is a bit off-hand and gruff. She is not easy to like but once people get to know her you will see past her stand off exterior and the true person she is. Her home now feels less lonely and her days are filled with things she looks forward to. She also begins to reflect on her relationship with her children and finds the courage to mend a few bridges. Along the way we learn of the struggles she has with one of her children, things she kept from her husband and secrets he thought he kept from his intuitive wife. This is a story about sacrifice, friendship, love and laughter. And plenty of bottles of prosecco. The awakening of Missy and she reclaims the life she has left now. I have a couple of lovely friends who are in their 70’s so I could totally picture all the times these ladies shared a bottle of wine together. This story was a highlight to the beginning of 2020 for me. A great reminder that you are never too old and it’s never too late to do new things.
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  • Ivana - Diary of Difference
    January 1, 1970
    I have received an ARC copy of Saving Missy by the team at LoveReading UK. Publishing date: Spring 2020.
  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    SAVING MISSY is the third book I read this year that features an older heroine (Missy is rapidly approaching 80), and I am so glad to see older people making a come-back in fiction! There is something irresistible about books that reflect back on life’s journey, and knowing that wonderful new things can still happen in the winter of your life.If I had to sum up this book in just a few words, I would say it is about friendships, and the power of people to save each other. Missy is a woman in her SAVING MISSY is the third book I read this year that features an older heroine (Missy is rapidly approaching 80), and I am so glad to see older people making a come-back in fiction! There is something irresistible about books that reflect back on life’s journey, and knowing that wonderful new things can still happen in the winter of your life.If I had to sum up this book in just a few words, I would say it is about friendships, and the power of people to save each other. Missy is a woman in her late seventies living in her big empty house in London, feeling the silence suffocating her. To escape her loneliness and to have something to write about to her grandson on the other side of the world, she takes long walks through the park, which does little to improve her isolation. Until an accident put her in the path of strangers who will end up changing her life forever – through the most unlikely friendships.The narrative of SAVING MISSY unfolds slowly, as Missy’s life gradually changes for the better through the budding friendships she has recently – and reluctantly – forged. Throughout the book, she reflects back on her life and the choices she has made that have brought her to this place in time, her lonely existence, her empty house. Although Missy can be prickly at times, and tends to close herself off when she feels stressed, she is a very different character to Eleanor Oliphant, which is a comparison that has been made in the media. So if you weren’t a fan of Eleanor, be reassured that Missy is completely different. And if you were, then this book will still offer you a very unique character who is worth your time getting to know.I’m not sure if this book is being marketed as “uplit”, but I thought it fits the genre well. There is some tragedy, as life most often serves up through one’s lifetime at some stage, but the general message is one of hope and salvation when one has all but lost hope. I loved the way the author brought out this feel-good vibe in a way that never sounded preachy, or stereotypical, or cheesy – indeed a difficult balance to achieve. If this cynical reader claims that – then this is saying something! As the story took me on its roller coaster ride of life’s ups and downs, I laughed, I cringed, I shivered a little and I shed quite a few tears. There will be triggers for some readers, which I can’t discuss because of spoilers, but just be prepared to have your heart ground in the dirt and stomped on a few times, and have some tissues handy!I read about an interview with the author, in which she said that she “wanted to write a book that could make people cry, but with happiness, not sadness.” I feel that she has totally fulfilled that criteria.Thank you to Netgalley and HarperCollins Australia for the free electronic copy of this novel and for giving me the opportunity to provide an honest review. *blog* *facebook* *instagram*
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  • Amalie_reads
    January 1, 1970
    Saving Missy is a delightful, unique and heartbreaking story all in one that took me by surprise. It started a little slow for me but once I got into it I couldn’t put it down.Missy is in her late 70’s, she lives at home by herself and is living a very lonely life and only leaves the house when absolutely necessary. She has basically given up all hope on life until one day she goes for a walk in the park and meets Sylvie and Angela and from there her life begins to take on new meaning and Saving Missy is a delightful, unique and heartbreaking story all in one that took me by surprise. It started a little slow for me but once I got into it I couldn’t put it down.Missy is in her late 70’s, she lives at home by herself and is living a very lonely life and only leaves the house when absolutely necessary. She has basically given up all hope on life until one day she goes for a walk in the park and meets Sylvie and Angela and from there her life begins to take on new meaning and fulfilment. I loved the supporting characters and the relationships and joy they bring to Missy’s life. I particularly enjoyed the reconciliation between Missy and her daughter. Overall I really enjoyed this charming and heartwarming story that although sad at times was also very uplifting and I felt an incredible joy as Missy’s character develops and she finds herself again. Such a wonderful read which shows the incredible importance of friendship. I want to thank HarpersCollins Australia and Netgalley for providing me with this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Eloise
    January 1, 1970
    Heartbreakingly and heartwarmingly wonderful this is a truly resonant story about love, friendship, memory, sacrifice and the aching sadness of loneliness. I devoured this book, savouring every morsel of the beautiful prose and emotionally resonant story. As the story of Missy Carmichael unfolds, alternating smoothly between past and present, an ever more complex and emotionally nuanced portrait of the titular Missy is revealed. She is a spiky, closed-off heroine, at times, like Eleanor Heartbreakingly and heartwarmingly wonderful this is a truly resonant story about love, friendship, memory, sacrifice and the aching sadness of loneliness. I devoured this book, savouring every morsel of the beautiful prose and emotionally resonant story. As the story of Missy Carmichael unfolds, alternating smoothly between past and present, an ever more complex and emotionally nuanced portrait of the titular Missy is revealed. She is a spiky, closed-off heroine, at times, like Eleanor Oliphant, difficult to like, but ultimately you will fall deeply in love with her and her wonderful life-affirming story. A must read.
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  • Jennifer (JC-S)
    January 1, 1970
    ‘If you really want something, you hang on.’Millicent (Missy) Carmichael is nearing 79 years of age, lonely, and alone. Her son Alistair and grandson Arthur have just returned home to Australia, she doesn’t have much contact with her daughter Melanie. Missy had devoted her life to her husband Leo and her children. Now she has time on her hands, and nothing much to do. Alone in her home with memories, Missy decides to venture out to the park. A chance meeting (or two) changes Missy’s life.Missy ‘If you really want something, you hang on.’Millicent (Missy) Carmichael is nearing 79 years of age, lonely, and alone. Her son Alistair and grandson Arthur have just returned home to Australia, she doesn’t have much contact with her daughter Melanie. Missy had devoted her life to her husband Leo and her children. Now she has time on her hands, and nothing much to do. Alone in her home with memories, Missy decides to venture out to the park. A chance meeting (or two) changes Missy’s life.Missy meets two women and a small boy. And gradually, her life changes. Missy discovers that she does not have to be alone, that others welcome her into their lives. But Missy feels guilty about something that happened a long time ago, and she’s also ignoring some practical concerns.So how can Missy be saved? Meet a dog named Bobby, a kind and talented woman named Sylvie, Angela and her son Otis. Gradually Missy’s story unfolds: we learn of her past, of life with Leo, of the sacrifices she’s made. And in the present, we watch her reclaim life. ‘So here we are: the old biddy, the single mother, the superhero and the adopted mongrel, on our way to see my daughter marry her girlfriend.’’This is Ms Morrey’s debut novel, and it touches on several of the issues that will become real for many of us as we age. ‘Never get old’, my later father-in-law used to say. Unfortunately, the alternative doesn’t appeal.I enjoyed this novel, and while the ending was a little too neat it was still very satisfying.Note: My thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins Publishers Australia for providing me with a free electronic copy of this book for review purposes.Jennifer Cameron-Smith
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  • Latkins
    January 1, 1970
    This is a moving debut novel about the life of Londoner Millicent (aka Missy) Carmichael, who is in her late 70s. Beginning in 2016, it takes us over more than year as Missy navigates her way through loneliness by making new friends and, crucially, acquiring a borrowed dog, Bobby. As she does so, she looks back at her life, from the death of her father during the war, to her time at Newnham College, Cambridge, to her marriage to Leo and her devotion to bringing up her two children, Melanie and This is a moving debut novel about the life of Londoner Millicent (aka Missy) Carmichael, who is in her late 70s. Beginning in 2016, it takes us over more than year as Missy navigates her way through loneliness by making new friends and, crucially, acquiring a borrowed dog, Bobby. As she does so, she looks back at her life, from the death of her father during the war, to her time at Newnham College, Cambridge, to her marriage to Leo and her devotion to bringing up her two children, Melanie and Alistair. We discover her darkest secrets – some are easy to guess, others less so – and revel in the way she becomes the centre of a small community and unlikely dog lover. This is clearly pitched as the ‘new Eleanor Oliphant’, and it’s easy to see why – a somewhat unlikeable character gains a new lease of life, with a major part of her story withheld until the end. But this is a much gentler read than Eleanor, and it offers a different view on old age and the importance of friendship (of both humans and dogs!).
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  • janine
    January 1, 1970
    I honestly think after reading the reviews that I'm the only one that just didnt like this book.The characters are stereotypical and the ending is just horrible.I'm sorry but just not for me.Thanks to netgalley and the publishers for the ARC.
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Firstly I want to say thank you to Harper Collins for sending me a copy of this book for review. As soon as I found out that it had been compared to Eleanor Oliphant - one of my favourite books ever - I knew that I had to give this a go.This is a really lovely book full of heartache, sadness but also a lot of happiness. It explores the theme of loneliness in such an effective way which is a relatively common but unspoken issue in society today especially involving elderly people. Saving Missy Firstly I want to say thank you to Harper Collins for sending me a copy of this book for review. As soon as I found out that it had been compared to Eleanor Oliphant - one of my favourite books ever - I knew that I had to give this a go. This is a really lovely book full of heartache, sadness but also a lot of happiness. It explores the theme of loneliness in such an effective way which is a relatively common but unspoken issue in society today especially involving elderly people. Saving Missy will really pull on your heart strings. It is very touching throughout. You may need your tissues at certain points.I did like some of the characters within this, my favourite has to be Angela she is such a fun loving wonderful character. Her antics did make me laugh numerous times. However, I did not like Missy as a character. I know the author intended the reader to feel sorry for her and connect with her but I just couldn't do it. If I had not been told that she was an 80 year old lady, I would have thought she was a young adult, I do not feel like her character was portrayed in a way that was appropriate to show her age. Maybe that is just me. A lot of reviews that I have read state that Missy is a favourite character so don't let me put you off. I just found her boring and not a very likeable character. I liked the idea I just could not connect to her in the way that I needed too.Whilst this is an easy read that you can get through very quickly, Saving Missy took me a while to get through. I just didn't feel the urge to pick it up and read more. I found that I didn't really care what happened next. Due to the hype surrounding this book I did continue to read it because I wanted to make sure that I didn't miss anything ... I didn't. I must say that I did find that once I had picked this book up I kept reading but it was the initial picking up that made it difficult for me. Saving Missy is compared to Eleanor Oliphant, but for me it doesn't come close. Eleanor was such a likeable character for me and I loved her character and story. Saving Missy was just okay. I know it is a debut novel which is why I have given it an extra star as I do think I would pick another book by this author and give her another chance. But this one wasn't for me. Saving Missy comes out in February. There is nothing wrong with this book, there were no issues it just wants for me. Maybe its the writing style, I'm not sure. Based on other reviews I have read I would like to state that I appear to be in the minority so I suggest you pick it up and give it a go. You might find that you love it. 
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  • Hayley James
    January 1, 1970
    This book is such a good read for someone who wants something a little 'chick lit' and not so serious but with enough emotion and angst to make it relatable and you wanting to read more. It's heartbreaking in the right places and heart warming in others. Written very poignantly and very relatable. Missy has such a strong voice - there aren't many books that are written about elderly people and I think Beth Morrey got the voice and stylisation of Missy perfect. You can envision her in your head This book is such a good read for someone who wants something a little 'chick lit' and not so serious but with enough emotion and angst to make it relatable and you wanting to read more. It's heartbreaking in the right places and heart warming in others. Written very poignantly and very relatable. Missy has such a strong voice - there aren't many books that are written about elderly people and I think Beth Morrey got the voice and stylisation of Missy perfect. You can envision her in your head when you read her. The other characters are also strong, no one really seems like a fill in character which is so nice. The book does a really good job at dealing with female friendships, there is a strong theme of friendship which is something so important in books as in the world we are in where lots of books focus on relationships between men and woman. The females in this book have such strong bonds - and their relationships are very complex and real. They fight, they love each other, they help each other out and they also have moments where they don't want to be around each other. This book tells a tale of how important friendships are in our lives, especially once we start getting older. 'Saving Missy' also does a really good job of describing what it is likes to grow old and lonely. When children move away and your husband has passed or is sick the loneliness can feel so overwhelming and I think this book accurately portrayed exactly what that was like. Missy felt lonely, sad, angry and then the occasional bout of happiness when she feels she's got her life together again and then falls right back to the start. which is exactly what life is like. Really hard hitting moments throughout the book about regrets, and wishing things could be different that made your heart ache for the characters. Overall it was a really enjoyable read, a really good one to take on holiday with you and finish in one sittingThanks netgalley for sending me a copy in return for a fair review!
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  • V_Nerdbooks
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my goodness, I simply ADORED this story (insert heart eyes emoji here)This is the story of Millicent Carmichael aka Missy.Missy is 79 years old and lives alone in her large house in London, she lost her husband a few years back, and her 2 children have flown the nest, one of them to Australia, taking her grandson with them.Missy is lonely.She emails her son in Australia all of the time, telling him what a "lovely day" she has had, but she beefs-up the stories to make them sound more Oh my goodness, I simply ADORED this story (insert heart eyes emoji here)This is the story of Millicent Carmichael aka Missy.Missy is 79 years old and lives alone in her large house in London, she lost her husband a few years back, and her 2 children have flown the nest, one of them to Australia, taking her grandson with them.Missy is lonely.She emails her son in Australia all of the time, telling him what a "lovely day" she has had, but she beefs-up the stories to make them sound more interesting.One day Missy sees a young boy, about the same age as her grandson is now, and watching him playing makes her heart ache, she sits in the park and watches him play, and then gets talking to another woman walking her dogs, Sylvie.Turns out that Sylvie also knows the young boys mother, the red headed and foul mouthed creature Angela.One day Angela turns up at her door and asks a favour, well kind of bamboozles her really, and by the time Angela has gone, Missy has acquired a dog called Bob. Thus creating a wonderful friendship that only one can have with a dog.With the commitment of owning a dog, Missy begins to venture out of the house, and starts to interact with other people in the community, and as much as she doesn't like to admit it,she kind of starts to enjoy herself.This was such a wonderful story, and by the end I had a big tear rolling down my face.This is the authors debut novel, and if this is what she is starting with, I'm sure she will have a fantastic writing career in front of her.If you liked stories like Eleanor Olliphant, then you will LOVE this one.Coming in February 2020, keep your eyes peeled for this one, I think it is going to BLOW UP!!
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  • Gill
    January 1, 1970
    WHAT a story! Loved every page of this wonderful book. Review to follow .. Missy and all your friends, I'm going to really miss you now - my mornings will be bereft without my half hour read to start the day.Full Review:-This is a wonderful heartfelt story of growing old, looking back on regrets in life, loneliness, making friends and growing bonds in unlikely places.Missy is 79. With her husband gone she lives a lonely life. Her beloved son lives in Australia with her 7 year old grandson. She WHAT a story! Loved every page of this wonderful book. Review to follow .. Missy and all your friends, I'm going to really miss you now - my mornings will be bereft without my half hour read to start the day.Full Review:-This is a wonderful heartfelt story of growing old, looking back on regrets in life, loneliness, making friends and growing bonds in unlikely places.Missy is 79. With her husband gone she lives a lonely life. Her beloved son lives in Australia with her 7 year old grandson. She sees them far less than she would like. She has a daughter but as you read through the pages it appears they had a big fall out and Missy really doesn’t know what to do about that. Leo, her husband would know as they were close, but he’s not here any more.On one of her lonely walks in the park on a cold winters day Missy happens upon Sylvie and her younger friend Angela, single mum to Otis. Otis reminds Missy of her own grandson. As a result of their acquaintance in the park, Missy begins to form unlikely friendships with both of these women and this is how Missy’s life starts to take a turn for the better.Missy might be 79 but she’s no befuddled little old lady. Throughout the book we hear a lot about Missy’s younger days. Her university days, how she met her husband, life as a young mum and her relationship with both her husband and her children. The story is told in the first person by Missy and it’s via her memories as she mulls over past events from time to time, that the reader learns about what makes Missy who she is today.There’s plenty going on in the present too which makes this book a compelling read. I always looked forward to picking it up to see what happened next. It has a good supporting cast of characters, all likeable in their own unique way. It has just the right mix of all the ingredients of a good read – humour, sadness, touching moments and action moments too. I missed my visits to Missy’s house and all the other characters when I’d finished it.
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  • Robyn
    January 1, 1970
    This book made me angry.That's all I'm going to say.Okay, also this: it is one thing to write a book with no plot, no tension, and no stakes. It's something else to write a book in which..... spoiler alert.....spoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alert....you have a dog run over in the last act. It cannot be a feel good book when you run over a dog near the end. (This is not to say feel good books don't have death; my This book made me angry.That's all I'm going to say.Okay, also this: it is one thing to write a book with no plot, no tension, and no stakes. It's something else to write a book in which..... spoiler alert.....spoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alertspoiler alert....you have a dog run over in the last act. It cannot be a feel good book when you run over a dog near the end. (This is not to say feel good books don't have death; my god, Ove dies by the end of Ove. But he dies FULFILLED and after having a good and meaningful final act. He does not get run over in the street.) Grrr. Nead to go read something awesome to cleanse my palate. This feel good pitch LIED to me.
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  • Victoria Spicer-Stuart
    January 1, 1970
    *Thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.* What a truly beautiful book about the powerful redemption that comes with friendship and dog ownership. 'Saving Missy' is reminiscent of the wildly popular 'Eleanor Oliphant' by Gail Honeyman and 'The Cactus' by Sarah Haywood. If you enjoyed either (or both) of those books, then you are in for a treat. 'Saving Missy' focuses on the incredibly empty and lonely life of Millicent Carmichael. Missy to *Thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.* What a truly beautiful book about the powerful redemption that comes with friendship and dog ownership. 'Saving Missy' is reminiscent of the wildly popular 'Eleanor Oliphant' by Gail Honeyman and 'The Cactus' by Sarah Haywood. If you enjoyed either (or both) of those books, then you are in for a treat. 'Saving Missy' focuses on the incredibly empty and lonely life of Millicent Carmichael. Missy to her friends... if she had any friends. Missy lives by herself in a sprawling old house and has little to fill her days. That is, until she meets Otis, Angela and Sylvie at the local park. Little does she know, her life will never be the same. Whilst the majority of the novel is set in the present, it is interspersed with scenes from her childhood and youth to build up the picture of how Missy became the woman she is today. A truly delightful book that I am so glad I read.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Quite a few books have been described as similar to Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine or A Man Called Ove. The Love Story of Missy Carmichael is one of the few books that I've come across that compares favorably to both of them. Highly recommend if you enjoyed either of those books.
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  • AnnaG
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced proof in exchange for an honest review. This was such a promising book with a cute dog and multiple Blackadder references, but by the end, I felt I had been mis-sold on it. It's not heart-warming or life-affirming, it's actually pretty depressing.
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  • Monique
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this novel from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I loved this book. It was well written with believable and relatable characters whose lives I became invested in. Missy is so prickly and stand-offish when we first meet her, but over time meeting two new friends, Angela and Sylvie, who refuse to allow Missy to shut them out, releases Missy from the restrictions she’s placed on herself.Flashbacks to earlier times in her life in Cambridge and I received a free copy of this novel from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I loved this book. It was well written with believable and relatable characters whose lives I became invested in. Missy is so prickly and stand-offish when we first meet her, but over time meeting two new friends, Angela and Sylvie, who refuse to allow Missy to shut them out, releases Missy from the restrictions she’s placed on herself.Flashbacks to earlier times in her life in Cambridge and her family life when her children were young give us some insight into how she got to where she is today. It’s a lesson to us about how pride and wanting to keep up appearances can lead you to shut yourself off from the better things in life. It’s also a reminder to younger people that the elderly were young once too!The little mini-twist near the end was a surprise I didn’t see coming, so well done.I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and would love to read the author’s future work.
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  • Louize
    January 1, 1970
    This is going to be a pickle. I don't know how to review or rate this one.
  • Tara Russell
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow. For now I'll just say I loved it.
  • lola.and.puki
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsA poignant, heartwarming and at times heartbreaking story about love, loneliness, hope and the power of human relationships. While Saving Missy got off to a slow start, I was able to quickly find the charm in this moving novel and by the end loved it. It’s refreshing to read about a more mature main character, I found all the characters quite relatable and I thought this novel was beautifully written and an enjoyable read.
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  • Rosie Collinson
    January 1, 1970
    A sweet story about a little old lady and the importance of friendship and community, also heavily features a dog companion so really a lot of loveliness, definitely for fans of Man Called Ove, Three Things About Elsie and other such reads.
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