How To Bury Your Brother
Her brother's letters reveal everything--if only he'd written one to her.Alice always thought she'd see her brother again. Rob ran away when he was fifteen, with so many years left to find his way home. But his funeral happened first.Now that she has to clear out her childhood home in Georgia, the memories come flooding in, bringing with them an autopsy report showing her family's lies-and sealed, addressed letters from Rob.In a search for answers to questions she's always been afraid to ask, Alice delivers the letters. Each dares her to open her eyes to her family's dark past-and her own role in it. But it's the last letter, addressed to her brother's final home in New Orleans, that will force her to choose if she'll let the secrets break her or finally bring her home.Everything I Never Told You meets The Night Olivia Fell set against a vivid Southern backdrop, How to Bury Your Brother follows a sister coming to terms with the mystery behind her brother's disappearance and death.

How To Bury Your Brother Details

TitleHow To Bury Your Brother
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 12th, 2020
PublisherSourcebooks Landmark
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Mystery, Adult, Thriller

How To Bury Your Brother Review

  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    Alice's older brother ran away when he was fifteen years old. Alice always thought that she would see him again, she even thinks from time to time that she sees him on the street....After his funeral, Alice cleans out her family home and finds a box of letters addressed to various people, some she knows and some she does not. One question she wants to know is why there was no letter for her. Alice begins to deliver the letters and begins to slowly learn certain truths about her brother, her fami Alice's older brother ran away when he was fifteen years old. Alice always thought that she would see him again, she even thinks from time to time that she sees him on the street....After his funeral, Alice cleans out her family home and finds a box of letters addressed to various people, some she knows and some she does not. One question she wants to know is why there was no letter for her. Alice begins to deliver the letters and begins to slowly learn certain truths about her brother, her family, and even herself.Although we really do not see Rob much in this story - apart from the very beginning, the Author does a great job of giving us a glimpse into his life, his thoughts, and actions. As Alice begins to deliver the letters, she learns her brother's reasons for running away, truths about his death and some family secrets.I found this to be a thought provoking and well written book. Like Alice, I was curious about the letters and why he chose to write to the people he did. I also enjoyed watching as Alice became more determined and made some important decisions about her life as well. A gripping tale about relationships, family, secrets, illness, love and death.Thank you to Sourcebooks Landmark and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Dana
    January 1, 1970
    How To Bury Your Brother. A strong title. One that gets a reaction right away, different emotions depending on the nature of ones relationship with their brother. For me, this title inflicted sadness. I have one sibling, a brother.At the young age of fifteen Robinson (Rob) runs away from home. His sister Alice is left questioning why her brother left, where he went, and if he's coming back. The summer of 2007, 24 years later, still without answers, Alice attends Robs funeral...Fast forward to th How To Bury Your Brother. A strong title. One that gets a reaction right away, different emotions depending on the nature of ones relationship with their brother. For me, this title inflicted sadness. I have one sibling, a brother.At the young age of fifteen Robinson (Rob) runs away from home. His sister Alice is left questioning why her brother left, where he went, and if he's coming back. The summer of 2007, 24 years later, still without answers, Alice attends Robs funeral...Fast forward to the winter of 2016. While clearing out her childhood home Alice discovers a stack of letters, each addressed to a different person ... all written by her brother. From here a new chapter in Alice's life is written.To say this book was beautiful would be an understatement. This story was complex, thought provoking, layer upon layer of family relationships, self discovery but ultimately learning the truth, coming to terms with how to move forward and say goodbye. I highly recommend this book but beware, there are heavy trigger warnings ❤️Huge thank you to Sourcebooks Landmark for my copy!!
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  • Producervan in Cornville, AZ from New Orleans & L.A.
    January 1, 1970
    How to Bury Your Brother, a novel by Lindsey Rogers Cook. Sourcebooks Landmark. General Fiction (Adult). Women’s Fiction. ISBN: 9781728205373. Pre-publication digital copy. Publication date 12 May 2020. 5 Stars. Southern and by turns heartwarming and tragic, this story keeps you turning the pages with glimpses of deep sibling love as seen through the often foggy, haunting lens of loss.With determination, Alice struggles to balance her own family while pursuing leads to learn the truth about her How to Bury Your Brother, a novel by Lindsey Rogers Cook. Sourcebooks Landmark. General Fiction (Adult). Women’s Fiction. ISBN: 9781728205373. Pre-publication digital copy. Publication date 12 May 2020. 5 Stars. Southern and by turns heartwarming and tragic, this story keeps you turning the pages with glimpses of deep sibling love as seen through the often foggy, haunting lens of loss.With determination, Alice struggles to balance her own family while pursuing leads to learn the truth about her runaway brother, Rob, by sorting through memories and the letters he left behind. Alice can either destroy or reimagine herself—bringing the reader along with her to its soulful resolution. Highly recommend.Thanks to NetGalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for providing a digital edition of this book for review.
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  • Shelfrighteous_Bibliophile
    January 1, 1970
    This book begins with a suicide. Rob's suicide.It's not really bothersome because you don't know him yet and the importance of this scene passes you by without so much as a backwards glance.Alice and Rob were very close growing up. Unlike other siblings, they never fought or bickered. They never had that "sibling hatred" that so many of us have, quite the opposite actually. They loved each other more than anything, their bond was impenetrable. When Rob was nearing adulthood, he ran away & never This book begins with a suicide. Rob's suicide.It's not really bothersome because you don't know him yet and the importance of this scene passes you by without so much as a backwards glance.Alice and Rob were very close growing up. Unlike other siblings, they never fought or bickered. They never had that "sibling hatred" that so many of us have, quite the opposite actually. They loved each other more than anything, their bond was impenetrable. When Rob was nearing adulthood, he ran away & never returned. His family never saw him again until the day of his funeral. Nearly a decade later, Alice is cleaning out his old bedroom and finds a box addressed to her that contains 7 handwritten letters, each made out to a different person, but there isn't one for her.We follow Alice as she delivers the letters and tries to uncover the mystery of who her brother was & the dark past of her family. I felt that the author's writing was diverse and filled with emotion. She made me fall in love with Rob's character, which is why I'm happy that she put his suicide at the very beginning. Alice was okay, but she infuriated me a lot with how she handled certain situations. My issues with this book were that I felt the pace was a bit too slow, and the ending was not what I had imagined nor what I wanted. The author left us with a bit of unfinished business that I personally would have liked to know how it turned out. My curiosity for the letters and my growing fondness of Rob kept me going. I'm glad that I read it & I would definitely recommend this to fans of mystery & suspense. I just personally wanted a bit more. A big thank you to Netgalley for sending me this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Heather~ Nature.books.and.coffee
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was well written and had a good amount of suspense!! It's about family, love, loss, suicide, and grief!At the beginning we read about the suicide of Alice's brother Rob. He ran away from home at the young age of 15, and he never came back! Growing up, they were very close and barely fought. She always thought she would see him again, but she doesn't! She decides to move on with her life, and gets married and has children. While pregnant with her 2nd child, she learns of Robs suici I thought this was well written and had a good amount of suspense!! It's about family, love, loss, suicide, and grief!At the beginning we read about the suicide of Alice's brother Rob. He ran away from home at the young age of 15, and he never came back! Growing up, they were very close and barely fought. She always thought she would see him again, but she doesn't! She decides to move on with her life, and gets married and has children. While pregnant with her 2nd child, she learns of Robs suicide and is devastated!After a decade, Alice's mother is dealing with dementia and needs to go into an assisted living home. Alice must pack up the family home, and while searching Rob's bedroom, she comes across a box of letters that Rob had written to various people, but not one for her, and an autopsy report. Alice uncovers lies her mother had kept from her and wonders why her mother never told her. She decides to deliver the letters to the people he wrote to. As the story progresses, you learn about the truth behind why Rob ran away, secrets are revealed, I enjoyed reading this and learning about Rob and him as a person. Parts of the book I found were just too slow for me, and I felt like a few things were left unanswered!  But all in all, it was decent read and would recommend it!
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  • Krysti
    January 1, 1970
    HOW TO BURY YOUR BROTHER is about a young woman coping with the death of her estranged brother and trying to learn the truths about his life without unraveling her own. It’s beautifully written and emotionally evocative. Perfect for fans of literary fiction, family dramas, and mysteries!
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  • Miki Mackennedy
    January 1, 1970
    When 11 year old Alice’s bother Rob runs away from home during their annual vacation, she doesn’t realize that it will be forever. Deep in her heart, she just knows he will return. Rather than follow her love and her dreams, she stays close to their childhood home, always on the lookout for him. After years of torture, she decides to “put it in a box in her mind” and move on as best she can, telling her new boyfriend and soon to be husband that she a brother “but we aren’t close”. And so Alice b When 11 year old Alice’s bother Rob runs away from home during their annual vacation, she doesn’t realize that it will be forever. Deep in her heart, she just knows he will return. Rather than follow her love and her dreams, she stays close to their childhood home, always on the lookout for him. After years of torture, she decides to “put it in a box in her mind” and move on as best she can, telling her new boyfriend and soon to be husband that she a brother “but we aren’t close”. And so Alice begins her life, employing all the training her mother gave her, knowing what to put in a box and what to say and what face to show to the world.Several years later, while pregnant with her second child, news of Rob’s death shocks Alice. A decade later, with her mother in an assisted care facility, slowly succumbing to the effects of dementia, Alice must close up her childhood home for good. While going through the house, she realizes just how long her mother had been suffering with dementia. She also finds some boxes of Rob’s that were mailed after he died and in one, letters to be sent to various people.Alice slowly begins to discover the story of the brother she lost and in the process learns about herself and her own children and what her children know about her.The idea behind this book was very good. Slowly peeling back the layers of family and secrets, we begin to see just how much of the family foundation is built on lies.There were a couple of things that I did not enjoy. Jake – everything about Jake was pointless other than to show what she was willing to give up in order to find her brother. Jake and Alice meeting again after so many years and their reunion was not believable and not relevant to the story and also a little too much to be believed in the telling of how their lives intersected.Not enough was told about Alice’s mother and father and Uncle Jamie but there were just enough glimmers that I figured out one of the pivotal relationships very early on.The ending felt flat to me. Alice’s daughter’s insight into Alice was very well done and seemed to open Alice’s eyes quite a bit.Thank you to NetGalley and to the Publisher for the e-ARC in exchange for my honest review
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  • Lori L (She Treads Softly)
    January 1, 1970
    How to Bury Your Brother by Lindsey Rogers Cook is a highly recommended look at a dysfunctional Southern family with secrets.Alice's best friend, her brother Rob, ran away at age fifteen. She was five years younger than him and has missed him ever since then. Two decades later she is attending his funeral. His death, her mother tells her, was a heart attack due to an overdose on Oxycontin. She never had closure over his disappearance and death, so eight years later when her mother is in a memory How to Bury Your Brother by Lindsey Rogers Cook is a highly recommended look at a dysfunctional Southern family with secrets.Alice's best friend, her brother Rob, ran away at age fifteen. She was five years younger than him and has missed him ever since then. Two decades later she is attending his funeral. His death, her mother tells her, was a heart attack due to an overdose on Oxycontin. She never had closure over his disappearance and death, so eight years later when her mother is in a memory care facility and she is cleaning out her mother's house she is shocked to come across Rob's guitar and a stack of seven letters he has written to various people. She also finds an autopsy report showing her family's lies. Alice is hurt that her mother hid all of this and never said a word to her. She is also hurt that she is not among the letter recipients, but she decides to find the people Rob wrote to and give them the letter he wrote to them years earlier.This is a well-written, perceptive novel of dark secrets that families keep hidden and the secrets that are exposed but not acknowledged. Alice must not only face the secrets uncovered in the letters, she must also admit to the problems in her own life. As Alice delivers the letters, both truths hidden in the past and those not confronted in the future are revealed. She discovers some truths about her brother while she reexamines her relationship with her mother and, ultimately, she learns something about herself. While the pacing of the plot is uneven and interminably slow at times, it does pick up toward the end. Rob's story kept me reading. The final denouement is unexpected, but does tie in with the storyline.Both Alice and her brother are well-developed characters. For all his problems, Rob becomes an appealing likeable character in the end after the letters are revealed. It is heartbreaking when he finally shares why he ran away. Alice mentions her husband's ongoing affair at the start but, much to my chagrin, just lets it slide without confrontation for much of the novel. Her inability to say something was off-putting. There were some other unanswered questions and encounters that made the end of the novel just a bit too pat for me. I do think this could be a good choice for bookclubs to discuss as there are plenty of issues presented that could evoke many reactions. 3.5 rounded upDisclosure: My review copy was courtesy of Sourcebooks.http://www.shetreadssoftly.com/2020/0...
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  • Leah M
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC and the opportunity to review it.The premise of this book sounded interesting, and it was done incredibly well. TRIGGER WARNING: overdose, suicide, infidelity, dementia, substance use, mention of statutory rape (off-page)It starts with an overdose, and a funeral. We aren't given much information about Rob, the guy who died, but the story focuses on his family, mainly Alice, his sister.As with so many families, there's an image to uphold, and Alice's family is Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC and the opportunity to review it.The premise of this book sounded interesting, and it was done incredibly well. TRIGGER WARNING: overdose, suicide, infidelity, dementia, substance use, mention of statutory rape (off-page)It starts with an overdose, and a funeral. We aren't given much information about Rob, the guy who died, but the story focuses on his family, mainly Alice, his sister.As with so many families, there's an image to uphold, and Alice's family is working hard to maintain theirs. Rather than putting things out in the open, the family has secrets in layers. The first surrounds Rob - he's estranged from the family, and Alice, who was just a young girl when he left, doesn't know anything about the man he became. There's hints of trouble within her marriage, but not much is explained in the immediacy of processing a death.Nearly a decade later, Alice's mother is in a nursing home, and the task of clearing out her house falls to Alice. She discovers a box that has her name on it, and it has letters from her brother. While there isn't one for her, she feels obligated to deliver these letters in hopes of finding out more about him. She also discovers an autopsy report that reveals that there was more than originally revealed going on with her brother. On her quest to find out who her brother is, she discovers who she is and makes some weighty decisions about her own life. Flashbacks clue us in to more of her life story, which is shown in bits and pieces throughout the book. The pacing wasn't consistent throughout the book. The first half of the book was engaging but fairly slow moving, and around the halfway point, it kept picking up speed, and I flew through the remainder of the book. It was well worth the time, though. I'd strongly recommend this book, as long as the trigger warnings are those that you can handle.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Alice is just 11 when her 15-year-old brother Robinson (Rob) disappears, a runaway who she never sees again until his funeral following his suicide years later. Over the years, she has convinced her husband (Walker) and herself that Rob wasn't that important to her, even though, as she gives his eulogy, she realizes this was never true. In the present day, Alice is still with Walker (who is a stereotypical husband of means and a creep throughout the book,) running an environmental center that he Alice is just 11 when her 15-year-old brother Robinson (Rob) disappears, a runaway who she never sees again until his funeral following his suicide years later. Over the years, she has convinced her husband (Walker) and herself that Rob wasn't that important to her, even though, as she gives his eulogy, she realizes this was never true. In the present day, Alice is still with Walker (who is a stereotypical husband of means and a creep throughout the book,) running an environmental center that her husband paid to open as a project to keep her busy, (which sounds as condescending as it should,) and has two children and a dog. The life she should have aspired for according to her now-suffering-from dementia mother.Alice is cleaning out her parents' home, when she discovers a box filled with letters that Rob left for seven people that were never delivered, but none for Alice herself. The rest of the book is centered around Alice delivering the letters and trying to learn why Rob left and never came back for her.This book had it's sad moments, but I really enjoyed reading it. My favorite character was actually Alice's teenage daughter, who was stronger and smarter than so many of the other characters, a trait not shown very often in female teenage characters in this genre. And I liked how Alice recognized her daughter's strength and used it as motivation to start to take charge of her own life instead of being so fixated on outward appearance. I think the book would have been even more successful if the main characters were less stereotypical, less black-and-white in their thinking, and given more depth, but I still really enjoyed reading about Alice's growth as a person (instead of just as a wife and mother.)Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with the ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. It has not influenced my opinion.
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  • Kristi
    January 1, 1970
    How To Bury Your Brother by Lindsey Rogers Cook is a deep and thought-provoking novel, there are layers to this book that explore all the complexities of family relationships and how they shape us as adults. The main character, Alice struggles with the suicide of her estranged brother who left home before she hit her teens, never understanding why he left, Alice feels abandoned by the one person she related to in her family. As the book moves into the present, we see Alice coping with her own li How To Bury Your Brother by Lindsey Rogers Cook is a deep and thought-provoking novel, there are layers to this book that explore all the complexities of family relationships and how they shape us as adults. The main character, Alice struggles with the suicide of her estranged brother who left home before she hit her teens, never understanding why he left, Alice feels abandoned by the one person she related to in her family. As the book moves into the present, we see Alice coping with her own life difficulties including her mothers declining health. Which leads her to the task of cleaning out her childhood home which is where she finds a stack of undelivered letters that her brother had written just before he died. There isn’t a letter for Alice but she feels compelled and obligated to deliver the letters and hopes that she’ll learn more about her brother and why he left. Alice learns as much about herself as she does about her brother on her journey. There are secrets, there is heart-break, there is self-discovery and there is a reminder to always look deeper than the surface layer. How To Bury Your Brother is beautifully written and has a tightly woven plot with characters that brought out the emotions in me; it’s definitely one I’ll be recommending.Thank you to Sourcebooks Landmark and Lindsey Rogers Cook for gifting me with a copy of How to Bury Your Brother in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Ruthie Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    ~~I received a free copy of this book to read and review for Wicked Reads ~~ After a very sad start, which the rest of the book seeks to explain and explore, the pace goes slowly for quite a long while. However, once it picks up, there is plenty to commend it. I think possibly I wasn't entirely sold on the letter idea, but by the end it led to the very right place. What I did find very intriguing was the way that Alice had been so close to her brother, but had in time bought into her parents' c ~~I received a free copy of this book to read and review for Wicked Reads ~~ After a very sad start, which the rest of the book seeks to explain and explore, the pace goes slowly for quite a long while. However, once it picks up, there is plenty to commend it. I think possibly I wasn't entirely sold on the letter idea, but by the end it led to the very right place. What I did find very intriguing was the way that Alice had been so close to her brother, but had in time bought into her parents' complete denial, even when she was convinced that she had seen him. He had almost a ghostly quality which never left her, and yet she never actually actively sought him out. As we later learn ... and I will say no more, the whole of her life to date has been lived in a less than full way - even if externally one would think otherwise. At heart this is a tragedy, but maybe, just maybe, Alice will come out the other side ready for the life she was always meant to lead.
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  • Mandy McHugh
    January 1, 1970
    I went into this book not knowing what to expect, and I took so much more from it than I could've anticipated. In grad school, I took a semester focusing on Southern women writers, and How to Bury Your Brother felt like coming home. Alice's life is shaped from the absence of her brother. Leaving without an explanation, Alice is tormented by the unknown cause of his departure--and when he is found dead years later of an apparent overdose, she's convinced she'll never get answers. Or closure. As s I went into this book not knowing what to expect, and I took so much more from it than I could've anticipated. In grad school, I took a semester focusing on Southern women writers, and How to Bury Your Brother felt like coming home. Alice's life is shaped from the absence of her brother. Leaving without an explanation, Alice is tormented by the unknown cause of his departure--and when he is found dead years later of an apparent overdose, she's convinced she'll never get answers. Or closure. As she's tasked with clearing out her childhood home, Alice stumbles on a series of letters written by her brother and decides to deliver them in the hope of learning about Rob and why he left. What she finds in the process, like my experience with this book, was more than she expected.So many things worked for me. Structurally, Cook's writing was beautiful and crisp. Weaving flashbacks and memories with letters in her present journey could've easily been overwhelming or clunky, but this was an effortless read. I was particularly fond of the mini chapters, crossing off each letter along the journey. It felt like a personal connection with Alice and resonated on an emotional level. It's something I might do myself if I was in Alice's shoes. Along these lines, Alice's character is an excellent example of how the south can shape the life of a woman. Indeed, like many classic southern literary texts, the south is its own character. From the elegant imagery of the environment, to the social etiquette and expectations--and her brief foray in New Orleans where the humidity, food, and events are detailed--the South is a living, breathing being, as much a part of Alice as she is of it. She's troubled about her past, about her relationship with her mother, but she also cherishes these things. The generational connection you see so often in southern literature is also important here. Maura and Alice and Caitlin are strong and independent women facing challenges because of their gender, relationship status, and societal expectations. I really enjoyed the dynamic between them, seeing how each woman grew as a person because of the maternal effect of the south. What elevated the emotion most of all were Alice's complex feelings about her estranged, and later deceased, brother. At one point, she questions the definition of "close," and this was such a powerful moment. Are you close with someone because of proximity? Blood ties? Do you lose a bond because you go decades without speaking? Or is being close with another person reliant on perception alone? As someone who frequently goes weeks without speaking to her younger brothers but still considers them to be two of the most important people in her life, I related to this so much. Distance, time--it changes circumstances, but it doesn't diminish the bond that formed. This makes the conclusion all the more heart-wrenching, and Alice's arc all the more satisfying. This book is perfect for anyone looking for sprawling family sagas, complex family dynamics, and fans of southern women writers. Cook proves you don't need a fast-paced thriller in order to evoke high stakes emotions.
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  • Amanda Brainerd
    January 1, 1970
    The title of this deceptively quiet novel is a metaphor for so many secrets untold. "How to Bury Your Brother" finds Alice, the sister, seeking to bury a deeply painful past. Her efforts to bury the truth about her relationship with her brother (who meant everything to her) focus on her wish to be approachable, acceptable and ultimately lovable by anther man. Alice hides the truths of her past, telling her husband "we weren't close." Alice denies who she is, and ultimately who she will become. U The title of this deceptively quiet novel is a metaphor for so many secrets untold. "How to Bury Your Brother" finds Alice, the sister, seeking to bury a deeply painful past. Her efforts to bury the truth about her relationship with her brother (who meant everything to her) focus on her wish to be approachable, acceptable and ultimately lovable by anther man. Alice hides the truths of her past, telling her husband "we weren't close." Alice denies who she is, and ultimately who she will become. Until she finds the letters that will rewrite the past. What is incredible here, is that "buried" beneath this story, infused with the recognizably quotidien details of a woman's life --going to work, putting supper on the table, getting the kids to playdates etc -- is so much darkness, so much sacrifice, and so much disappointment. Alice parses through questions. Why did she hide so much of her closeness with her brother. why did her family hide secrets from their kids. Her brother is dead, Alice is left to assess it all alone. Seemingly a regular person, Alice hides huge personal secrets and makes us realize that not even the simplest of us leads a simple life.
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  • Jennie Springer
    January 1, 1970
    The debut novel of Lindsey Rogers Cook introduces a talented Southern writer weaving relationships of three generations of the Tate family against a Southern landscape stretching beyond the creeks and rivers and cities of Georgia to New Orleans. The title How to Bury Your Brother conveys a serious, measured mystery of family relationships and stories told to tidy-up the passed down memories. Alice Tate idolized her older brother Rob who was her protector, best friend and confident, with the sibl The debut novel of Lindsey Rogers Cook introduces a talented Southern writer weaving relationships of three generations of the Tate family against a Southern landscape stretching beyond the creeks and rivers and cities of Georgia to New Orleans. The title How to Bury Your Brother conveys a serious, measured mystery of family relationships and stories told to tidy-up the passed down memories. Alice Tate idolized her older brother Rob who was her protector, best friend and confident, with the siblings working in tandem combating the just beneath the surface trauma of the Tate family. Rob mysteriously disappeared when he was fifteen year old. Their mother Maura confined herself to her room for a few days and then resumed her routine of bridge games, church activities and social occasions. The Tate family did not speak about unpleasant happenings, and they did not speak of Rob or what happened or might have happened the night he disappeared. Alice searched for Rob, grieved, and quietly rebelled by substituting her love for nature and animals for family love and loss of her dearest friend. Rob's whereabouts were apparently unknown for two decades until Maura pronounced his death to Alice in the church parking lot after services. Maura planned a funeral befitting the Tate family image and invited dutiful mourners with scant interest or knowledge about happened to Maura's wayward son who disappeared years ago. The Tate family offered no plausible explanation for the absence of time. Struggling with childhood memories, a very-pregnant Alice Tate Wright was designated by Maura to give the perfect eulogy for a Tate family member. Alice's father and Uncle Jamie assured her Rob's death and a proper funeral was best for the Tate family. For Alice, the eulogy was like losing her brother again. Eight years after Rob's funeral, Alice is called upon to clear out the contents of the Tate home she vowed never to enter after leaving for University of Georgia. Her father is deceased and Maura is in a memory care home. Alice is now a middle-age mother of two children who has walked through the second part of her life as the Tate daughter, Walker's wife and Caitlin's and Robbie's mother while penciling in hours as a self-employed conservationist, funded by her husband to keep her pacified. Surveying her childhood home and making decisions about family belongings, Alice discovers a box with an autopsy report along with letters Rob had written and addressed shortly before his death. But when and who put the letters in an obscure place in the house where Alice would find them? Alice decides to deliver the letters to family members and persons she never met, earnestly hoping to find clues as to the person Rob became and why he wrote the letters, though being miffed a letter was not addressed to her. As she delivered letters to an array of Georgia locations and to a purple house in New Orleans, she pieced together a puzzle of a brother she no longer knew and learned secrets that others already knew. Rob had faced his demons and found a way to tell his own story. Delivering the letters brought to the surface Alice's own defense mechanisms for coping with the Tate family and being Walker's wife. She reflected on her own life and the choices she made which seemingly always involved memories of her brother. Sibling secrets were just Alice's after her brother left home. Walker never knew her secrets. Walked hide his secrets in plain sight. What happened to Rob who had so mysteriously disappeared is a prelude to the wake-up jolt Alice experiences as she returns home from New Orleans. Alice had never considered herself a strong person. She was willing to stay in a scripted marriage where she dutifully played her part. Alice too realized she had had enough of family fantasy. She was done; she was her own person, a strong Southern woman, an established Conservationist and a devoted mother willing to take control of her own life.In the tradition of Southern storytelling, Cook understands the reader needs time to process thoughts and actions of characters, intentionally slowing and accelerating the pace of the story. Family sagas progress and unravel at their own pace, and Cook allows the family dynamics and relationships to dictate the pace of the story. Family stories are mysteries with no explanation of why an action was taken and likely can not be rationally explained. Family secrets and generational drama are untidy and twisted trauma that escalate unless resolved or understood. Cook is honest and resists dressing up a family story. The pitiful uncle is real. A wife pretends to love for the sake of her children. Lives are tangled. Familial stories are better understood with the passing of time.
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  • Faith Hurst-Bilinski
    January 1, 1970
    How to Bury Your Brother is a book of secrets. And it starts with one that we, the reader, get to know that none of the other characters ever seem to learn. We begin with the death of Alice's brother. We jump to his funeral. Alice has to give a eulogy to the man who left as a 15 year old boy and never returned. Over the course of the book we learn just what that abandonment did to her life and how it shaped her decisions. Form the decision to lose the love of her life to her own obsession with f How to Bury Your Brother is a book of secrets. And it starts with one that we, the reader, get to know that none of the other characters ever seem to learn. We begin with the death of Alice's brother. We jump to his funeral. Alice has to give a eulogy to the man who left as a 15 year old boy and never returned. Over the course of the book we learn just what that abandonment did to her life and how it shaped her decisions. Form the decision to lose the love of her life to her own obsession with finding her bother to how the lie she told her husband on their first date was really an allegory for her entire marriage.9 years later Alice's father is already dead, her oldest child is ready to go off to college, and her mother is decaying in a home. Her childhood family is being torn down and Alice is all that is left to take care of everything that remains within before that happens. This isn't a story of that. This is a story of how that task leads her to follow her brother's footsteps, meet the people form his adult life, and learn the truth behind his leaving all those years before.What did I love about this book?Rob. Rob was the big brother every wishes they had. He was 4 years older but never treated his sister like a pest. He was her best friend, her champion, her protector, and her guide. It's very clear from the beginning that he is troubled. But it never was to the little girl that looked up to him.Athens. OK, my soft spot for Athens, Georgia, that cute little college town with all of its musical history was a big lure. Her brother played The 40 Watt Club? One of the same ones REM played? Probably not. That placed moved around all of the time (when I was there I swear I went to a dozen places that had once housed it.) Caitlin. Though not central to the plot, a very important motive for Alice's search. It wasn't just about her past, but about her future. And she was everything Rob was without the circumstances that lead to his leaving, smart, talented, self-assured.Alice, to an extent. I liked her more as the book went on and she stopped being what she was supposed to be and started being who she should have become. She made mistakes, but she was looking to make up for them and she wasn't afraid to admit to herself that she may have been wrong. It was a hard journey.What if? The what ifs that come with a turning point. What if ...then would? There are so many moments in this book that you feel were times in which everything could have changed and maybe Rob would have lived if this or that had been slightly different.So what did I not like? Not much. I remember being slight annoyed at some things while reading, but I cannot remember, upon completion, what those were. Sure, I hated Walker from the first scene he was in. Who gets mad over these things. I wasn't fond of Jamie. These characters were necessary. Perfectly unlikeable, though in the case of Walker, I guess, to perfectly unlikeable. It's really hard to know what she had ever seen in him and he doesn't have a single redeeming scene. Which leads to the only thing I can think of that I may not have like. Some of the characters were not well developed. Most, in fact. We were squarely in Alice's mind. And that is OK. I would have liked a few more rounded characters. It doesn't reduce the stars, though.Thank you to Netgalley, Lindsey Rogers Cook, and Sourcebooks Landmark for the advanced copy.
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  • Tina Rae
    January 1, 1970
    So. This was a fascinating book. It starts with a suicide and the rest of the book is the impact from that one event. Alice's brother, the brother she'd idolized but had lost when he ran away at 15 and never made contact again, dies. Seven years later, she's cleaning out her parents house and finds a box of letters from her brother. So she delivers them all and tries to learn about who her brother had become in the years since she had known him.It sounds interesting on paper and, honestly, it is So. This was a fascinating book. It starts with a suicide and the rest of the book is the impact from that one event. Alice's brother, the brother she'd idolized but had lost when he ran away at 15 and never made contact again, dies. Seven years later, she's cleaning out her parents house and finds a box of letters from her brother. So she delivers them all and tries to learn about who her brother had become in the years since she had known him.It sounds interesting on paper and, honestly, it is. The basic ~story of this book is fascinating. However, in execution, I found it left a little to be desired. For one thing, I struggled with the pacing of this book. It felt a little too slow (there are a lot of years between the suicide & funeral and Alice's delivering the letters and I don't really think that serviced the story) and honestly a lot of the plot details were bypassed for other things. Not a lot of detail is put into Alice's parents and Jamie where I think there should've been? It felt like this book told us that Alice had a bad childhood but never really ~showed us. At least not in the detail I think it should've. And in other details as well. (For example: For a good chunk of the book, I thought Jake was Caitlin's father, not Walker??) So it felt like this book just hit the high points in some areas and dragged out others.The basic story, however, was fascinating. For anyone who has ever lost someone close, this will definitely resonate. The emotion and passion in the writing is powerful and thought provoking. There are so many aspects of this novel that I have found myself continuing to think about, even after I've finished. And Rob's character was definitely what kept me going in this book. Even though we never truly ~meet him and his story is told only secondhand or through flashbacks, he's the character I connected with most.The last hundred pages were my favorite and the part that I truly connected with. I loved the New Orleans setting and Alice's ~finding the things she'd lost while there. And that's definitely where I felt the most powerful emotional connection to this story.But. The ending itself felt a little flat? There were a few loose ends I wanted to be tied up that weren't. And all of the ~action (I guess?) felt like it was packed into the ending. The book felt like it dragged until there. So. I liked it? But I definitely think the pacing was off and it could've been trimmed in some places and expanded in others. I liked what this book was ~trying to do but for something marketed as a mystery/suspense novel, it doesn't really feel like it's either of those things until the end. (I guess??? I don't know what genre this book is supposed to be and that's even after reading it. NetGalley is saying General Fiction? I don't even know.)So. Definitely interesting and I do recommend if you're looking for an emotionally charged story of family and loss. It definitely delivers in those areas!Thank you to NetGalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for allowing me the chance to read and review this book!
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  • catherine ♡
    January 1, 1970
    *Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for a free e-copy in exchange for an honest review.* Actual Rating: 2.5Unfortunately, this book didn't hit me the way I wanted it to, though plotwise there was a lot of potential.The story starts after Rob's suicide; Alice finds a box of letters written from her brother to various people in his life — a life she didn't know that much about because he ran away when he was fifteen. Finally gathering up the courage to address what happened to her brother i *Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for a free e-copy in exchange for an honest review.* Actual Rating: 2.5Unfortunately, this book didn't hit me the way I wanted it to, though plotwise there was a lot of potential.The story starts after Rob's suicide; Alice finds a box of letters written from her brother to various people in his life — a life she didn't know that much about because he ran away when he was fifteen. Finally gathering up the courage to address what happened to her brother in the years they were apart, Alice delivers the letters herself and embarks on a journey to find the answers.The plot had a lot there, but honestly I was a little confused by the chronology of things. There were things that were happening in the current timeline, but also long passages about previous occurrences with Alice and with Robinson, and it was kind of difficult to follow.The characters were also quite interesting, but I was more connected to the present timeline with Alice and Walker and their children than with Robinson and what happened to him. Because the story started after his suicide and was so strongly in Alice's perspective, it was honestly hard to care about Robinson and connect with him.One thing that I really enjoyed was Alice's character development in the present, and how even though she was given a little romance sub-plot, that did not put a halt to the mystery and her personal growth, which she kept trying to find.The writing style was honestly a little slow for me. The first half felt like nothing was happening, and the last part felt like things were revealed very quickly, but not in a satisfying way where our main character found things out slowly and pieced them together herself, but rather because the information was handed to her in the form of a letter or just by someone telling it to her.Ultimately, this book was just kind of "stuffy" to me. It was hard to get through because the characters were distant and the plot was slow. In more abstract terms, I appreciate the main character's development and I appreciate the plot arc, but in execution it was hard to get through the novel.
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  • Stacy
    January 1, 1970
    https://anecessarylibrary.wordpress.c...How To Bury Your BrotherBy Lindsey Rogers CookThank you to NetGalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for this uncorrected proof in exchange for an honest review.How to Bury Your Brother is the first novel from Lindsey Rogers Cook. I didn’t discover this until after I had finished the novel, and I was completely shocked. The book is well thought out, has a very unique premise, and is overall an exciting read.The book opens with Alice, at the time in her early 30s, https://anecessarylibrary.wordpress.c...How To Bury Your BrotherBy Lindsey Rogers CookThank you to NetGalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for this uncorrected proof in exchange for an honest review.How to Bury Your Brother is the first novel from Lindsey Rogers Cook. I didn’t discover this until after I had finished the novel, and I was completely shocked. The book is well thought out, has a very unique premise, and is overall an exciting read.The book opens with Alice, at the time in her early 30s, in attendance at her older brother’s funeral. He had been missing for most of her life, having run away from home when she was a preteen. Alice never understood why he left, and struggled with feeling abandoned by the only person who she felt ever truly understood her. The book then picks up ten years later, when Alice is now raising a high school senior and a ten year old son, while dealing with her mother’s declining mental faculties, her husband’s infidelity, her own feelings of apathy, and the gargantuan task of readying her mother’s home for auction before it is razed. While cleaning out her childhood home, she finds a box of Robinson’s things, including a stack of undelivered letters written shortly before he died. Realizing that he didn’t write her a letter, but that the letters could contain all of the answers she has been searching for the last 30 years of her life, Alice begins a journey to find the recipients of the letters.I really enjoyed this book. I have never read a book quite like this one, where an entire relationship between siblings is told from an idealized, what-could-have-been standpoint. I enjoyed learning about Robinson and his journey along with Alice. The only thing I was left dissatisfied by was a specific scene during the culmination of the book. I can’t really go into that here, without giving away the majority of the plot, so I will just encourage you to check out this novel by a new author.How to Bury Your Brother is set for publication on May 12, 2020.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    How to Bury Your Brother takes on a story of life’s uncertainty. Alice is a mother of two, married to a lawyer who’s supportive of her centre for environmental studies and cares for her ailing mother who suffers from dementia. However, Alice’s brother, Rob ran away when she was 13 and she despite what her family wanted to believe, she never recovered from his loss. When her family had to arrange a funeral for her brother who committed suicide several years later, secrets begin to leak out that f How to Bury Your Brother takes on a story of life’s uncertainty. Alice is a mother of two, married to a lawyer who’s supportive of her centre for environmental studies and cares for her ailing mother who suffers from dementia. However, Alice’s brother, Rob ran away when she was 13 and she despite what her family wanted to believe, she never recovered from his loss. When her family had to arrange a funeral for her brother who committed suicide several years later, secrets begin to leak out that fractures her marriage and everything Alice believed was true. After finding addressed letters from her Rob, she goes on a journey to deliver the letters to their rightful owners and to find out why Rob didn’t leave her one.The story was difficult to get into because although there was a mystery surrounding Rob’s disappearance and how he ended up taking his own life several years later, most of the book was Alice’s focus and whole mindset about her brother. Discovering the letters from her brother triggered an almost obsessive toll on Alice’s sanity for her finding out more about who Rob was after he had left. I ended up skimming a bunch of pages because the stages of when Alice was piecing things together from her past was becoming an omnibus of Rob Rob Rob.However, the book picks up speed when Alice delivers the final letter and meets up with Jake, her ex-boyfriend before she met her husband, and the one who also left a huge void in her life. At this point because the focus became less about Rob (although it does of course, circle back to him) and more about Alice’s marriage and finding her old true love, it got more interesting for me. It was a good read at the end and although I wasn’t sold on the story for the first half, if you stick with it, I think you’ll like this story.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    How to Bury Your Brother takes on a story of life’s uncertainty. Alice is a mother of two, married to a lawyer who’s supportive of her centre for environmental studies and cares for her ailing mother who suffers from dementia. However, Alice’s brother, Rob ran away when she was 13 and she despite what her family wanted to believe, she never recovered from his loss. When her family had to arrange a funeral for her brother who committed suicide several years later, secrets begin to leak out that f How to Bury Your Brother takes on a story of life’s uncertainty. Alice is a mother of two, married to a lawyer who’s supportive of her centre for environmental studies and cares for her ailing mother who suffers from dementia. However, Alice’s brother, Rob ran away when she was 13 and she despite what her family wanted to believe, she never recovered from his loss. When her family had to arrange a funeral for her brother who committed suicide several years later, secrets begin to leak out that fractures her marriage and everything Alice believed was true. After finding addressed letters from her Rob, she goes on a journey to deliver the letters to their rightful owners and to find out why Rob didn’t leave her one.The story was difficult to get into because although there was a mystery surrounding Rob’s disappearance and how he ended up taking his own life several years later, most of the book was Alice’s focus and whole mindset about her brother. Discovering the letters from her brother triggered an almost obsessive toll on Alice’s sanity for her finding out more about who Rob was after he had left. I ended up skimming a bunch of pages because the stages of when Alice was piecing things together from her past was becoming an omnibus of Rob Rob Rob.However, the book picks up speed when Alice delivers the final letter and meets up with Jake, her ex-boyfriend before she met her husband, and the one who also left a huge void in her life. At this point because the focus became less about Rob (although it does of course, circle back to him) and more about Alice’s marriage and finding her old true love, it got more interesting for me. It was a good read at the end and although I wasn’t sold on the story for the first half, if you stick with it, I think you’ll like this story.
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  • TL
    January 1, 1970
    This was a birthday gift last month from my good friend David Green :)*****Side note: anyone having trouble concnetrating on doing book reviews sometimes?*What caught my eye was the title.. it amused me for a minute till I read the description and the book jumped out at me Read me, read me! . Didn't win the giveaway but I put it on my wishlist (where I was told by a different friend I was forbidden to buy anything off it till after my birthday or she'd kick my butt haha).This was a quiet book. I This was a birthday gift last month from my good friend David Green :)*****Side note: anyone having trouble concnetrating on doing book reviews sometimes?*What caught my eye was the title.. it amused me for a minute till I read the description and the book jumped out at me Read me, read me! . Didn't win the giveaway but I put it on my wishlist (where I was told by a different friend I was forbidden to buy anything off it till after my birthday or she'd kick my butt haha).This was a quiet book. It tells the story without fanfare, taking you by the hand as you go along the journey with Alice as she finds out things about her family (some of them she had never thought about). You hope with Alice for a little bit, the impossible hope because you want that resolution for her but you know she has to reach the place she needs to be and she has to face it head on.One revelation I guessed at but was hoping I was wrong :(. I wanted to give Rob a big hug and not let him go for awhile. There was some good in his life, and I was glad he had some, but he was a troubled guy.There's a bittersweet kind of quality to this at times, but it doesn't overtake the story. It's just there, hanging out while everything is revealing itself.The ending had me smiling a bit, you get the sense that (view spoiler)[things are going on the right path for Alice and that she'll be okay. She's at peace at the end, and she's gotten to know Rob a little bit better. I like to think his spirit was with her during all this and guiding his sister in his own way. (hide spoiler)]Would recommend :)
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  • WycEd Reader
    January 1, 1970
    Check out our HOW TO BURY YOUR BROTHER post on Wicked Reads.Reviews by the Wicked Reads Review TeamRuthie – ☆☆☆☆After a very sad start, which the rest of the book seeks to explain and explore, the pace goes slowly for quite a long while. However, once it picks up, there is plenty to commend it. I think possibly I wasn't entirely sold on the letter idea, but by the end, it led to the very right place.What I did find very intriguing was the way that Alice had been so close to her brother, but ha Check out our HOW TO BURY YOUR BROTHER post on Wicked Reads.Reviews by the Wicked Reads Review TeamRuthie – ☆☆☆☆After a very sad start, which the rest of the book seeks to explain and explore, the pace goes slowly for quite a long while. However, once it picks up, there is plenty to commend it. I think possibly I wasn't entirely sold on the letter idea, but by the end, it led to the very right place.What I did find very intriguing was the way that Alice had been so close to her brother, but had, in time, bought into her parents' complete denial, even when she was convinced that she had seen him. He had almost a ghostly quality which never left her, and yet she never actually actively sought him out. As we later learn... and I will say no more, the whole of her life to date has been lived in a less than full way – even if externally one would think otherwise.At heart, this is a tragedy, but maybe, just maybe, Alice will come out the other side ready for the life she was always meant to lead.Reviewers received a free copy of this book to read and review for Wicked Reads.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    When Alice's brother Rob commits suicide at the age of just 39, she is devastated. Rob had run away from home at age fifteen and part of Alice had always hoped he'd return to her.Years later, Alice uncovers a box of Rob's personal effects - including a series of letters, addressed to everyone but her. Hurt by this but determined to find out more of what became of her brother, Alice decides to deliver these letters herself and hopefully find answers.Through Alice's mission to deliver the letters, When Alice's brother Rob commits suicide at the age of just 39, she is devastated. Rob had run away from home at age fifteen and part of Alice had always hoped he'd return to her.Years later, Alice uncovers a box of Rob's personal effects - including a series of letters, addressed to everyone but her. Hurt by this but determined to find out more of what became of her brother, Alice decides to deliver these letters herself and hopefully find answers.Through Alice's mission to deliver the letters, we find out more about Rob and are treated to a series of flashbacks to show his true character. Not only do we gain an understanding of the closeness of the siblings, but we are given a reminder not to judge a book by its cover. Rob's life after he left home was by no means shiny, but most of this was a result of the trauma he suffered from prior to his escape. There's a definite message in these pages that those who may not fall into societal norms are not always bad people, but trying to find escape. It is heartbreaking to read Rob's story, especially when all is finally revealed. This was a good story to read but it also felt like everything was maybe too easy. Alice seemed to have no trouble finding anyone she was looking for, and they were all very cooperative despite most having never met her before. The growth of Alice's confidence over the course of the novel was clear, but I actually felt like her daughter was a more interesting character. The story moved slowly at times.Overall, I would recommend How to Bury Your Brother - it certainly has an interesting plot, and despite Rob's death at the very start, his character is well developed within flashbacks and memories.Thank you to Netgalley for this free ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lauryn
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t remember what it was about the description for Lindsey Rogers Cook’s upcoming How to Bury Your Brother that first interested me. It’s her first novel, so I wasn’t already a fan of her work (sure am now, though). Possibly the promise of angst and family drama. Whatever it was that caught my attention and made me want to preview this novel, I’m glad I did. It packed a hearty emotional punch, and not in a way that felt manipulated or contrived. Largely focused on grief, guilt, and honesty, I don’t remember what it was about the description for Lindsey Rogers Cook’s upcoming How to Bury Your Brother that first interested me. It’s her first novel, so I wasn’t already a fan of her work (sure am now, though). Possibly the promise of angst and family drama. Whatever it was that caught my attention and made me want to preview this novel, I’m glad I did. It packed a hearty emotional punch, and not in a way that felt manipulated or contrived. Largely focused on grief, guilt, and honesty, How to Bury Your Brother examines the ripple effect that secrets can have within a family and how they can contort one’s mental and emotional health when left alone too long.Alice adored her older brother, Rob, when she was younger. But when he was just a teenager, he ran away and she never saw him alive again. While the questions about what happened and why he left begin to surface for her at his funeral, it isn’t until almost a decade after that when her father is died and her mother’s dementia leaves Alice with the task of clearing out the family house. A bigger mess than she anticipated, Alice discovers boxes with her brother’s things, letters he wrote to friends and relatives, and a pile of papers that appear to be about him as well. Refusing help from her father’s adopted brother, Alice decides it’s finally time to figure out just what happened to her brother – why he left, where he went, and the truth about how he died.For my full review, please visit my blog: https://wp.me/pUEx4-YA
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  • (Belleand_books) Isabella Valentine
    January 1, 1970
    Tw: suicide, drug use, sexual abuse of a minor Thank you to Net Galley for a free ARC, all thoughts are my own. This book starts off with a suicide- it’s an impactful suicide that leads to a woman realising so much of her life is a lie, but you don’t know that yet. Rob left Alice when she was 11, he was 15. When you meet Alice again she’s at Ron’s funeral where he died from an overdose. Eight years later and Alice is now cleaning out her aging mother’s house, where she finds Ron’s suicide letter Tw: suicide, drug use, sexual abuse of a minor Thank you to Net Galley for a free ARC, all thoughts are my own. This book starts off with a suicide- it’s an impactful suicide that leads to a woman realising so much of her life is a lie, but you don’t know that yet. Rob left Alice when she was 11, he was 15. When you meet Alice again she’s at Ron’s funeral where he died from an overdose. Eight years later and Alice is now cleaning out her aging mother’s house, where she finds Ron’s suicide letters and boxes. Alice then begins questioning what really happened to her brother. As Alice begins the journey to find out, she also discovers who she is. This book was fine and it was good. You wanted to know about why Rob left and you wanted Alice to figure it out. Here’s my real concern though: why did her parents lie? You figure out at the end what actually happens and you learn VERY early that her mother knows more than she’s letting on, but why lie to Alice? Especially after Rob died (she was in her late 20s)? That was one question I had left unanswered and the one I really wanted to know. Over all the book is good and I really enjoyed it. My biggest problem is the timeline is a bit much- you jump between past and present a few times with no clear indication of which is which.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Alice and her brother, Rob were close growing up at home. When Rob turned 15 years old, he ran away from home. Alice can’t believe he left. She is upset. Her parents refuse to talk about Rob. Why? Alice goes to college and meets her husband. She doesn’t love him but thinks he will provide and take good care of her. Rob dies and there is a funeral where Alice speaks. Why? Walker and Alice’s marriage is fine at first. Her mother goes into a nursing home. Alice goes to her parent’s home to get it r Alice and her brother, Rob were close growing up at home. When Rob turned 15 years old, he ran away from home. Alice can’t believe he left. She is upset. Her parents refuse to talk about Rob. Why? Alice goes to college and meets her husband. She doesn’t love him but thinks he will provide and take good care of her. Rob dies and there is a funeral where Alice speaks. Why? Walker and Alice’s marriage is fine at first. Her mother goes into a nursing home. Alice goes to her parent’s home to get it ready to go on sale. She goes to a space/tunnel between her brother’s bedroom and her bedroom. She finds with her name on a box and Rob’s guitar. In a box, she finds several envelopes with names on them written in Rob’s handwriting.. When she discovers Walker is having an affair, she continues on without telling Walker about what she found a her parents home that is getting ready to sale. She decides to deliver the letters for Rob and for herself. She hopes people will share the letters with her as she feels she doesn’t know her brother after he left home. Will she be able to find them? Alice doesn’t understand why Rob didn’t write her a letter. Why didn’t he?The novel is about a dysfunctional family, love, a mystery and secrets. I felt Alice’s hopelessness about not being able to see Rob. It’s tender and dark. It’s a book that will make you think about secrets and what they do to relationships. Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book from the author/publisher from NetGalley. I wasn’t obligated to write a favorable review or any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.
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  • O Prism
    January 1, 1970
    Good debut story with lots of heart and secrets. How long can one hold secrets without them coloring their entire world? Alice, now middle aged, worshipped her older brother Rob, who ran away at 15. Devastated at his funeral, she goes through their childhood home before its to be demolished, once again overwhelmed with memories. She finds a box of her brother’s possessions, including letters addressed to strangers and an autopsy report. Where was her personal letter from her beloved brother? Mor Good debut story with lots of heart and secrets. How long can one hold secrets without them coloring their entire world? Alice, now middle aged, worshipped her older brother Rob, who ran away at 15. Devastated at his funeral, she goes through their childhood home before its to be demolished, once again overwhelmed with memories. She finds a box of her brother’s possessions, including letters addressed to strangers and an autopsy report. Where was her personal letter from her beloved brother? More hurt feelings, but she decides to deliver the letters, hoping to find out more about her brother’s history and his missing history. Here is the heart of the story, as Alice delivers each letter, and finds out a little more about Rob with each delivered letter, as well as finding herself. I don’t want to give too much away, but there is hope and love at the ending. While I found the plot a little slow, it was worth it to read to the end. The plot was interesting and held my attention, and the characters were well-developed. As a GA native, I enjoyed reading about familiar towns and places.Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an ARC in exchange for my honest opinion.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Not quite the way I thought we'd begin right out of the gate but it's titled, "How to Bury your Brother" with a suicide by a troubled man leading to insights, discovery, and changes that ripple throughout many lives including Rob's sister Alice.Alice never thought that he'd take his own life however she's left to pick up the pieces and the letters left behind.They are uncovered at her mother's homestead while cleaning it out and they are meant to be delivered.With each recipient and letter comes Not quite the way I thought we'd begin right out of the gate but it's titled, "How to Bury your Brother" with a suicide by a troubled man leading to insights, discovery, and changes that ripple throughout many lives including Rob's sister Alice.Alice never thought that he'd take his own life however she's left to pick up the pieces and the letters left behind.They are uncovered at her mother's homestead while cleaning it out and they are meant to be delivered.With each recipient and letter comes a new revelation for everyone involved in the personal connotations.This novel had a few triggers so if you're squeamish you may wish to shy away as infidelity, dementia, suicide are on the plate.With this noted this was an interesting ending to say the least and the entire story was uniquely different.It was full of family secrets that kept the reader's interest but it was slow in coming and for that I could only give it three stars.Thank you to Lindsey Rogers Cook ,the pub, NetGalley, and Kindle for this ARC in exchange for this honest review.
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  • Debi
    January 1, 1970
    Alice's beloved brother Rob dies from an overdose after years of being estranged from his sister and family. The memories she holds are old yet dear. Her father, mother and Uncle never speak of her brother or his death. Or more importantly why he left. Eight years after his death, and subsequently her father's death, Alice is challenged with selling the family home and care taking for her mother who is now failing with Alzheimer's disease. By chance Alice finds a box of letters to her parents, U Alice's beloved brother Rob dies from an overdose after years of being estranged from his sister and family. The memories she holds are old yet dear. Her father, mother and Uncle never speak of her brother or his death. Or more importantly why he left. Eight years after his death, and subsequently her father's death, Alice is challenged with selling the family home and care taking for her mother who is now failing with Alzheimer's disease. By chance Alice finds a box of letters to her parents, Uncle and several persons she doesn't know written by Rob. She takes the bold step of following the letters to each recipient in hopes to learn who her brother really was and why she hadn't received a letter. Alice's own life is built on deceptions for the sake of family and security. But the letters found release in her a desire to reconnect to the brother that she loved so much as a child. The journey to the answers both reinvigorate her own stale life but she finds much more than she bargained for.
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