Ballistic (The Palladium Wars #2)
There is a personal price to pay for having aligned with the wrong side in a reckless war. For Aden Jansen it’s the need to adopt a new identity while keeping his past hidden. Now he’s integrated himself aboard the Zephyr, a merchant ship smuggling critical goods through dangerous space. But danger is imminent on planet Gretia, as well. Under occupation, torn between postwar reformers and loyalists, it’s a polestar for civil unrest.Meanwhile an occupation forces officer is pulled right back into the fray when the battle alarm is raised, an ambitious heiress is entangled in a subversive political conspiracy, and an Allied captain is about to meet the enemy head-on.As Aden discovers, the insurgents on Gretia—and in space—are connected, organized, and ready to break into full-scale rebellion. History is threatening to repeat itself. It’s time that Aden rediscovers who he is, whom he can trust, and what he must fight for now.

Ballistic (The Palladium Wars #2) Details

TitleBallistic (The Palladium Wars #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 26th, 2020
Publisher47North
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, War, Military Fiction, Science Fiction Fantasy, Space, Space Opera

Ballistic (The Palladium Wars #2) Review

  • Christi M
    January 1, 1970
    One thing is certain – Marko Kloos knows how to write a sci fi story. Just like the first book in the series he once again leaves us with another cliff hanger. I can even hear his evil, maniacal laughter as he types the ending. He builds and builds the story and just when it is ramping up to its climax he ends it and just leaves you hanging. Sigh. I seriously wasn’t ready for the story to end.Ballistic begins a few months after the events of the first book and once again we follow the stories of One thing is certain – Marko Kloos knows how to write a sci fi story. Just like the first book in the series he once again leaves us with another cliff hanger. I can even hear his evil, maniacal laughter as he types the ending. He builds and builds the story and just when it is ramping up to its climax he ends it and just leaves you hanging. Sigh. I seriously wasn’t ready for the story to end.Ballistic begins a few months after the events of the first book and once again we follow the stories of Aden, Dunstan, Idina, and Solvieg. Aden and his crew mates agree to transport an item – no questions asked. But Aden is smart and starts asking questions. Dunstan and his crew answer the distress call of a completely destroyed ship, but also answers another call from a familiar ship. Idina and her Gretian police partner investigate a man with an unauthorized weapon that leads to unattended consequences. While Solvieg starts exerting a little independence from her father and receives an opportunity to visit the planet Acheron for the first time.Even though I really enjoyed everyone’s story in Aftershocks, I couldn’t quite get into Idina’s storyline as much as the others. In Ballistic, my appreciation toward this character grew quite a bit – while Aden’s story will always feel like the main one and Dunstan is my personal favorite, I found Idina’s story much more engaging in Ballistic and followed her and Dahl’s police investigative work very closely. I also loved how Solvieg started making strides to becoming her own woman against her father wishes. Anything she does to irritate her father and break away from his control I am definitely for.I enjoy the world Marko Kloos has created in this series. The characters, the societies, the planets – All the worlds have their own style and personalities and in Ballistic we get to take a closer look at them than in the first book. Here we get to see how the planet’s society has adapted to the planet’s atmosphere.Overall, if you love space opera and military science fiction then this is definitely a science fiction book to recommend.Thanks to Netgalley and 47North for advanced reader copy and opportunity to provide an honest review.
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  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very solid Mil-SF that doesn't so much dwell on the military aspect as it focuses more on our four main characters that come from all walks of life in a richly-imagined worldbuilding setting. It continues after the events of the war in the first book, mostly developing a feel of uneasy occupation in enemy territory, or rather, trying to get by as the defeated party in your own world. I think a lot of us can relate to that. So much of our lives seem to be out of our control and power is This is a very solid Mil-SF that doesn't so much dwell on the military aspect as it focuses more on our four main characters that come from all walks of life in a richly-imagined worldbuilding setting. It continues after the events of the war in the first book, mostly developing a feel of uneasy occupation in enemy territory, or rather, trying to get by as the defeated party in your own world. I think a lot of us can relate to that. So much of our lives seem to be out of our control and power is in the hands of people we don't/can't trust. Add a rather deep look into the life of the police, or smugglers, or the daughter of a business clan on the losing side, and you have a pretty detailed and broad tale in this book.So many people are just trying to get by, have to suffer under misconceptions, or even actively try to stop terrorism even when it hurts them personally. I really enjoyed the character building and the sacrifices that keep having to be made.As for the big action near the end, suffice to say, Kloos has a definite thing about leaving us at spots where we REALLY can't wait for the next volume. :)
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  • Robin (Bridge Four)
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on Books of My HeartReview copy was received from Publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.Ballistic is the second book of The Palladium Wars and needs be read after Aftershocks, the story of a place five years after a war and the repercussions felt over six different worlds.I really enjoyed getting to see an expanded world. For instance, one of the planets, Acheron, we get to visit this time is toxically gaseous. Peopl This review was originally posted on Books of My HeartReview copy was received from Publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.Ballistic is the second book of The Palladium Wars and needs be read after Aftershocks, the story of a place five years after a war and the repercussions felt over six different worlds.I really enjoyed getting to see an expanded world. For instance, one of the planets, Acheron, we get to visit this time is toxically gaseous. People live in planned, domed cities that float in the atmosphere. The way of life there is very pleasure based and if you have the credits, you can get just about anything your heart desires. It reminded me of Vegas if it was floating and a little cleaner.Ballistic follows four different PoVs to give the reader the full scope of the story happening in multiple places. Aden (former PoW), Solvieg (Aden’s sister and heir to a huge corporation), Dunstan (Palladian Space Police), and Idina (Alien ground military on Gretia). Each PoV add to the worldbuilding/galaxy building of the story and add a unique perspective.In Aftershocks, I felt it was very much Aden’s story. Ballistic incorporated the other characters PoVs more, opening up the world and the characters in it. Aden’s PoVs were definitely my favorites in the first book of the series but I found myself really warming to a few of the other characters this time around.Aden has found a multinational crew to work with running cargo. Most of it is legal everyday supply type runs. However, they have one of the fastest ships around and take on a job that is less than reputable. What was supposed to be a basic run has some very serious consequences and Aden and crew are in some really tight spots.Solvieg works for her father’s company. He isn’t allowed to be a part of it anymore since Gretia lost the war and that company was one that supplied weapons for the Gretian soldiers. It has been held for her to take a spot at the executive table as a way for him to still have some control of the company. Solvieg doesn’t really want to be his puppet and is trying to make her own way as well as build a relationship with Aden, the brother once thought dead without her father knowing.Dunstan’s PoV was one of the most interesting for me in this series. He is the captain of a military ship and is on space patrols. Something strange is happening though, he gets the sense that possibly he and his men are in over their heads when he comes upon a destroyed vessel and can’t figure out what went wrong with it and how it was destroyed. He is about to be a key player in a rebellion that seems destined to get started and the rebels don’t seem above guerilla warfare.Idina is foreign police on Gretia. She is there to work with the Gretian police to keep law and order. As an occupying army, there are a lot of mixed feeling towards her, but she has at least made a few connections on planet. The reader gets to experience some of the prejudices and hard feelings since the war through her and see what is happening planet side that might tie in with what Dunstan is dealing with in space. Someone isn’t happy the war is over and less so that they lost. There might be some looking to spark another interstellar war.Ballistic ends on a bang and things are really starting to happen. All of our characters are left in pretty precarious situations and it will be interesting to see what they all do after the fallout that happens at the end of this book.Overall a completely engaging and interesting story.  Narration: Angelo Di Loreto did a good job with all of the PoVs in Ballistic. He is a change in narrator for the series, as Luke Daniels narrated Aftershocks, so it took a little time to warm to his version of the voices. I was able to listen to this at my normal 1.5x speed.Listen to a clip:  HERE
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  • Silvana
    January 1, 1970
    Marko Kloos's works are kind of my comfort read now. He might not be full of twists and turns and his plotting is almost always as straight as an arrow, but he is good in making clean narratives with engaging characters that flow within an interesting made-up world. His military knowledge gives him more edge, of course, so you know you'll enjoy more authenticity in the stories as well as the action.Ballistic continues to be a great but light entertainment for me. I am fully invested in the chara Marko Kloos's works are kind of my comfort read now. He might not be full of twists and turns and his plotting is almost always as straight as an arrow, but he is good in making clean narratives with engaging characters that flow within an interesting made-up world. His military knowledge gives him more edge, of course, so you know you'll enjoy more authenticity in the stories as well as the action.Ballistic continues to be a great but light entertainment for me. I am fully invested in the characters' arcs - the tropes used are not annoying at all, they just felt comfortable. In Aftershocks we were introduced to a world still recuperating from years of wars and the original invader had to deal with the consequences, while facing threats of rebellion from the so-called losing side who's not afraid of terror attacks. He might be inspired with what happened in the Gulf Wars, but now in a much grander scale. I absolutely enjoyed the arc of Idina the Palladian soldier when she had to balance her military training and crowd control when she was embedded in the police force of a former enemy planet. It takes totally different training; policing seems very much more unpredictable as you often don't know where your next attack will come from especially in public space. Her friendship with a vet female police officer was refreshing. I wish more SFF have more of these mature, highly capable women's friendship and bonding.I could not wait for the next installment. Thank you Netgalley and 47North for the review copy!
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  • Liviu
    January 1, 1970
    After the unexpected hit Aftershocks (the first volume of this series - review here https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...), which made my top 5 last year, Ballistic went straight to the top of my 2020 wanted books and luckily I got an advanced copy in early January. The novel starts a few months after the end of Aftershocks to give a little breathing space for the characters to settle and continues the 4-way viewpoints from space travel (Aden), space military (Dunstan), police work on Gretia After the unexpected hit Aftershocks (the first volume of this series - review here https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...), which made my top 5 last year, Ballistic went straight to the top of my 2020 wanted books and luckily I got an advanced copy in early January. The novel starts a few months after the end of Aftershocks to give a little breathing space for the characters to settle and continues the 4-way viewpoints from space travel (Aden), space military (Dunstan), police work on Gretia and the budding insurgency (Idina) and the corporate world of Gretia (Solveig); this time there is a lot of balance as Solveig who in Aftershocks was more of a secondary character as her viewpoint had fewest pages and was fairly passive becomes more important and finally, she (and of course us) finds out why Aden left the family so dramatically 17 years ago - another cool tidbit is that in the local Gaia calendar it is now year 923 (as Solveig is 23 and was born in 900 per Aden's reminiscences) while the 4-year war took place 5 years back so 914-918 (!)We get to see Pallas and Acheron this time (at least the station Pallas 1 and Coriolis City on Acheron) and of course, a lot happens in Sandvik (the capital of Gretia and still largest city in the system), while in the last volume we saw Oceana and some of Rhodia, so only Hades which is far away, near the Sun, so accessible only by specially built ships with lots of shielding and redundancy is the one planet we just have heard of so far.The story is as absorbing as in the first volume and the book impossible to put down while many things happen - the ending while not quite on a literal cliffhanger is at a very dramatic point and volume 3 promises a lot; there is action and even space battles, while Aden finally gets to use his linguistic skills in an essential way; of the secondary characters, the most interesting are the unflappable Gretian police captain Dahl whom we find out that she is 52 and three years from retirement but still loves patrolling the streets of Sandvik, the Oceanian ship doctor Tristan, also in his 50's and a veteran spacer with an interesting past from what we infer from his interactions with Aden, and of course Falk Ragnar who is still the tough big boss despite being in his 70's and officially banned from his company by the peace treaty, though Solveig finally starts being more openly independent rather than always humoring him and just trying to elude her minders who report all her actions to her father...Overall a great sequel bringing enough new stuff but also lots of continuity and balance, the storyline goes up one notch and the ending is quite dramatic so volume 3 is another huge asap;highly recommended though of course, one should start with AftershocksHere is a small fragment from Idina's pov that I quite enjoyed and has no spoilers:“We have put in a request for a detention order. But the Hall of Justice is not working off its backlog very quickly. They expect to have an order ready by the end of the week.”“The guy is converting illegal military weapons for the black market, and the Hall of Justice thinks that’s not an urgent enough matter,” Idina summarized. “That’s not very efficient.”“They issue the detention orders,” Dahl said. “We have to wait for one before we can search his place. That is the way the system works. If I start searching homes without judicial consent, the system is no longer in place. Without the system, I am not a police officer anymore. Just someone with a weapon and a meaningless word written on my armor. And then ****** can claim the right to search my place, too, as long as he brings a bigger gun.”Idina felt a pang of irritation at Dahl’s calm and matter-of-fact chastening. Every day, the woman confirmed some of her prejudices about Gretians and then completely dispelled them again.
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  • The Captain
    January 1, 1970
    Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  While I try to post no spoilers, if ye haven’t read the first book then ye might want to skip this post. If ye keep reading this log then ye have been forewarned and continue at yer own peril . . .I really enjoyed book one of this series but was worried because a lot of of the details had faded by the time I picked up book two.  I gave meself a quick refresher by reading me review of aftershocks Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  While I try to post no spoilers, if ye haven’t read the first book then ye might want to skip this post. If ye keep reading this log then ye have been forewarned and continue at yer own peril . . .I really enjoyed book one of this series but was worried because a lot of of the details had faded by the time I picked up book two.  I gave meself a quick refresher by reading me review of aftershocks and jumped back in.  No worries, this was fun and engrossing.While the blurb makes it seem that Aden is the only character, really this series has multiple points of view.  Ye follow four folks:Aden - a POW from the losing side of the battle who is released five years after defeat to start anew;Idina - a soldier from the winning side who holds a grudge, she is part of the occupying military force on the defeated planet;Dunstan - a member of the winning naval space fleet whose simple guard duty turns into a mess with epic ramifications; andSolvieg - a civilian who was a minor during the war now has to deal with the consequences of her planet's loss and what it means for the family business.Marko Kloos writes excellent popcorn sci-fi with characters that shine.  One of the best parts about this series is that the characters are from different planets and backgrounds.  In this installment ye get to see more of six worlds and other character perspectives and I loved feeling that the worldview has expanded.  There is enough action without sacrificing character development.  And I loved how the characters' lives intersect without seeming forced.  They come together and then diverge again in fun ways.  I kept changing me mind about who me favorite character was (including minor characters).  I love that!Again these books end on rather abrupt notes that still set up what's to come.  Some readers might not enjoy that type of ending.  Just like with the first book, I ended this with a "Dang it!  I want more!"  I will avidly be waiting for the next installment and will pick it up as soon as it is released.  Arrrr!So lastly . . .Thank you 47 North!
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*tl;dr: Finished at 2AM after a building fire alarm evac. Something that can hold your attention during/after something like that is definitely a damn fine tale. More below:Ballistic is the second in Marko Kloos’ Palladium Wars series. I enjoyed the first book a great deal; it deftly explored the aftermath of an interplanetary war, the morality and ethics of occupation, and the effects of the conflict on both occupiers and the occupied. And it did all *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*tl;dr: Finished at 2AM after a building fire alarm evac. Something that can hold your attention during/after something like that is definitely a damn fine tale. More below:Ballistic is the second in Marko Kloos’ Palladium Wars series. I enjoyed the first book a great deal; it deftly explored the aftermath of an interplanetary war, the morality and ethics of occupation, and the effects of the conflict on both occupiers and the occupied. And it did all of that while managing to tell an absolutely cracking story, where fast-paced, compelling action was wonderfully leavened with raw, emotional, character-driven moments of humanity. It was, in short, rather good. So what about the sequel? Well, it has all of the same facets that made the first book in the series so much fun. The world (well, worlds) are vivid, well-realised, each with their own unique mix of societies and cultures. Our protagonists are engaging, with unique voices, and seeing through their eyes always feels like it adds a unique perspective to the story as that crackles along. And yes, there’s more than enough plot here for anyone. High politics. Low politics. Knives in the dark. Some outright heroism, and moments of emotional resonance, backed by adrenaline thumping action sequences which actually made me gap more than once. If you want the tl;dr, then this is it: this is a high quality work of science fiction which will take and hold your attention, and you won’t want to put it down until you’re done. The story takes place over multiple worlds; some we’ve seen before, while others are new to us. I have to admit, I have a particular liking for the scenes set on Gretia, a planet which started a war with every other planet in the system, and then had the poor grace to lose. Now occupied by forces form the other planets, the Gretin society is fascinating, as are the tensions within it. Business people from the old political classes are restricted in their dealings. Gretian police officers are paired up with non-Gretian military. Civilians are trying to adjust to a new reality, living with the guilt of starting a war, the shame of losing one, and the economic consequences of both. Gretia is a world on the edge, trying to decide which way it’ll fall. Unsurprisingly, the occupiers aren’t popular there, and simmering resentment is starting to build, even if it’s purposeless and poisonous. Gretia is a cauldron on simmer, waiting for the right demagogue to boil it over. On the other hand, it’s also a place with people like Solveig; heiress to one fo Gretia’s largest interplanetary businesses, thrust into the role after her unpleasantly political father has been locked out, she really wants to do the right thing. To cut deals, yes, but to make good ones, with old friends and new, to try and put Gretia’s past behind and make something. This is the younger generation, strikign out for themselves – or, in some cases, falling back into the dry embrace of a dead past. Solveig though, is energetic, driven and perceptive. She can see the power structure of her company, and the way it still revolves around the fierce intelligence of her father, who is no less a sharp businessman for his unapologetic views on the lost war (and whose regrets over losing it are oozingly self-justifying. They make an interesting pair, fencers face to face, one trying to make something of his daughter, the other trying to get out from under the shadow of her father and become what she needs to be. It’s a lovely dynamic, and Solveig’s efforts to turn Gretian commerce around are quietly compelling, if less explosive than others. Solveig also takes us to all sorts of exciting new places, about which I’ll say little, except thaat they’re richly imaginative, and very well drawn indeed. Then there’s Idina. If Solveig is the new Gretia, Idina is their nightmares come to life. A member of the elite ground troops of their occupying enemies. Idina is fast with a gun, faster with a blade, and has so much technological backup inside her armoured suit that you’d need an anti-tank rifle to put a dent in her. Idina is great fun to follow, because she will take absolutely no crap. A senior NCO, she’s not just a one-hit warrior, swinging madly into crowds – but a thoughtful, analytical individual, always maintaining situational awareness, ready to leap into action (occasionally literally) at a moment’s notice. Idina humanises the Gretian’s enemies; not forgiving the cromes of their leaders, but perhaps softeninig on the populace as a whole. She’s fierce, smart, and taking absolutely no crap, which meant the pages turned very fast during her chapters. In this, she’s ably assisted by her Gretian partner; she nominally supervises the other woman’s work. Of course, Idina is military, not police, so really it’s more that the two are learning to come together, to rub along without strife, to see each other’s strengths and weaknesses, to put aside preconceptions that were shaped by years of now quiescent conflict, and make something better. ANd you know what, it works. This is a slowly warming friendship, opening up by degrees, and the role that the two fill, investigating weapons caches and rising terror threats against civilian targets on Gretia, is utterly fascinating. Solveig’s brother is another viewpoint; the black sheep, ex-military, a man with false papers, living on a courier vessel which might, sometimes, take on a cargo that’s a little bit grey market. Living on the boundaries of things, and just trying to make a life for himself as something other than his past – a past which the world just won’t let go of. Of course, being a scion of one of the most famous families on Gretia wouldn’t help that – if anyone knew, anyway. The slow growth of camraderie and loyalty that Aden has for his crew is genuinely warming, and their jaunts through space with a cargo of a somewht mysterious nature make for interesting reading; Aden’s quieter, more contemplative, and the threats his crew face tend toward the personal – the knife in the dark, the offer that’s also a threat. Another perspective on evolving, complex situations. Which leaves Dunstan, captain of a non-Gretian warship, trying to stave off piracy and work out exactly what's making so many ships disappear, if it’s not piracy in his spare time. Dunstan’s military approach is direct, honourable, but still has some room for wit, guile and manoeuvre. He’s someone we can trust, looking at the direct threats out of the window to the stars. I shan’t say more without spoilers, but his sections are always riveting. Bringing all of these characters and their myriad stories toward a conclusion without us losing the thread is quite a task, but it’s done wonderfully here. There’s always enough from any given viewpoint to advance the story, to answer a few questions, to leave us asking more, to push toward a climax, or allow for a moment of personal tragedy, or triumph. And tying the whole ball of string together is seriously impressive. The story works, it ticks along with the precision of a finely made watch. You’ll find yourself stopping to eat dinner, wondering where the time went....and then wondering how it got to be three in the morning before you put the book down. This is a story with a lot of really interesting themes to lay upon and questions to ask, but it’s also a personal story, a character driven story, and also, a story with rather a lot of snappy action and, er, explosions. What it is, in the end, is a really good read. So,if you wondered if this sequel was worth your time, I can only say this: yes. Give it a go, you won’t regret it.
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  • Jeff Cosmi
    January 1, 1970
    Very enjoyable read. This book will be very familiar if you read book one in this series. The story follows the same characters in the same fashion as the first. The book starts off somewhat slow but builds up as the story moves along, also much like the first book. The author is very talented you notice a lot of attention to detail every aspect of the story is realized in full detail and wonderful color. It’s only a shame that we have to wait so long until the next installment arrives. I have t Very enjoyable read. This book will be very familiar if you read book one in this series. The story follows the same characters in the same fashion as the first. The book starts off somewhat slow but builds up as the story moves along, also much like the first book. The author is very talented you notice a lot of attention to detail every aspect of the story is realized in full detail and wonderful color. It’s only a shame that we have to wait so long until the next installment arrives. I have to say I really like how the book spent next to zero time rehashing events that took place in book one.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC! I really enjoyed the first book in this series, and I enjoyed this one very much too! If you are looking for the really deep philosophical scifi, maybe this one isn't it, but if you like good pacing, great characters and lots of action and fun, this is just a really good series. I will definitely be looking for the next volume (there'd better be a next volume!)
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  • Dirk Reul
    January 1, 1970
    What if you fought a wrongful war and lost? What if you were the bad guy.? What if the perpetrators act like the victim and hate rises again?The second book in Marko Kloos Palladium Wars continues right were the first book left off. The peace after the victory of the Alliance over the armies of Gretia is suddenly threatened by insurgence. The players are yet unknown and event move forward at a brisk pace. This is not a story about a people looking for penance or redemption, this is a tightly wri What if you fought a wrongful war and lost? What if you were the bad guy.? What if the perpetrators act like the victim and hate rises again?The second book in Marko Kloos Palladium Wars continues right were the first book left off. The peace after the victory of the Alliance over the armies of Gretia is suddenly threatened by insurgence. The players are yet unknown and event move forward at a brisk pace. This is not a story about a people looking for penance or redemption, this is a tightly written story about conflict, lies and the atrocities of war. The scars left on those who suffered and those who perpetrated horrors. Some never learn, some evils always come back. As a German, many of the events described after the war bring memories of stories told in my childhood. About soldiers returning after the war, after they were released from being prisoners of war. About occupation, to protect the world from the threat your country posed. About resentment and unrest and maybe something even bigger. There is no excuse made for the atrocities of war. The writing is crisp. The different strands form a cohesive world and we learn about the characters, we get to know them and what drives them. We see hints of what may be out there until all hell breaks lose. The second book is even better than Aftershocks. The narrative moves forward and as the stories unfolds, tension rises. In many aspects this series is very different from the first series. It’s reminiscent of the world building in The Expanse. Physics exist, actions have consequences. I can’t wait to see where the story goes and who is behind the uprising. This is a great continuation and I highly recommend it. I got this ARC for an honest review from the publisher.
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  • Ronald
    January 1, 1970
    Ballistic is the second book by Marko Kloos in The Palladium Wars series. The first, Aftershocks, was primarily used to develop the characters in the series. By the end of Aftershocks, I suspected but was not sure, who the main characters in the series books would be. With Ballistic, those characters were solidified and the story jumps from the perspective on each one in succeeding chapters. The war had been fought by three planets, Rhodia, Pallas, and Gretia with the latter being the aggressor. Ballistic is the second book by Marko Kloos in The Palladium Wars series. The first, Aftershocks, was primarily used to develop the characters in the series. By the end of Aftershocks, I suspected but was not sure, who the main characters in the series books would be. With Ballistic, those characters were solidified and the story jumps from the perspective on each one in succeeding chapters. The war had been fought by three planets, Rhodia, Pallas, and Gretia with the latter being the aggressor. The four main characters are:• Aden Ragnar, a Gretian whose life to date has been driven by a need to escape his wealthy overbearing father,• Rhodian Navy Lieutenant Commander Dunstan, an aging piece force space ship captain who is honor bent to uphold traditional military discipline while policing the inter-planetary trade routes in a powerful, but outdated, spaceship,• Pallas ground force Captain Idina who, along with her Gretian Police Captain counterpart, is policing a militarily defeated planet called Gretia, • And Aden’s sister, Solveig Ragnar, left behind to grow up and take over an inter-planetary sales company owned by her and Aden’s father.A Gretian résistance rising in the inter-planetary system becomes more evident in this book. It is driven by former well train Gretian soldiers and intelligence agents. As the four characters attempt to get on with the peaceful existence they’re each seeking, they increasingly find themselves faced with the disruptive effect of the résistance.The Paladian War series is shaping up to be a long story told via succeeding series books. While I sometimes suspect that an author’s decision to break a story up in installments is driven by a profit motive, in this case, the break up is necessary. Kloos’ story unfolds at a slow pace at times due to the depth of his character and storyline building. Were he not to break up the story as he did, the result would be a very thick and expensive book that few of us would want to pay for or commit the time to read.Kloos’ storytelling is good, but I hope he picks up his publishing pace as I’m anxious to see where the next series installment takes me.
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  • D. Jensen
    January 1, 1970
    Of course, it's Marko Kloos. Right there you can be certain the story is more about the people, their motivations and actions than it is about what size gun they're wielding. That's not to say that there is not weaponry involved--weapons are just the props for all the rest.Story so far, Gretia has lost a war and is now occupied by its victors from Pallas, Rhodia and Archeon. The four major characters and their friends/others must navigate the escalating aftermath as an old war becomes the founda Of course, it's Marko Kloos. Right there you can be certain the story is more about the people, their motivations and actions than it is about what size gun they're wielding. That's not to say that there is not weaponry involved--weapons are just the props for all the rest.Story so far, Gretia has lost a war and is now occupied by its victors from Pallas, Rhodia and Archeon. The four major characters and their friends/others must navigate the escalating aftermath as an old war becomes the foundation for a new one.Aden Ragnar-Robertson-Jansen is a just released POW who has the misfortune of being Gretian. He is trying to start a new life far, far from his father's control.Idina is a sergeant in the Palladian forces and part of the occupation of Gretia. She works with the Gretian police through the Joint Security Police (JSP) as tensions on the planet builds as the population bucks under the occupiers.Solveig Ragnar - at 23 she becomes a vice president of Ragnar Technologies - a puppet so that her father can hold on to his company. At least that is how Fulk Ragnar sees it.Dunstan Rhodian Lt. Commander who, with his crew aboard the Minotaur, patrols for pirates, but soon becomes embroiled in the quickly expanding terrorist actions of the Gretian (we all assume) resistance.While this series, so far, isn't as strong as some of his other work, I still stand by my appreciation of Mr. Kloos' creativity. Normally, I wait until the trilogy (or series) concludes before writing a review, but since I'm on Goodreads . . . eh! why not mention this book.
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  • Ty Cole
    January 1, 1970
    DisappointingI liked the first book but there was a lot of holes in the plot line. Why did everyone hate the gretians? Sure they invade two other worlds but they did not miss treat the people on those worlds. It seems more of a forced motive for plot reasons then a genuine emotion, sort of when something bad happens it has to be the evil Gretians. The Alliance has occupied Greta for over 5 years, holding their people and economy in a prison. One of the main character points out after being held DisappointingI liked the first book but there was a lot of holes in the plot line. Why did everyone hate the gretians? Sure they invade two other worlds but they did not miss treat the people on those worlds. It seems more of a forced motive for plot reasons then a genuine emotion, sort of when something bad happens it has to be the evil Gretians. The Alliance has occupied Greta for over 5 years, holding their people and economy in a prison. One of the main character points out after being held a prisoner of 5 years for just being on the losing side that going home is just leaving one prison for another. The Alliance seems to treat Gretians brutally and hates them for complaining about it. Why is Aden suddenly ashamed for.being a gretian? That makes no sense, Then the end of the book. Aden is a trained field intelligence officer and he knows they are going to be hunted but goes out drinking? One man confronts 5 people with only a knife (3 knives, but that does not matter) with one arm trapped against one of their bodies? Please knives do not kill people that fast and 5 untrained people can beat one person everytime. Numbers always matter and at least two of them are trained. And a cliffhanger ending? You are a better writer than this.
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  • Traci
    January 1, 1970
    I debated giving this installment 4 stars, because I really like Kloos's writing, but "oh good, the story's finally beginning" is not what a reader should be thinking at the end of Book 2. If Aftershocks read like an extended prologue, Ballistic reads like the first few chapters of the story: we get a lot of quiet background, pieces seem to be moved into place, but just as the main action appears to begin . . . roll credits.This book and Aftershocks could have been smushed together into a single I debated giving this installment 4 stars, because I really like Kloos's writing, but "oh good, the story's finally beginning" is not what a reader should be thinking at the end of Book 2. If Aftershocks read like an extended prologue, Ballistic reads like the first few chapters of the story: we get a lot of quiet background, pieces seem to be moved into place, but just as the main action appears to begin . . . roll credits.This book and Aftershocks could have been smushed together into a single novel, and I think it still would've read like an extended prologue to the main action. Frankly, I think a reader could easily skip the first book and jump right in here, which isn't what you want to see in a series like this.I'll pick up Book 3, because again, I really like Kloos's writing. But I'll do so with the stated hope that I'll stop feeling like I'm waiting for the main story to finally begin.I received a free copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • I.F. Adams
    January 1, 1970
    A well paced interleaved geo(stellar?) political, adventure and light military scifi all rolled into one. And I say this as a huge compliment, it reminded me of some of John Birmingham's stories and how he carefully interleaves and intersects multiple discrete plot arcs.I particularly liked that it struck the balance of giving enough breathing room and background to make it a vibrant "living" world, without turning into a tedious explication of every little detail.A few common tropes but with so A well paced interleaved geo(stellar?) political, adventure and light military scifi all rolled into one. And I say this as a huge compliment, it reminded me of some of John Birmingham's stories and how he carefully interleaves and intersects multiple discrete plot arcs.I particularly liked that it struck the balance of giving enough breathing room and background to make it a vibrant "living" world, without turning into a tedious explication of every little detail.A few common tropes but with some fun twists, particularly a "buddy-copy" plot arc that is between an occupation soldier of the "winning" side and a domestic police officer.Not sure how I felt about the "big" twist (no spoilers here), but it does work in the context of the universe and explaining on of the main characters background and estrangement from his family.Anyways, definitely looking forward to the next one and sad that I'm gonna have to wait a while.
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  • Ralph Blackburn
    January 1, 1970
    Ballistic by Marko Kloos- Sequel to last years Aftershock and a very good space opera to boot! It's been five years in this relatively recent colonized system since an all out civil war devastated everyone. One planet decided all should be under their rule, but was defeated through great effort and sacrifice. Each society is unique and well developed for their environment. The story continues, as in Aftershocks, following the individual stories of four people dealing in their own way with the af Ballistic by Marko Kloos- Sequel to last years Aftershock and a very good space opera to boot! It's been five years in this relatively recent colonized system since an all out civil war devastated everyone. One planet decided all should be under their rule, but was defeated through great effort and sacrifice. Each society is unique and well developed for their environment. The story continues, as in Aftershocks, following the individual stories of four people dealing in their own way with the aftermath of the war and the unpleasantness that followed. Great world building and great character development raises this story above the normal slam-bang military space operas, and becomes a very enjoyable read. My only complaint is that by book's end there is not much resolution to the story, only a promise that there's more to come. I'll be waiting!
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and 47North for this eARC. As a fan of the Frontline series, I was happy to see Marko Kloos step back from it to write something different. I feel that the two books in this series have been his best and bode well for Book 7 of Frontlines.This four viewpoint book takes a look at the fallout of a local system interplanetary war. These perspectives are from an heiress of a company on the losing side, a fleet commander from the winning side, a member of the force occupying the l Thank you NetGalley and 47North for this eARC. As a fan of the Frontline series, I was happy to see Marko Kloos step back from it to write something different. I feel that the two books in this series have been his best and bode well for Book 7 of Frontlines.This four viewpoint book takes a look at the fallout of a local system interplanetary war. These perspectives are from an heiress of a company on the losing side, a fleet commander from the winning side, a member of the force occupying the losing side and a member of the losing side just released from military prison. The characters have barely crossed paths in two books, but some of the most tense scenes occur when they do. This book does an excellent job of blending Kloos` well establish military sci-fi with slice of life storylines. I am really excited for the next installment
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    I received a pre-release copy of this book from NetGalley.Ballistic is the second book in Marko Kloos's Palladium Wars series. As with the first book, this one follows four different characters through four separate story arcs. These threads do briefly converge from time to time, but for the most part they are all pieces to a larger story going on in the background.The groundwork and worldbuilding laid down in the first book definitely pay off here. I recall when reading the first book that I sp I received a pre-release copy of this book from NetGalley.Ballistic is the second book in Marko Kloos's Palladium Wars series. As with the first book, this one follows four different characters through four separate story arcs. These threads do briefly converge from time to time, but for the most part they are all pieces to a larger story going on in the background.The groundwork and worldbuilding laid down in the first book definitely pay off here. I recall when reading the first book that I spent the whole thing waiting for something to happen. Well, things definitely happen in the second book. I won't spoil anything, but there are a few key events that have me definitely looking forward to see what happens next. This is a quick read, which usually I'm okay with, but since I read it pre-release, it means I have a long wait until the next one...
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Aftershocks and Ballistic is a good sequel, that succeeds in keeping the well-developed characters and moves the heroes forward with their life. There are even some significant developments taking place for some of them. However, the plot movements in general do not clarify the big picture. The first book of the series reveals some sinister forces working to disrupt the fragile peace in the system. In the second book we see these forces in action forwarding their plan. But the nature of I loved Aftershocks and Ballistic is a good sequel, that succeeds in keeping the well-developed characters and moves the heroes forward with their life. There are even some significant developments taking place for some of them. However, the plot movements in general do not clarify the big picture. The first book of the series reveals some sinister forces working to disrupt the fragile peace in the system. In the second book we see these forces in action forwarding their plan. But the nature of these forces remains unclear, the very few glimpses of the agents do nothing to explain the motives or the identity of these forces. All this makes the book a weaker an in-between bridge in the sequel.
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  • Rusty
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free eARC of this in exchange for an honest review.This suffered the same problem that the first installment did. There was a whole bunch of buildup but it wasn't resolved in this volume. It did move the plot forward more than the first book, and it gets you almost to the point of "oh yeah" and then goes, nope, we'll see you next time, same Bat-time, same Bat-channel.If you liked the first one you will like this one, too. And there is action in this. There are major plot points that I received a free eARC of this in exchange for an honest review.This suffered the same problem that the first installment did. There was a whole bunch of buildup but it wasn't resolved in this volume. It did move the plot forward more than the first book, and it gets you almost to the point of "oh yeah" and then goes, nope, we'll see you next time, same Bat-time, same Bat-channel.If you liked the first one you will like this one, too. And there is action in this. There are major plot points that happen and nice space battle and planetside operations. But it still hasn't dropped the big stuff. Reckon we will see that in the next book. Maybe. Hopefully. Please.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    This is a safe bet from an experienced author. As usual, it's an imaginative tale with well drawn characters and good action. I"m not a big fan of cliffhangers which the author is fond of. Otherwise, this is nicely done.Thanks very much for the review copy!!
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    GreatTerrorism at the extreme, something we all fear. Showing us how everyone deals with act. Kind of an emotional rollercoaster with the characters and the small problems of their lives. But the book series is well written. Thanks!
  • Bob Miller
    January 1, 1970
    A collection of small stories that are still loosely connected, perhaps to be resolved in follow on books. Several of these stories appear to have reached anticlimax at the end of this book. Prepare for sequels.
  • Connor Evans
    January 1, 1970
    A bit of a disappointment I loved the first book from this series and was dramatically excited to learn of the new book! However i feel a bit let down.It seems that the entire book could have been written in half the amount of words, and achieve the same level of novel
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  • Michael Haynes
    January 1, 1970
    Kloos does it again and leaves me hanging. When's the next installment due to release, so I can get my preorder in?
  • Matthew Stienberg
    January 1, 1970
    A great sequel to the first novel in this new series. The stakes are raised, and we get a better look at the looming war in this series. Can't wait for the next!
  • Adamo Rodriguez
    January 1, 1970
    Great book
  • Mads Pedersen
    January 1, 1970
    Only thing I did not like about this, is that I now have to wait for the next one to find out what happens....
  • Gwen
    January 1, 1970
    Now I want the next one! Now!
  • Cory McConnaughy
    January 1, 1970
    Shows something a little more than the first book. The characters are a bit too to-type, but Kloos plays them off together well and the plot is thickening in an intriguing way.
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