The Electric Heir (Feverwake #2)
In the sequel to The Fever King, Noam Álvaro seeks to end tyranny before he becomes a tyrant himself.Six months after Noam Álvaro helped overthrow the despotic government of Carolinia, the Atlantians have gained citizenship, and Lehrer is chancellor. But despite Lehrer’s image as a progressive humanitarian leader, Noam has finally remembered the truth that Lehrer forced him to forget—that Lehrer is responsible for the deadly magic infection that ravaged Carolinia.Now that Noam remembers the full extent of Lehrer’s crimes, he’s determined to use his influence with Lehrer to bring him down for good. If Lehrer realizes Noam has evaded his control—and that Noam is plotting against him—Noam’s dead. So he must keep playing the role of Lehrer’s protégé until he can steal enough vaccine to stop the virus.Meanwhile Dara Shirazi returns to Carolinia, his magic stripped by the same vaccine that saved his life. But Dara’s attempts to ally himself with Noam prove that their methods for defeating Lehrer are violently misaligned. Dara fears Noam has only gotten himself more deeply entangled in Lehrer’s web. Sooner or later, playing double agent might cost Noam his life.

The Electric Heir (Feverwake #2) Details

TitleThe Electric Heir (Feverwake #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 17th, 2020
PublisherSkyscape
ISBN-139781542005081
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, LGBT

The Electric Heir (Feverwake #2) Review

  • may ➹
    January 1, 1970
    Victoria Lee said Im gonna give the gays everything they want but also break their hearts a little. as a treat.The Feverwake series centers around Noam and Dara, two boys who survived a virus that turned them into witchings, giving them the possession of powerful magic. The Electric Heir, like The Fever King, is without a doubt absolutely electrifying (pun fully intended). Its certainly darker, and much more difficult to read, but its also so much harder to put down, even for one minute, and not Victoria Lee said I’m gonna give the gays everything they want but also break their hearts a little. as a treat.The Feverwake series centers around Noam and Dara, two boys who survived a virus that turned them into witchings, giving them the possession of powerful magic. The Electric Heir, like The Fever King, is without a doubt absolutely electrifying (pun fully intended). It’s certainly darker, and much more difficult to read, but it’s also so much harder to put down, even for one minute, and not think or care about the characters.The Electric Heir takes place six months after the events of the first book, and I can’t say much without spoiling The Fever King, but you jump immediately into the action. I also am allowed to say (meaning: it is not a spoiler) that there was one moment in the beginning when I thought Dara was dead even though my brain KNEW that the author had tweeted that Dara’s POV was included and therefore he could not be dead. I’m an idiot confirmed!You can tell from the start that The Electric Heir is going to be a little less action-packed than the first book, and I loved it. It, while still full of thrilling events, puts more of a focus on growth and recovery, especially in terms of abuse and trauma, as well as Noam and Dara’s !!relationship!! “Things like that, when you’re a teenager, and especially with people in power… they aren’t consensual. They can’t be, by definition. I know you don’t want to hear it, and maybe it’s easier to believe you chose this, but that’s not how any of this works.” Noam and Dara both had POVs in The Electric Heir, and oh my god, I loved it. Dara Shirazi is a character I don’t think I’ll ever stop caring about, and including his POV was a genius idea. Seeing both of them try to save Carolinia, each other, and themselves was a breathtaking, difficult journey, and it made their ending all the more sweeter.Noam, on one hand, is grappling with abuse without even realizing it for what it is, forced into a relationship with Lehrer. And Dara is trying to heal from his own trauma and abuse, while also trying to help Noam see, as Dara also was once blind to, the abuse he’s experiencing.The Fever King and The Electric Heir are about many things but I think most of all they are love letters to survivors like and unlike Noam and Dara. The experiences they are forced to live through are unfathomable to those who have never faced them. There are scenes that will force you to take a break, there are scenes that will make you cry. And there are scenes that show you how strong survivors are, even though they shouldn’t have to be.One of my wishes for the first book was that it had just a bit more worldbuilding, and The Electric Heir delivered on that! We got to visit Texas (my lovely gun-filled homophobic home) and also see more perspectives that the world has on Carolinia.And somehow, even after Noam and Dara actually got together in the first book after enduring a long slowburn, things hurt even more when it comes to their relationship? It’s like, yeah they’re kissing but ow it hurts [for reasons that will remain redacted]. Thank you Victoria Lee, I really needed that pain on top of all the other pain!!In general, though, it was fully engaging and unputdownable. When I read this, I was struggling to stay up past like 1 or 2 except for school-related reasons, and I remember one night I just kept reading until it was around 3:30 and even then I wanted to keep going. “I want to choose you,” Noam said softly. “Every day, again and again.” If you can, I fully recommend picking up this book and/or series. It’s utterly thrilling and entertaining, and more than anything it’s about two characters learning how to survive. Victoria Lee said, “The Electric Heir is, at its core, about what it means to be a survivor—both the experience of surviving, and the expectations that society places on survivors.” And this shines through, crafting a truly poignant masterpiece.:: rep :: biracial (Latinx, white) bisexual Jewish MC, gay POC Jewish LI with depression and an eating disorder, queer Jewish major character, all-queer cast:: content warnings :: violence, intergenerational trauma/genocide, abuse, attempted rape, mental health and suicide, slut-shaming, victim-blaming, ableist language, drug and alcohol abuse, parental death [more details here]
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  • Lily ☁️
    January 1, 1970
    ✨ THE COVER IS LIVEbless your eyes here!!! ✨This book is incredible, I dont even have the words. I n c r e d i b l e.Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr | Bloglovin ✨ THE COVER IS LIVE—bless your eyes here!!! ✨This book is incredible, I don’t even have the words. I n c r e d i b l e.Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr | Bloglovin’
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  • Victoria Lee
    January 1, 1970
    [Scroll down for content warnings.]The Electric Heir is, at its core, about what it means to be a survivorboth the experience of surviving, and the expectations that society places on survivors. Like Noam and Dara, I survived childhood sexual abuse and violence. Like Lehrer, my abuser was attractive and powerful and charismatic. Like Dara, I was not believed when I came forwardnot until other girls said hed done it to them too. Girls who more closely fit the stereotype of abuse survivors. So [Scroll down for content warnings.]The Electric Heir is, at its core, about what it means to be a survivor—both the experience of surviving, and the expectations that society places on survivors. Like Noam and Dara, I survived childhood sexual abuse and violence. Like Lehrer, my abuser was attractive and powerful and charismatic. Like Dara, I was not believed when I came forward…not until other girls said he’d done it to them too. Girls who more closely fit the stereotype of abuse survivors. So many victims are afraid to speak up, a fear their abusers manipulate to say no one would believe you, not when they could believe me instead. Abuse takes a massive toll on victims’ mental health, and this, in turn, can be used as a justification for the abuser’s behavior—he’s just looking for attention; she misunderstood the situation. In The Electric Heir, Noam struggles to define what’s happening to him as abuse, even as Dara begins the slow road to recovery. Noam and Dara experienced the abuse differently, reacting in very different ways—and each must face Lehrer on his own terms. If there is anything I want the reader to understand when they read The Electric Heir, it is this: there’s no one way to be a survivor. To understand Noam and Dara’s story is to understand a story of not being believed—of facing your abuser alone—of not being the kind of victim people expect. And all I want is for these characters to be believed.---It’s really important to me that everyone who reads this book has a safe experience. I posted detailed content warnings for The Fever King on my website, and most of them also apply to this book–so I recommend checking out that post as well.However…this book is a lot darker than TFK. The Electric Heir is an exploration of the narratives we tell ourselves in order to survive abuse while it’s happening, and the slow journey of being able to define and face our trauma after it’s over.One thing I want to make clear is that some characters in this book will initially express ideas and narratives about abuse that are harmful and false, such as denying that abuse is occuring or denying that certain acts constitute abuse. Many abuse victims, including myself, once believed similar narratives–it was the only way we were able to survive the abuse while it was going on.However, these narratives are ultimately challenged. That’s part of the characters’ journeys in this book. So I just wanna be clear that even if a character expresses a certain belief or beliefs at a given point, that is not an endorsement on my part. I also wanna be clear that there is a lot of denial going on in this book, especially in the first half–and although the denial doesn’t last, if this is something that will be difficult for you to read, you should know this up front.I wrote this book based off my own lived experiences as a survivor, which are not universal, and which are not always clean. To survive is to fight for your life, for your self-concept, for the right to your own agency and autonomy. That’s messy business. This book reflects that messiness.Okay. Now that’s been said, let’s move on to the specific content warnings. First, I’ll list a general set of content warnings. Details will be linked on my blog, and may contain spoilers.Spoiler-free list:* intergenerational trauma, genocide* violence* abuse* attempted rape* mental health and suicide* slut-shaming* victim-blaming* emetophobia* drug and alcohol abuse* parental death* ableist languageTo view the full list of content warnings with detail, please click through to my blog here.
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  • Fadwa (Word Wonders)
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange of an honest reviewCW: mention of suicide and suicidal ideations, illness, death, violence, fascism,  excessive drinking, pedophilia, statutory rape, abuse in all its forms, graphic description of physical abuse, manipulation, mind control, trauma, murder, gore, generational trauma, depression, eating disorder.So...I read THE ELECTRIC HEIR back in September and couldn't review it. I told myself that I'd read it too fast, didn't retain I received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange of an honest reviewCW: mention of suicide and suicidal ideations, illness, death, violence, fascism,  excessive drinking, pedophilia, statutory rape, abuse in all its forms, graphic description of physical abuse, manipulation, mind control, trauma, murder, gore, generational trauma, depression, eating disorder.So...I read THE ELECTRIC HEIR back in September and couldn't review it. I told myself that I'd read it too fast, didn't retain enough, and would need a reread to solidify my thoughts before putting them on page. I reread the book last week and I...still don't know how to review it. This book is a masterpiece. It just means too much to me. It dug deep down in my soul and hit all those soft tender spots that were tucked deep down, so deep that I even convinced myself they weren't there anymore. It made cry, all kinds of tears, and it was one of the most rewarding reading experiences I've ever had.The writing in this one is just as good as in the first book, if not better. It's visceral, gutting, buries itself in the deepest darkest corners of your mind and messes with them, makes you question everything happening, and stop trusting even your own shadow. THE ELECTRIC HEIR is -obviously- an extension of THE FEVER KING, picking up six months after it, with Noam in a mess that's too big for him to get himself out of on his own, and yet still believing he has it under control, still believing he can get out (sounds familar...). This continuation digs even deeper into trauma, abuse and corrupted governments, which I didn't think was even possible because of how masterfully done in the first book. Full review posted on my blog : Word Wonders
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  • Alaina
    January 1, 1970
    I have received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Okay, so The Electric Heir was even more amazing than the first book. It doesn't matter that I read them accidentally out of order. I loved every page I read between these books. Now this one starts about 6 months or so after the first one ended. Not going to lie, I love when books in a series do that because it makes the transition between each book less painful. After reading the first book, things definitely made more I have received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Okay, so The Electric Heir was even more amazing than the first book. It doesn't matter that I read them accidentally out of order. I loved every page I read between these books. Now this one starts about 6 months or so after the first one ended. Not going to lie, I love when books in a series do that because it makes the transition between each book less painful. After reading the first book, things definitely made more sense to me in this one. No, I didn't reread this one after it BUT if I ever get the next book I will most definitely read the books in order. Fall in love with everything all over again will make me happy. I still loved everything about Noam and Dara. They are absolutely everything to me and I just couldn't ask for more. I mean, I could if I would and I would still be extremely happy with everything that went down.In the end, I seriously want another book. Please, oh please Victoria - I want another one.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    WHEW THIS BOOKBuddy reading with my love!________________________________I GOT A REVIEW COPY OF THIS BOOK I'M ABOUT TO PASS OUT________________________________When I saw a 2020 release date, I blacked out for a second before I remembered that's next year and not 2 years like my brain thought kjhdsjkdfgI just know this book is going to cause a heart attack but it's ok I'm ready to die for these characters anyway
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  • Hollis
    January 1, 1970
    After coming out of THE FEVER KING with much less love than I thought I would, I was pretty pleased by how strong I felt this follow up was. At least, initially.My main problem was where this story went in regards to a certain relationship and the direction it took. There are so many complicated emotions, so many traumas, so much grief, wrapped up in the why or maybe the how of it. And Lee does (I think, at least) a good job of trying to explain the messiness of it all, the conflicting After coming out of THE FEVER KING with much less love than I thought I would, I was pretty pleased by how strong I felt this follow up was. At least, initially.My main problem was where this story went in regards to a certain relationship and the direction it took. There are so many complicated emotions, so many traumas, so much grief, wrapped up in the why or maybe the how of it. And Lee does (I think, at least) a good job of trying to explain the messiness of it all, the conflicting perceptions and means to which one might convince themselves of something, through her characters. But I still didn't like it, and every time it came up I wanted to put the book down and walk away. One particular exchange, between the two POVs and leads, made me oh so very angry. And hurt. So, I mean, kudos for that. But that didn't make me like the story anymore.And the story itself, well, there's not much I can say regarding the plot for a sequel/finale, but mostly I'm just confused. I have no idea how we got to the ending we did, and how it's going to stick, considering.. everything. Additionally I guess I just don't understand why the story, the series, happened in the first place? Why these kids, why couldn't Lehrer just.. I don't know. I feel like I understood what I read, what happened, but I'm missing the point, I guess.For all that I clearly have no idea how to feel, despite knowing I didn't love this, I have to say that Lee's writing is strong. She doesn't shy away from darker topics (there's a warning at the front, and content/triggers listed at the back) and I feel she handles a lot of it with dignity and care. These characters, all of them, have been through so much, are still dealing with so much, and while sometimes it felt like too much, it's all rather tied up in one catalyst. It's heartbreaking and awful and while I didn't hate Noam, one of our POVs, I absolutely adored Dara. Full stop.Anyway, I don't know. I feel like this is a series I should've loved and, when pitched to me, I knew I wanted to read it. Something about this just didn't connect. And I'm sad about it. But I'm also an outlier, so, please read the glowy reviews and, if this sounds like your thing, definitely give it a try.** I received an ARC from NetGalley and the publisher (thank you!) in exchange for an honest review. **---This review can also be found at A Take From Two Cities.
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  • c, (½ of readsrainbow)
    January 1, 1970
    Noam had crawled his way into Daras mind and planted himself there, a root system tangled into Daras thoughts and Daras telepathy.Inextricable. Actual rating 4.5 On my blog. Rep: Jewish mcs, bi mc, gay mc with substance abuse disorder, MDD, & unspecified eating disorder, Black side character, Chinese American side character, Indian American side character, lesbian side characterCWs: all CWs are online here. To note: relationship between adult and minor is between (view spoiler)[Lehrer and Noam had crawled his way into Dara’s mind and planted himself there, a root system tangled into Dara’s thoughts and Dara’s telepathy.Inextricable. Actual rating 4.5 On my blog. Rep: Jewish mcs, bi mc, gay mc with substance abuse disorder, MDD, & unspecified eating disorder, Black side character, Chinese American side character, Indian American side character, lesbian side characterCWs: all CWs are online here. To note: relationship between adult and minor is between (view spoiler)[Lehrer and Noam (hide spoiler)], with particular scenes in: ch 3 (all), ch 4 (end), ch 7 (opening), ch 9 (middle/end), ch 11 (sort of, throughout), ch 17 (middle), ch 23 (beginning to middle), ch 31 (middle; sexual assault), 32 (throughout; attempted rape)Galley provided by publisherSometimes, you love a book so much that you wonder just how the sequel can live up to the first book. That was the case for me, with The Fever King. This sounds a little like a set-up for me to say this one didn’t live up to it, but it’s not. It was just as good as the first book, but it was good in a different way, and perhaps not the way I was initially expecting.The Electric Heir opens up a few months after the end of The Fever King. Noam thinks Dara has succumbed to the sickness and is working with Lehrer, to ostensibly find the cure. However, he has remembered what it was Dara told him at the end of the first book, and is also working to take Lehrer down (albeit slowly). But Dara isn’t dead, and when he arrives back in Carolinia to kill Lehrer, Noam finds himself torn between loyalties.To be quite honest, I had a rough start to this book. I had read the content warnings, so I knew there would be depicted a relationship between an adult and minor. Perhaps foolishly, I thought that this would mean flashbacks for Dara. Nope. It was between Lehrer and Noam. So this first point is a highly personal one, and actually just meant to make others who might be in a similar position aware. Because, in this case, I needed that little bit more information. But anyhow, after a week of being less-than-keen to pick the book back up, I did (and finished it in a day so). And, barring my immense discomfort reading the scenes (I ended up skimming a few), I really enjoyed the book.Unlike The Fever King, which I would say has more action, this book is a lot more character-driven. Yes, there are events happening at the same time, but it really centres more on Noam and Dara, and telling a story of survivorship (much like Girls of Storm and Shadow, really). And honestly, I feel like YA needs a whole lot more of that. And yes, the pacing sometimes felt a little off, and it’s a wholly different focus from what you might expect, but it’s a necessary focus. And a very well done one. It definitely helps that Victoria Lee’s characters just jump off the page – even the side characters have a lot of depth – and, for the most part, you sympathise intensely with them (except Lehrer, for obvious reasons. Though I also appreciate that Lee went the way of not using his backstory to excuse his actions. More of this in YA, please).I mentioned pacing earlier, and mostly, the balance between the narrative and the character-driven aspects of the story is excellent. I would say, however, there were a few places that jumped out at me where the pacing felt a little off (to me, at least). That is, the war with Texas and the ending. The war started very abruptly (like, I turned a page and they were at war, abruptly), and I think it could have had more build-up or started earlier. The ending too seemed to happen very fast, although that was more understandable in the narrative. But balancing these aspects is difficult, and I can’t think of that many books that have done so as successfully as this one did. (Another nitpicking thing though: I sort of wanted to see Noam remember what Dara had told him rather than that being a “oh he’s done this part already” bit at the beginning. But yeah. Nitpicking.)But like I said, the characters are excellent and the perfect vehicles for a character-driven novel in that sense. And, most importantly, it gives you a happy ending.
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  • Silvia
    January 1, 1970
    I was sent this book as an advance copy by the publisher for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. buddy read with Laura!!Finishing this book felt like being the "I lived bitch" memeThe Electric Heir messed with my emotions in a way that The Fever King didn't. I want to make it clear before we start that I don't consider myself a survivor of the type of abuse portrayed here, and this is a duology that's especially written for survivors. So there will be things I don't get and all I I was sent this book as an advance copy by the publisher for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. buddy read with Laura!!Finishing this book felt like being the "I lived bitch" memeThe Electric Heir messed with my emotions in a way that The Fever King didn't. I want to make it clear before we start that I don't consider myself a survivor of the type of abuse portrayed here, and this is a duology that's especially written for survivors. So there will be things I don't get and all I can do is listen to those who see themselves in this series.What I can say is that this book is very hard to read and I don't know if I recall many books that made me have to stop reading and take a breath because it was becoming too much. I had expectations and thoughts on how this book was going to play out, but even aware of the content warnings I was not prepared for how sudden everything was and how we were thrown in the middle of that whole emotional mess. Saying that I loved it would be inaccurate: this book gets ugly and you can't help but hate it a little, but it makes its conclusion all the more satisfying.There isn't a lot I can talk about while reviewing a second and final book in a duology, but I loved finally getting Dara's POV and I liked his voice maybe more than Noam's. I was also under the impression that this series was going to be a trilogy but while I was reading I found out it's a duology and I have to say, I need more series to be written in this format. This is a short review because anything I say would be spoilery both for this book and the previous book, but watch out for Victoria Lee and her ability to create unforgettable characters. I'm looking forward to reading whatever she comes up with next.TWs: inter-generational trauma, genocide, violence, abuse, attempted rape, mental health and suicide, slut-shaming, victim-blaming, emetophobia, drug and alcohol, abuse, parental death, ableist language.
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  • shri (sunandchai)
    January 1, 1970
    Full review on my blog! ARC provided in exchange for an honest review.I always pitch The Fever King as a book about survivors for survivors. And if thats the case, then The Electric Heir is supportive hand reaching for those who are still surviving, not yet out of the woods. Its for the people who still blame themselves even though they rationally know they shouldnt. Its for the people who feel hopeless, lost, and purposeless after every sense of agency is taken away from you. Admittedly, Full review on my blog! ARC provided in exchange for an honest review.I always pitch The Fever King as a book about survivors for survivors. And if that’s the case, then The Electric Heir is supportive hand reaching for those who are still surviving, not yet out of the woods. It’s for the people who still blame themselves even though they rationally know they shouldn’t. It’s for the people who feel hopeless, lost, and purposeless after every sense of agency is taken away from you. Admittedly, the first few chapters were incredibly difficult to get past—Victoria Lee wasn’t kidding when she said this book would be darker than The Fever King. But once I got over the stomach-roiling shock, I sped through the book with a desperation that wasn’t mine—it was the characters’. The Electric Heir is an excellent exploration of abuse of power, whether in politics or interpersonal relationships. It gets up and into your face, unafraid to make you face difficult truths as the reader. I can’t describe how infinitely grateful I am for how The Electric Heir was written.
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  • rin ( ̄ヘ ̄) read/watch mo dao zu shi
    January 1, 1970
    got an arc. a win for the gaysthe fact that victoria made content warnings available and ready.. we stani would consider not suing victoria lee for the emotional distress caused by book #1 but only if i get to read this one like right now even thought it's not even written yet probably
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  • mina reads™️
    January 1, 1970
    Make sure to read the content warnings provided by the authors and read safely loves: http://victorialeewrites.com/2019/10/...arc provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review CW: pedophilia, abuse,i recommend checking the author's website to stay safeThis book was at once an excellent sequel and a mildly disappointing conclusion to the duology. I again found myself enamored with the fascinating and innovative dystopian world that Lee imagines for us. This series really restored my hope Make sure to read the content warnings provided by the authors and read safely loves: http://victorialeewrites.com/2019/10/...arc provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review CW: pedophilia, abuse,i recommend checking the author's website to stay safeThis book was at once an excellent sequel and a mildly disappointing conclusion to the duology. I again found myself enamored with the fascinating and innovative dystopian world that Lee imagines for us. This series really restored my hope for YA dystopians. Victoria Lee has created some of the most captivating characters I have ever had the pleasure to read about and the fact that this sequel was so charcter heavy was a wonderful way to round out the various arcs Lee explores in this series. In this installment some time has passed since the ending of The Fever King and Noam has been living under Lehrer's mind control and is being successfully groomed and manipulated by him. I think Lee crafted the perfect villian with Lehrer, his despicable actions unfold so slowly in the first installment that I too was enthralled by him at first and I think Lee hammers home an important message about how powerful, likeable people use their reputation as the perfect shield while they engage in monstrous acts behind the scenes. I also appreciated that this narrative addressed how gross immortal + human teenager stories really are. Seeing Noam grappling with understanding that he has been abused and trying to escape while also falling victim to his own matyrdom was at once heartbreaking and frustrating. In direct contrast we get Dara' perspective and he has been living without Lehrer's influence and is at a completely different stage in his recovery, seeing these two victims of abuse trying to overcome their abuser and stop the cycle of violence and abuse and corruption was incredibly powerful, it was a really difficult and uncomfortable subject but I think Lee really said some important things with this novel. While I think Lee did an amazing job with these characters and their arcs, I couldn't help but feel like the other aspects of the plot were very poorly fleshed out. There is a rebel fraction trying to overthrow Lehrer as chancellor but we really never find out much about them or Dara's involvement with them beyond a few scheming sessions. I just think the politics and the war aspect of the plot was really too understated and I needed more from that side of the story, and the world could have been expanded a bit more. I stand by the idea that this should have been a trilogy.Overall it was great. Noam and Dara have my heart. Brillant, nuanced exploration of child abuse and grooming, and what it means to be a survivor, amazing character arcs, fascinating world, mildly disappointing plot but the writting and characters made up for what the plot lacked. 4 stars
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  • Miri ♪ Book Dragoness ♪
    January 1, 1970
    This was terribly dark but it also ended up being really well-written and probably a best book of the year.Thoughts to come soon!Ahhhh! I cannot believe I am finally going to read this! 💕💕Thank you to Netgalley and the publishers for granting me this eARC My Blog 📚 My Instagram 📚 My Twitter This was terribly dark but it also ended up being really well-written and probably a best book of the year.Thoughts to come soon!—Ahhhh! I cannot believe I am finally going to read this! 💕💕Thank you to Netgalley and the publishers for granting me this eARC My Blog 📚 My Instagram 📚 My Twitter
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  • Sahitya
    January 1, 1970
    CW: depictions of sexual assault and child abuse, domestic violence, references to suicide, and depictions of eating disorders and substance abuse. For more detailed information, please see the authors website: http://victorialeewrites.com.As soon as I finished The Fever King, I knew I had to read this sequel because that was a great ending. Even though Ive gotten used to waiting an year for every sequel, I wont deny that binging a series is always more fun. And this one was both fun and intense CW: depictions of sexual assault and child abuse, domestic violence, references to suicide, and depictions of eating disorders and substance abuse. For more detailed information, please see the author’s website: http://victorialeewrites.com.As soon as I finished The Fever King, I knew I had to read this sequel because that was a great ending. Even though I’ve gotten used to waiting an year for every sequel, I won’t deny that binging a series is always more fun. And this one was both fun and intense af, and I really wasn’t expecting it. I thought I knew where the author was going to take this story but wow was I wrong. They managed to surprise me at every turn, both with an interesting plot that kept me engaged and with the sheer brutality of everything. The world is expanded upon a little, and we get to know more about life outside Carolinia, but I kept wanting more - not that it in anyway lessened my enjoyment of the story itself. We also get two POVs this time, so it was finally good to be in Dara’s head. There are also many instances in the story where the author makes us question if there are any good sides in this conflict, forcing us to realize that war and conflict is usually much more messy and even people with good intentions end up having to do destructive things. However, it was their decision to end the story in the way they did that really surprised me but upon reflection, I think it was just the right choice.But it was the depiction of abuse and domestic violence, the perpetrators and the survivors that was most impactful about this book. I don’t think I can talk more about it and do justice, but the author’s note about how this book is for survivors who have been gaslighted incessantly into believing that somehow it’s their fault, and that there’s a right and wrong way for “victims” to act, really felt right. We get to read about different kinds of survivors, how they cope and behave and just try to get through one day after another - and it’s a lesson to us all to not judge anyone in real life for doing the best they can. Noam... I really don’t know what to say about him. He is still brave and strong but he is also stubborn in a way that prevents him from realizing how much of a deep shit he is in. But being in an abusive environment, trying to play both sides, figuring out constantly what is true and what is manipulated takes a lot of toll on him and I frankly kept waiting for the book to be over so that he could get some reprieve. He suffers a lot throughout the book and it just pained me that he was going on a path that he might come back from. Dara on the other hand is the clear headed one this time around, constrained by other factors but more or less in control of his thoughts and actions. Distance has given him a new perspective on the kind of abuse he has suffered and how he was a destructive path using his addiction and eating disorder as coping mechanism, but he is trying to be better now and I admired him. Noam and Dara’s relationship is very fraught in this book - Dara pleading Noam to open his eyes and see the truth about his abusive situation, while Noam insisting that he had everything under control. Even when they couldn’t see eye to eye, it was obvious that they were agonizing over each other’s safety, and it really pained me to see them be so painfully in love but unable to truly articulate their feelings. This is a couple who’ve been through immense suffering and all I wanted was for them to finally be able to escape it all. We also get to meet some new and old characters and I enjoyed all of them, though my slight complaint from book one remains that we don’t get to know most of them that well. It’s Lehrer instead who gets more time, both on the page as well as in the characters’ heads and I think the author’s depiction of this highly intelligent, charismatic, powerful and manipulative abuser was just perfect and maybe a cautionary tale to all of us that unfortunately many such people exist in real life. In the end, all I have to say is that I’m very impressed sans affected by this story. It’s a dark and brutal but ultimately hopeful story of survival, fighting back and reclaiming your life. If you enjoyed The Fever King, I promise this will impress you even more. And if you haven’t read this series but enjoy YA sci-fi stories about young people fighting back against systems of oppression, charismatic villains as well as the demons in their heads, this is the perfect choice for you. This book really is for survivors and I hope, just like the author, that someone out there feels seen and understood within these pages.
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  • Fanna
    January 1, 1970
    March 21, 2020:This duology has become one of my faves so if you wish to fan over a queer OTP, scientific magic/magical science, and psychological, political, & hopeful themes in a future where pathetic policies & deadly viruses need to be fought. Full review to come. March 16, 2020: After being completely blown away by the first in this duology, The Fever King , and thanking the ARC gods for giving me this sequel because I couldn't have waited a day more to know how this all ends, I'm March 21, 2020:This duology has become one of my faves so if you wish to fan over a queer OTP, scientific magic/magical science, and psychological, political, & hopeful themes in a future where pathetic policies & deadly viruses need to be fought. Full review to come. March 16, 2020: After being completely blown away by the first in this duology, The Fever King , and thanking the ARC gods for giving me this sequel because I couldn't have waited a day more to know how this all ends, I'm finally ready to know if my OTP walks into the sunset happily ever after...or not. Thank you, FFBC Tours & Skyscape for a digital review copy via Netgalley!
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  • Georgia (thefictionfolio)
    January 1, 1970
    "Noam had crawled his way into Dara's mind and planted himself there, a root system tangled into Dara's thoughts... Inextricable." TW for violence, death, genocide, suicide, abuse, rape, sexual assault of a minor, sex, drug and alcohol use, various mental health conditions, disordered eating ➸ My 5 star review of book 1, The Fever King The Electric Heir came for my entire life. I was expecting as much, after adoring the first book, and hearing nothing but amazing things about it's sequel. But "Noam had crawled his way into Dara's mind and planted himself there, a root system tangled into Dara's thoughts... Inextricable." TW for violence, death, genocide, suicide, abuse, rape, sexual assault of a minor, sex, drug and alcohol use, various mental health conditions, disordered eating ➸ My 5 star review of book 1, The Fever King The Electric Heir came for my entire life. I was expecting as much, after adoring the first book, and hearing nothing but amazing things about it's sequel. But I was still surprised by what it did. It has similarities but also notable differences to the Fever King, in that it's perhaps even more character driven, but simultaneously had more action. What this book really hones in on is the intricate complexities of the relationship between our three main characters: Noam, Dara & Lehrer. It dugs its way into my heart, and doesn't want to leave. I know I'll be thinking about this story, these characters, and the experience of reading it, for a long time. This book is a closer examination of power dynamics, both on a personal and political scale, and Lehrer is the perfect way to study both of these simultaneously. It's a criticism of militarisation, and war, thinly veiled dictatorships, and classism. But most specifically this book is for survivors, in a way that is twofold -- through Dara's story and through Noam's story. In many ways, Noam and Dara's roles are reversed from their roles in the last novel. (view spoiler)[Noam is now the one benefitting from Lehrer's favour but also suffering at his hand; whereas Dara is the one looking from the outside in, aware of how toxic and abusive it is.Lee offers the most complicated version of this through Noam -- who knows what Lehrer is capable of, was able to identify his relationship with Dara as abusive and as rape; and yet still feels that he is different. Yes, Noam is with Lehrer to bring him down from the inside, but -- and this is where Lee's genius lies -- there's also a part of him that desires Lehrer, is attracted to power, and believes that Lehrer actually cares about him. He truly thinks that he consents in a way that Dara couldn't, despite also being a minor. It's also clear that, in turn, Lehrer notices this and uses it to his advantage, allowing Noam to think he holds some power, in order to keep him where he wants him. . (hide spoiler)] Dara is recovering, and coming to terms with his past in this book. (view spoiler)[ The physical and sexual and emotional abuse he has suffered, his addiction, his eating disorder -- and most importantly his relationships, not only with Lehrer, but with General Ames too. With time away and supportive people around him, he is able to identify that these relationships were fundamentally wrong; abuses of power by nature. However, its not as simple as Dara suddenly seeing everything exactly as it is. He's angry at Noam when he first finds out that he's with Lehrer, not only because he's upset, but because a part of him is still convinced by Leher's logic. It's not until later in the story, once he's fully realised Lehrer's affect, that he can accept Noam's lack of ability to consent. (hide spoiler)] Noam and Dara's relationship also goes on a massive journey. They have a lot to work through, and atone for, and learn about each other. Ultimately, they have to learn how to forge a relationship separate from Lehrer's realm, and without the constant shadow of him. There is something so important and special about their bond, the way that they can uniquely understand each other and what they've been through. It's intoxicating to read about and I felt so desperately for them. So this utterly blew me away. One of the most equally painful and healing things I've ever read. What complexity. What catharcisim. What pathos. I haven't felt this way in a long time, and I'm already itching for content, and to read Lee's next novel.
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  • Nandini | Novels and Nebulas
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so thankful for the opportunity to read this early! I received an e-ARC via Net Galley from Skyscape.✨ Reasons to Love ✨✔ Dual POV✔ Theme of hope✔ M/M romance✔ Multimedia format✔ High-stakes plot✨ Characters ✨Victoria Lee is the best at crafting characters and her talent shines in this book. Not only do we get to see different sides of Dara and Noam, but the secondary characters also gain much more importance in the plot, especially the other Level IV students. I also really appreciated how I'm so thankful for the opportunity to read this early! I received an e-ARC via Net Galley from Skyscape.✨ Reasons to Love ✨✔ Dual POV✔ Theme of hope✔ M/M romance✔ Multimedia format✔ High-stakes plot✨ Characters ✨Victoria Lee is the best at crafting characters and her talent shines in this book. Not only do we get to see different sides of Dara and Noam, but the secondary characters also gain much more importance in the plot, especially the other Level IV students. I also really appreciated how the romance was developed in a believably angsty way in the sequel.✨ Plot ✨The plot picked up right where the previous book left off and the stakes were high from page one. There's a lot of politics, intrigue and espionage going on, which was dialled up from what we got in the first book. However, I didn't like the ending as I felt it was a bit rushed and wrapped up a little too neatly.✨ Writing ✨I love how we got the story in different formats and how they added a new dimension to the storytelling. The writing is simple and easy to read that the target audience of the book will certainly enjoy. Victoria Lee also handled heavy topics such as substance abuse, sexual abuse and manipulation with care and thoughtful insight, which I really admired about both the books.✨ Verdict ✨If you are looking for a young adult dystopian series with queer representation, I highly recommend this book. If you are comfortable with reading a dark narrative about immigration, oppression and the corruption of power, this book is for you. However, it comes with a host of trigger warnings, so be sure to check them out before diving into the book.For a more thorough analysis of the book, check out my full review posted on Novels and Nebulas.
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  • Maëlys
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.tw: all content warnings provided by the author can be found here (http://victorialeewrites.com/2019/10/...)My review for The Fever King (Book 1)Buddy read with Mina ♡✨ 4/5 ✨The decision felt like a steel shell closing around his heart. And then he felt nothing at all.Whew, this series was such a journey and I guess I acquired two new sons along the way. This sequel is a study of survival and is definitely more character driven. The plot ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.tw: all content warnings provided by the author can be found here (http://victorialeewrites.com/2019/10/...)My review for The Fever King (Book 1)Buddy read with Mina ♡✨ 4/5 ✨The decision felt like a steel shell closing around his heart. And then he felt nothing at all.Whew, this series was such a journey and I guess I acquired two new sons along the way. This sequel is a study of survival and is definitely more character driven. The plot was a weak point for me and I wasn’t in love with it but I don’t think it mattered too much at the end of the end because there was so much to take away from this book.I fell in love once again with Noam and Dara and I just want them to be happy and healthy. Their character arcs are so interesting on their own and in relation to one another. They both had so much room to grow, either apart or together, and Victoria Lee played it out so well. In this book they are both trying to come to terms with their own trauma and coping mechanisms. A lot of important discussions on healing and being a survivor of abuse are tackled here and for once we’re shown an immortal x teenager relationship in the creepy light it deserves. Victoria Lee has also crafted one of the best YA villains I’ve read about. He is charming, loved, makes some points but is still despicable, vicious and terrible. I just loved the exploration of his character, where he came from and how that played out later in his life. But it’s never given as an excuse for everything he’s done. Through this story the author opens up the discussion of “does the end justify the means” and puts forward a tactful exploration of the endless cycle of violence and abuse. This was an amazing series and it filled the void of YA Dystopia I had in my heart. I hope a lot more people will pick it up and give it a chance. You can also find me on Youtube & Twitter ✨
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  • Julia ✨
    January 1, 1970
    trigger warnings: intergenerational trauma, genocide, violence, abuse, attempted rape, mental health and suicide, slut-shaming, victim-blaming, emetophobia, drug and alcohol abuse, parental death, ableist languag.This book was dark, raw, disturbing, painful, real, messy, difficult, scary, marvelous, traumatizing.If I thought that The Fever King was dark and hard to read, the electric heir laughed me in the face while eating my heart for lunch.After finishing this, I doubt I still have a heart. trigger warnings: intergenerational trauma, genocide, violence, abuse, attempted rape, mental health and suicide, slut-shaming, victim-blaming, emetophobia, drug and alcohol abuse, parental death, ableist languag.This book was dark, raw, disturbing, painful, real, messy, difficult, scary, marvelous, traumatizing.If I thought that The Fever King was dark and hard to read, the electric heir laughed me in the face while eating my heart for lunch.After finishing this, I doubt I still have a heart. While the first book was more focused on the characters and the action, this book was about surviving the trauma, growth and dealing with recovery, learning to move on.The Electric Heir starts six months after the last events of book 1, and let me tell you, from the very start it was difficult. Seeing all the things Noam had to go through, him not realizing his abuse and pretending it was okay hurt me like nothing else.Dara is and always will be a piece of me. I've never connected more with a character before. I love him, I want to protect him and shield him from all the pain of the world. It was both a delight and a curse to see the story from his eyes.Before reading this series I thought: "oh it must be a nice ya sci-fi story with a lgbtq relationship" but no, oh no, was I wrong. This is a story about survival. Victoria Lee's writing is compelling, it doesn't let you stop reading, no matter how hard it is to go on. She wants to open your eyes, to show you the reality of this world. Victim-blaming, slut-shaming is still so much present in our society. We rush to blame victims and not the people who do the abuse. The fear of speaking up, the fear of not being believed, of being judged. There is not a perfect victim, not everyone can speak up, not everyone is ready to admit what they went through, not everyone thinks and accepts that they've been abused. And this book shows you exactly that. Dara and Noam aren't just victims. They're not just survivors either. Their story, their journey will destroy you, make you feel like every bone in your body is aching. And then it will heal you, it will make you smile between the tears. You'll never be the same, but you will be okay.
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  • tappkalina
    January 1, 1970
    Fuck my life, I just opened up my copy and we have DARA POVs! I mean, I guess he IS the electric heir, but still. OMG. I need his thoughts in my life. I need him in my life.
  • Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 1.5Thank you so very much to Skyscape and NetGalley for this advanced copy. Unpopular opinion time First things first, I was wondering why there were trigger warnings at the start of this book. Could it be that much darker than the first?, I thought. Too soon, I realized that, yes yes, it could! TW: sexual assault/rape, pederasty (I felt ill when there was the Youre so much older than your age line thrown in nonchalantly), drug, alcohol, and child abuse, physical/emotional abuse, Actual rating: 1.5Thank you so very much to Skyscape and NetGalley for this advanced copy. Unpopular opinion time First things first, I was wondering why there were trigger warnings at the start of this book. “Could it be that much darker than the first?”, I thought. Too soon, I realized that, yes— yes, it could! TW: sexual assault/rape, pederasty (I felt ill when there was the “You’re so much older than your age” line thrown in nonchalantly), drug, alcohol, and child abuse, physical/emotional abuse, references to suicide, eating disorders, graphic violence. Here’s the thing- Noam is 16 years old. Lehrer is presented as 24(?), but in reality over 120. This is gross, obviously, and challenged/questioned frequently and realistically. But I’m also not comfortable with Dara being 18 (a legal adult), and being with Noam (a legal minor) even with consent. And are we to assume that at the end (view spoiler)[Bethany(15) and Ames(18/19) are more than friends??? I wouldn’t be bringing it up if Bethany was older... (hide spoiler)]. There’s a lot of questionable content and relationship scenarios playing out in this book.I will say that Victoria Lee handles the difficult subject matter thoughtfully and with care. Essentially, this book is not about magic at all, but about survivors— how abuse affects those individuals— the coping, the struggling, the questioning, and all the swirling emotions trauma survivors go through. There are content warnings at the start and end of the book, as well as links and resources made available for those who may need them.Aside from that, there were many flaws, plot-wise. In general: it was all over the place. Clunky, heavy-handed, and paced very poorly. We jumped around way too often from one thing to the next, leaving this side plot for that one, bringing up points in regards to the main plot, but dropping them so suddenly and adding three new ones that dragged on... it was a lot. Admittedly, I fell victim to boredom; I hate to say that I was checking my progress every so often to see if I was any closer to finishing the book.I’m typically a huge fan of the ‘second-in-series’ books (they usually contain the most angst), but I was let down with The Electric Heir, especially considering how much I enjoyed The Fever King. And I’m guessing this is going to stay a duology? I can’t see any need for continuing the story, because it is fairly wrapped up (though very loosely) in this installment.The chapters alternate between Noam and Dara, which suits me just fine. I’ve recently had my fill of more than 2 POV’s per book. With just the two to focus on, you can really get a more in-depth, character-driven story. Except, again, all the other side characters are so woefully half-baked. This is really just the Noam/Dara/Calix show, which got redundant.Something else was sorely missing: the bisexual content. I must stress how disappointing this was. We’re given a bi character in the first book, and yet it’s so brief, under-developed, and quickly squashed. Here, in book two, it’s complete bi-erasure if you ask me. Why even have mentioned it in the first place if it’s never brought up again? Does it sound ignorant of me to ask these things? I’m being serious. I understand that Noam can still be canonically “bi” while in a same-sex relationship, but he’s in two (so to speak), and not once are we reaffirmed of his orientation (not to say that it’s the sum of all his parts, but just that’s it’s important for readers who feel woefully under-represented to remain included)... an inclusion of which should be such a huge step for the B in LGBT literature. But, again, it’s flimsy, half-hearted background info. So many missed opportunities in terms of crucial story arcs and narrative depth; so much that could’ve been said and done with the characterization... but it’s squelched.To sum up: I’m pretty goddamn disappointed.
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  • Ash | Wild Heart Reads
    January 1, 1970
    I have scrapped and rewritten this review so many times it's ridiculous, how can I review a book that is so good and so personal? None of my words can possibly do this book justice.  Every time I try to say what makes this book what it is my mind either blanks or what it comes up with just isn't enough to convey why I love The Electric Heir so much. So this is a short review not for lack of this to talk about but because this book renders me speechless. I'm writing this with tears in my eyes. I have scrapped and rewritten this review so many times it's ridiculous, how can I review a book that is so good and so personal? None of my words can possibly do this book justice.  Every time I try to say what makes this book what it is my mind either blanks or what it comes up with just isn't enough to convey why I love The Electric Heir so much. So this is a short review not for lack of this to talk about but because this book renders me speechless. I'm writing this with tears in my eyes. "The boy in this mirror was steel and frost and a bloodied knife. And he wasn't afraid of anything." Part of the reason why it's hard to a proper review is that as a survivor reading this was such a personal thing and a gift. It may not have always been an easy ready given what it deals with but fuck if it wasn't cathartic. It's hard to put into put into words how much it meant to see Noam and Dara fight and survive and ultimately get their happy ending. To know that they are - we are - worthy of it.I know ultimately this review isn't really much of one so I guess that I can only ask that you take my word for it. This duology is fantastic and if you thought The Fever Kings was good, The Electric Heir is out of this world. It reads like fanfiction in that it is everything you could possibly want out of the sequel and more.  "I'm staying with you," Dara said. "Until the end." My five star review of book one, The Fever King, can be found here: https://wildheartreads.wordpress.com/...Content Warnings: intergenerational trauma, genocide, violence, abuse, attempted rape, mental health and suicide, slut-shaming, victim-blaming, emetophobia, drug and alcohol, abuse, parental death, ableist language.These warnings are listed on Victoria's website, where they are also explained in greater detail if you need specific warning about these elements, found here: https://victorialeewrites.com/2019/10...*I received a review copy from the author and publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own*This review and more can be found at https://wildheartreads.wordpress.com/
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  • Sabs
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars gladly given!!! literally crying as i finished this lol yall aint READY for this spaghetti. this was everything i wanted and MORE bless up victoria lee. BEFORE...I HAVE! AN ARC!!! FOR THIS BEAUTY!!!!!!!! god BLESS skyscape ur my angel
  • Annemieke / A Dance with Books
    January 1, 1970
    CW/TW: Genocide / Trauma / Violence / Abuse / Attempted Rape of a Minor/ References to Suicide attempts / Slut-Shaming / (internalized) Victim Blaming / Ableist Language / References to substance abuse Thank you to Skyscape and Netgalley for the review copy in exchange for an honest review. This does not change my opinion in anyway Oh darn it, Victoria Lee. Did you really have to snap my heart out for another round or five? I read The Fever King last year and fell hard in love with Noam and CW/TW: Genocide / Trauma / Violence / Abuse / Attempted Rape of a Minor/ References to Suicide attempts / Slut-Shaming / (internalized) Victim Blaming / Ableist Language / References to substance abuse Thank you to Skyscape and Netgalley for the review copy in exchange for an honest review. This does not change my opinion in anyway Oh darn it, Victoria Lee. Did you really have to snap my heart out for another round or five? I read The Fever King last year and fell hard in love with Noam and Dara. With this world and those around them. This book continues about 6 months after the end of The Fever King and it throws us right into the feels. Because Noam doesn’t entirely remember everything that happened and guess who is taking advantage of that? In this book we get the dual perspective of Noam and Dara, and that worked so very well. Noam who is stuck in a ‘relationship’ with an abuser but can’t quite see it, and Dara who recognizes all the signs of it. There is so much to unpack here when it comes to trauma, ptsd, substance abuse, abuse and survival. It hits so many marks that come with a truly emotional read with a looming genocide in the background. With having to defeat the bad guy who knows how to twist everything that puts him in the right limelight. Where you doubt yourself constantly. It showcases the abuser as they come by in real life too. This one just happens to be able to manipulate the actual mind with his powers. But abusers in real life do this too, just with words and veiled threats. And then aggression. It is confrontational. Please be aware of that when you step into this book. It is not an easy read. Not this book nor The Fever King. But if you dare to step into it , it is so well worth it.
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  • Alexandra Nae
    January 1, 1970
    Okay book nerds. Strap in because this book may just be my top/favorite read of 2020. I kid you not. The Electric Heir is one conclusion I will never forget. Its powerful, its gripping, its intense, its heartbreaking, and above all, its beautifully done. I am truly in awe of this book.Beautifully writtenThe Electric Heir is beautifully written. Theres no other way to go about it. Every sentence, every chapter, every archive part, every flashbackthey were all there for a reason, they were all Okay book nerds. Strap in because this book may just be my top/favorite read of 2020. I kid you not. The Electric Heir is one conclusion I will never forget. It’s powerful, it’s gripping, it’s intense, it’s heartbreaking, and above all, it’s beautifully done. I am truly in awe of this book.Beautifully writtenThe Electric Heir is beautifully written. There’s no other way to go about it. Every sentence, every chapter, every archive part, every flashback—they were all there for a reason, they were all there to create a powerful story that will affect the readers. And boy, was I affected. My breath was knocked out of me; I was left feeling horrified; I cried; I felt all the anger, the frustration, the sadness, the angst, the fear, the hope; everything. I was so emotionally invested with the characters and the story because of the prose and how the author carefully built the story. I admire it so much.I also loved the addition of Dara’s point of view. It was so great to know more of his perspective, his experiences, his thoughts, his feelings. He was an enigma in The Fever King, and here in The Electric Heir, we’re given the chance to peek into his mind. I loved it.Complex charactersI loved how the author created such complex characters and explored each and every one of them. From Noam, to Dara, to Lehrer, and even the minor characters like Ames, Bethany, Taye, Leo, Priya and Claire. I applaud the author for such a great job with these characters.Noam, my sweet boy, Noam. There’s a drastic change from the Noam in The Fever King to the Noam here in The Electric Heir. He’s braver, smarter, definitely more powerful, but there’s also a new kind of darkness inside of him—a mix of guilt, longing, trauma, secrets, wrong decisions, and more.And Dara, my darling boy, Dara. There’s also a drastic change in Dara, all right. With him being no longer a Witching, we see him struggle and try to cope with being a normal person. We also see him try to deal with all that happened while he was gone, deal with the new Noam, and deal with the horrors Lehrer has imprinted on his mind.And that brings me to Lehrer. Just when I thought I have an idea of what kind of person Lehrer is, I am proven wrong. Lehrer’s character is such a good villain, I have to admit that, even though I have a newfound hatred for him. Him being an antagonist is good because it’s so real, because his character exists in the real world—in the faces of abusers, of corrupt politicians, of tyrants, of manipulators. That’s what makes him so good, and so scary, and so frustrating.Gripping storyline with significant themesThe author dedicated The Electric Heir to survivors. Because above all, this story is about surviving. Surviving abusers, surviving tyranny, surviving your own demons. I absolutely loved how the author focused on themes such as abuse, trauma, mental health, politics, relationships. There were already themes like these in The Fever King, but it’s in this book where these themes were such a distinct part of the plot. The author has woven them all together with such regard and, for me, it created such a powerful, gripping, and emotional story that will really stay with me as a reader and as a person. It was brilliant.Overall, this book is just so, so good. Actually, it’s more than that, it’s magnificent, What a finale! I’m pretty sure this is my new obsession now, and I can say that Victoria Lee is now one of my favorite authors.So glad, this got adapted into a Webtoon! AAAAAHHHHHHH(This review was first published on Enthralled Bookworm.)
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  • michelle (magical reads)
    January 1, 1970
    4.25 starsread on my blog Noam could taste his own fear in his mouth, hot and ferrous. It coiled down his spine like a snake: venomous.Fear was as much a weapon as anger. I absolutely adored The Fever King, and I was so anxious to read the sequel. The ending of the first book left me heartbroken, but The Electric Heir left me filled with hope. It's a stunning sequel, one that tells a story of healing and overcoming your abusers.I suppose this is technically a spoiler for book one, but theres no 4.25 starsread on my blog Noam could taste his own fear in his mouth, hot and ferrous. It coiled down his spine like a snake: venomous.Fear was as much a weapon as anger. I absolutely adored The Fever King, and I was so anxious to read the sequel. The ending of the first book left me heartbroken, but The Electric Heir left me filled with hope. It's a stunning sequel, one that tells a story of healing and overcoming your abusers.I suppose this is technically a spoiler for book one, but there’s no real way of reviewing it fully, so here goes: Dara’s alive, bitch! And thank goodness for that. I cried at the ending of The Fever King and never stopped.Having Dara’s point of view really opens up the story. Living in Noam’s head gives us a very skewed perspective on things, and Dara provides a clearer view. We also learn about the extent of his experiences of abuse under Lehrer’s thumb, a cycle Dara tries to stop with Noam. Could [Lehrer] see the threads of his own design stitching Noam together? This is just as much a story of survival and healing as well as the rebellion plot to overthrow Lehrer. Noam is playing a double agent, but he’s having trouble telling what’s real and what’s not with Lehrer. He enters a sexual relationship with him, telling himself that it’s only natural because they have so much in common. Of course, this is abusive; Lehrer will always have a position of power over Noam. There will always be an imbalance of power, and they will never be equals. Again, Dara tries to make him realize this because he’s been in Noam’s position.Both Noam and Dara really grew as characters, as well as Bethany and Ames. While it’s a long process, they all grow and develop healthier habits. Honestly, I would read another book of just them, living peacefully and happily!And we need to talk about the gay angst! I hate them (I love them). Communication has always been a fuzzy thing between Dara and Noam, even more so because they know that Lehrer can find out anything they say to each other. However, they eventually learn how to communicate more openly.The worldbuilding was really cool, particularly the magic system. We learn more about the territories outside of Carolinia and visit Texas (yeehaw, babey!). I really love the principle of the magic and how it’s based on what you’re interested in. Maybe it was okay to admit helplessness. Maybe it didn’t make them weak. It’s really hard to say anything more without spoiling the entire book, but know that Victoria Lee has written a quiet, beautiful story of healing and growing. This is a survivor’s tale. If you haven’t read The Fever King yet, I can’t recommend it enough.
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  • Iris
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't sure about this cover when I first saw it, but it's definitely growing on me !! I loooove how it looks next to the cover of The Fever King***Hello why is this book not out yet how am I expected to wait nine months I've barely made it three hours this is TORTUREEEE
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  • kelly ♥
    January 1, 1970
    im incoherent right now so let me just say: dara shirazi has never done anything wrong in his life ever. review to come i’m incoherent right now so let me just say: dara shirazi has never done anything wrong in his life ever. review to come
  • Lu
    January 1, 1970
    The electric heir is the sequel of the brilliant and amazing The fever king in the Feverwake duology.SPOILERS AHEADTWhttps://victorialeewrites.com/2019/10PLOTThe electric heir starts six months after the ending of The Fever King. After Noam helped overthrow the goverment of Carolinia, the Atlantians became citizens and Lehrer chancellor.But Noam remembers everything Lehrer did, with the magic, to Dara and hes ready to do anything to bring him down, even playing the double agent, tricking Lehrer The electric heir is the sequel of the brilliant and amazing The fever king in the Feverwake duology.SPOILERS AHEADTWhttps://victorialeewrites.com/2019/10…PLOTThe electric heir starts six months after the ending of The Fever King. After Noam helped overthrow the goverment of Carolinia, the Atlantians became citizens and Lehrer chancellor.But Noam remembers everything Lehrer did, with the magic, to Dara and he’s ready to do anything to bring him down, even playing the double agent, tricking Lehrer to think he’s on his side. When Dara, who Noam thought dead, returns to Carolinia, without his magic, stripped away by the same vaccine it saved his life, both of them are forced to play a dangerous game to bring Lehrer to justice and save their country.And themselves.MY THOUGHTSThis book is raw and brutal and so hard to read. Victoria Lee poured her heart in this duology, talking about suffering, abuse and survivors. It’s a book about survivors and surviving.Dara and Noam’s abuser is charismatic and powerful, persuasive and sick and it was so painful to read how Noam struggled to see what is happening to him as an abuse, as a violence.He’s so manipulate by Lehrer, so involved into this big game he has trouble realizing he’s a victim. Both Noam and Dara fight to recover and call things by their name, during the book and after.It was hard to read both of them feeling shame and guilt and blaming theirselves for others’ sins and I love how Ames was such an amazing friend, ready to open their eyes and pushing them to see the truth.In The electric heir Lehrer’s policy is still brutal and Noam and Dara chose to fight with the Black Magnolia, a rebellion movement, looking for a way to kill an immortal human being, while Lehrer continued his power climbing, using the IV teenager as weapons, Noam included.Noam found himself playing a double role, a spy for the resistance, living with Lehrer, faking it to be still under his persuasion (the Faraday cage helped him to protect himself and to remember everything Lehrer did to Carolinia, the virus and to Dara) and aiding the resistance.It was hard to think about how was hurt and manipulated by Lehrer, how twisted Lehrer’s mind could be, forcing Noam into a parody of a couple, when Noam is seventeen and under his power. It was difficult to read, too, when Dara confessed to Ames that Lehrer first and then Ames’ father raped him, when he still thought and yearned for Lehrer’s affection, before he realized the truth.Reading about Noam trapped in this big scheme was absolutely chilling, how determined he was, despite the dangers how being there with Lehrer, to destroy him, to find a solution against him, to avenge Dara.In The electric heir we have two POVs, reading Dara’s for the first time. I loved his POV’s, it was brilliant and interesting reading about his thoughts and feelings.Like in The fever king, Victoria Lee’s writing style is intense and powerful, so captivating I could feel Dara’s anxiety, his feeling powerless without his power, forced to hiding because Lehrer was looking for him and his being worried for Noam.The relationship between Noam and Dara is incredibly complex in The electric heir. They are both victim, both struggling with the notion of abuse and powerlessness. I loved how Dara decided, thanks to the QZ, to stop drinking and I was so anguished to read how him and Ames were so self-destructive, trying to feel the hollowness and pain with booze, drugs and sex.In Dara’s and Noam’s relationship there is hurt, betrayal, resentment and so much love and affection. During the book they still want and love each other and Dara hated seeing Noam with Lehrer, so in danger to be hurt, raped or killed. Reading about Dara and Noam being raped and hit was so awful.I felt so involved, my heart was beating so fast, screaming against the brutality, the unfairness.It was painful reading how both Dara and Noam thought they wanted to have sex with Lehrer, to consent to that, craving for his attention, manipulated by him.Before meeting Dara again at the gala, Noam felt guilty because he abandoned him and he spent six months thinking he was dead. His pain, his guilt and anguish were incredibly written. He got close to Lehrer for this reason, too and only after talking with Dara, Noam realized Lehrer had his eyes on him since the beginning.It was awful, heartbreaking to read how Noam was stressed and tense, refusing to have sex with Lehrer, starting to realized their relationship, since Dara is back. Difficult to read his denial, almost until the end, when Lehrer almost killed him because he refused him.I really loved this book, it was a difficult read because it’s impossible not to love these characters (Except Lehrer, even though he is a complex character and not the usual flat villain of the story).I loved the way the author talked about surviving and survivors, calling things by their names, talking about rape. Both Noam and Dara are survivors and they experience lots of feelings, like shame, guilt, powerlessness, denial. The reader is able to follow them struggling with their feelings and, above all Noam, realizing what is happening to them.Both Dara and Noam are abused by the same man, Lehrer, but they experience and react to the abuse in a different way. Dara was abused, physically, sexually, psychologically by his adoptive father, while Noam was involved, coerced, manipulated into an abusive relationship, a parody of a couple. Dara reacts in a self-destructive way, drinking, partying, having sex with strangers, Noam, at least in the beginning, can’t see or don’t want to realize what is happening to him as an abuse.Both of them has to come to term with their abuse, they went through hell, feeling shame, guilt and powerlessness, and it was great and moving reading about their friends, new and old, supporting and helping them. I loved Ames, Bethany and Taye (I’d love more Taye scenes since he’s really cool), their friendships, their wanting to protect each other.THE WRITINGThis book made my heart beat faster in more than one occasion, I have to say. Victoria Lee’s writing style is powerful and intense. Her characters are complex, real, authentic and the story is gripping and it leave you bleeding, in a very good way. They are brimming with life, anger, love, hope, rage and reading about them being hurt and scared was a punch in the gut.I was so involved, I felt everything. I was scared, I was angry, I felt Noam’s and Dara’s pain, shame, love, guilt, hope, rage.It was emotional, raw and it wrecked me completely.I was so captivated, so caught in the story I couldn’t stop reading and hoping for the best. It’s full of angst, revelations, truths and plot twists and I absolutely loved the final chapter, when everything comes to an end in a perfect way.It’s not saying they will never have nightmares and traumas, but it’s saying it’s possible to heal and move on. I loved seeing Dara and Noam together after all the things they have been through, living together, helping each other through the bad times, Dara cooking and showing Noam the constellations.Beautiful book, raw, painful and so necessary.I don’t think I will stop freaking out about this book, because I’ve been obsessed about it for months, since October.
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: intergenerational trauma, genocide, violence, abuse, attempted rape, mental health and suicide, slut-shaming, victim-blaming, emetophobia, drug and alcohol abuse, parental death, ableist language (Detailed warnings found on Lee's website)The Electric Heir defies words. It's stunning. I hadn't planned on reading it in one day, but you know those books that don't let you go? (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: intergenerational trauma, genocide, violence, abuse, attempted rape, mental health and suicide, slut-shaming, victim-blaming, emetophobia, drug and alcohol abuse, parental death, ableist language (Detailed warnings found on Lee's website)The Electric Heir defies words. It's stunning. I hadn't planned on reading it in one day, but you know those books that don't let you go? That demand to be read? That pretty much sums up The Electric Heir. It's a book about survival and abuse, about the challenge to dismantle the harmful rhetoric swirling around us. Not only is it emotional and poignant, but it is also a book about resistance and sacrifice. How do we process our trauma and survive? How can we witness and examine what is happening? Overall I am just so impressed and still in emotional shock from The Electric Heir. Our struggles to process what happened to us and figure out who we want to be. Using fantasy as a lens, Lee examines charismatic abusers and our difficulties to recognize our own abuse. It is emotional and will wrench your heart, but it's absolutely affirming to see on the page for people who went through similar situations. That feeling that no one will hear you or believe you.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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