Tigers, Not Daughters
The Torres sisters dream of escape. Escape from their needy and despotic widowed father, and from their San Antonio neighborhood, full of old San Antonio families and all the traditions and expectations that go along with them. In the summer after her senior year of high school, Ana, the oldest sister, falls to her death from her bedroom window. A year later, her three younger sisters, Jessica, Iridian, and Rosa, are still consumed by grief and haunted by their sister’s memory. Their dream of leaving Southtown now seems out of reach. But then strange things start happening around the house: mysterious laughter, mysterious shadows, mysterious writing on the walls. The sisters begin to wonder if Ana really is haunting them, trying to send them a message—and what exactly she’s trying to say.   In a stunning follow-up to her National Book Award–longlisted novel All the Wind in the World, Samantha Mabry weaves an aching, magical novel that is one part family drama, one part ghost story, and one part love story.  

Tigers, Not Daughters Details

TitleTigers, Not Daughters
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 24th, 2020
PublisherAlgonquin Young Readers
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Magical Realism

Tigers, Not Daughters Review

  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    And the award for the fastest NetGalley approval in history goes to... this one!!! I am here for the cover, the synopsis, and all the feminist retellings.*Many thanks to the publisher for providing my review copy.
  • Mandi1082
    January 1, 1970
    Tigers, not daughters is told by different perspectives. It deals with loss, grief, alcohol and physical abuse. When one of the Torres sisters dies the family each try to deal with it in their own way. You have a father who did not only lose his wife in child birth but also lost his oldest daughter. You have Jessica who misses her sister so much that she tries to be like her. You have Iridian who is scared to sleep in her own home. Then you have Ana the youngest who is dealing with her emotions Tigers, not daughters is told by different perspectives. It deals with loss, grief, alcohol and physical abuse. When one of the Torres sisters dies the family each try to deal with it in their own way. You have a father who did not only lose his wife in child birth but also lost his oldest daughter. You have Jessica who misses her sister so much that she tries to be like her. You have Iridian who is scared to sleep in her own home. Then you have Ana the youngest who is dealing with her emotions by finding the Hyena that has escaped. I love the poetic way this book was written. It does have a slight touch of Magic Realism. The way the characters are written you can feel all their pain and emotions. I would recommend this book to all who would love a quick touching read.
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  • Amy Imogene Reads
    January 1, 1970
    AHHHHH ghosts and houses and magical realism and sistersThank you to Algonquin Young Readers for an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.
  • Moony MeowPoff
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 40%I wanted to like this so bad. The cover was so beautiful, but the story, the characters - i didn't like it. How the story was 'cut up' in a way focusing on the characters here and there. But i just could'nt connect or like any of the characters or the story that unfolded in the book. This was not my cup of tea.
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  • Fanna
    January 1, 1970
    fantasy + contemporaryghost story + love story + family dramamagical Little Women for modern times ☀️fantasy + contemporary☀️ghost story + love story + family drama☀️magical Little Women for modern times
  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! I got this book as an advance reader’s copy from the publisher. She said to read it and I would not be disappointed. Man! Was she right! Loved the stories of these sisters. Easily one of the best I’ve read this year.
  • Sarah-Hope
    January 1, 1970
    First there are four Torres sisters. We see the four of them together, sneaking out of an upstairs window hoping to run away to live with an aunt and to escape their hot-tempered, lethargic father. A year later, the Torres sisters are only three—the eldest, Anna, has fallen from that same upstairs window and died. None or the three sisters, nor their father, will ever be the same. The Torres sisters are surrounded by troubles: isolation, repressed dreams, unkindness from peers, and constant First there are four Torres sisters. We see the four of them together, sneaking out of an upstairs window hoping to run away to live with an aunt and to escape their hot-tempered, lethargic father. A year later, the Torres sisters are only three—the eldest, Anna, has fallen from that same upstairs window and died. None or the three sisters, nor their father, will ever be the same. The Torres sisters are surrounded by troubles: isolation, repressed dreams, unkindness from peers, and constant scrutiny from neighbors. And Jessica, now the eldest, has a boyfriend who is becoming abusive.One year after her death, Anna's ghost returns, setting off a series of unnerving events, knocking on windows, belongings thrown about, even the escape of a hyena from the local zoo.Tigers, Not Daughters allows us to follow their survival strategies, some well-chosen, others not. One thing is certain: no matter how mad the sisters are with each other, they'll defend one another fiercely in the face of any threat, be it their father, that boyfriend, or even Anna's ghost.This book is an interesting, quick read. The blend of the ordinary and the paranormal isn't completely successful. Anna's ghost's appearances and actions feel random at times and don't always move the plot forward, even though they're at the center of the book. Read this book if you want to spend some time with an interesting, flawed family attempting to have some control over the world in which they live.
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  • Krissy
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really great read. It was about 3 sisters dealing with the loss of the fourth. They each cope in their own ways and each chapter is from a different point of view. Their father is mostly absent with his own grief and each of the girls are basically on their own. It follows them a year after the loss and shows exactly how they've been affected. Each one eventually overcomes and grows stronger. It was a good read for me. I would certainly read more by this author.
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  • Sacha
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC. I'll post a review upon publication in March.
  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for a copy of this book "Tigers Not Daughters" in exchange for an honest review. I knew nothing about this book before digging into it and once I started I literally could not stop reading. The tone is very different from anything I've read before. The book is about four girls who live with their father, who is a pretty terrible father and person. He tries to hold them close while also just being an irresponsible, selfish jerk. Their mother died when the youngest girl was Thank you to NetGalley for a copy of this book "Tigers Not Daughters" in exchange for an honest review. I knew nothing about this book before digging into it and once I started I literally could not stop reading. The tone is very different from anything I've read before. The book is about four girls who live with their father, who is a pretty terrible father and person. He tries to hold them close while also just being an irresponsible, selfish jerk. Their mother died when the youngest girl was born. Across the street lives a boy named Hector whose house is a hangout for his three best guy friends. Parts of this book are told from their perspective. Ana is the oldest daughter who just graduated high school. Her sisters are Jessica, Iridian, and Rosa who is around twelve years old and who all have very different personalities and quirks. The girls dream of running away. But one day Ana dies and the girls are left scrambling. Their plan was always led by Ana. A lot of interesting things start happening around a year after Ana's death. Pretty soon it is apparent that Ana is back and trying to send them a message. The girls deal with Ana's spirit differently and they try to unravel the message that she is sending them. Oh this book! It felt so real and the characters felt realistic and vulnerable. It made the 'ghostly' parts of the story more realistic as well. The only thing negative I can say is that boo is written in a way that never quite allows you to get in the character's heads. A good book can make you feel like you are completely immersed in the character. This felt more like watching a tv show. A really good tv show, maybe even your favorite, but still a tv show. But I wouldn't change the tone or writing either because it was so beautifully done. I really enjoyed this book. I love stories where women take their futures by the hand and overcome obstacles. I don't really see the Little Women comparisons though. The only thing I found to be similar was that both books are about four sisters. I highly recommend this one.
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  • Bethany Nichols (beth_and_books)
    January 1, 1970
    Trigger warnings: human and animal death (view spoiler)[mother dies in childbirth (hide spoiler)], abuse in a romantic relationshipSynopsis: We follow the perspectives of sisters Jessica, Rosa and Iridian as they live life whilst being haunted by their recently deceased sister, Ana. Oh, and we get the perspective from a nosy neighbour and his friends too. As the girls try to decipher why Ana is haunting them they each navigate their own life obstacles and grief in the 9 days that the majority of Trigger warnings: human and animal death (view spoiler)[mother dies in childbirth (hide spoiler)], abuse in a romantic relationshipSynopsis: We follow the perspectives of sisters Jessica, Rosa and Iridian as they live life whilst being haunted by their recently deceased sister, Ana. Oh, and we get the perspective from a nosy neighbour and his friends too. As the girls try to decipher why Ana is haunting them they each navigate their own life obstacles and grief in the 9 days that the majority of this story takes place in.Wow, I started this book last night without knowing quite what I was getting into. After reading the first page, I was irrevocably hooked. Normally I find it hard to sink in to a novel which has multiple perspectives as I find it hard to care that much about certain characters and only love one. However, I loved each perspective in this story equally - from Jessica's tough time with boyfriend John, Iridian and her sense of belonging within a page, Rosa and her sweet yet strong character, and even the boys next door and their well articulated shame at not doing more to help.I think my favourite part about this book was how real each of the characters felt. They didn't play the hero just because that would have been the easier path to take, instead they acted how any normal person would probably act in that situation. Then, when they tables were turned and a character did act, that also felt real. (view spoiler)[ Like when Jessica lashed out at John when he hit Iridian, hell yes, I would've done the same if anyone laid a finger on my younger sibling! (hide spoiler)]I'm lucky enough that I haven't experienced the death of someone close to me, all my close family and friends are still beautifully alive. So I don't feel like I can say that I related to the feelings of grief that the sisters and their dad experience, but I can say that I do believe that people react to grief in different ways and the way that Mabry writes this in her characters is poetic. Coming away from reading about grief written in this way has given me a new perspective on what it would be like to lose someone precious. Oh, and while I mentioned Dad... he is a grief stricken character who comes across as a "baddie" in the girls eyes, however, I think the reader is encouraged to sympathise with him a little bit. Not excuse him and his actions, but to develop our sympathy and make ourselves (the audience) recognise that although we are entitled to our opinions, it doesn't mean that others aren't.There are other elements in the book that I really enjoyed as well; the general sisterhood feel, hints of romance, the spiritual side of Rosa, the acknowledgement of how guilt can really plague a person, and that someone actually stood up against an asshole character in a way that wasn't all macho. I hope that this novel gets traction when it is published in March 2020 as I think it could help many people understand more about grief and emotions, as well as just being an all round hooking read. Now excuse me as I go find Mabry's other books!
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  • Jade - theelderbooks
    January 1, 1970
    I must admit the writing here was amazing ! I truly didn't see where the book was going until it was over, which is a huge green light for me in a book. Now, here is why I loved it, and why you probably will too !The biggest selling point of this book is 100% its characters. The sisters are just so real, somewhat relatable, dealing with issues way above them, and their bond is so strong, yet so raw and difficult. The way they deal with Ana's death is realistic, and I love how they come together I must admit the writing here was amazing ! I truly didn't see where the book was going until it was over, which is a huge green light for me in a book. Now, here is why I loved it, and why you probably will too !The biggest selling point of this book is 100% its characters. The sisters are just so real, somewhat relatable, dealing with issues way above them, and their bond is so strong, yet so raw and difficult. The way they deal with Ana's death is realistic, and I love how they come together when strange things begin to happen. Sisters supporting each other is the best.The message behind all this book, even though pretty guessable, only really hits you at the end of the book, and I felt so emotional when I finished my reading. If I had a paper version, I would definitely have held it to my chest like an idiot.The magical/paranormal aspect of the book is really not scary, and I thought the descriptions of it and the way it flows with the rest of the story were completely masterful. Samantha Mabry has a way with words that made me swoon in a way not many books can.If I must find something that disturbed my reading a little, I must mention the fact that the multiple POVs were mostly a good idea, except for the one of the neighbour kids. I have no clue how they are relevant to the whole plot, the whole book. Those kids felt like that extra screw you end up with when you finish building furniture : they're here but they're entirely useless.I can't recommend you this enough. We have a simple story, with simple people who encounter some perfectly balanced-written magic and strange events. Everything felt so nice and the messages of Tigers, not Daughters are really worth reading.
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  • Kayla Owens
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely devoured this book. I immediately fell in love with the Torres sisters and their unique fierceness.
  • Gustavo
    January 1, 1970
    "Apologies and forgiveness were rare and did not come easy in the Torres house, because rarely did anyone deserve them."This novel is about the Torres sisters trying to cope their sister Ana's death. They are dealing with their problems plus with her sister's ghost. "Her window was open—no, not open, broken. Someone must’ve thrown something through it. We watched a piece of glass the size of a hubcap dangle from the frame, then fall. Then, Ana’s sisters appeared in the window. They were "Apologies and forgiveness were rare and did not come easy in the Torres house, because rarely did anyone deserve them."This novel is about the Torres sisters trying to cope their sister Ana's death. They are dealing with their problems plus with her sister's ghost. "Her window was open—no, not open, broken. Someone must’ve thrown something through it. We watched a piece of glass the size of a hubcap dangle from the frame, then fall. Then, Ana’s sisters appeared in the window. They were screaming." This all begins somewhere in San Antonio, in a sad house where four sisters lived. Rosa, the youngest of the house, has the “gift” of seeing life differently. She likes to talk to animals. She is the strongest character of all. Iridian, the second to last of the sisters, likes to keep to herself. She likes to read the Witching hour and likes to write. She is one of the people most affected by her sister’s death. Jessica, the second oldest sister, is trying to hide her feelings and is trying to become like her sister that has passed away. She is working in a pharmacy to support her family. Ana, the oldest, she was like a mother to them, and now she’s the ghost. Rafe, their father who is the weakest of all, has not been able to cope with his wife and daughter’s death. There are some neighbors who witness their lives and have an important role in this story. "Her entire neighborhood knew all the details of her miserable life. Peter knew. Peter’s friends knew. Peter’s friends’ grandparents knew. Mrs. Rivas from earlier today probably knew. Her fucking cat Hudspeth probably knew. They knew about Jessica’s dead mother, her dead sister, her alive but destroyed sisters, her total disaster of a dad." I’m in love with the writing style, I’m in love with the sisters and with the plot. I cried in some chapters and I really felt for the characters and their emotions. If you like ghost stories, magic realism, sisterhood, grieving, this book is one hundred percent for you. I totally recommend it."Rosa believed in signs, but she didn’t believe in coincidences. It was no coincide, for example, that the anniversary of Ana’s death came on the same day that an animal escaped from the zoo."Thank You NetGalley and publisher for a copy of this book
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  • Gustavo
    January 1, 1970
    “Apologies and forgiveness were rare and did not come easy in the Torres house, because rarely did anyone deserve them.”This novel is about the Torres sisters trying to cope their sister Ana's death. They are dealing with their problems plus with her sister's ghost.“Her window was open—no, not open, broken. Someone must’ve thrown something through it. We watched a piece of glass the size of a hubcap dangle from the frame, then fall. Then, Ana’s sisters appeared in the window. They were “Apologies and forgiveness were rare and did not come easy in the Torres house, because rarely did anyone deserve them.”This novel is about the Torres sisters trying to cope their sister Ana's death. They are dealing with their problems plus with her sister's ghost.“Her window was open—no, not open, broken. Someone must’ve thrown something through it. We watched a piece of glass the size of a hubcap dangle from the frame, then fall. Then, Ana’s sisters appeared in the window. They were screaming.” This all begins somewhere in San Antonio, in a sad house where four sisters lived. Rosa, the youngest of the house, has the “gift” of seeing life differently. She likes to talk to animals. She is the strongest character of all. Iridian, the second to last of the sisters, likes to keep to herself. She likes to read the Witching hour and likes to write. She is one of the people most affected by her sister’s death. Jessica, the second oldest sister, is trying to hide her feelings and is trying to become like her sister that has passed away. She is working in a pharmacy to support her family. Ana, the oldest, she was like a mother to them, and now she’s the ghost. Rafe, their father who is the weakest of all, has not been able to cope with his wife and daughter’s death. There are some neighbors who witness their lives and have an important role in this story. “Her entire neighborhood knew all the details of her miserable life. Peter knew. Peter’s friends knew. Peter’s friends’ grandparents knew. Mrs. Rivas from earlier today probably knew. Her fucking cat Hudspeth probably knew. They knew about Jessica’s dead mother, her dead sister, her alive but destroyed sisters, her total disaster of a dad.”I’m in love with the writing style, I’m in love with the sisters and with the plot. I cried in some chapters and I really felt for the characters and their emotions. If you like ghost stories, magic realism, sisterhood, grieving, this book is one hundred percent for you. I totally recommend it.“Rosa believed in signs, but she didn’t believe in coincidences. It was no coincide, for example, that the anniversary of Ana’s death came on the same day that an animal escaped from the zoo.”Thank You NetGalley and the publisher for a copy of this book.
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  • Abbey Flentje
    January 1, 1970
    Tigers, Not Daughters is the story of the Torres sisters, three young women -- Iridian, Jessica, and Rosa -- grieving the loss of their eldest sister, Ana. Ana, however, is not quite gone, and her sisters find themselves and their home haunted by Ana's spirit. As all three girls navigate isolation, an abusive boyfriend, and an escaped hyena, the ghost of their sister lingers and forces them to come to terms with their grief once and for all. Samantha Mabry writes with a unique voice, lyrical Tigers, Not Daughters is the story of the Torres sisters, three young women -- Iridian, Jessica, and Rosa -- grieving the loss of their eldest sister, Ana. Ana, however, is not quite gone, and her sisters find themselves and their home haunted by Ana's spirit. As all three girls navigate isolation, an abusive boyfriend, and an escaped hyena, the ghost of their sister lingers and forces them to come to terms with their grief once and for all. Samantha Mabry writes with a unique voice, lyrical prose that flows gently even as it punches the reader in the gut. Each sister is distinctive and their grief is palpable. Mabry demonstrates how the grieving process is for different people, even those who have lost the same loved one. This book is a masterful portrayal of the bonds between sisters, the grief that binds them together, and the pain that ultimately heals them.Thank you to Netgalley for sending me a digital ARC.
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  • Cristina
    January 1, 1970
    GORGEOUS
  • Lady Fay
    January 1, 1970
    I will try to stay Spoiler-free. I'm COMPLETELY catched by this book and the story of the girls, since receiving it for an honest review I cannot get rid of it and I cannot believe that it will be out in 2020 (so late!). It's well well (two well is better than one, this is not a typo) written and everything is creepy perfect. I dunno to spoiler but it is about sisterhood bonds and it's inspired by Shakespeare himself but twisted among a latino atmosphere and there is a revenants theme that has I will try to stay Spoiler-free. I'm COMPLETELY catched by this book and the story of the girls, since receiving it for an honest review I cannot get rid of it and I cannot believe that it will be out in 2020 (so late!). It's well well (two well is better than one, this is not a typo) written and everything is creepy perfect. I dunno to spoiler but it is about sisterhood bonds and it's inspired by Shakespeare himself but twisted among a latino atmosphere and there is a revenants theme that has hugely impressed me with his psychological perspective. I'm half-way and I don't have finished the story but this book is one of the best that I've recently read giving fresh air and goodness to the all-fantasy/romance YA. POV changes among the boys (you will know that there are also boys) and the sisters Iridian, Jessica and Rosa. And ever if I really like Iridian they are all very deep and enjoyable in their differences. This is a very real book, and a very precious one. It's like a gem, with all of the details given one by one about the plot and the presence of a fathers that keeps "the girls" for himself but there are so strong and wild that are really the tigers of the title (and of the amazing cover). Psychology of the characters is explored with a slow pace, and we get in love with the broken daughters that want to escape from their small word to the bigger opportunity of deciding for their own lives. Mourning and ghosts are present along with a different culture (the catholic neighborhood of San Antonio) opposite to the bigger world of freedom of the escape from the claustrophobic house where they lives with the widowed dad. As a sicilian I do know of this type of haunting and puns, as it is culture-bonded maybe and I really enjoyed something that I can stay into either if I'm not an american.
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  • Lady Fay
    January 1, 1970
    I will try to stay Spoiler-free.I'm COMPLETELY catched by this book and the story of the girls, since receiving it for an honest review I cannot get rid of it and I cannot believe that it will be out in 2020 (so late!).It's well well (two well is better than one, this is not a typo) written and everything is creepy perfect. I dunno to spoiler but it is about sisterhood bonds and it's inspired by Shakespeare himself but twisted among a latino atmosphere and there is a revenants theme that has I will try to stay Spoiler-free.I'm COMPLETELY catched by this book and the story of the girls, since receiving it for an honest review I cannot get rid of it and I cannot believe that it will be out in 2020 (so late!).It's well well (two well is better than one, this is not a typo) written and everything is creepy perfect. I dunno to spoiler but it is about sisterhood bonds and it's inspired by Shakespeare himself but twisted among a latino atmosphere and there is a revenants theme that has hugely impressed me with his psychological perspective. I'm half-way and I don't have finished the story but this book is one of the best that I've recently read giving fresh air and goodness to the all-fantasy/romance YA. POV changes among the boys (you will know that there are also boys) and the sisters Iridian, Jessica and Rosa. And ever if I really like Iridian they are all very deep and enjoyable in their differences. This is a very real book, and a very precious one. It's like a gem, with all of the details given one by one about the plot and the presence of a fathers that keeps "the girls" for himself but there are so strong and wild that are really the tigers of the title (and of the amazing cover). Psychology of the characters is explored with a slow pace, and we get in love with the broken daughters that want to escape from their small word to the bigger opportunity of deciding for their own lives. Mourning and ghosts are present along with a different culture (the catholic neighborhood of San Antonio) opposite to the bigger world of freedom of the escape from the claustrophobic house where they lives with the widowed dad. As a sicilian I do know of this type of haunting and puns, as it is culture-bonded maybe and I really enjoyed something that I can stay into either if I'm not an american.
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  • Serena
    January 1, 1970
    I recieved an ARC of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I initially asked for this book because I had recently seen the Turkish movie Mustang, about five teenage sisters that lived with their controlling father. It quickly became a favorite coming of age story for me, and I have been looking for similar books, movies and tv shows ever since. This book was it, in the same way.This book is a contemporary, set in a family of four sisters and a widowed dad. He has a lot of I recieved an ARC of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I initially asked for this book because I had recently seen the Turkish movie Mustang, about five teenage sisters that lived with their controlling father. It quickly became a favorite coming of age story for me, and I have been looking for similar books, movies and tv shows ever since. This book was it, in the same way.This book is a contemporary, set in a family of four sisters and a widowed dad. He has a lot of rules for the house they live in, and one of them is none of the girls can let any boys in the house, so the older has to sneak out of her room's window to see the various boys (and men) she's dating. One night she ends up dying while she was climbing down the tree outside of her window to go see her boyfriend, and so the plot starts. The little town they live in is almost exclusively latinx, and the story is told through feminist lenses, though it may not seem at first in the beginning because the message it's giving isn't exactly spelled out for the reader to see.All of the sisters, even the dead one you don't even get to actually see throughout the book, have very distinct personalities and voices. The chapters alternate with their respective PoVs, and eventually one of a group of boys that live opposite them. If the chapters weren't named after the PoV girl, I would've still recognized which one of them it was.Jessica is the second oldest after Ana, the one who died. So now she has to work to pay for the expenses that their drunk dad can't afford to pay. She's in a really really toxic relationship that I loved-hated reading about. Jessica is such a strong-minded person, but she became submissive when John was around, and some people are starting to notice.Iridian kept her dead sister's books right after she died, so now her biggest passion is writing paranormal romance, and she does so whenever and wherever she can. She's the shy one, the snarky one, the look-at-me-and-I'll-bite-you one. I really liked her connection with Ana, because it wasn't as direct as the other two girls', but rather through books and stories and thinking what did Ana find in those that Iridian was not finding herself.And then Rosa is the youngest one. She's like caught in fairyland: speaks to animals, to her sister's ghost, likes to feel for the hidden forces in everyone and everything. She spends the whole book chasing a wild animal that ran away from a zoo, just because she's like that.What I found most interesting about this book was the everyday life of these three sisters after the death of the oldest one, seeing them cope and finding out through spread-out flashbacks what happened immediately after Ana died one year ago. I liked that we only got like one scene that was set in school, because I really don't think this book would've benefitted from being a high school drama. I think it's not even mentioned if Rosa goes to school or not. We focus on their neighborhood, Jessica's job at a pharmacy, and the church Rosa goes to every week, and that's it.The paranormal bit was really well done. I loved that it wasn't explained that much, and that the sisters didn't get all detective-like when they found out what was happening. I liked what it meant for the boys that live opposite them, and I FUCKING LOVED John's scene with it near the end. It merged really well with the end of the story, and because it wasn't really flashy it didn't seem out of place.What I didn't like was the lenght, lol. I would've made it 200 pages longer, so maybe we could've explored the side characters a bit more. Poor Walter didn't deserve to be in only like 10 pages.
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  • Kavanand (Reading for Two)
    January 1, 1970
    The Torres girls are a mess since their oldest sister Ana died last year. Jessica is angry at the world and in a bad relationship with Ana's controlling ex. Iridian never leaves the house and loses herself in writing. Rosa has turned to religion and believes she can communicate with animals. Their father is mostly drunk and has abdicated responsibility for his daughters.The sisters are shaken when they start to think that Ana's ghost may be lingering.I loved this book. Mabry is such a The Torres girls are a mess since their oldest sister Ana died last year. Jessica is angry at the world and in a bad relationship with Ana's controlling ex. Iridian never leaves the house and loses herself in writing. Rosa has turned to religion and believes she can communicate with animals. Their father is mostly drunk and has abdicated responsibility for his daughters.The sisters are shaken when they start to think that Ana's ghost may be lingering.I loved this book. Mabry is such a distinctive writer, and her prose style works really well in this mostly realistic story that's laced with some magical realism. Her descriptive writing really evokes the setting (a Latinx community in San Antonio) and the sisters, who are all very distinctive characters. The book is slightly reminiscent of The Virgin Suicides because the story is partly told through the point of view of a group of boys who are mildly obsessed with the sisters. This part of the narration is told in first person, and I liked the switch from the third person narration of the sisters' narratives. This is a ghost story of sorts, but it's not terribly scary (although there are a few tense moments). It's really more of a family story, about sisters torn apart and finding their way back to each other. I love books about siblings with rough relationships, so this was very much in my wheelhouse. It's a really lovely book. Trigger warning for an abusive relationship. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the ARC.
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  • Ayre Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I did not enjoy this story. This is a character driven story and if you, like me, do not like any of the characters its very hard to enjoy the story. There isn't a character in this book that isn't a horrible person in some way with really problematic behavior brushed off as "oh they're a teen its normal". Typically I give books like this 3 stars but I cant support the message this story gives to teens.This book is targeted to I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I did not enjoy this story. This is a character driven story and if you, like me, do not like any of the characters its very hard to enjoy the story. There isn't a character in this book that isn't a horrible person in some way with really problematic behavior brushed off as "oh they're a teen its normal". Typically I give books like this 3 stars but I cant support the message this story gives to teens.This book is targeted to teens and teens tend to be really impressionable. This book doesn't address how bad all the characters behavior is (other than the dads) and seems to encourage and normalize behavior that should ever be considered appropriate. The "great guy" character in this book shows some serious stalker trends and perversion written off as "hes a normal teenage boy of course hes going to look at naked girls through their windows". Even more worrisome is the character in an abusive relationship, like physically punching abusive, and she keeps going back to him like nothing happened. Yes, this happens in real life all the time but don't normalize it for teen girls!
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  • Tristan Munoz
    January 1, 1970
    "If it weren’t for us, things would’ve turned out differently. If it weren’t for us, Ana wouldn't have died two months later and her sisters wouldn’t have been forced to suffer at the hands of her angry ghost.” This was a moving story about the power of grief and the strength of sisterhood. Set in San Antonio "Tigers, Not Daughters" shows the gritty and raw side of raising daughters in modern times. The Torres sisters live across the street from teenage boy Hector, whose teenage male friends are "If it weren’t for us, things would’ve turned out differently. If it weren’t for us, Ana wouldn't have died two months later and her sisters wouldn’t have been forced to suffer at the hands of her angry ghost.” This was a moving story about the power of grief and the strength of sisterhood. Set in San Antonio "Tigers, Not Daughters"  shows the gritty and raw side of raising daughters in modern times. The Torres sisters live across the street from teenage boy Hector, whose teenage male friends are generally hanging around.  They are being raised by their father, their mother died after the youngest daughter was born. But what happens to the already unpleasant Torres household when the oldest sister dies? What secrets is everyone hiding? Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Siham
    January 1, 1970
    *I would like to thank Algonquin Young Readers for sending me a copy via Netgalley!* Trigger Warnings for: Sibling Death, Physical Abuse and Anxiety. When I picked this up I had little to no idea what I was really signing up for, but I couldn't be happier that I requested it. It only took reading the prologue for the author's writing to enchantment me with its beauty and suck me in. I really loved the characters that we followed. Each one of the sisters was written so uniquely that I couldn't *I would like to thank Algonquin Young Readers for sending me a copy via Netgalley!* Trigger Warnings for: Sibling Death, Physical Abuse and Anxiety. When I picked this up I had little to no idea what I was really signing up for, but I couldn't be happier that I requested it. It only took reading the prologue for the author's writing to enchantment me with its beauty and suck me in. I really loved the characters that we followed. Each one of the sisters was written so uniquely that I couldn't help but grow attached to them. I loved the path the book followed and I just can't recommend this enough! If you have the chance to pick it up, please do! Full Review will be up on my blog next month!
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  • Colby
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, thank you NetGalley and Algonquin Teen for an eARC in exchange for an honest review!Tigers, Not Daughters follow the Torres sisters. The oldest, Anna, fellow out her window and died. Now, a year later, the family is falling apart. Jessica, the second eldest (now the eldest) has an abusive boyfriend. Never the same after the loss of Anna, the family is grieving, suffering from isolation, and scrutiny. Now a year later, Anna's ghost has returned to hunt the Torres family, knocking First of all, thank you NetGalley and Algonquin Teen for an eARC in exchange for an honest review!Tigers, Not Daughters follow the Torres sisters. The oldest, Anna, fellow out her window and died. Now, a year later, the family is falling apart. Jessica, the second eldest (now the eldest) has an abusive boyfriend. Never the same after the loss of Anna, the family is grieving, suffering from isolation, and scrutiny. Now a year later, Anna's ghost has returned to hunt the Torres family, knocking window panes. Tigers, Not Daughters is a charming, sad, and heartwarming story of family and grief. It's was short and quick to get through, and the cover is absolutely beautiful! It wasn't a favorite, but I did enjoy it!
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  • Kendra
    January 1, 1970
    This begins much like Jeffrey Eugenides's The Virgin Suicides--narrated by the boys in a neighborhood who spy on a house full of sisters, all of whom are trying to escape--until one dies. After the death of their oldest sister, the remaining girls each try to find paths for themselves--through work, relationships, religion. But none of it really works for them until everything comes to a head when the ghost of their sister appears. The reaction of the neighborhood to her appearance gives the This begins much like Jeffrey Eugenides's The Virgin Suicides--narrated by the boys in a neighborhood who spy on a house full of sisters, all of whom are trying to escape--until one dies. After the death of their oldest sister, the remaining girls each try to find paths for themselves--through work, relationships, religion. But none of it really works for them until everything comes to a head when the ghost of their sister appears. The reaction of the neighborhood to her appearance gives the remaining sisters the energy they need to leave their abusive father, abusive boyfriends, abusive schools, and to seek out a new path together. A good book about women making do for themselves, about empowerment, about standing up to abuse. Powerfully written and beautifully constructed.
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  • Abby
    January 1, 1970
    The Torres sisters are the modern-day Little Women. A tragedy rips their family apart but through everything, the sisters reunite when it matters the most. I was drawn in by the description of this book. When I started reading it the characters were what kept me reading. In the same way as Little Women, you kind of find yourself identifying with one of the characters. For me, Iridian was the one I connected with the most because of her love of literature and writing. But the other sisters had The Torres sisters are the modern-day Little Women. A tragedy rips their family apart but through everything, the sisters reunite when it matters the most. I was drawn in by the description of this book. When I started reading it the characters were what kept me reading. In the same way as Little Women, you kind of find yourself identifying with one of the characters. For me, Iridian was the one I connected with the most because of her love of literature and writing. But the other sisters had characteristics that I loved as well. Like Rosa’s love for animals and her empathy towards them. Through their narratives, you see how each one of them has their way of coping with the death of their sister, Ana. The material in the book can be quite heavy depending on the person.
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  • Keeley
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. Tigers, Not Daughters, tells the story of the four Torres sisters, one of whom is a ghost. They dream of running away, but are pulled back by their emotionally broken and derelict father, among other things. (Trigger warning: physical and emotional abuse.)What starts off as a story of tragic sisters with strong Virgin Suicides vibes quickly develops into an ode to sisterhood, standing up for yourself, and being strong when no one else will. Thank you to the publisher for the I loved this book. Tigers, Not Daughters, tells the story of the four Torres sisters, one of whom is a ghost. They dream of running away, but are pulled back by their emotionally broken and derelict father, among other things. (Trigger warning: physical and emotional abuse.)What starts off as a story of tragic sisters with strong Virgin Suicides vibes quickly develops into an ode to sisterhood, standing up for yourself, and being strong when no one else will. Thank you to the publisher for the review copy.
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    Haunting and magical, Tigers, Not Daughters follows the lives of three young women one year after the death of their eldest sister, Ana-- and it seems her presence still lingers. There's Iridian, the writer; Rosa, the quiet observer; and Jessica, who strives to become the embodiment of who Ana once was. Now Ana's leaves ominous signs and messages for her sisters in many bizarre ways, but whether she's warning them or antagonizing them, none can say. Mabry's writing is so lyrical and enrapturing, Haunting and magical, Tigers, Not Daughters follows the lives of three young women one year after the death of their eldest sister, Ana-- and it seems her presence still lingers. There's Iridian, the writer; Rosa, the quiet observer; and Jessica, who strives to become the embodiment of who Ana once was. Now Ana's leaves ominous signs and messages for her sisters in many bizarre ways, but whether she's warning them or antagonizing them, none can say. Mabry's writing is so lyrical and enrapturing, I would have been happy to follow the Torres girls wherever their intuitive hearts took them long after the last page.
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  • Lunireads
    January 1, 1970
    If you like* dysfunctional families.* Ghost stories.* sisterly love.* mysteries.Then I think you’re probably going to like this book because it has all of that and more. Personally I enjoyed the writing and the plot of this novel but since I didn’t connect with any of the characters I couldn’t get fully invested in it so it ended up just being an ok read for me. I definitely think others should give it a try if they like any of the things I mentioned though because it really was quite a good If you like* dysfunctional families.* Ghost stories.* sisterly love.* mysteries.Then I think you’re probably going to like this book because it has all of that and more. Personally I enjoyed the writing and the plot of this novel but since I didn’t connect with any of the characters I couldn’t get fully invested in it so it ended up just being an ok read for me. I definitely think others should give it a try if they like any of the things I mentioned though because it really was quite a good book.
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