The Missing American (Emma Djan Investigation #1)
Accra private investigator Emma Djan's first missing persons case will lead her to the darkest depths of the email scams and fetish priests in Ghana, the world's Internet capital. When her dreams of rising through the police ranks like her late father crash around her, 26-year-old Emma Djan is unsure what will become of her life in Accra. Through a sympathetic former colleague, Emma gets an interview with a private detective agency tracking down missing persons, thefts, and marital infidelities. It’s not the future she imagined, but it’s her best option. Meanwhile, Gordon Tilson, a middle-aged widower in Washington, DC, has found solace in an online community after his wife’s passing. Through the support group, he’s even met a young Ghanaian widow he really cares about, and when her sister gets into a car accident, he sends her thousands of dollars to cover the hospital bill—to the horror of his only son, Derek. When Gordon runs off to Ghana to surprise his new love and disappears, Derek chases after him, fearing for his father’s life. The case of the missing American man will drag both Emma and Derek into a world of sakawa scams, fetish priests, and those willing to keep things secret through death.

The Missing American (Emma Djan Investigation #1) Details

TitleThe Missing American (Emma Djan Investigation #1)
Author
ReleaseJan 14th, 2020
PublisherSoho Crime
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Cultural, Africa, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

The Missing American (Emma Djan Investigation #1) Review

  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best things about reading is the chance to visit places you have never been. This book takes us to Ghana where an intrepid young policewoman tries to do her job in the face of rampant corruption and even sexual harassment. When she stands up for herself she is fired but bounces back as a private investigator. Her first case is the missing American who has visited Ghana to visit a woman he met on-line but discovers he has been defrauded for money. He disappears when he tries to find One of the best things about reading is the chance to visit places you have never been. This book takes us to Ghana where an intrepid young policewoman tries to do her job in the face of rampant corruption and even sexual harassment. When she stands up for herself she is fired but bounces back as a private investigator. Her first case is the missing American who has visited Ghana to visit a woman he met on-line but discovers he has been defrauded for money. He disappears when he tries to find out who tricked him. The investigation goes through the seamy side of Ghana including a voodoo priest who has connections to powerful people. It's really interesting and there are a lot of twists and turns. It's amazing to read about a place that I had no knowledge of before this and, unfortunately, left me with no desire to visit.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This is a relatively slow paced mystery with a really interesting presence--an American man disappears in Ghana after going to visit who he believes to be a woman he's fallen in love with over the internet (and just happens to have given several thousand dollars.) I liked private detective Emma Djan, who has a compelling backstory, but I didn't quite feel like I got to know her because there were so many characters. I'm definitely interested to see how she develops in future installments of the This is a relatively slow paced mystery with a really interesting presence--an American man disappears in Ghana after going to visit who he believes to be a woman he's fallen in love with over the internet (and just happens to have given several thousand dollars.) I liked private detective Emma Djan, who has a compelling backstory, but I didn't quite feel like I got to know her because there were so many characters. I'm definitely interested to see how she develops in future installments of the series, however. The mystery was certainly a compelling one, as was the story of the sakawa boys, who attempt to harness the power of spiritual rituals to increase their success as internet scammers. At times the dialogue seemed a bit stilted to my ear, but it may just be different speech patterns more common to Ghana, and I really have no way of knowing.Overall, while this wasn't a favorite, I liked it and will probably read the next book in the series. I would recommend to mystery readers who are patient and enjoy reading books set in novel settings and cultures.
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  • OLT
    January 1, 1970
    This book would translate well to film. It has almost everything you need to make a compelling movie: (1) Interesting, somewhat complex plot, (2) Exotic locale, (3) Large cast of characters to add some complexity to the story line, (4) Lots of local color and atmosphere, (5) Topical themes of internet scams and of political corruption.This is a mystery/thriller set in modern-day Ghana. Theoretically, the main character is 26-year-old Emma Djan, rookie police officer following in her late This book would translate well to film. It has almost everything you need to make a compelling movie: (1) Interesting, somewhat complex plot, (2) Exotic locale, (3) Large cast of characters to add some complexity to the story line, (4) Lots of local color and atmosphere, (5) Topical themes of internet scams and of political corruption.This is a mystery/thriller set in modern-day Ghana. Theoretically, the main character is 26-year-old Emma Djan, rookie police officer following in her late father's footsteps, who suffers a setback in her career and finds herself dismissed from the police force. She lands on her feet with a job at a private detective agency. This agency is hired by American Derek Tilson to find his father Gordon, of Washington D.C., missing several weeks since arriving in Ghana, the victim of an elaborate internet romance scam. The Ghanaian police department had been informed of Tilson's disappearance but lack of much cooperation and investigation on their part leads Tilson's son to the private agency.That would be the main and titular story of this start to a new series by Ghanaian-American author Kwei Quartey, whose Darko Dawson series, also set in Africa, appears to be popular, although I have never read any of the Darko books and cannot give an opinion. This is my first book by Quartey and my impression of it is favorable as an entertainment.There's a lot going on and a wide range of characters to keep you interested and on your toes. For the first third of the book you may be wondering what all these seemingly disparate happenings in very short chapters have to do with each other, but everything will be tied up neatly by the end.You have political assassinations and government intrigue, undercover investigations, a fetish priest/witch doctor and Ghanaian "sakawa" boys (internet scammers), a Ghanaian autism center, corruption in the police force. All of this and a bit more and told with a good bit of local color and Ghanaian traditions to make the story fun and even informative.Where this fails for me, enough that I'll only go to three stars for its rating, is in the writing. It's just good enough to get the story told and that's all. Also there are many characters but little character development. Every person here is just a bit player in the story (even Emma) and feels pulled directly from Central Casting. I don't feel I really know much about any of the character's real character after the read.If I had enjoyed the way the story was written as much as I enjoyed the story itself, this could have been a 5-star book.
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  • Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits)
    January 1, 1970
    See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsThe Missing American is a nice crime story with enough twists and turns to unravel its mystery that it kept me hooked throughout. Quartey makes the most of his Ghanaian setting with moments of Sjowall and Wahloo style social commentary that I particularly appreciated. I felt I got a good sense of Atimpoku and how people live there. This novel is much more of a serious crime story than the better known Alexander McCall Smith cosy series, but I See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsThe Missing American is a nice crime story with enough twists and turns to unravel its mystery that it kept me hooked throughout. Quartey makes the most of his Ghanaian setting with moments of Sjowall and Wahloo style social commentary that I particularly appreciated. I felt I got a good sense of Atimpoku and how people live there. This novel is much more of a serious crime story than the better known Alexander McCall Smith cosy series, but I wouldn't say that it has the pace to be a real thriller.While I liked the narrative itself, I did unfortunately think that the story was let down by unconvincing characters. Even our heroine, Emma Djan, didn't have a memorable enough portrayal for me to fully believe in her and I don't see how she will become the lynchpin of a whole series. (The Missing American is book one of the Emma Djan mysteries.) Dialogue is often clunky and repetitive too. I lost count of how many times characters recapped plot points to each other that we readers were already well aware of! If you're a crime fiction fan, The Missing American is worth picking up for its unusual plotlines, but I don't think I would continue with the series.
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  • Paula Kaufman
    January 1, 1970
    The title of Kwei Quartey's new book, The Missing American, does not do justice to this first in a new series featuring Emma Djan, former member of the Ghana Police Service turned private detective. I am a fan of mysteries set in countries outside of the U.S. and I have read and admired Quartey's previous Darko Dawson series. The Missing American far exceeds his previous efforts. Emma is a complex character who engages in a complicated set of scams, crimes, and murders that take the reader deep The title of Kwei Quartey's new book, The Missing American, does not do justice to this first in a new series featuring Emma Djan, former member of the Ghana Police Service turned private detective. I am a fan of mysteries set in countries outside of the U.S. and I have read and admired Quartey's previous Darko Dawson series. The Missing American far exceeds his previous efforts. Emma is a complex character who engages in a complicated set of scams, crimes, and murders that take the reader deep into the world of the sakawa phenomenon - the internet scams that permeate Ghana and target Americans and other westerners. We also glimpse politics, corruption, and greed, and a touch of sexual harassment too. But, Ghanaian society is not all scams and schemes and darkness, and Quartey manages to show us many good sides of the culture, too. More than 50 years ago I had a summer job working for a Yale economist whose work focused on Ghana and I was intrigued enough to want to visit. Although I never did, my resolve to spend some time in the country has been renewed. My thanks to Quartey for reigniting my interest through his excellent novel. I am looking forward to reading more in this series.Thanks to Soho Press and NetGalley for providing an ARC of this novel in exchange for an objective review.
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  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    My first experience with what has become known as an “internet scam” actually arrived in the form of a snail-mail letter that I received in 1994. The sender advised me that there was 13 million AMD in the account of a deceased citizen in Nigeria that I could acquire if I would be willing to turn over my bank account information and tender in advance an amount equal to a (relatively) small commission plus transmittal fees. These have become much more sophisticated over the course of the last My first experience with what has become known as an “internet scam” actually arrived in the form of a snail-mail letter that I received in 1994. The sender advised me that there was 13 million AMD in the account of a deceased citizen in Nigeria that I could acquire if I would be willing to turn over my bank account information and tender in advance an amount equal to a (relatively) small commission plus transmittal fees. These have become much more sophisticated over the course of the last quarter-century, while adding emotional and romantic involvement as yet another hook to sink into a potential victim.Author Kwei Quartey, whose critically acclaimed Inspector Darko Dawson books have acquired a steadily increasing readership, uses the Ghanian internet scam business to introduce private investigator Emma Djan in THE MISSING AMERICAN, the first of what hopefully will be a long-running series.Most of the book takes place in Accra, Ghana, and its surrounding environs. Indeed, Quartey wastes little time in setting up his storyboard. Ghana Police Service Constable Emma Djan’s hope was to follow her deceased father’s career path as a homicide detective, but she is making the best of her assignment in the busy yet unexciting Commercial Crimes Unit. When she is given the chance to join the homicide division, she jumps at it. However, her refusal to compromise her principles in a nightmarish vignette during her interview for the position causes her to lose both the opportunity and her job in the police department.Emma is tossed a lifeline when a former colleague sets her up for an interview with the Sowah Detective Agency, a private investigation firm that is one of only two such agencies in Accra that is fully licensed and vetted. She is immediately hired and almost as quickly gets her baptism by fire when the firm is retained by an American named Derek Tilson. Derek has come to Accra out of concern for the safety of his father, Gordon. The senior Tilson, a widower, had developed an online relationship with a woman from Accra and had sent her several thousand dollars to cover her sister’s emergency hospital bills. Gordon decided to journey to Accra to meet his soulmate in person, but discovered upon his arrival that she does not exist. He resolved to use his time in Accra to find out who was scamming him. Derek has journeyed there and retained the Sowah firm after not hearing from him for a few weeks.Emma’s investigation plunges her and Derek into the world of the “sakawa boys,” who practice fraud on an international basis by utilizing a unique combination of cutting-edge software and internet schemes with traditional witch doctor magic. She attempts to determine Gordon’s fate while bringing the people who defrauded him to justice. There are several investigative and cultural twists and turns that Emma must navigate, but what she lacks in experience she more than makes up for with a canny intelligence and dogged determination that helps see her to a most satisfactory, if somewhat bittersweet, conclusion.Anyone with more than a passing interest in the world of internet scamming must read THE MISSING AMERICAN, with its extremely realistic heroine and unblinking assessment of cultural similarities and differences between the United States and Ghana. I also must give a tip of the fedora to Quartey and his publisher, Soho Crime, for the book’s extensive glossary for those of us interested in broadening our vocabularies. Well played, and strongly recommended.Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub
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  • Cathy Cole
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of Kwei Quartey's Darko Dawson series since the first book, Wife of the Gods. I was thrilled to discover that The Missing American has the same superb sense of place as Quartey's previous series. Readers can feel as though they're actually in Ghana while they read; the landscape, weather, people, food, and culture give the story a richness that I find irresistible.Although I loved reading this book, I did find it a bit bloated with a lot of "irons in the fire." Internet scams, I have been a fan of Kwei Quartey's Darko Dawson series since the first book, Wife of the Gods. I was thrilled to discover that The Missing American has the same superb sense of place as Quartey's previous series. Readers can feel as though they're actually in Ghana while they read; the landscape, weather, people, food, and culture give the story a richness that I find irresistible.Although I loved reading this book, I did find it a bit bloated with a lot of "irons in the fire." Internet scams, sexual harassment, an assassin on the loose, corrupt police and government officials, a center for autistic children, murder, and missing persons just to mention a few. It's a lot to keep track of, and some of that action undoubtedly could have waited for upcoming books in the series.The characters in The Missing American are an interesting mix. I couldn't really drum up a lot of sympathy for the missing American, which probably sounds a bit harsh, but I certainly do like Emma Djan, whose character is a good blend of intelligence, frailty, and strength. I also want to know more about her boss in the agency, Yemo Sowah. He's a fascinating man surrounded by a bit of mystery-- just the sort of character to pique my curiosity.Now that Kwei Quartey's new Emma Djan series has well and truly begun, I find myself looking forward with a great deal of anticipation to my next visit to Ghana.
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  • Beverly
    January 1, 1970
    This was 3.5 read for me.Thoughts coming shortly
  • Jean
    January 1, 1970
    Will link to review when published.
  • Tonstant Weader
    January 1, 1970
    The Missing American is Gordon Tillson who met the love of his life while working in Ghana in the Peace Corps. When his beloved wife dies of cancer, he mourns her for years and becomes a fixture in a Facebook group for the bereaved. He has a type, a Ghanaian woman connects with him on Facebook and he begins to fall for her. He also has a one-night tryst with a Ghanaian woman who is in D.C. for a fundraiser, the wife the head of the national police force. When his son, Dexter, confronts him about The Missing American is Gordon Tillson who met the love of his life while working in Ghana in the Peace Corps. When his beloved wife dies of cancer, he mourns her for years and becomes a fixture in a Facebook group for the bereaved. He has a type, a Ghanaian woman connects with him on Facebook and he begins to fall for her. He also has a one-night tryst with a Ghanaian woman who is in D.C. for a fundraiser, the wife the head of the national police force. When his son, Dexter, confronts him about his internet romance whom he has sent a few thousand, he travels to Ghana to meet her and prove his son wrong.Emma Djan is an ambitious young woman eager to follow in her father’s footsteps in the police – as a homicide detective. However, she soon runs into the old boy’s network and becomes a private detective, one who Gordon’s son Dexter hires to find his father who has gone missing. This takes her into investigating the infamous 419 scams which leads to investigating the corrupt police who help keep the scams going.The Missing American is rich in plot. There are conspiracies on top of conspiracies with political assassinations, fraud, murder and corruption. I guess there is so much plot there was little room for the rest of what makes a great mystery, developing characters and establislhing a sense of place. It’s not that setting is completely absent, but it is not well-developed. There is a difficult balance on character development. Too much and the plot is weakend. Too little and we don’t care about the people. I would like to have seen more character development, but believe it may come in subsequent books in the series.The Missing American will be published on January 14th. I received an e-galley from the publisher through EdelweissThe Missing American at Soho PressKwei Quartey author sitehttps://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...
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  • Martina
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first in a new series from Kwei Quartey featuring private investigator Emma Djan. I just love Quartey's Darko Dawson series which is set in Ghana, and so glad that the new series is also set there. Many thanks to @sohocrime @soho_press for the advance readers copy of the book. It will be published on January 14, 2020.Emma Djan was in the police force, following her father's career. She leaves the force and is offered a position with a private detective agency which she accepts. The This is the first in a new series from Kwei Quartey featuring private investigator Emma Djan. I just love Quartey's Darko Dawson series which is set in Ghana, and so glad that the new series is also set there. Many thanks to @sohocrime @soho_press for the advance readers copy of the book. It will be published on January 14, 2020.Emma Djan was in the police force, following her father's career. She leaves the force and is offered a position with a private detective agency which she accepts. The first major investigation she has is tracing an American man who had come to Ghana in hopes of meeting a woman who he had met in an online chat group and had fallen in love with. When he disappears during his trip to Ghana, his son comes to Accra to try to find out what happened to him. This is a fascinating story bringing to life the Ghanaian version of the Nigerian Prince scams of many years ago, this version more Rom Con, using sophisticated computer programs and software to allow the young men who practice Sakawah, in connection with fetish priests to give them special powers, to lure people into relationships and convince them to send money to help with various 'problems'. The amount of money earned through these scams is enormous and thus the threat of exposure is fought against with deadly consequences. Quartey presents a rich picture of Ghana and Ghanaians, as well as providing an exciting and at times intense story. I'm looking forward to more books featuring Emma, but I'd also love reading more books featuring Darko!
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  • Marilyn
    January 1, 1970
    THE MISSING AMERICAN by Kwei Quartey. Gordon Tilson, a retired widower, thinks he's found a new love through an online senior dating site. Helena is Ghahaian like his dead wife, and when she mentions a family emergency they can't afford, he's happy to send her the money. Gordon goes to Ghana to meet Helena and discovers that she doesn't exist. He's been the victim of a widespread scam that involves people in every social strata. Angry, Gordon starts to ask questions, and soon he's gone missing. THE MISSING AMERICAN by Kwei Quartey. Gordon Tilson, a retired widower, thinks he's found a new love through an online senior dating site. Helena is Ghahaian like his dead wife, and when she mentions a family emergency they can't afford, he's happy to send her the money. Gordon goes to Ghana to meet Helena and discovers that she doesn't exist. He's been the victim of a widespread scam that involves people in every social strata. Angry, Gordon starts to ask questions, and soon he's gone missing. No one knows where he is. Young Emma Djan, now working for a private detective, is determined to find him. The talented Kwei Quartey has given us a powerful story with a cast of three-dimensional wonderful characters. A wonderful read!
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  • Candace
    January 1, 1970
    Emma Djan is a neat, smart, thoughtful policewoman, trying to maintain her focus and morals in the midst of the swirling chaos that is Accra, Ghana. Her father was a policeman, but she's off the force once she refuses her superior's advances. Fortunately, she is recommended to a private investigator who appreciates her initiative and imagination. Her first case is to find what happened to an American named Gordon Tilson, who came to Ghana to meet a woman he met online. Of course, there is no Emma Djan is a neat, smart, thoughtful policewoman, trying to maintain her focus and morals in the midst of the swirling chaos that is Accra, Ghana. Her father was a policeman, but she's off the force once she refuses her superior's advances. Fortunately, she is recommended to a private investigator who appreciates her initiative and imagination. Her first case is to find what happened to an American named Gordon Tilson, who came to Ghana to meet a woman he met online. Of course, there is no such person. Even Gordon, the widower of a Ghanaian woman and who has lived in Ghana, falls for a scam headed by a fetish priest and his team of young men.Kwei Quartey takes us into the world internet scams, especially sakawa scams which require sacrifices to a fetish priest to guarantee success. Emma ends up in the middle of some pretty gruesome stuff, and heaps of corruption, all of which she handles neatly and creatively. What a treat to have a PI who's not a mess.Quartey's Ghanian novels are a glimpse into a very different world with a culture that is mysterious and powerful. "The Missing American" is a bold start to his new series.Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for approving me to read and review.Candace Siegle, Greedy Reader
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  • Sasha
    January 1, 1970
    Gordon Tilson is a middle-aged widower living in Washington, DC. While finding friendship and support through online communities Gordon meets Helena, a woman from Ghana, and the two become close as they discuss not only their shared grief but their shared love of Ghana; Gordon met his first wife, who was Ghanaian, there when he was in the Peace Corps. When Helena finds herself in need of money, Gordon is all too wiling to send it to her, causing his son Derek to suspect that something isn’t Gordon Tilson is a middle-aged widower living in Washington, DC. While finding friendship and support through online communities Gordon meets Helena, a woman from Ghana, and the two become close as they discuss not only their shared grief but their shared love of Ghana; Gordon met his first wife, who was Ghanaian, there when he was in the Peace Corps. When Helena finds herself in need of money, Gordon is all too wiling to send it to her, causing his son Derek to suspect that something isn’t quite right about the relationship. His suspicion turns to outright fear, however, when Gordon goes to Ghana to surprise Helena and he suddenly cannot be reached.Emma Djan, determined to follow in her father’s footsteps and become a homicide detective in the Ghana Police Services, finds her life taking a detour that ultimately leads to a job working for a private detective agency investigating crimes such as thefts and missing persons. Trying to locate his father, Derek retains the services of the detective agency, thrusting Emma into the world of Sakawa boys and internet scams as she searches for Gordon Tilson. Kwei Quartey, in The Missing American, weaves together the lives of his characters to create a cautionary tale, exposing some of the negative consequences that come with internet love. The characters are well-written and realistic; I liked the way their lives were interconnected with each other and how those connections played out during the events of the novel. It was a story that kept me turning the page and guessing up until the very end.
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  • MD
    January 1, 1970
    NOTE: There is a glossary at the end which defines slang, names of food, etc. used in the book and gives their pronunciation. I wish I’d known that before finishing the book. First in a series, Quartey introduces a rather large cast of characters in this book, but does a good job of helping you remember who each one is. The Ghana setting and the romance-scam premise made the book feel informative as well as entertaining. The chapters are surprisingly short - most only a few pages - which I found NOTE: There is a glossary at the end which defines slang, names of food, etc. used in the book and gives their pronunciation. I wish I’d known that before finishing the book. First in a series, Quartey introduces a rather large cast of characters in this book, but does a good job of helping you remember who each one is. The Ghana setting and the romance-scam premise made the book feel informative as well as entertaining. The chapters are surprisingly short - most only a few pages - which I found I really liked. I did get a little confused though in the second half of the book when the timeline started jumping around. A few nice twists, several likable characters, a lot of coincidences. The coincidences did help illuminate some of the characters and supported a complex plot without introducing even more characters, but seemed a little annoying at times.
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  • Bookworm LLC
    January 1, 1970
    This is a new series that is set in Ghana introducing Emma Djan. She has turned to private investigation due to the fact that her police career is over.When a former colleague manages to get her an interview with a detective agency Emma realizes she has an opportunity to salvage her career.Gordon Tilson enters the story looking for comfort in an online support group after the death of his wife. Through this group Gordon meets a young widow and quickly befriends her. He even sends her money to This is a new series that is set in Ghana introducing Emma Djan. She has turned to private investigation due to the fact that her police career is over.When a former colleague manages to get her an interview with a detective agency Emma realizes she has an opportunity to salvage her career.Gordon Tilson enters the story looking for comfort in an online support group after the death of his wife. Through this group Gordon meets a young widow and quickly befriends her. He even sends her money to help with bills when her family suffers a tragedy. Gordon runs to Ghana to the horror of his son Derek who, enlisting the help of Emma, follows his father.This case will take Emma and Derek into the world of crime and scams. St times they won't know who to trust.Fast paced and riveting!
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  • Patti
    January 1, 1970
    This is a new series that is set in Ghana introducing Emma Djan. She has turned to private investigation due to the fact that her police career is over.When a former colleague manages to get her an interview with a detective agency Emma realizes she has an opportunity to salvage her career.Gordon Tilson enters the story looking for comfort in an online support group after the death of his wife. Through this group Gordon meets a young widow and quickly befriends her. He even sends her money to This is a new series that is set in Ghana introducing Emma Djan. She has turned to private investigation due to the fact that her police career is over.When a former colleague manages to get her an interview with a detective agency Emma realizes she has an opportunity to salvage her career.Gordon Tilson enters the story looking for comfort in an online support group after the death of his wife. Through this group Gordon meets a young widow and quickly befriends her. He even sends her money to help with bills when her family suffers a tragedy. Gordon runs to Ghana to the horror of his son Derek who, enlisting the help of Emma, follows his father.This case will take Emma and Derek into the world of crime and scams. St times they won't know who to trust.Fast paced and riveting!
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  • Jennifer S
    January 1, 1970
    Kwei Quartey introduces a new protagonist in this book. Emma Djan is a newly minted police investigator who longs to be in homicide but is stuck in a bureaucratic department investigating commercial crimes. When she is forced to leave the police force, she is hired into a private investigation firm which is led by a man with trust and integrity. Her first complex case involves an American who has traveled to Ghana as a victim of an internet scam and vanished.Emma is a good character and I am Kwei Quartey introduces a new protagonist in this book. Emma Djan is a newly minted police investigator who longs to be in homicide but is stuck in a bureaucratic department investigating commercial crimes. When she is forced to leave the police force, she is hired into a private investigation firm which is led by a man with trust and integrity. Her first complex case involves an American who has traveled to Ghana as a victim of an internet scam and vanished.Emma is a good character and I am looking forward to seeing her develop. However, I thought this book had too many characters and too many threads, all of which twisted around and interconnected.
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  • Janet Hutchinson
    January 1, 1970
    This was a rather slow moving book, and I felt like Emma's character was a little lost in the whole thing. There were too many other characters, and that made it harder to tell who were the good guys, and who were the bad.
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 star! Full review to follow!
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow in the Library Journal.This is the first in a series.
  • Mhd
    January 1, 1970
    Found this book in BookPage Jan 2020.
  • Susan Walker
    January 1, 1970
    I know very little about Ghana and enjoyed learning about it in this book. The story has a great plot and kept me entertained.
  • Giselle Foss
    January 1, 1970
    Not very well written, but adequately entertaining.
  • Jane Randell
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this. The sense of place is so strong that Ghana feels like another character in the book.
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