Dear Edward
Inspired by a true story of one child’s incredible survival--riveting, uplifting, unforgettable. After losing everything, a young boy discovers there are still reasons for hope in this luminous, life-affirming novel, perfect for fans of Celeste Ng and Ann Patchett. In the face of tragedy, what does it take to find joy? One summer morning, twelve-year-old Edward Adler, his beloved older brother, his parents, and 183 other passengers board a flight in Newark headed for Los Angeles. Among them is a Wall Street wunderkind, a young woman coming to terms with an unexpected pregnancy, an injured vet returning from Afghanistan, a septuagenarian business tycoon, and a free-spirited woman running away from her controlling husband. And then, tragically, the plane crashes. Edward is the sole survivor.Edward's story captures the attention of the nation, but he struggles to find a place for himself in a world without his family. He continues to feel that a piece of him has been left in the sky, forever tied to the plane and all of his fellow passengers. But then he makes an unexpected discovery--one that will lead him to the answers of some of life's most profound questions: When you've lost everything, how do find yourself? How do you discover your purpose? What does it mean not just to survive, but to truly live?Dear Edward is at once a transcendent coming-of-age story, a multidimensional portrait of an unforgettable cast of characters, and a breathtaking illustration of all the ways a broken heart learns to love again.

Dear Edward Details

TitleDear Edward
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 6th, 2020
PublisherDial Press
ISBN-139781984854780
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary

Dear Edward Review

  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    A compassionate and realistic look at a young boy confronting paralyzing grief and survivor guilt. His family, moving from New York to LA, are on an airplane, when the plane crashes and Eddie, 12, is the only survivor. Taken in by his mother's sister and her husband, a couple that has suffered their own private grief, he no longer feels as if he fits in his own skin. Shay, a girl his own age, his new neighbor may be the door that allows him to find a way to move forward.In alternating chapters A compassionate and realistic look at a young boy confronting paralyzing grief and survivor guilt. His family, moving from New York to LA, are on an airplane, when the plane crashes and Eddie, 12, is the only survivor. Taken in by his mother's sister and her husband, a couple that has suffered their own private grief, he no longer feels as if he fits in his own skin. Shay, a girl his own age, his new neighbor may be the door that allows him to find a way to move forward.In alternating chapters we meet some of the people on the doomed flight, a look into their personal lives and hopes for their future and regrets from their pasts. Such great characters, this author has created, people who try to help Eddie and people who his life touches. The way to healing is hard, but Eddie is never alone, something he needs to realize for himself. Fate is not in ones control, and a tragedy such a this touches many, not only those involved. This emotional novel does a fantastic job showing how essential human connection is, and how it can be of benefit if one can open themselves to acceptance. Friendship, love, and hope. The ending had me teary eyed, despite the sadness, I loved watching these characters heal and grow.ARC from Dial Press/Random House.
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  • Cheri
    January 1, 1970
    ”We contain the other, hopelessly and forever.” -- James BaldwinAn examination of the sorrow that follows losing loved ones, as well as the suffering that follows any harrowing ordeal, this centers primarily on twelve-year-old Edward Adler who is the sole survivor of a plane crash. During the early part of the flight we learn bits and pieces about some of the 183 passengers. One young woman has just found out she is pregnant, while another woman is leaving behind a husband, an elderly ”We contain the other, hopelessly and forever.” -- James BaldwinAn examination of the sorrow that follows losing loved ones, as well as the suffering that follows any harrowing ordeal, this centers primarily on twelve-year-old Edward Adler who is the sole survivor of a plane crash. During the early part of the flight we learn bits and pieces about some of the 183 passengers. One young woman has just found out she is pregnant, while another woman is leaving behind a husband, an elderly business mogul has an assistant flying with him, a woman, Edward’s mother, working on a script for a movie in first class while her two sons and husband sit in coach, another woman who believes that she has been reincarnated many times. Many other characters stories are shared in a more limited sense, but this is really Edward’s story. After the plane crash, and after a somewhat lengthy stay in the hospital Edward goes to live with his mother’s sister and her husband in West Milford, New Jersey, overlooking Greenwood Lake. It’s not that far from where his family had lived in NYC, but it has the benefit of being remote and relatively quiet, although it had lost some of the charm it once held as a summer resort town over the years. When the girl next door befriends Edward, it is like a lifeline for him, and he grabs hold to it, but it is still a while before Edward begins to even begin to return to his pre-sole survivor status. Joy is fleeting for some time, but there are moments where his trust and comfort in the company of Shay show his walls coming down, if not with everyone then with her. There are some very lovely, and some very emotional elements of this story, but the frequently changing perspectives took a bit of a toll on me for the story overall. Still, I found this to be a very compelling story. My eyes filled with tears at moments, and other moments had me smiling as I saw Edward finding his way toward a life with love, and the peace that follows discovering the path to the life he was meant to live. Pub Date: 14 Jan 2020Many thanks for the ARC provided by Random House Publishing Group – Random House / The Dial Press
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  • Jayme
    January 1, 1970
    “So much could be solved, she thinks, if we simply held hands with each other more often.” 12 year old Eddie Adler boards flight 2977 from Newark to Los Angeles with his parents, and his older brother Jordan. 191 souls will perish with Eddie being the sole survivor of the crash. The whole country is captivated with Eddie (now referred to as Edward) and his story. They think he is LUCKY. They don’t understand the pain of being the one “left behind”. The story is told from the alternating “So much could be solved, she thinks, if we simply held hands with each other more often.” 12 year old Eddie Adler boards flight 2977 from Newark to Los Angeles with his parents, and his older brother Jordan. 191 souls will perish with Eddie being the sole survivor of the crash. The whole country is captivated with Eddie (now referred to as Edward) and his story. They think he is LUCKY. They don’t understand the pain of being the one “left behind”. The story is told from the alternating timelines of “ the flight” and the years that follow..The “flight chapters” acquaint you with some of the other passengers. Not all of them were likable, and I felt like I should’ve grieved more for these people who lost their lives...Edward’s chapters were much more poignant, as he struggles to make sense of his new life. His chapters brought both tears, and smiles..They were the more captivating, as were the people who rally around Edward to try and bring him comfort and hope. His friendship with Shay is truly one of the most moving friendships you will ever have the pleasure of reading about! My one critique: The author shares that she spoke with those who administer insurance claims, with those in the military, and with pilots for AUTHENTICITY.She SHOULD HAVE also spoken with flight attendants. Veronica was a cliche. Not a chance that her unprofessional behavior would happen or go unnoticed. And, what MIGHT be done with an elderly passenger who suffers what her passenger suffers while inflight...also completely inaccurate. Thank you to Netgalley, Viking, and Ann Napolitano for the digital ARC I received in exchange for a candid review! This title will be released on Feb. 27, 2020. Recommended!
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Edward (Eddie), his brother Jordan and parents Bruce and Jane board flight 2977 to Los Angeles, as they are moving from New York to relocate for Jane’s job. A new and exciting life for all of them.After the plane crash, Eddie discovers he is the sole survivor, 191 people including his family. His Aunt and Uncle take him in where he has to learn to live without his family and recover from his injuries.The story goes back to the flight where we are introduced to some of the other people on the Edward (Eddie), his brother Jordan and parents Bruce and Jane board flight 2977 to Los Angeles, as they are moving from New York to relocate for Jane’s job. A new and exciting life for all of them.After the plane crash, Eddie discovers he is the sole survivor, 191 people including his family. His Aunt and Uncle take him in where he has to learn to live without his family and recover from his injuries.The story goes back to the flight where we are introduced to some of the other people on the plane and get to know their back stories.This is such a beautifully written emotional book that will tug at your heart strings and made me tear up at times. Although this is a sad story it is also about survival and hope.Loved Eddie’s close friendship with neighbour Shay, with her help can he overcome the guilt of being the sole survivor and start a new life. This book will stay in my thoughts for a long time to come. A new author for me and I will definitely be looking out for her other books.Thank you to Netgalley for my copy in exchange for a review. The
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  • Jennifer Blankfein
    January 1, 1970
    Reconnecting with life after loss can be a struggle and Ann Napolitano’s Dear Edward, uplifting and hopeful, is a story of a young boy’s journey to overcome challenges, pick up the pieces and begins to dream again following a deadly plane crash.An unthinkable tragedy leaves a young boy devoid of normalcy and purpose, yet over time, love, friendship and community breathe life back into him as he finds his way. Edward, along with his older brother, Jordan, and their parents are on a flight from NJ Reconnecting with life after loss can be a struggle and Ann Napolitano’s Dear Edward, uplifting and hopeful, is a story of a young boy’s journey to overcome challenges, pick up the pieces and begins to dream again following a deadly plane crash.An unthinkable tragedy leaves a young boy devoid of normalcy and purpose, yet over time, love, friendship and community breathe life back into him as he finds his way. Edward, along with his older brother, Jordan, and their parents are on a flight from NJ to LA when the accident happens and there are no survivors…except for twelve year old Edward.Dear Edward, is an emotional and beautiful story of a young boy’s coming of age as he learns new ways to love while coming to grips with the loss of his family. We meet many of the airplane passengers like the injured army vet, the woman with memories of past lives, the stewardess, the Wall Street guy, and the pregnant girl... FULL REVIEW AND AUTHOR Q & A on https://booknationbyjen.com/2019/10/3...
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  • Ivana - Diary of Difference
    January 1, 1970
    Wishlist | Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano is one of the few books that instantly captures your heart, then shatters it into hundred pieces and teaches you many life lessons at the same time. "A reporter holds up a copy of The New York Times to a camera, to show a huge block headline, the kind normally reserved for presidential elections and moonwalks. It reads:191 DIE IN PLANE CRASH; 1 SURVIVORThe relatives have only one question when the press Wishlist | Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano is one of the few books that instantly captures your heart, then shatters it into hundred pieces and teaches you many life lessons at the same time. "A reporter holds up a copy of The New York Times to a camera, to show a huge block headline, the kind normally reserved for presidential elections and moonwalks. It reads: 191 DIE IN PLANE CRASH; 1 SURVIVORThe relatives have only one question when the press briefing comes to close; they all lean toward it like a window in a dark room:"How is the boy?"Dear Edward features a boy called Edward, who is flying with his family to move across states. This is their chance of a new life, a brand new start. When the plane crashes, he is the only survivor.The author tells the story through two different timelines; during the flight and after the plane crash. We follow Edward's life and how he is coping with the loss of everything he knew. We also see how he is struggling to cope with the unwanted celebrity title he has now.I have always been intrigued by planes and plane crashes. I used to watch every single episode of the documentary on Discovery Channel back in the days. And today, I like to listen to the Plane Crash Podcast by Michael Bauer. I have had some bad experiences while flying, and have always wanted to understand what exactly happens when a plane crashes, and what aviation does to prevent this from happening in the future. This book contains amazing details about the crash, and my hidden mystery person inside me was deeply satisfied by all those pilot dialogues and explanations.Edward's grief and growing up journey is so painful. He survived, but everyone he loved and cared about in his life died. He is lucky to have survived, but why does he then feel guilty? Why did he swap places with his brother on the flight? If they didn't - his brother would still be alive now. The brother relationship was written so perfectly. The love and the bond they shared for each other was so strong.Despite the fact that Edward is the main character in this story, we also get to meet so many other characters, the people who lost their lives in the crash. Through flashbacks and "during flight" scenes, as well as encounters from their families, we get to see all the wishes that will never come through, all the hopes and dreams buried under the plane ash.And that is why Edward's journey is so difficult. He doesn't have to only carry to guilt for his own family, but all those other lives as well. Edward receives letters from the families asking him to do all these things that these people would do. He is asked to become a musician, a doctor, a teacher, to travel around the world, learn knitting, etc, and Edward feels obligated to do all of these things, to give peace to the families. View this post on Instagram I knew this book would stay with me forever from the moment I started reading the first few pages. It is so harshly real and painful, but what it does it remind us how every day is special and we should be thankful for it! We may not get a tomorrow, but that's why we have today. Let's make the best of it! Thank you to the team at Penguin Random House for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. Also thank you to the team at LoveReading UK, for allowing me to be their Super Ambassador of this book for the month of November.Wishlist | Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars, rounded upThis novel tracks what happens to a young man who is the sole survivor when a plane crashes in Colorado. What caught me off guard is that we are given glimpses into the lives of the other passengers on board. I wasn’t initially crazy about this aspect and wasn’t sure where it was going. As the book goes on, it becomes apparent why you have learned about them, as their loved ones interact with Edward or the brief encounters they had with Edward shape him. Napolitano does a 3.5 stars, rounded upThis novel tracks what happens to a young man who is the sole survivor when a plane crashes in Colorado. What caught me off guard is that we are given glimpses into the lives of the other passengers on board. I wasn’t initially crazy about this aspect and wasn’t sure where it was going. As the book goes on, it becomes apparent why you have learned about them, as their loved ones interact with Edward or the brief encounters they had with Edward shape him. Napolitano does a great job expressing the survivor’s guilt and grief that Edward feels. But we also get to see how he slowly does move forward with his life. I also felt for Edward’s aunt and uncle, attempting to deal with this unexpected wrinkle in their life. But Shay ends up being Edward’s saving grace as she’s the only one that doesn’t walk on eggshells around him.This was a well written book, but it also was uneven. I was much more interested in Edward’s sections than the other passengers. It drags a little in the middle. But the ending was totally uplifting and a good reminder to all of us. My thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Mandi1082
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Netgally and Random House for providing an ARC of this book for an honest review. Edward is the only survivor when his family and other passengers board the flight 2977 and it crashes. Edward's aunt and uncle take him in and that is when Edward decides within himself what is there to live for. He does a lot of soul searching and thinking about his past and his future. This book was wonderful. I loved how it did not only tell Edward's story but how it told stories from the other Thank you Netgally and Random House for providing an ARC of this book for an honest review. Edward is the only survivor when his family and other passengers board the flight 2977 and it crashes. Edward's aunt and uncle take him in and that is when Edward decides within himself what is there to live for. He does a lot of soul searching and thinking about his past and his future. This book was wonderful. I loved how it did not only tell Edward's story but how it told stories from the other passengers. This book was so heartbreaking and had me crying. It has you thinking what if you lost everyone you loved the most would life be worth going on. Beautiful story!
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  • Tami
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished one of the best books that is coming out in January 2020! From reading the synopsis, one might think that this book may require a box of tissues nearby. Yes, it is sad at times, but the author writes the story in such a way that readers aren’t bogged down in despair.It begins when the Adler family boards a plane for a flight from New York to California. As they board, readers are introduced to several others who will be on the same flight and get a brief glimpse into the lives of I just finished one of the best books that is coming out in January 2020! From reading the synopsis, one might think that this book may require a box of tissues nearby. Yes, it is sad at times, but the author writes the story in such a way that readers aren’t bogged down in despair.It begins when the Adler family boards a plane for a flight from New York to California. As they board, readers are introduced to several others who will be on the same flight and get a brief glimpse into the lives of each individual.Moving back and forth from the day of the flight to what happens after the crash, readers follow Edward Adler’s life as he comes to terms with the tragic accident. Being the only survivor, he is besieged by well-wishers and the family members of the victims who want to know details of their loved ones last moments.Reading this was such an eye-opening window into the deep grief that a person can experience after a tremendous loss and life-altering event. What was so special about Edward was his intelligence. Edward moved at his own pace and faced his experience head on when he was ready. He also had a close group of people supporting him and loving him along the way.Naturally, a plane crash story could be a trigger for some, but overall, I found this to be a hopeful, heartwarming story that showed readers resilience through the life of Edward Adler.Many thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group-Random House for allowing me to read an advance copy and give my honest review.
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  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    Not exactly what I expectedHm, this wasn't quite what I expected, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. It sounds like it should go without saying that a book about the aftermath of a plane crash would be dark and depressing, but as of this reading, the publisher's blurb advertised a "luminous and life-affirming novel." There was much, much more that was dark and depressing than "luminous and life affirming."Based on the title, I expected....well, more Edward. Nearly as much time is spent Not exactly what I expectedHm, this wasn't quite what I expected, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. It sounds like it should go without saying that a book about the aftermath of a plane crash would be dark and depressing, but as of this reading, the publisher's blurb advertised a "luminous and life-affirming novel." There was much, much more that was dark and depressing than "luminous and life affirming."Based on the title, I expected....well, more Edward. Nearly as much time is spent telling the other passengers' stories as is telling Edward's story. While it was helpful hearing about Edward's family members and perhaps a few of the passengers, some of the minor characters' segments seemed like filler material. I would have liked a deeper dive into Edward's growth over time, as he is the most complex character of any in the novel.While Dear Edward was generally well done, I can't say that I enjoyed reading it. It was much too sad and heavy for my personal taste. Because other people might like it more than I did, I'll give it four stars.Thanks to NetGalley and Random House for giving me a DRC of this novel, which will be available for purchase on January 14, 2020.
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  • Alan Cotterell
    January 1, 1970
    Firstly I must thank NetGalley, for the free ARC in return for an honest review.This book has been very thought fully plotted and extremely well written. I loved the way the two timelines are entwined. It is interesting the way the lives of the other passengers are depicted, by some very emotive writing I found myself hoping that somehow more would survive, even though you know what has happened!The current timeline follows Edward and his emotional growth through the next few years and the Firstly I must thank NetGalley, for the free ARC in return for an honest review.This book has been very thought fully plotted and extremely well written. I loved the way the two timelines are entwined. It is interesting the way the lives of the other passengers are depicted, by some very emotive writing I found myself hoping that somehow more would survive, even though you know what has happened!The current timeline follows Edward and his emotional growth through the next few years and the development with of his relationship with his neighbour Shay. The characters are very real and grow with the book. Love the way it makes you think what you would do, in that situation, how would feel. It would be a great book for discussion about surviving against the odds.It is obvious that the author has put a lot of thought and research into this book to make it an intense read. Without this I think it would lose a lot of its effect. It was very heavy and emotionally exhaustive read so I am not sure I could say I loved it. But I am very glad I have read it as I found it extremely moving and incredibly profound, which is why I have rated it so high. I can recommend this book.
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  • Martie Nees Record
    January 1, 1970
    Martie's Rating: 3 1/2 StarsGenre: Literary FictionPublisher: Random HousePub. Date: Jan. 14, 2020After losing everything, a pre-teen boy discovers there are still reasons to continue living. This is just the sort of sappy novel that I usually do not care for. Surprisingly, I enjoyed and recommend “Dear Edward.” The unique writing style is what made the difference for me. The reader goes in knowing that twelve-year-old Edward’s older brother, his parents, and almost 200 other passengers will die Martie's Rating: 3 1/2 StarsGenre: Literary FictionPublisher: Random HousePub. Date: Jan. 14, 2020After losing everything, a pre-teen boy discovers there are still reasons to continue living. This is just the sort of sappy novel that I usually do not care for. Surprisingly, I enjoyed and recommend “Dear Edward.” The unique writing style is what made the difference for me. The reader goes in knowing that twelve-year-old Edward’s older brother, his parents, and almost 200 other passengers will die when the plane crashes. Edward is the sole survivor. The book is divided into two timelines, the past, which is during the flight, and the present. On the plane, we get to understand the family dynamics of Edward’s immediate family. We also meet a Wall Street rising star, an unlikeable septuagenarian business billionaire who is the rising star’s role model, an unmarried young woman who takes a pregnancy test while on the plane, a wounded vet with a secret, and an uninhibited, possibly crazy woman who happens to believe in reincarnation. These well-developed characters are very much a part of Edward’s story, creating interesting storylines that are not about overcoming tragedy. This helps make the novel less fatiguing to read since the bulk of the story in the present describes Edward’s overwhelming depression. The events that occur on the flight are divided by time right down to the minute of the crash. (Boarding your next plane might feel different after reading this one). Even though we know the ending, this part of the tale still reads like a page-turning mystery. In the present, we meet a few new characters. In Edward’s new life, disagreeing with myself, there are characters that read a bit saccharine. His aunt and uncle, new best friend and high school principal are just too self-sacrificing and flawless to feel like true people. This contrasts with the realness felt in the characters from the plane ride. Still, in my mind, Napolitano’s weaving of past and present makes up for that over-sweetening. Plus, by the end of the novel, it can also read as a coming-of-age story, which is a genre I have always liked. Clearly, the novel is not all doom and gloom. By the end of the novel, as the author intended, I had a smile on my face. Heartwarming endings can be a good thing.I received this Advance Review Copy (ARC) novel from the publisher at no cost in exchange for an honest review.Find all my book reviews at:https://www.goodreads.com/review/list...https://books6259.wordpress.com/https: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/review...https://www.facebook.com/martie.neesr...https://www.instagram.com/martie6947/https://www.pinterest.com/martienreco...\
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  • Jamie beauty_andthebook_
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars!Dear Edward is a book unlike any I've read before - a young boy is the only survivor of a plane crash that kills his parents, his brother and hundreds of other strangers. Becoming the public face of a miracle, Edward is thrust into the spotlight, something he does not want and us readers get to view how his life is changed as a result of the crash. Told in alternating chapters from the actual plane from various passengers as well as after the crash solely from Edward's perspective, 4.5 stars!Dear Edward is a book unlike any I've read before - a young boy is the only survivor of a plane crash that kills his parents, his brother and hundreds of other strangers. Becoming the public face of a miracle, Edward is thrust into the spotlight, something he does not want and us readers get to view how his life is changed as a result of the crash. Told in alternating chapters from the actual plane from various passengers as well as after the crash solely from Edward's perspective, this story will move you and I hope you will find it as special as I did!Thank you to Dial Press for an advanced copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Maggie Gust
    January 1, 1970
    6/25/2019 – Dear Edward – Net Galley – Ann Napolitano – The Dial Press/Random House – 20205 stars. I loved this book. It did take me a couple of chapters to “get into” it, though. Once I did, I did not want to put it down and finished it in two sittings with just a brief intermission! Edward is a 12-year-old boy who is the sole survivor of an horrific airliner crash in which 191 people lose their lives. Among those 191 are Edward’s parents and his 15-year-old brother Jordan. The boys were home 6/25/2019 – Dear Edward – Net Galley – Ann Napolitano – The Dial Press/Random House – 20205 stars. I loved this book. It did take me a couple of chapters to “get into” it, though. Once I did, I did not want to put it down and finished it in two sittings with just a brief intermission! Edward is a 12-year-old boy who is the sole survivor of an horrific airliner crash in which 191 people lose their lives. Among those 191 are Edward’s parents and his 15-year-old brother Jordan. The boys were home schooled their entire lives by their brainy father, so they were extremely close to each other. After living their entire lives in a New York City apartment, the family was heading to Los Angeles for a new life due to mom Jane’s writing job. The crash happens over Colorado, where Edward spends the initial phase of his medical treatment and recovery. Thereafter he is eventually taken by his Aunt Lacey, his mother’s younger sister, and her husband John back to their place in New Jersey. They have no children of their own despite multiple attempts but they are determined to make a home for Edward as they are each other’s only family. Edward, being 12 years of age, is at a vulnerable time in his life even if there had been no airliner crash and the loss of his immediate family. He is treated by other people, even authority figures, as a porcelain doll and is pretty much not held accountable and not given boundaries. Everyone knows his story and whenever they venture out for physical therapy, doctor visits and counseling, Edward is subjected to stares and phone photography by multitudes of bystanders. He has made friends with the girl next door who is the same age, and he decides he wants to go to school for the first time in his life. On that first day at school, he is driven the three blocks by the neighbor because the street is lined with hundreds of people who know what he is doing, where he lives and what his schedule is. People on both sides of the streets are snapping photos of him and trying to get as close as possible. Since he is already traumatized, it does not really sink in. He actually lives in his own little bubble at this time and for some time to come. Shay is the neighbor girl, a very intelligent person mature beyond her years in many ways but with some socialization issues of her own. She has been suspended in the past for fighting with another student. Edward decides he wants to sleep in Shay’s room rather than the unused nursery that Aunt Lacey had assigned him. For some reason, the adults agree to this including Shay’s single mom Besa. I had a bit of a problem with the lack of boundaries given to this boy, but I also could see adults being afraid to impose boundaries on a newly orphaned traumatized kid recovering from major physical injuries. Ms. Napolitano uses a flashback format to tell this story. The first several chapters are of the airliner passengers of course, but after the crash, she intersperses Edward’s recovery phase with flashbacks to the airliner. She drew an amazingly interesting cast of characters on that plane including a very sensuous chief flight attendant who has an assignation with a male passenger in the restroom (room being a misnomer, as we all know they are more like cubbyholes). One of my favorite characters was Florida, a woman who is very aware of her previous many lives and startles her seatmate with her tales of life in previous historical eras. There is a very wealthy elderly man on his way to LA for a cancer cure, a younger man of the same ilk who wants to be that very wealthy man but while he is still young, and Linda, a young woman on her way to reconnect with a lover by whom she is pregnant. With each flashback, we learn more about Bruce and Jane, Edward’s parents, and the state of their relationship, as well as the secret that Jordan has been keeping from everyone including Edward. I found myself looking forward to those flashback sections, even though I was totally engulfed in Edward’s new life. The author has an amazing talent for storytelling, as well as character development and pulling all the threads of her story lines into a seamless tapestry. I love that she showed so much respect for all her characters, including the “kids.” None of her young people were bratty and selfish, but all showed growth and self-awareness and it was heartwarming to see the friendship between Shay and Edward strengthen over three years. I definitely recommend this book. I received an ARC of this title from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank the publisher for letting me read it.
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  • Aga Durka
    January 1, 1970
    Dear Edward is a heartbreaking story of a 12-year-old boy whose life is turned upside down after he loses his family in the plane crash. Edward is a lone survivor of the crash, and the reader gets to follow Edward’s story during his physical and mental recuperation from the accident. Reading this book was a true struggle for me. In my opinion, this novel could have been so much more than it actually was and sadly, I was left unsatisfied with the whole story. I was expecting to feel all kinds of Dear Edward is a heartbreaking story of a 12-year-old boy whose life is turned upside down after he loses his family in the plane crash. Edward is a lone survivor of the crash, and the reader gets to follow Edward’s story during his physical and mental recuperation from the accident. Reading this book was a true struggle for me. In my opinion, this novel could have been so much more than it actually was and sadly, I was left unsatisfied with the whole story. I was expecting to feel all kinds of emotions while reading this novel, but honestly, I was left feeling almost nothing. I did not connect with Edward as much as I thought I would and I found most of the characters uninteresting and with no depth to them.I really wish I liked this book more, but in the end it was just not a great fit for me.Thank you NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC copy of this novel in exchange for my honest opinion.
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  • Selena
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free e-copy of Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano from NetGalley for my honest review.A beautifully written yet desperately sad story of loss and finding the power to heal and survive the unimaginable.This book is the story of a 12 year old boy, Eddie Adler. He is the sole survivor of the crash of Flight 2977. Eddie has lost his entire family in the plane crash, and is placed in the care of his Aunt and Uncle. Eddie, who was once home schooled has to now learn to communicate and get I received a free e-copy of Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano from NetGalley for my honest review.A beautifully written yet desperately sad story of loss and finding the power to heal and survive the unimaginable.This book is the story of a 12 year old boy, Eddie Adler. He is the sole survivor of the crash of Flight 2977. Eddie has lost his entire family in the plane crash, and is placed in the care of his Aunt and Uncle. Eddie, who was once home schooled has to now learn to communicate and get along with others at school. The other students, however, treat him differently, because he cheated death. Edward's story is national news, of course, so everyone knows what happened to him. Yet, Eddied struggles to find out who he is and where he belongs without having his family. He feels like a part of him was left in the sky after the crash but the other part is here and now. He is torn, sad, lost and confused. You need to read this book to learn his story, hear his heartfelt words and follow his journey of finding his purpose.
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  • Angela M
    January 1, 1970
    Many of us know what it feels like to grieve the loss of loved ones, but how unimaginable to lose your whole family at twelve years old as the sole survivor of a plane crash. Who is there to understand what Edward Adler, this young boy, broken physically and emotionally, is feeling? Is there anyone to help him heal, to find his way through the trauma and horrific loss? Perhaps it’s his Aunt Lacey, who has not only lost her sister, but suffers her own personal losses. Or maybe her husband John, Many of us know what it feels like to grieve the loss of loved ones, but how unimaginable to lose your whole family at twelve years old as the sole survivor of a plane crash. Who is there to understand what Edward Adler, this young boy, broken physically and emotionally, is feeling? Is there anyone to help him heal, to find his way through the trauma and horrific loss? Perhaps it’s his Aunt Lacey, who has not only lost her sister, but suffers her own personal losses. Or maybe her husband John, who is determined to protect Edward from those who may want to exploit him, from any more hurt. Or maybe his therapist, Dr. Mike. Maybe it’s the young girl, Shay, who lives next door and becomes a source of solace for Edward. Maybe it’s his principal who helps nurture Edward by having him nurture the plants in his office. Maybe it’s the families of some of the others who have perished in the crash. Perhaps it’s all of them. It takes a village. This is such a heartbreaking story and I cried for Edward multiple times as he grieves the loss of his family, particularly at the moments when he thinks of his older brother Jordan, with whom he shared a special bond. The sadness I felt was not just for his family, but for a number of other passengers that we meet in alternating narratives which reveal their personal stories and why they are on the flight. We learn what his parents and brother are thinking about and also an injured soldier, a dying man, a pregnant young woman, a flamboyant woman who believes in reincarnation, among others. Later in the story we get a glimpse of the grief of their loved ones in a stunning way. It’s thought provoking in a number of ways - how does a young boy bear his grief, this loss, the trauma of what he has experienced but it made me consider how little we know of the burdens that people whose paths we cross might carry. This book is full of sadness, without a doubt, but it is also filled with shared sorrow, love, friendship and caring. A beautiful story. I received an advanced copy of this book from Random House through NetGalley.
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  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    After a horrific airline crash, twelve-year-old Eddie discovers he alone is the only survivor. After losing his family, he is permanently placed in the care of his aunt and uncle where he begins to mend his heart, body and soul. This story reminds us of how we are all tethered; some by chance or even indirectly. How the actions of one can have a profound impact on another. Dear Edward is a beautifully written and utterly moving novel. For those who enjoy Chloe Benjamin or Hannah Tinti.
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  • Sherri Thacker
    January 1, 1970
    Edward is a 12 year old boy who was the sole survivor of a plane crash with 191 people. It goes back and forth from the crash to before the crash, then after the crash and how he lives his new life with his aunt and uncle. Parts of it I admit to skimming pages during the back stories of the ones who died because i was losing interest but i loved the current story of Edward and Shay. It took me awhile to connect with the characters in this book but in the end I did enjoy the book. I think this Edward is a 12 year old boy who was the sole survivor of a plane crash with 191 people. It goes back and forth from the crash to before the crash, then after the crash and how he lives his new life with his aunt and uncle. Parts of it I admit to skimming pages during the back stories of the ones who died because i was losing interest but i loved the current story of Edward and Shay. It took me awhile to connect with the characters in this book but in the end I did enjoy the book. I think this book will stay with me for awhile.
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  • Emer (A Little Haze)
    January 1, 1970
    "Dear Edward" follows the story of a plane crash with just a single survivor, 12 year old Eddie who after the flight chooses to be called Edward. The story unfolds over two time periods; the events that occurred on the flight and the storylines of its passengers, and then following Edward as he comes to terms with what his survival truly means to him and to the world at large. I really wanted to love this book and had thought that I would find it deeply moving but sadly I found the writing to be "Dear Edward" follows the story of a plane crash with just a single survivor, 12 year old Eddie who after the flight chooses to be called Edward. The story unfolds over two time periods; the events that occurred on the flight and the storylines of its passengers, and then following Edward as he comes to terms with what his survival truly means to him and to the world at large. I really wanted to love this book and had thought that I would find it deeply moving but sadly I found the writing to be in too much of a detached style for my personal taste. I preferred Edward's story and struggle to come to grips with what happened to him a lot more than the stories of the people on board the plane. Those stories to me seemed to be rather confusing and I was constantly getting mixed up between characters due to the style of narrative used. I do however also think that because I read an eARC copy that is not the finalised version, that its formatting on my kindle paperwhite made things more difficult for me to follow and added to my lack of enjoyment. For the last quarter of the book I switched to using the Bluefire app on a tablet and the formatting was 100% better. As I said earlier, I very much preferred following Edward's story. I thought it was very interesting to read about how he dealt with survivor's guilt and the loss of his entire family along with his medical problems and upheaval to a new life with his aunt and uncle. His relationship with his new friend Shay was the highlight of the book for me and I really loved how their friendship helped to create a new normal for Edward. Overall I'm sad to say that this book wasn't completely to my liking but it did have some very touching moments that hopefully a different reader would enjoy more than I did. *An e-copy of this book was kindly provided to me by the publisher, Penguin Books UK/Viking, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    12-year-old Edward Adler was the Lone Survivor of Flight 2977 to Los Angeles where 215 people lost their lives. He was travelling on the plane from New York to Los Angeles where it is to be his new home. His mother a writer was starting a new job and Edward and his family was moving there.The story continues with Edward moving in with his Aunt and Uncle that he barely knows with no children of their own, it’s a new experience for them, as it is to himself. He must learn to bear the guilt he 12-year-old Edward Adler was the Lone Survivor of Flight 2977 to Los Angeles where 215 people lost their lives. He was travelling on the plane from New York to Los Angeles where it is to be his new home. His mother a writer was starting a new job and Edward and his family was moving there.The story continues with Edward moving in with his Aunt and Uncle that he barely knows with no children of their own, it’s a new experience for them, as it is to himself. He must learn to bear the guilt he feels as the only survivor. He was also home schooled by his father so, he must learn to communicate with his peers at school and cope with the other students believing him to be like a god as he cheated death. He has one ally Shay. Who seem to be the only one that understands him.After his 15th Birthday he discovers letters from the siblings of the survivors which he goes through. Trying to meet some of the people to give them some sort of peace. And, for him to come to terms with everything that has happened and his future. Thank you NetGalley and Penguin for a copy of Dear Edward. This book was completely different to what I was expecting. I did like the premise of this story, but I thought this book was a lot of hard work. I thought that the story was quite rushed and didn’t flow. It just jumped from one thing to another which prevented me to really connecting this book and the characters in it. I wanted something spectacular to that didn’t happen. So, in some parts my mind wondered off not caring about the story.
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Netgalley and Random House for sending me a digital ARC, in exchange for an honest review.I REALLY wanted to like "Dear Edward" by Ann Napolitano, but everything was just so dull and pointless. Even though the writing was decent, I had a difficult time keeping track of all the different narratives. There were too many characters. I was only interested in hearing about Edward's story, but the narrative kept switching back too many times and I became bored (I get bored very easily). I Thank you, Netgalley and Random House for sending me a digital ARC, in exchange for an honest review.I REALLY wanted to like "Dear Edward" by Ann Napolitano, but everything was just so dull and pointless. Even though the writing was decent, I had a difficult time keeping track of all the different narratives. There were too many characters. I was only interested in hearing about Edward's story, but the narrative kept switching back too many times and I became bored (I get bored very easily). I ended up skimming the majority of the second half. This book was too long as well. I just wanted it to be over. The story lacked emotion. I didn't feel any connection to any of the characters, their backstories weren't compelling enough. The main focus should've been on Edward. He was supposed to the heart and soul of this book, and he felt more like an afterthought. A very underwhelming plot, and I didn't like overall tone. It felt very disjointed, sterile, and awkward. A lot of people love this book so I'm in the minority here. A frustrating read to say the least. Ugh.Release date: January 7, 2020
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    12 year old Eddie is on a flight with his family as they move across the country. The plane crashes in a field in Colorado, killing 191 people and leaving Eddie as the sole survivor.Eddie is now Edward, living with his aunt and uncle, attempting to heal physically from his wounds, and attempting to come to grips with this new life and the grief over losing his family. The grief and survivors guilt that threatens to drown him.𝐃𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐄𝐝𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 is powerful, moving, and absolutely unputdownable. The 12 year old Eddie is on a flight with his family as they move across the country. The plane crashes in a field in Colorado, killing 191 people and leaving Eddie as the sole survivor.⁣⁣Eddie is now Edward, living with his aunt and uncle, attempting to heal physically from his wounds, and attempting to come to grips with this new life and the grief over losing his family. The grief and survivors guilt that threatens to drown him.⁣⁣𝐃𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐄𝐝𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 is powerful, moving, and absolutely unputdownable. The story is told in dual timelines- Edward after the crash and the events leading up to the fateful event. The passengers are given names, stories, and survivors in a remarkable way. The writing is lovely and poignant. This book is utterly human and raw, and absolutely remarkable. The power of grief. The power of love. The power of hope.⁣⁣All of the stars for this beautiful novel, one sure to become a top book of 2020. Add this to your TBRs and look for it early in the New Year.⁣⁣Thank you @randomhouse for the advance reader in exchange for my honest review.⁣⁣
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    Neapolitano has written a remarkable, lovely, and totally original novel about a child who becomes a “miracle” when he alone survives a plane crash. Eddie is forced to build an entirely new life when his family is destroyed in an air crash. He is fortunate to be surrounded by an incredible amount of support from his mother’s sister, her husband and the remarkable young girl who lives next door. Eddie’s rehabilitation, both physical and mental, is portrayed with sensitivity. I was never bored for Neapolitano has written a remarkable, lovely, and totally original novel about a child who becomes a “miracle” when he alone survives a plane crash. Eddie is forced to build an entirely new life when his family is destroyed in an air crash. He is fortunate to be surrounded by an incredible amount of support from his mother’s sister, her husband and the remarkable young girl who lives next door. Eddie’s rehabilitation, both physical and mental, is portrayed with sensitivity. I was never bored for a moment. Napolitano created a cast of beautiful characters, from the relatives who cared for him, to his therapist, the school principal and the families of the victims. His relationship with his neighbor, Shay, is very touching and allows the reader hope for a happy ending, even in the throes of such emotional devastation. The importance of friendship as a tool of healing is beautifully wrought. There are ancillary characters that are exceedingly well-developed and likable. I was amazed at how invested I felt in some of them. I cannot begin to express how totally appealing I found this novel. I think that reading groups will love this book and I will certainly recommend it to my Education students since it will impart tremendous insights into the mind of teenaged boys and sibling bonding. Of course, I will remind everyone to bring tissues because there are special moments that bring tears. I thank Netgalley for giving me the opportunity to read and review this golden nugget of a novel.
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  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    Exquisitely written, this book takes your breath away, breaks your heart and offers hope. The book tells the story of the sole survivor of the crash of Flight 2977, 12 year old Eddie/Edward Adler. In alternating chapters we are with Eddie and his family on the doomed flight and with him after the crash. It is a story of profound losses, survivor guilt and the slow process of healing and continuing to live, even thrive. Beautifully told Edward's story will stay with you long after you close the Exquisitely written, this book takes your breath away, breaks your heart and offers hope. The book tells the story of the sole survivor of the crash of Flight 2977, 12 year old Eddie/Edward Adler. In alternating chapters we are with Eddie and his family on the doomed flight and with him after the crash. It is a story of profound losses, survivor guilt and the slow process of healing and continuing to live, even thrive. Beautifully told Edward's story will stay with you long after you close the book. Will be great for book club discussions.A novel has rarely made me cry with how beautiful it is, but this one has. Do read this book, it's spectacular in every way.
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  • Chelsea Hofmann
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic writing of a great story! Thank you so much to Random House and Netgalley for allowing me to reach such a phenomenal book! The premise was so interesting- 191 people on a plane that ends up crashing, leaving 10-year old Edward as the lone survivor. Much like the show “Manifest”, the fact that Edward survived leads the public to believe that he has special gifts or is saved by God. The chapters switch to before and after the crash, and you learn about the passengers and their stories, Fantastic writing of a great story! Thank you so much to Random House and Netgalley for allowing me to reach such a phenomenal book! The premise was so interesting- 191 people on a plane that ends up crashing, leaving 10-year old Edward as the lone survivor. Much like the show “Manifest”, the fact that Edward survived leads the public to believe that he has special gifts or is saved by God. The chapters switch to before and after the crash, and you learn about the passengers and their stories, similar to the show LOST. The story is interesting and beautiful and heartbreaking and examines what makes life worth living. The conflicting emotions of struggling to find meaning and reconciling a loss of life is so poignantand real and touched me in many ways.Edward is taken in by his aunt and uncle and the story of his life begins to unfold. I thought it was so interesting that this horrible tragedy happens right when Edward should be growing and getting to know himself and exploring life. Instead, he is dealing with depression, loss, and survivor's guilt. I love the way the book highlights the little interactions we have with people every day. When the families of the people who died write him letters, Edward examines if he met each one and what their small exchanges meant to him and them as well. The overarching narrative combines so many interesting stories into one, and I truly can’t think of another book like this one. What do we do when we lose everything? We need to examine who we are and use what we have for good. This heartwarming story will make you cry, smile, and feel for the characters. 5-stars!
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  • Kayleigh Kehoe ♡
    January 1, 1970
    wordpress tumblr instagram twitter _____________________________ "The most common qualification is the fact that it is statistically more dangerous to travel in a car than in an airplane. In absolute numbers, there are more than five million car accidents compared to twenty aeronautic accidents per year, so, in fact, flying is safer. People are also helped by etiquette; because commercial air travel is public, a kind of group confidence comes into play. People take comfort in each other's ♡ wordpress ♡ tumblr ♡ instagram ♡ twitter ♡_____________________________ "The most common qualification is the fact that it is statistically more dangerous to travel in a car than in an airplane. In absolute numbers, there are more than five million car accidents compared to twenty aeronautic accidents per year, so, in fact, flying is safer. People are also helped by etiquette; because commercial air travel is public, a kind of group confidence comes into play. People take comfort in each other's presence. Sitting side by side, shoulder to shoulder, they believe that it is impossible for this many people to have taken a foolish risk at the same time." 188 Passengers board a plane heading to Los Angeles on a clear, summer morning. Only one passenger makes it out alive. Twelve year old Edward, previously known as Eddie, is the sole survivor of Flight 2977. His older brother and parents are now dead, along with 183 other passengers. Edward is taken on by Lacey and John, his aunt and uncle, and with the help of a nearby neighbour, Shay, has to relearn how to navigate a world where he has lost everything.This was such a gruelling read, it definitely wasn't a book that I could devour in one setting as it was emotionally draining. The careful focus on character development by the author was done with incredible precision. Eddie overcoming the loss of his family - and strangers who technically he should have died with - was a long, overwrought process.I felt like Ann Napolitano put a lot of thought and research into this book for it to result in such an intense read. I was grateful for this because I think if it had been rushed then the book would have lost it's effect. I found the narrative quite aloof, but I also felt that this was more from how Eddie was getting over the shock of the recent trauma than that being the author's actual writing style, and his perception of things was very detached because he didn't feel like he should have been a part of the world. I could be reading too much into it but the fact that I found Shay's dialogue engaging and John and Lacey's relationship routinely passionate made me feel that the narrative was done in a certain way. I also thought that the depiction of the lives of the other passengers on Flight 2977 - who we know will die - are a touching addition and also helped break up the deep introspection of Edward. The flashbacks to the flight and the characters thinking about their personal lives was also cause for great sadness because the reader knows that their linear lives will become inevitably and inexplicably intertwined with Edward's.I wouldn't say I loved this read as it was very heavy and emotionally exhaustive. But I did find it extremely moving and incredibly profound, which is why I have rated it so high. Thank you to Net Galley and Penguin Books for providing an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Robyn Schaub
    January 1, 1970
    In a word: un-put-down-able. This book had me from the first chapter and I was holding on for dear life -- just like the passengers on flight 2977 when their plane fell from the sky. Edward is the miraculous sole survivor who loses everything: his home, his family, his direction in life. This is the story not of how he survived the crash, but how he survived the aftermath. From his well-meaning, but ill-equipped aunt and uncle who take Edward in to the prickly neighbor girl, who begins as an In a word: un-put-down-able. This book had me from the first chapter and I was holding on for dear life -- just like the passengers on flight 2977 when their plane fell from the sky. Edward is the miraculous sole survivor who loses everything: his home, his family, his direction in life. This is the story not of how he survived the crash, but how he survived the aftermath. From his well-meaning, but ill-equipped aunt and uncle who take Edward in to the prickly neighbor girl, who begins as an unexpected source of comfort and ends up as his best friend and confidant, the supporting characters in this book had just enough depth to support the storyline without being distracting. And the main character -- Edward (or Eddie as he's known before the crash) -- is so lovable and broken and flailing that you just want to wrap him in your arms and tell him it's okay. But as the book makes clear: it's not okay. In fact, it's a very sad story, and the characters face tough decisions. They don't always make the right ones, but they're human. And that's what makes you care about them, no matter how flawed they may be.The chapters alternate between the day of the crash and Edward's life afterward, which is perhaps what keeps the book moving at a breakneck pace. As you see Edward start to heal and discover his purpose and direction, it's nearly impossible to want to stop reading.If I have one criticism, it's a small one. I'd like to have learned the backstories of some of the other supporting characters. While some had almost entire chapters devoted to their backstory, they were not the most interesting or multi-dimensional. Others, like Besa and Principal Arundhi, get little more than a paragraph or two. I could've done with less of the crash details and a little more on these people that played a key role in Edward's healing.Overall, an excellent read. I expect to see it pop up on a lot of reading lists come January! I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Michelle Beckwith
    January 1, 1970
    I was unexpectedly drawn into this novel's "sole survivor of a plane crash" plot line, and my experience as a flight attendant piqued my curiosity. Edward navigates his life after the devastating event with the help of those around him, who are managing their own survival and existence in various ways. Pain vs love in their most extreme physical and mental forms sets a tone from start to finish. Edward views himself as a counterweight to 191 lost souls and as he heals and matures, he discovers I was unexpectedly drawn into this novel's "sole survivor of a plane crash" plot line, and my experience as a flight attendant piqued my curiosity. Edward navigates his life after the devastating event with the help of those around him, who are managing their own survival and existence in various ways. Pain vs love in their most extreme physical and mental forms sets a tone from start to finish. Edward views himself as a counterweight to 191 lost souls and as he heals and matures, he discovers his new, impactful place among mere mortals. Ms. Napolitano hits realistic notes with her airplane scenes, accelerating the suspense as past and present converge in an artful way. The brotherly bond cleverly touched upon throughout the pages, and underscored in the final chapter, had this reader weeping. If you have a soft spot for young Theo Decker in Donna Tartt's "The Goldfinch", be sure to add this novel to your TBR list!Thank you Dial Press and Netgalley for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    Different. I could find nothing to compare with Dear Edward. On the surface it's the story of a horrific plane crash and of Edward, the twelve year old sole survivor. Chapters bounce back and forth between the passengers on the flight and the quiet voice of Eddie, his soul hunkered down inside Edward, an outwardly almost normal automaton. Edward leaves the hospital with an aunt and uncle he doesn't know well, lives in their house in a new town, goes to a different school. Everything Eddie ever Different. I could find nothing to compare with Dear Edward. On the surface it's the story of a horrific plane crash and of Edward, the twelve year old sole survivor. Chapters bounce back and forth between the passengers on the flight and the quiet voice of Eddie, his soul hunkered down inside Edward, an outwardly almost normal automaton. Edward leaves the hospital with an aunt and uncle he doesn't know well, lives in their house in a new town, goes to a different school. Everything Eddie ever knew is gone: his mother, his father, his brother, his home, his friends. The girl next door is his age and he grasps onto her as a lifeline, his only friend in an empty world. The chapters about the flight are told from different passengers viewpoints. We see families at the airport before takeoff and slip into the lives of several on the flight of several hours. A wounded soldier going home to his grandmother, a young woman with a positive pregnancy kit who's unsure how her boyfriend in California will react, a rich old man dying of cancer, a young stockbroker, a flight attendant, the pilots, and of course, Eddie's family. The book is half over before the two story lines begin to intertwine and we see the meaning behind the title. No spoilers. This is partly a coming of age story. The ending is upbeat, maybe a little too pat for some readers. I liked it.
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