The Fugitive and the Vanishing Man (The Map of Unknown Things, #3)
Ladies and gentlemen, for the very final time, Elizabeth and Edwin Barnabus will perform the grand illusion of the Vanishing Man.Elizabeth Barnabus is a mutineer and a murderer. So they say. The noose awaits in Liverpool as punishment for her crimes. But they'll have to catch her first.Disguised as a labourer, Elizabeth flees west across America, following a rumour of her long-lost family. Crossing the border into the wilds of the Oregon Territory, she discovers a mustering army, a king who believes he is destined to conquer the world, and a weapon so powerful that it could bring the age of reason crashing down.In a land where politics and prophecy are one and the same, the fate of the Gas-Lit Empire may come to rest on the perfect execution of a conjuring trick...

The Fugitive and the Vanishing Man (The Map of Unknown Things, #3) Details

TitleThe Fugitive and the Vanishing Man (The Map of Unknown Things, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 14th, 2020
PublisherAngry Robot
ISBN-139780857668448
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fantasy, Steampunk, Science Fiction Fantasy

The Fugitive and the Vanishing Man (The Map of Unknown Things, #3) Review

  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 5.0 of 5 ***WARNING -- POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD! READ AT YOUR OWN RISK*** Oh, wow. Rod Duncan wraps up the Elizabeth Barnabus series with a tale that is wild, tight, beautiful, and heart-wrenching in so many different ways.Elizabeth Barnabus, who, despite being an enemy of the Gas-Light Empire, is a strong supporter of the peace and stability that the Empire brings. Although she's given up all the information she can to the This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 5.0 of 5 ***WARNING -- POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD! READ AT YOUR OWN RISK*** Oh, wow. Rod Duncan wraps up the Elizabeth Barnabus series with a tale that is wild, tight, beautiful, and heart-wrenching in so many different ways.Elizabeth Barnabus, who, despite being an enemy of the Gas-Light Empire, is a strong supporter of the peace and stability that the Empire brings. Although she's given up all the information she can to the authorities in the Patent Office no one seems to take her seriously. She has seen first-hand what could happen if the Empire isn't prepared and so she does what she has always done ... take things into her own hands.Escaping the Empire she heads into the wild lands of Oregon where a king is preparing for war. And this king has a number of aides on his side. He has a powerful new weapon that can kill many enemies in just one squeeze of the trigger. And, among his many confidants, he has a magician - Edwin, the son of the previous magician who was killed when her prophecy turned out not to be true. Edwin knows his time is short, especially since the king has another aide who will stop at nothing to get Edwin discredited and killed.Edwin has one more trick that even he didn't realize for the longest time. Elizabeth is Edwin's twin sister. Raised in a circus family performing magic tricks, and with Elizabeth having spent much of her life pretending to be her brother Edwin, the two might be able to perform, for one last time, the Vanishing Man trick and stop a war and save their own lives as well.Raised by a different parent and in a different land, Elizabeth and Edwin don't exactly see eye to eye.This story is just ... wow.Although we've heard mention of Edwin throughout the series as Elizabeth (when she's dressed as a man she refers to herself as her brother Edwin), I didn't expect to actually encounter this sibling. And pulling in the magic that she and Edwin were raised on - the kind of magic that started this series - is some kind of brilliance.Before I started this I had read or heard somewhere that this was the last book in the series. I don't know if that's true or not, and because I've been enjoying this so much I was definitely hoping that this would continue on. But about three quarters of the way through the book, I could see the end coming. And I was completely content.Something about the way that Duncan pulled the pieces together had me feeling good about this series and the idea that we weren't likely to get another Elizabeth Barnabus story. It was just feeling ... right.There are so many layers to this book that I'm sure that when I read this again I'll discover even more. The surface story - that story which is described as a blurb on book selling websites - is only the action that gets us from point A to point B. But the story of family is just tremendous. Though an absent figure in Elizabeth's life, her mother and her mother's leaving have been a source of frustration for some time. And though we get to meet the mother (albeit briefly - and Elizabeth doesn't), there is so much for Elizabeth to come to terms with.And alongside this learning about family, she also has to face her thoughts on politics and governance. There is a system which hasn't treated her well over the years. A system she herself tried to disrupt. But she finds herself defending this system when confronted with something very different and very aggressive.One of the most interesting characters here ... and someone I suspect we may see again in another book (either a Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire series or the Map of Unknown Things series [or a combination of them]) - is the strange woman being held prisoner by the king simply for refusing to recant her declaration that there is no such thing as magic. Elizabeth becomes obsessed with her strength and integrity for refusing to even just say the words without meaning it in order to gain her freedom. Elizabeth will see to her escape - thereby freeing herself (metaphorically) as well.This is easily one of the best series I've read (with only Roger Zelazny's Amber series being in the same grade) and this book just made me feel good. I don't know that I've ever had such a feeling of peace at the end of a book ... but it took a lot to get us there!Looking for a good book? The Fugitive and the Vanishing Man by Rod Duncan is a tremendously superb book that (perhaps) closes the cycle of Elizabeth Barnabus stories. Please read the entire series!I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through the publicist, in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Online Eccentric Librarian
    January 1, 1970
    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ As soon as I received this, I dropped every other book I was reading and then binge-read through the entire night to finish. This has been one of my favorite series and although I am sad that it is definitely ending the second trilogy and is perhaps the last in the Elizabeth Barnabus books, it was a deeply satisfying and engrossing read. I have to applaud author Duncan in that each of the 6 books was very different and More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ As soon as I received this, I dropped every other book I was reading and then binge-read through the entire night to finish. This has been one of my favorite series and although I am sad that it is definitely ending the second trilogy and is perhaps the last in the Elizabeth Barnabus books, it was a deeply satisfying and engrossing read. I have to applaud author Duncan in that each of the 6 books was very different and very distinct. Story: Elizabeth has learned that her brother is alive in Oregon - but she is trapped on the East Coast in the hands of the Patent Office. They want information from her about New Foundland and she wants safety for Julia and Tinker. She must escape them to travel to Oregon but at the same time guarantee that Julia and Tinker aren't implicated in her 'crimes.' Meanwhile, Edwin Barnabus is the first counselor and court magician to the king of Crown's Point on the Oregon coast. His position is precarious - it even cost the life of his mother, who held the job before him. As New Foundland and Oregon look to make an alliance that could topple the Gas-Lit Empire, Elizabeth and Edwin will play key roles in the coming future of North America.The book is about Elizabeth and Edwin, told in their two POVs. Fortunately, we don't wait the whole book for them to meet. A lot of the book is about the twins struggling to remember their lives together (they've been separated since they were 7) and the differing stories and philosophies of their parents. As well, Edwin has a rival who seeks his downfall and Elizabeth has the patent office ready to spring on her as soon as she surfaces. As with previous volumes, there are the conflicts of those in power and the authority they hold over Elizabeth's (and Edwin's) head. The counterpoint in this third book is that the Oregon Kingdom is very similar to a medieval one - just with the invention of the gatlin gun. This juxtaposes the hard living warrior-society of New Foundland in book 2 and the free-living pirates of the Sargasso sea.As with every other book, our protagonists survive by their wits and what luck they can find. Elizabeth's journey to Oregon is not without incident and Edwin's political machinations are equally daunting. As with all the books, there is a pervasive air of desperation that is not lightened by levity. A failure at any junction is death for both Elizabeth and Edwin; but they are trapped in the struggle all the same. But that is the genius in the storytelling here: we have a heroine who is all show and little tell; such a contrast to most fiction today and a character whose exploits we want to follow as she succeeds and fails based on her intelligence.Much of the story comes full circle at the end and ties up well for an excellent ending. All the same, there is some room for more tales with a new start for Elizabeth - only time will tell if author Duncan chooses to continue her story. But I have enjoyed the well-thought out plot in every novel and greatly appreciated the scope of the world building in this alternate universe historical fiction. Oh, and I'd love to read more of Gilad! Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Barnabus, our intrepid adventurer, having made it to the Free States of America, is pursued, caught, and eventually escapes the custody of Gas-Lit Empire agents. She flees to a kingdom in Oregon, where a power-hungry monarch has plans for eastward conquest. Only a grand illusion and an assist from a long-lost ally can save her skin and keep the world from falling into ruin.This is the sixth and final(?) adventure for Elizabeth and these books have been really enjoyable. This specific Elizabeth Barnabus, our intrepid adventurer, having made it to the Free States of America, is pursued, caught, and eventually escapes the custody of Gas-Lit Empire agents. She flees to a kingdom in Oregon, where a power-hungry monarch has plans for eastward conquest. Only a grand illusion and an assist from a long-lost ally can save her skin and keep the world from falling into ruin.This is the sixth and final(?) adventure for Elizabeth and these books have been really enjoyable. This specific trilogy has improved with each subsequent installment, with each book exploring a new frontier and story type. Book 1 was a seafaring tale, Book 2 a revenge story, and Book 3 now deals with court intrigue and politics. While I’m less interested in the world-altering events that Elizabeth continues to be mixed up with, her personal journey is the hook that keeps me coming back for more. The smaller moments of this book that deal with Elizabeth finding her identity, her family, and her real place in the world are exceedingly well done. In all, this is a satisfying conclusion to a six-book, two-trilogy saga that has been supremely entertaining and well-told by an author with a wonderful flair for storytelling.My thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review.See this review and others at The Speculative Shelf.
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  • Paul Sparks
    January 1, 1970
    I am a newbie to this author and was pleasantly surprised by this book, it’s not my usual fare but it kept me engaged and interested
  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    This is an intriguing end to this series. Unlike all the previous books this one features very little action - it is very focused on the protagonist, Elizabeth Barnabus, and reveals a great deal of her back story that's previously only been hinted at.
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  • Star Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    An entire review can be found at In Pursuit of My Own LibraryThe series is finally over. "Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire" occurred in an England torn in two with recurring characters and a unity of purpose. They flowed from one to the other even if I liked one book over another. That cohesion and unity of world didn't turn up in the second trilogy of Elizabeth Barnabus. In fact, she is the only string tying the three books together. And she wasn't a very good string, unfortunately. Her charm seemed An entire review can be found at In Pursuit of My Own LibraryThe series is finally over. "Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire" occurred in an England torn in two with recurring characters and a unity of purpose. They flowed from one to the other even if I liked one book over another. That cohesion and unity of world didn't turn up in the second trilogy of Elizabeth Barnabus. In fact, she is the only string tying the three books together. And she wasn't a very good string, unfortunately. Her charm seemed to dwindle the longer things went on.I truly loved the start of Elizabeth Barnabus's journey with its gypsies and daring. The clear tensions gave the story direction and kept the pages turning. Once she left the continent, it became all politics--very preachy politics. It just felt so forced that we had to read pages and pages of social justice. Since I always need to point out something positive, my favorite scene of the entire "Map of Unknown Things" is the Vanishing Man. It brought back all that glorious mayhem and magic from "Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire." So at least the book ended on a happy note for me.
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  • Jacey
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Barnabus, also sometimes known as Edwin in her manly disguise is wanted for capital crimes back in England. Leaving her lover, an agentn of the dreaded Patent Office, far behind, She searches acvross America into the wilds of the Oregon Territory in search of the brother, the real Edwin, she barely remembers. Politics and prophesy mesh as Elizabeth finds Edwin embroiled in court intreague with a king who believes he's destined to conquer the world – and he has the weapons to do it. The Elizabeth Barnabus, also sometimes known as Edwin in her manly disguise is wanted for capital crimes back in England. Leaving her lover, an agentn of the dreaded Patent Office, far behind, She searches acvross America into the wilds of the Oregon Territory in search of the brother, the real Edwin, she barely remembers. Politics and prophesy mesh as Elizabeth finds Edwin embroiled in court intreague with a king who believes he's destined to conquer the world – and he has the weapons to do it. The fate of the Gas Lit empire, and Elizabeth and Edwin, could hand on one daring conjuring trick. This looks like the end of the two Elizabeth Barnabus trilogies. I recommend you start with the Bullet Catcher's Daughter
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    This is an intriguing end to this series. Unlike all the previous books this one features very little action - it is very focused on the protagonist, Elizabeth Barnabus, and reveals a great deal of her back story that's previously only been hinted at.
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