Bad Weekend
JUST IN TIME FOR CONVENTION SEASON-the ultimate comic con crime tale!Comics won't just break your heart.Comics will just kill you.Hal Crane should know, he's been around since practically the beginning. Stuck at an out-of-town convention, waiting to receive a lifetime achievement award, Hal's weekend takes us on a dark ride through the secret history of a medium that's always been haunted by crooks, swindlers, and desperate dreamers.BAD WEEKEND-the story some are already calling the comic of the year from its serialization in CRIMINAL #2 and 3-has been expanded, with several new scenes added and remastered into a hardcover graphic novel, in the same format as BRUBAKER and PHILLIPS' (KILL OR BE KILLED, FATALE, CRIMINAL) bestselling MY HEROES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN JUNKIES. This gorgeous package is a must-have, an evergreen graphic novel every true comics fan will want to own.Collects CRIMINAL #2-3 with expanded content

Bad Weekend Details

TitleBad Weekend
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 16th, 2019
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534314405
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Mystery, Crime, Fiction

Bad Weekend Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    Set in 1997, Jacob is asked to chaperone his former mentor, comics legend Hal Crane, around a convention where he will be given a lifetime achievement award. Sounds straightforward enough, eh? Except Hal is an embittered old drunken wreck whose increasingly reckless, unhinged behaviour lands him and Jacob in one sketchy situation after another! Will they get through the Bad Weekend in one piece? Much to my, and other fans’, delight, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips re-upped their five year exclusiv Set in 1997, Jacob is asked to chaperone his former mentor, comics legend Hal Crane, around a convention where he will be given a lifetime achievement award. Sounds straightforward enough, eh? Except Hal is an embittered old drunken wreck whose increasingly reckless, unhinged behaviour lands him and Jacob in one sketchy situation after another! Will they get through the Bad Weekend in one piece? Much to my, and other fans’, delight, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips re-upped their five year exclusive deal with Image last December and their first project to emerge was a new monthly run of their signature series, Criminal. Bad Weekend collects issues 2 and 3 of this new run along with a clutch of previously cut pages to form the second Criminal “novella” (the first being last year’s My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies). The 2019 run of Criminal (currently six issues long) has been absolutely superb though I’d say this storyline, while still good, was my least favourite so far. Except I surprisingly enjoyed reading it in collected form much better the second time around! Maybe because it doesn’t suffer from the comparison of the more exciting Lawless storyline that bookends it in the series or maybe it’s more rounded this way, as opposed to reading it serially – I have noticed how different an experience it can sometimes be to read a title monthly (or whatever the schedule is) and to read it in a collection. The story is always entertaining. From the moment Jacob encounters Hal, it’s a rollercoaster of crazy: pistol-whipping colleagues in barroom toilets, planning a B&E with Ricky Lawless to get back artwork, and the funny awards show at the end. It’s never anything but an exciting and imaginative read, masterfully written and drawn. What stood out more to me on this second read was Hal’s complex character – his unexpected moments of vulnerability counterbalancing his obnoxious behaviour, and the tragic story likely behind his destructive behaviour: a car crash back in 1955 with Hal’s old mentor, Archie Lewis. It adds another dimension to the otherwise overfamiliar and sordid tale of comics creators getting fucked over by their publishers. And that bittersweet ending is perfect. I still don’t really like Jacob Phillips’ colours but it doesn’t detract from the book to give it anything less than the highest rating. Bad Weekend is utterly fantastic and a particularly wry accompaniment to con season! Brubaker and Phillips continue to shine as one of comics’ greatest creative teams – if this is any indication, I can’t wait to see what else they’ve got planned in the years ahead!
    more
  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips put the con back in comic con! Or more correctly, they show you that deceit, back-stabbing, and drunken thievery even at the highest levels of comics fame was always there. As with their The Fade Out, that manages to successfully achieve both nostalgia and expose the dirty "secrets" we all now know about the film industry, Bad Weekend, a gorgeous hardcover compiled from just two issues of the new Criminal (2019) run, (I have reviewed them as they have come out) crea Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips put the con back in comic con! Or more correctly, they show you that deceit, back-stabbing, and drunken thievery even at the highest levels of comics fame was always there. As with their The Fade Out, that manages to successfully achieve both nostalgia and expose the dirty "secrets" we all now know about the film industry, Bad Weekend, a gorgeous hardcover compiled from just two issues of the new Criminal (2019) run, (I have reviewed them as they have come out) creates the same kind of nostalgia/horror vibe, but this time about the comics industry, a complete arc focused on former comics star Hal Crane, told by Jacob, his one-time assistant who shepherds Crane around at the conference. Hal's in his seventies, a drunk, known for some great comics but also for bad sexist drunken behavior, for berating all of his assistants, and for stealing some of his own old comics to help pay for gambling debts. At one point they contact (seasoned thief) Ricky Lawless to break into a guy's house, the day before Crane is supposed to accept a Lifetime Achievement Award at a Comic Con. You don't get any better than this, period.One moment that made me laugh aloud, just to get the flavor of the writing: We have spent much of the first issue (focused on Friday of said "bad weekend") learning what a prick Hal was, especially to our narrator, who ends the issue planning a comics heist. This Crane is a "character," but also pretty despicable, a jerk. Then, on the very next page, headed "Saturday" Jacob begins, "I feel like I'm not giving you a fair picture of Hal Crane. I'm talking like he's just this string of bad luck and drunken rage. . . but there was more to him than that." Fair picture?! Why do we need a "fair" picture of a guy who was never fair?! But then Jacob proceeds to convince us there's actually a beating heart in old Crane, one that once lived for comics, something Jacob sees in Crane, and wants us to see. The book came in the mail, and I sat down and read it. You should do the same.
    more
  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    Bad Weekend is issue 2-3 of the new criminal but it's confusing as I wonder where the hell issue 1 went. Anyway, this is still great. So this is a story about a retired comic artist who basically transformed from a kind man to a asshole. So basically Alan Moore. Now that he is crabby and annoyed at life he is forced to go to a comic con with his old assistant, Jacob. Jacob is not enjoying much of his time with his old mentor but he does what he must because of old times. This turns quickly into Bad Weekend is issue 2-3 of the new criminal but it's confusing as I wonder where the hell issue 1 went. Anyway, this is still great. So this is a story about a retired comic artist who basically transformed from a kind man to a asshole. So basically Alan Moore. Now that he is crabby and annoyed at life he is forced to go to a comic con with his old assistant, Jacob. Jacob is not enjoying much of his time with his old mentor but he does what he must because of old times. This turns quickly into a crime story and then a sad tale of loss and forgetting. I really enjoyed a lot of it. The ending is really predictable but the story and the way it is told is near perfect. The emotions run high, the art is fantastic as always, and the way you feel for a asshole like Hal is perfect. I really enjoyed this and want more Criminal from Ed brubaker for the rest of my life. A 4 out of 5.
    more
  • L. McCoy
    January 1, 1970
    I have yet to read a Brubaker and Phillips story I don’t like.What’s it about?Hal is a washed up, old comic book artist. He’s very out of touch, depressed, angry, addicted to alcohol and even violent at times. Jacob (another artist who used to be an assistant for Hal) is given the job of making sure Hal doesn’t do anything too crazy and actually makes it to things at a comic con that Hal is a guest at. Well shit gets quite crazy as things tend to in Brubaker’s work!Why it gets 5 stars:The story I have yet to read a Brubaker and Phillips story I don’t like.What’s it about?Hal is a washed up, old comic book artist. He’s very out of touch, depressed, angry, addicted to alcohol and even violent at times. Jacob (another artist who used to be an assistant for Hal) is given the job of making sure Hal doesn’t do anything too crazy and actually makes it to things at a comic con that Hal is a guest at. Well shit gets quite crazy as things tend to in Brubaker’s work!Why it gets 5 stars:The story is very interesting. This is less action and more drama than I usually read but nonetheless it’s an outstanding tale.Sean Phillips is as always a damn good artist and his son Jacob is a damn good colorist!The characters are very interesting. Brubaker always puts a lot of depth into his characters to make readers more interested in them and this book is a great example.While not quite an action comic there are some really good intense moments.This book is pretty suspenseful for sure.Some parts are quite humorous. Despite a very serious tone I still got to laugh a few times.The ending is very well done and unexpected.This story is very emotional.I always like books set in nerdy environments. The scenery, references, characters, etc. have some sort of nerdy magic to me that always make me like it even more.Overall:Another masterpiece from Brubaker and Phillips (now double the Phillips!). The Criminal series (which this is a part of for anyone who may be unaware) continues to be fantastic. This is a great story with emotion, interesting characters and fantastic art. The book may be called Bad Weekend but there’s nothing bad about this masterpiece in comics.5/5
    more
  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Bad Weekend is a graphic novel that pays some serous homage to the comics can industry, its tortured artists, and the crazy fans. A famed company c writer from yesteryear has little understanding of today's fans, comic conventions, and the price of fame. Hal, instead, is a bit twisted over the imagined or real theft of his art. Cantankerous, nasty, but a true artist.
    more
  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    Every time I read a book by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips, I wonder why I ever read anything else. Jacob Phillips’s coloring is getting fantastic, too. There’s a few panels in this with colors that will just knock your damn socks off.
  • Rory Wilding
    January 1, 1970
    Comic books are fun, there is no denying that. It’s a medium not just about superhero-themed shared universes, but also a place where anyone can tell any story they wish, as proven with creator-owned works from Image and the recently-cancelled Vertigo imprint. However, from the very beginning to even now, there has always been a shadiness within the comics industry where creators have been screwed over. If you are well-versed in comics history, you can’t help but feel a bit cynical about key asp Comic books are fun, there is no denying that. It’s a medium not just about superhero-themed shared universes, but also a place where anyone can tell any story they wish, as proven with creator-owned works from Image and the recently-cancelled Vertigo imprint. However, from the very beginning to even now, there has always been a shadiness within the comics industry where creators have been screwed over. If you are well-versed in comics history, you can’t help but feel a bit cynical about key aspects of the industry, which is satirized in the latest Criminal novella.Please click here for my full interview.
    more
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Weirdly my first thought was "What the hell does Ed Brubaker know about old school comics?"Despite having met him at a convention, in my head he's this gritty, disheveled looking private detective hanging out in sleazy bars, trying not to get his fingers broken. If you could typecast a writer, that's my mental image of him.So, it's really cool to read a story that hits a lot closer to home for both Brubaker and Phillips. It's the kind of story that makes me wonder how much truth there is to it a Weirdly my first thought was "What the hell does Ed Brubaker know about old school comics?"Despite having met him at a convention, in my head he's this gritty, disheveled looking private detective hanging out in sleazy bars, trying not to get his fingers broken. If you could typecast a writer, that's my mental image of him.So, it's really cool to read a story that hits a lot closer to home for both Brubaker and Phillips. It's the kind of story that makes me wonder how much truth there is to it all. Is Hal Crane a pseudonym for a real person or just an amalgamation of people? Is this the real life origin story for Brubaker or Phillips? The narrator Jacob sure looks like Sean Phillips.... and shares his son's name...This story feels a lot more intimate, there's not a lot of criminality to it, it's more of a character study... I mean they all are, but this one more-so.As usual I could gush endlessly about Sean Phillips art, but it was really enhanced by his son Jacob's colours. They're so vibrant and clash at times but in a way that really works for the story. I was really impressed by how well this father and son duo work together.This is one of my favourite Criminal stories, I think because it hits so close to home.
    more
  • Adam Stone
    January 1, 1970
    I never got into Brubaker's Criminal, Vol. 1: Coward series, despite the praises of many of my trusted comic-fan friends. I loved his work within the Batman Universe, and his work for Marvel, but neither Criminal nor Incognito hooked me in.This is the second Criminal spin-off that I've loved. My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies was another Five Star book for me.This volume deals with art theft, involving a mid-20th century newspaper cartoonist. I'm not usually one who enjoys the meta-ness of comi I never got into Brubaker's Criminal, Vol. 1: Coward series, despite the praises of many of my trusted comic-fan friends. I loved his work within the Batman Universe, and his work for Marvel, but neither Criminal nor Incognito hooked me in.This is the second Criminal spin-off that I've loved. My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies was another Five Star book for me.This volume deals with art theft, involving a mid-20th century newspaper cartoonist. I'm not usually one who enjoys the meta-ness of comics about comic creators, but this book was paced perfectly and felt Very Real.That Brubaker and Phillips are one of the best creative teams in modern comics is no secret, but this voume was just perfect to me.I recommend it for people who enjoy real crime stories (though it is not a real crime story), fans of noir ideas with real language, and anyone who loves a heist story that focuses more on Why the heist happens, as opposed to How the heist happens.
    more
  • Mars Dorian
    January 1, 1970
    An incredible spin-off(?) in the Criminal series, which also works as a standalone, which is the case for all the books in Criminal.I don't want to write about the story; everyone else does that already. I just want to say that the focus on the comic book world is incredible and seamlessly blends into crime, who would have thought? Brubaker's writing is an odd mix of social satire, detective noir, and pulp fiction but with a sophisticated twang. He's a master of urban street grit and smoky, mult An incredible spin-off(?) in the Criminal series, which also works as a standalone, which is the case for all the books in Criminal.I don't want to write about the story; everyone else does that already. I just want to say that the focus on the comic book world is incredible and seamlessly blends into crime, who would have thought? Brubaker's writing is an odd mix of social satire, detective noir, and pulp fiction but with a sophisticated twang. He's a master of urban street grit and smoky, multi-layered characters with more shades of gray than others. Sean Phillips is still quasi-realistic, but more loose and sketch-like here, which I dig, because it brings new energy and flow. The colorful ambient mixes well with the crime atmosphere, giving it a funky look.If you want to read the best crime in comic form, this one is another FULL HOUSE by the Brubaker Phillips duo. I HAD to read it in one sitting and will read it again tomorrow.
    more
  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    Haven't rated Criminal in so long, too aware what genre it belongs. [Repeat: x2]Brubaker culture, no longer applies to me. [Repeat: x4]It's tough at the top, the cranky artist, fight in con loo, fight in con loo.Sometimes it's hard to stop, when your heart is set on old betrayals, old betrayals.Haven't rated Criminal in so long, too aware what genre it belongs. [Repeat: x2]Brubaker culture, no longer applies to me. [Repeat: x4]It's tough at the top, the cranky artist, fight in con loo, fight in Haven't rated Criminal in so long, too aware what genre it belongs. [Repeat: x2]Brubaker culture, no longer applies to me. [Repeat: x4]It's tough at the top, the cranky artist, fight in con loo, fight in con loo.Sometimes it's hard to stop, when your heart is set on old betrayals, old betrayals.Haven't rated Criminal in so long, too aware what genre it belongs. [Repeat: x2]Brubaker culture, no longer applies to me. [Repeat: x4]It's tough at the top, the cranky artist, fight in con loo, fight in con loo.Sometimes it's hard to stop, when your heart is set on old betrayals, old betrayals.Comics needs so much money to spend, barely 80 pages in Bad Weekend.And there's no reason for staying in, except lyric pastiche reviewing.Brubaker culture, no longer applies to me. [Repeat: x4](Edelweiss ARC)
    more
  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    Hmmm… A "Criminal" book without much crime in it, would be, well, criminal, but that's pretty much the case here. What crime there is seems utterly, utterly inconsequential as well, leaving this a story about regret, the fact everyone gets usurped by a younger person whether they like it, tell them to quit the industry or neither, and of course comics. Yes, this tale, which is not sordid, not sexy and definitely not criminal, takes place – with the help of copious flashback – at a small comics c Hmmm… A "Criminal" book without much crime in it, would be, well, criminal, but that's pretty much the case here. What crime there is seems utterly, utterly inconsequential as well, leaving this a story about regret, the fact everyone gets usurped by a younger person whether they like it, tell them to quit the industry or neither, and of course comics. Yes, this tale, which is not sordid, not sexy and definitely not criminal, takes place – with the help of copious flashback – at a small comics con. It's power to the makers they've got Ghostbusters, Wonder Woman and Hellboy cos-play all on the pages, but if more effort had gone into the story I might have found this more satisfying. Yes it reads with their usual breeziness, but this I fear will prove to be quite forgettable. Perhaps the demands of a regular output is counter to the brilliance their one-shot stories had in the past. Two and a half, sinfully low, stars.
    more
  • Terry Mulcahy
    January 1, 1970
    Can't say I really enjoyed it much. Basically, it's a setup to go to a Comic Con, make up a story about artists stealing each other's actual finished work, a brooding, alcoholic old comics creator, and a little violence. Not quite what I expected of Brubaker. It would work as perhaps the first installment of a great story to come later (it's only 72 pages after all). The twist at the end is not much of a twist, since there are over two pages of panels and monologue to tell us what's coming. I gu Can't say I really enjoyed it much. Basically, it's a setup to go to a Comic Con, make up a story about artists stealing each other's actual finished work, a brooding, alcoholic old comics creator, and a little violence. Not quite what I expected of Brubaker. It would work as perhaps the first installment of a great story to come later (it's only 72 pages after all). The twist at the end is not much of a twist, since there are over two pages of panels and monologue to tell us what's coming. I guess Brubaker wrote it to appeal to the upcoming cons, and it might sell there.
    more
  • Paul Allard
    January 1, 1970
    Brubaker homage to the comic industry - entertaining This short comic book deals with a retired comic artist at a convention, bucking the system and searching for missing artwork. The story involves a few interesting characters with the writer’s usual dark/criminal goings-on. The creative team excel again and it’s entertaining and nicely done. Worth a look, especially if you’re fans.
    more
  • Ramon
    January 1, 1970
    There's a certain standard of quality with Brubaker/Phillips books, but this has a lil' added something, perhaps because of the connection to comics. Anyway, great work from both as usual; it's a funny book, and has some nice moments of emotion and sadness.
    more
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes the subtle crimes are the worst. And sometimes they make for the best crime stories.
  • Jesse Richards
    January 1, 1970
    One of the better of Brubaker/Phillips classic noir tales, which is saying a lot.
  • Kevin Mann
    January 1, 1970
    Pretty good, I am always a Brubaker-Phillips fan, but I do have to admit this effort seemed a bit slight, at least in page count. It really needed one more issue of content after "ending"....i wanted to see the assistant sell the pages and be recipient of true noir twist ending, whatever that would be. On positive note, the numerous insights into Comic Book Industry, with composite profiles based on well-known Creator's lives, makes this highly unique, as Crime Noirs go.
    more
  • Rob Schamberger
    January 1, 1970
    Masterpiece.
  • Larakaa
    January 1, 1970
    Quite meta but thought there would be more to it.
Write a review