The Fire Never Goes Out
From Noelle Stevenson, the New York Times bestselling author-illustrator of Nimona, comes a captivating, honest illustrated memoir that finds her turning an important corner in her creative journey—and inviting readers along for the ride.In a collection of essays and personal mini-comics that span eight years of her young adult life, author-illustrator Noelle Stevenson charts the highs and lows of being a creative human in the world. Whether it’s hearing the wrong name called at her art school graduation ceremony or becoming a National Book Award finalist for her debut graphic novel, Nimona, Noelle captures the little and big moments that make up a real life, with a wit, wisdom, and vulnerability that are all her own.

The Fire Never Goes Out Details

TitleThe Fire Never Goes Out
Author
ReleaseMar 3rd, 2020
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN-139780062278272
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Nonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Comics, LGBT

The Fire Never Goes Out Review

  • Ivy
    January 1, 1970
    FUCK. YES.
  • Lauren Lanzilotta
    January 1, 1970
    A lovely memoir by the brilliant author of Nimona (which remains one of my favourite graphic novels!)Id known close to nothing about Noelle Steveson before reading this memoir. I had no clue what to expect from this, either, but The fire Never Goes Out ended up being really insightful as to her life before becoming a well known comic artist.This was a journey through the years of ups and downs. I really appreciated that Noelle touched upon mental illness through her narrative, along with the A lovely memoir by the brilliant author of Nimona (which remains one of my favourite graphic novels!)I’d known close to nothing about Noelle Steveson before reading this memoir. I had no clue what to expect from this, either, but The fire Never Goes Out ended up being really insightful as to her life before becoming a well known comic artist.This was a journey through the years of ups and downs. I really appreciated that Noelle touched upon mental illness through her narrative, along with the love and struggles that come with being young and thrust into the working world. It was great to see some real photographs interspersed between her drawings as well; many of them made me smile :)The original art accompanying the writing was wonderful as to be expected. I found it really great to get a glimpse into Noelle’s life during the earlier years of her career. Overall, I found this a nicely put together memoir that gave me a great understanding of Noelle’s life!
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  • Samantha Puc
    January 1, 1970
    Goddamn, this is absolutely stunning. Full review coming soon, but for now: thank you for this, Noelle.
  • Doug Chase
    January 1, 1970
    Noelle Stevenson tells us heavy things in an accessible way--her struggles with self, with talent and creativity and drive--and as any successful memoir will do, we empathize, feel her pain, celebrate with her. She is a remarkable artist. I look forward to all that is yet to come.
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  • Allie (alliecatreads)
    January 1, 1970
    This memoir was so heartbreakingly honest. I have been a long-time fan of Noelle Stevenson and never realized how many similar experiences we have both gone through. Questioning religion? Check. Questioning sexuality? Double check. Declining mental health? A thousand checks. I love that she has found her person and gotten to a stable mental health situation and has a wonderful relationship with her parents, even if I dont personally relate to that. It was inspiring to see that it does get This memoir was so heartbreakingly honest. I have been a long-time fan of Noelle Stevenson and never realized how many similar experiences we have both gone through. Questioning religion? Check. Questioning sexuality? Double check. Declining mental health? A thousand checks. I love that she has found her person and gotten to a stable mental health situation and has a wonderful relationship with her parents, even if I don’t personally relate to that. It was inspiring to see that it does get better, especially for someone like me who has been struggling a lot lately with things like mental health and even my relationship with my parents. I essentially have no relationship with my parents because they’ve chosen a religion over their daughter. I have had a series of really bad mental health episodes lately, and I have been questioning my faith more and more. I’ve said I’m an atheist, pagan, agnostic, etc. It’s a personal struggle of mine that I related to a lot in this memoir, and I just really think everyone should read this because of it showing both the highs and the lows, and it is such a heartbreakingly honest story of her struggles.TW: self-harm
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    I was so tired, but the fire was still there, and it propelled me stubbornly forward even as it consumed everything inside of me. I thought I could fix everything if I just tried harder... and if I didn't fix things, no one would. I lived in constant dread of the one small slip or mistake that would ruin everything forever. I carried it all, in obsessive detail, in my head, and eventually I stopped being able to turn it off. [...] Admitting that something was wrong would mean that there was I was so tired, but the fire was still there, and it propelled me stubbornly forward even as it consumed everything inside of me. I thought I could fix everything if I just tried harder... and if I didn't fix things, no one would. I lived in constant dread of the one small slip or mistake that would ruin everything forever. I carried it all, in obsessive detail, in my head, and eventually I stopped being able to turn it off. [...] Admitting that something was wrong would mean that there was something wrong with me - that I hadn't done a good job, that I wasn't cut out for this, that I had failed. So despite all the red flags, I just kept pushing through. I have thoroughly enjoyed so much of Noelle Stevenson's career. Nimona was the first real foray I took into graphic novels, and I loved it so ridiculously much that they've honestly become one of my favorite genres to read now. And don't even get me started on Lumberjanes. That comic means the world to me, and I treasure each and every issue that comes out. And now we have the She-Ra reboot. I mean, her work speaks for itself in how fantastic it is.It's always a pleasure to get to know more about the artist behind the art you love, and I have so much respect for how honest and open she was in this memoir. She catalogues all of her career and personal highs, but she also doesn't stray from her lows. She's open about her struggle with mental illness and anxiety as well as the process of discovering and accepting her own sexuality. But she manages to do so in such an approachable and relatable way, with a good sense of humor throughout the entire thing. This book is vulnerable and refreshingly candid (especially in debunking of the idea of the tortured artist and going into detail about how she found her creativity again) and I can't recommend it enough, especially if you already enjoy her art, as this is full of adorable doodles depicting everything from Avengers and Hunger Games fanart to her own wedding.
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  • Brigid
    January 1, 1970
    Usually when I love a book, I want to share it with everyone I know. This one? I want to share with just one person.The story begins when ours began. And so many moments come at me like echoes. I can remember where we were when that was happening. What we were thinking about, in some other place, on some other coast, sometimes across an ocean.This is a graphic memoir, though it's hard to see it as a memoir, when really Noelle Stevenson's story is just beginning. The book is made up of images and Usually when I love a book, I want to share it with everyone I know. This one? I want to share with just one person.The story begins when ours began. And so many moments come at me like echoes. I can remember where we were when that was happening. What we were thinking about, in some other place, on some other coast, sometimes across an ocean.This is a graphic memoir, though it's hard to see it as a memoir, when really Noelle Stevenson's story is just beginning. The book is made up of images and text, sometimes sparse that they left me with a thousand unanswered questions. I think that's part of the power of it. By filling the pages with pictures and open space, and only a quick burst of language here and there, she's left so much of her story untold, and it's easy to fill in the gaps in the way that feels most true to me. On the surface, she's led a charmed life, with incredible success and opportunity and exposure; but by omitting the details, and dwelling deeper in spaces of confusion and self-doubt, she's written the story of her uncharmed life. A few trigger warnings to call out. There are moments of deep loneliness, self-hatred, and self-harm here. But the overall tone of the book is one of discovery, hope and light. For those who are familiar with Noelle Stevenson's body of work, you may find it difficult to separate the artist from familiar characters from her projects. There were times when I couldn't not see her as Cath from Fangirl, and times when I was sure she was out Lumberjaning in the woods.This is a book that I don't want to say too much about. Maybe it feels too close to me, or maybe the act of discovery is so rich that I don't want to take it away. So my recommendation? Find it, peek behind the dust jacket, and read the first page. The gorgeous language and the sometimes-silly, sometimes-stunning illustrations will probably tell you more than I could hope to say.
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  • Alissa
    January 1, 1970
    One of the awesome perks about working at a library is you get to preview new books before they hit the shelves, and sometimes before those books are even "technically" released to the public (Sshhh! Don't tell!!). This was one of those times. I'd had this book on my TBR shelf for months and was legit chomping at the bit to get my hands on it. So when my coworker handed it to me with the instructions to just put it back on the "processing" cart when I finished, I snatched it up so quickly and One of the awesome perks about working at a library is you get to preview new books before they hit the shelves, and sometimes before those books are even "technically" released to the public (Sshhh! Don't tell!!). This was one of those times. I'd had this book on my TBR shelf for months and was legit chomping at the bit to get my hands on it. So when my coworker handed it to me with the instructions to just put it back on the "processing" cart when I finished, I snatched it up so quickly and greedily I probably frightened that poor girl (No...take it back. She's got a toddler at home. Nothing probably scares her after tackling the Mommy thing, brave girl. Besides, she's used to me by now...). And I spent a very nice evening reading. Because I can. Because it's part of my job to familiarize myself with the collection.And because it's the first HUGE snowstorm since, like, November. And no one is in the library but staff. And so it was lovely to have something constructive to do besides wander around the building and, occasionally, boredom-eat the stale, and very likely long-expired, pretzels that have been in my office cubby since Halloween (Was it Halloween? Or was it before? Hmmmm.... Should probably throw those out...). Anyway, I loved, loved, LOVED this book! I've been a fan of Noelle's work since devouring Nimona (Note to self: Check out Broship of the Rings. Like, IMMEDIATELY!!). It was nice to get to know her as a person rather than just a fellow artist whose work I really admire. I may have to get my own copy of this as soon as its available to the general public. Because this one's gonna be popular, people. And I likely won't see it gracing the library shelves until... probably sometime in August.
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  • Alexa Blart, Library Cop
    January 1, 1970
    I've loved Noelle Stevenson since 2012, when I discovered her Avengers comics. It's been really fun watching her career explode for the past eight yearsI loved Nimona and Lumberjanes, and I'm a big fan of She-Ra. Needless to say I was super excited for this memoir.I was not at all prepared for how hard this was going to hit me. On one level, because a lot of comics I recognize from Tumblr and Twitter are included as a part of itfunny ones like Broship of the Ring and that Peeta and Katniss one I've loved Noelle Stevenson since 2012, when I discovered her Avengers comics. It's been really fun watching her career explode for the past eight years—I loved Nimona and Lumberjanes, and I'm a big fan of She-Ra. Needless to say I was super excited for this memoir.I was not at all prepared for how hard this was going to hit me. On one level, because a lot of comics I recognize from Tumblr and Twitter are included as a part of it—funny ones like Broship of the Ring and that Peeta and Katniss one that cracks me up every damn time, plus serious ones like Noelle's Pulse nightclub shooting reaction—and it was nice to see them again. But on another level because, it turns out, Noelle and I are a lot alike. And I related so so so so so hard to so much of what she had to say, and so much of what she experienced, it was like getting punched in the gut repeatedly and Liking It.Also: the final photograph in this book is of a wedding. I won't go any further into detail than that, spoiler-wise, but I had tears running down my face practically from the minute I turned the page. Happy tears, though. What a beautiful note to end on. I hope with all my might I get that someday.Thank you, Noelle, for sharing all this. I'm incredibly grateful.
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  • Casey Frank
    January 1, 1970
    I blazed through this illustrated memoir while bundled up in bed in a single evening. I became a fan of Noelle Stevensons work through Nimona, but wasnt aware of a lot of her history. This book gives a concise look at both how she became the award-winning artist that we know today and the mental health and identity struggles that permeated even the best years of her life.What I appreciated the most was her sharing that a diagnosis and medication didnt mean losing her ability to create good art. I blazed through this illustrated memoir while bundled up in bed in a single evening. I became a fan of Noelle Stevenson’s work through Nimona, but wasn’t aware of a lot of her history. This book gives a concise look at both how she became the award-winning artist that we know today and the mental health and identity struggles that permeated even the best years of her life.What I appreciated the most was her sharing that a diagnosis and medication didn’t mean losing her ability to create good art. For too long there’s been a mythology of the tortured artist, so that many creative people thought not being okay was a part of the artistic process, and more and more creatives are coming forward to say that it’s not true.I think this book will resonate with a lot of readers, while also occasionally being a little tough to read if you too are in the thick of working toward positive mental health.I'm not sure that teens are the right audience for this book, but definitely people in their early twenties. If you've been a long time follower this doesn't contain much in the way of new information, but rather is a way to have it all in once place.
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  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    As with most memoirs, I have to give Noelle Stevenson a ton of credit for even publishing this in the first place. Its clear that it comes from a genuine place, and to be so vulnerable with your readers takes a lot of guts. This memoir chronicles Stevensons life since 2011 and how she came to the place in her career where she is today. I love her art style; theres something relatable messy about it. I laughed out loud at some of the comics she included because I remember them from Tumblr, like As with most memoirs, I have to give Noelle Stevenson a ton of credit for even publishing this in the first place. It’s clear that it comes from a genuine place, and to be so vulnerable with your readers takes a lot of guts. This memoir chronicles Stevenson’s life since 2011 and how she came to the place in her career where she is today. I love her art style; there’s something relatable messy about it. I laughed out loud at some of the comics she included because I remember them from Tumblr, like the one with Haymitch sending messages to Katniss and Peeta in the arena to kiss. I also forgot that Stevenson’s art is on the cover of Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl, because it’s been so long since I read it. But even then, I’d loved the art. In her memoir, Stevenson also doesn’t ignore some dark places in her life, when she was struggling with mental illness and body image. As a reader I really appreciated that openness. The photos of her and her wife were so beautiful and adorable! Looking forward to more of her comics in the future.
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  • Andy
    January 1, 1970
    I dont know if Noelle reads Goodread comments at all but if you do: thank you so much for this book. I have been following you and your work since 2011 reading the early parts of this book really took me back to when I was in high school and nerding out over your lord of the rings posts. Ive had the outsiders perspective of your artistic and professional journey through social media and your comics and shows and it was something special to get to read some of what your life was like and and i I don’t know if Noelle reads Goodread comments at all but if you do: thank you so much for this book. I have been following you and your work since 2011 — reading the early parts of this book really took me back to when I was in high school and nerding out over your lord of the rings posts. I’ve had the outsider’s perspective of your artistic and professional journey through social media and your comics and shows and it was something special to get to read some of what your life was like and and i was surprised but touched to see that I have shared so many of your struggles. Your art and writing have always reached me in a unique and powerful way. I have cried real tears over Nimona, Lumberjanes, She-Ra, your personal artwork, and now this. As a lesbian with severe mental illness that is also finally seeking help and looking toward the future with hope and love, thank you for writing this. Your words and art went straight to my heart and I hope that’s something you can be proud of.
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  • Sophial G.
    January 1, 1970
    I almost cried reading the very last page...The whole book is kind of a mess? Like it gows from a place to another in a second, and you get lost easily, but you understand what'S happening in general. Part of me thinks it's a bad sign if it's messy but part of me also thinks it works perfectly because the book is about how her life is messy and hard. It's about feeling horrible in this world and not always knowing why. So you know what? It works.The concept of a graphic memoir is really I almost cried reading the very last page...The whole book is kind of a mess? Like it gows from a place to another in a second, and you get lost easily, but you understand what'S happening in general. Part of me thinks it's a bad sign if it's messy but part of me also thinks it works perfectly because the book is about how her life is messy and hard. It's about feeling horrible in this world and not always knowing why. So you know what? It works.The concept of a graphic memoir is really interesting too. I think the whole book is mostly interesting if you know who this person is. If not, then you feel it but the messiness can be overwhelming. I stll enjoyed it though! In a "Life can be shit, I feel you" kind of way.
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  • Gianna Caforio
    January 1, 1970
    Damn. That shit hit HARD. Its beautiful, full of dark low points and yet its still full of hope. There were lots of parts where I could see myself in the pages, like she was able to put words and metaphors and art to things that Ive never been able to describe. This is an absolutely gorgeous, impactful little book. I absolutely love how her deceptively simple looking art style absolutely packs the most impactful punch with every page. Its powerful and thought provoking and I really respect her ‪Damn. That shit hit HARD. It’s beautiful, full of dark low points and yet it’s still full of hope. There were lots of parts where I could see myself in the pages, like she was able to put words and metaphors and art to things that I’ve never been able to describe.‬ This is an absolutely gorgeous, impactful little book. I absolutely love how her deceptively simple looking art style absolutely packs the most impactful punch with every page. It’s powerful and thought provoking and I really respect her for sharing such a vulnerable and personal side of herself to the world. I can only imagine how many people this book will help, or at the very least be inspired to reach out when struggling. It’s nice to have a reminder that you’re not crazy. You’re not alone. Thank you, Noelle.
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  • Jacquie Fortin
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this! Noelle is a creator I've looked up to for a long time, so I couldn't wait to read this when I heard it was coming out. I've heard her talk about her personal life & story a little bit in interviews but it was really cool to see the story in this format through her art. I was surprised by how many of the small moments she'd chronicled brought tears to my eyes, particularly the ones where she talks to her former self. I loved the way she reflected on strength, both in terms of I loved this! Noelle is a creator I've looked up to for a long time, so I couldn't wait to read this when I heard it was coming out. I've heard her talk about her personal life & story a little bit in interviews but it was really cool to see the story in this format through her art. I was surprised by how many of the small moments she'd chronicled brought tears to my eyes, particularly the ones where she talks to her former self. I loved the way she reflected on strength, both in terms of what that means and what that looks like, and how she's grappled with her definition of it over time. Excited to keep following her journey & all that she creates.
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  • Ella
    January 1, 1970
    The Fire Never Goes Out is a wonderful hit of nostalgia if you, like me, have been a fan of Noelle Stevenson since she was drawing utterly hilarios Avengers/Broship of the Rings/etc comics back in 2011, and this book would be worth it for that alone, in my opinion. (Hulkeye! In hard copy! Can you believe it?!) But above and beyond Noelle's knack for humor, this is also an insightful look at the process of reconciling the person you once were with the person you have grown to be. Anyone who's The Fire Never Goes Out is a wonderful hit of nostalgia if you, like me, have been a fan of Noelle Stevenson since she was drawing utterly hilarios Avengers/Broship of the Rings/etc comics back in 2011, and this book would be worth it for that alone, in my opinion. (Hulkeye! In hard copy! Can you believe it?!) But above and beyond Noelle's knack for humor, this is also an insightful look at the process of reconciling the person you once were with the person you have grown to be. Anyone who's ever wanted to go back and give their younger self a. warning or a pep talk or just a tight hug will find something recognizable and lovely here.
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  • April Bancroft
    January 1, 1970
    Its crazy to think that you only see the image that people give online and have no clue whats really going on behind closed doors. I have been a fan of Noelle since I madly fell in love with the cover for Fangirl in 2013. Its incredible to see how far she has grown in her career in only 8 years and what happened in her life as time went by. I love how truthful she was in this book and didnt hide anything from her readers. I like how different this bio was with her beautiful artwork as always. It’s crazy to think that you only see the image that people give online and have no clue what’s really going on behind closed doors. I have been a fan of Noelle since I madly fell in love with the cover for Fangirl in 2013. It’s incredible to see how far she has grown in her career in only 8 years and what happened in her life as time went by. I love how truthful she was in this book and didn’t hide anything from her readers. I like how different this bio was with her beautiful artwork as always. She’s seriously so so talented!!
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    1-Sentence: Noelle Stevenson explores the most recent years of her life in comic form. Gay?: Noelle being very gay, yes. Keywords: artist, mental health, love, anger, growthLike?: I dont normally like breaking from my three-books-at-a-time rule, but as soon as this arrived in the mail, I needed to crack it open. I devoured it in an hour, surprising no one, and cried, surprising even less. I love Noelles work and I identify with a lot of the darker stuff she talks about, and Im really glad she 1-Sentence: Noelle Stevenson explores the most recent years of her life in comic form. Gay?: Noelle being very gay, yes. Keywords: artist, mental health, love, anger, growthLike?: I don’t normally like breaking from my three-books-at-a-time rule, but as soon as this arrived in the mail, I needed to crack it open. I devoured it in an hour, surprising no one, and cried, surprising even less. I love Noelle’s work and I identify with a lot of the darker stuff she talks about, and I’m really glad she put so much of it together in this book. It’s lovely.Rating: 5/5
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  • Andrea Monsma
    January 1, 1970
    Ever since I read Nimona years ago, I fell in love with Noelle Stevenson and all of her work. I was beyond excited to hear that she was publishing a memoir, and I was not disappointed. This book is raw and heartbreaking and strong and sweet and important. I saw myself in the pages and couldnt put it down until I had absorbed every page. Through beautifully simple illustrations, Noelle Stevenson shows you her journey, complete with both struggles and triumphs. Its honest and riveting and potent. Ever since I read Nimona years ago, I fell in love with Noelle Stevenson and all of her work. I was beyond excited to hear that she was publishing a memoir, and I was not disappointed. This book is raw and heartbreaking and strong and sweet and important. I saw myself in the pages and couldn’t put it down until I had absorbed every page. Through beautifully simple illustrations, Noelle Stevenson shows you her journey, complete with both struggles and triumphs. It’s honest and riveting and potent. I highly recommend this book.
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    I adore Noelle Stevenson and still fondly remember stumbling across Broship of the Rings on Tumblr ages ago. I was an instant fan, so I felt this book was a must-buy. I dont regret buying it because I want to support a favorite artist, but this felt a bit rehashed and lacking in cohesion. I felt like Id read/seen most of the cartoons, Id read all the years in review, and I was hoping for a steadier narrative arc throughout the book rather than the scattered pieces I got. Still, Im a huge fan, I adore Noelle Stevenson and still fondly remember stumbling across Broship of the Rings on Tumblr ages ago. I was an instant fan, so I felt this book was a must-buy. I don’t regret buying it because I want to support a favorite artist, but this felt a bit rehashed and lacking in cohesion. I felt like I’d read/seen most of the cartoons, I’d read all the years in review, and I was hoping for a steadier narrative arc throughout the book rather than the scattered pieces I got. Still, I’m a huge fan, and I look forward to more work in the future!
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  • Hayley Stone
    January 1, 1970
    This book/graphic novel is a deeply personal memoir and a gift to creators, especially those struggling with mental illness and burnout. It hit very close to home for me, and I imagine it will do the same for other creatives. Highly recommended if you're a fan of Stevenson's work.I especially loved these lines near the end:"Take a breath as well as you can and prepare for the careful climb down. You have a long life still to live and many more mountains to climb."
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  • Jesse Richards
    January 1, 1970
    I love Noelle's work, have followed her since 2011, and own some of her original art. But I felt that this book was missing something. She used metaphor to convey her story but that only goes so far. Things were left deliberately vague and some of the actual events triggering her feelings were barely mentioned. As a diary of the time, it works, but maybe she should have gone back and added more detail. As it was, I left frustrated.
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  • Juan
    January 1, 1970
    Unfortunately I thought this just took too long to get going. Roughly the first half of this book reads like just a list of accomplishments and events interspersed with tiny comics, all with no real introspection. And while it becomes clear in the second half why the first half is written that way and the second half does have some really good discussion of queerness and mental health, it still doesn't make the first half very engaging to read.
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  • dylan
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not really sure how to rate this. I enjoyed reading it and it honestly inspired me, but it felt very scattered and a bit all over the place. i also felt the ending was kind of abrupt. honestly, the way it was organized felt like looking at an archive of the authors tumblrI'm glad I read this, I'm glad I bought it, I will be keeping it, but I don't think I'd recommend it? cw: self harm, unhealthy weight loss, discussion of mental illness
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  • Blue
    January 1, 1970
    I know Noelle from Lumberjanes and Nimona.Her art work was also featured on the cover of Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell and she now works on She-Ra.This is about her coming to terms with herself, her sexuality, her success, her life.It is a cute way of doing that and I enjoyed the way it was sort of diary liked.Also her wedding dress was hella adorable.
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  • Jamie Fearon
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a following Noelle Stevenson since Nimona was still an ongoing webcomic, and I am so glad to see many of her musings and self-reflective comics that I first saw on her Tumblr collected into a book. I am glad to see it all streamlined into a book and to be able to see the evolution in her art and in her personal journey with the turn of a page.
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  • Kalei
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book in one sitting and I feel like it captured the essence of going through the beginning of adulthood pretty well. I like how Noelle organized this book as well as how she explains her struggles even while being at her most successful times in her life. Shes very open in this book and her struggles are very relatable though it shows that you can make it through them. I read this book in one sitting and I feel like it captured the essence of going through the beginning of adulthood pretty well. I like how Noelle organized this book as well as how she explains her struggles even while being at her most successful times in her life. She’s very open in this book and her struggles are very relatable though it shows that you can make it through them.
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  • Kavi
    January 1, 1970
    Jesus this book is good. It's very reassuring to know that more I'm not the only creative who has their wires crossed the way I do; Noelle's existential crises are extremely relatable, and her art style remains as charming as it's been since Nimona. I'm gonna be thinking about this book for a long time.
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  • Kaitlin
    January 1, 1970
    Such a wonderful book as someone who has been following Noelle's work since 2015 this book felt like both going back in time and also realizing that Noelle's art is on some books I own but didn't know she did the art for. Also as someone who struggles with mental illness, this book and Noelle's honesty means a lot to me.
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  • Dana
    January 1, 1970
    Incredibly relatable Ive seen a good deal of these comics on Noelles tumblr before but it is really great to see them all together. Noelle is an incredibly inspiring person and it is amazing to see how shes gotten to where she is. I started crying after the first page. Noelle has put so much good out into the world, I am so happy for her Incredibly relatable I’ve seen a good deal of these comics on Noelles tumblr before but it is really great to see them all together. Noelle is an incredibly inspiring person and it is amazing to see how she’s gotten to where she is. I started crying after the first page. Noelle has put so much good out into the world, I am so happy for her
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