And Then We Grew Up
A journey through the many ways to live an artistic life--from the flashy and famous to the quiet and steady--full of unexpected insights about creativity and contentment, from the author of The Good Girl's Guide to Getting Lost.Rachel Friedman was a serious violist as a kid. She quit music in college but never stopped fantasizing about what her life might be like if she had never put down her bow. Years later, a freelance writer in New York, she again finds herself struggling with her fantasy of an artist's life versus its much more complicated reality. In search of answers, she decides to track down her childhood friends from Interlochen, a prestigious arts camp she attended, full of aspiring actors, artists, dancers, and musicians, to find out how their early creative ambitions have translated into adult careers, relationships, and identities.Rachel's conversations with these men and women spark nuanced revelations about creativity and being an artist: that it doesn't have to be all or nothing, that success isn't always linear, that sometimes it's okay to quit. And Then We Grew Up is for anyone who has given up a childhood dream and wondered "what-if?", for those who have aspired to do what they love and had doubts along the way, and for all whose careers fall somewhere between emerging and established. Warm, whip-smart, and insightful, it offers inspiration for finding creative fulfillment wherever we end up in life.

And Then We Grew Up Details

TitleAnd Then We Grew Up
Author
ReleaseJan 7th, 2020
PublisherPenguin Books
ISBN-139780143132127
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Art

And Then We Grew Up Review

  • Laura Mills
    January 1, 1970
    This was a quick, easy read about coming to terms with the road not taken, and dealing with our American obsession with success. Overall enjoyable and relatable, though I thought some of her points were overdone and she quoted from several mainstream books I had already read, which was a strange experience to have as a reader. I did love her interviews with former artist camp friends, and her observations about their lives were interesting and thoughtfully done. Ultimately I was rooting for the This was a quick, easy read about coming to terms with the road not taken, and dealing with our American obsession with success. Overall enjoyable and relatable, though I thought some of her points were overdone and she quoted from several mainstream books I had already read, which was a strange experience to have as a reader. I did love her interviews with former artist camp friends, and her observations about their lives were interesting and thoughtfully done. Ultimately I was rooting for the narrator, I hope she picks up the viola again someday!
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A bracing read for anyone who grew up in the 80s and was told they were "gifted" or "creative"!
  • Megan Bell
    January 1, 1970
    For anyone who grew up gifted but ditched violin or poetry (hi!) or sculpture after college and has always wondered, “What if?” Now you’ll be wondering, “Where has AND THEN WE GREW UP been all my (adult) life?” As a child, Rachel Friedman played viola so skillfully she made it into the prestigious Interlochen Arts Camp, but she left her bow behind amid the pressure cooker of college. Now she’s a freelance writer in NYC plagued by old questions about what creative success is supposed to look For anyone who grew up gifted but ditched violin or poetry (hi!) or sculpture after college and has always wondered, “What if?” Now you’ll be wondering, “Where has AND THEN WE GREW UP been all my (adult) life?” As a child, Rachel Friedman played viola so skillfully she made it into the prestigious Interlochen Arts Camp, but she left her bow behind amid the pressure cooker of college. Now she’s a freelance writer in NYC plagued by old questions about what creative success is supposed to look like. Where are all those fellow campers now? Did they all achieve their childhood dreams? In tracking these former child prodigies down, Friedman discovers a vast range of creative engagement, from a screenwriter in Hollywood to a Pilates instructor in Denver. Interweaving these interviews with passages from sages like Elizabeth Gilbert and Pema Chodron, she finds an acceptance and appreciation for creativity in all its forms and gives us all the much needed encouragement to make peace with the possible selves of our pasts and rediscover the creativity that was with us all along. *Also there’s several paragraphs meditating on the ending of Harry Potter so yeah, this book was made for me.
    more
  • Christine,
    January 1, 1970
    If you are looking for a memoir about creativity and childhood dreams long lost (and maybe for a reason), you might relate to Rachel Friedman's, And Then We Grew Up. Friedman evaluates our potential and how this potential translates to success as adults. Interviewing a series of childhood friends that attended the same prestigious art camp, Friedman sees how they define success and who've they've become. Who held onto their creativity while also making a living from it. Who moved on but managed If you are looking for a memoir about creativity and childhood dreams long lost (and maybe for a reason), you might relate to Rachel Friedman's, And Then We Grew Up. Friedman evaluates our potential and how this potential translates to success as adults. Interviewing a series of childhood friends that attended the same prestigious art camp, Friedman sees how they define success and who've they've become. Who held onto their creativity while also making a living from it. Who moved on but managed to find happiness--and how?Although I had mixed feelings about the book, the premise and raw honesty is inspiring. You can find my full review on The Uncorked Librarian: https://theuncorkedlibrarian.com/and-...Thanks to the author for sending me a free advanced copy to review.
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing! I expected that it wouldn’t be something I could relate to very much, seeing as I am not an especially creative person, but having gone through a professional journey of walking away from what I once thought to me my life’s passion, I found this book incredibly enlightening and comforting. The way that the author approaches failure puts words to emotions that anyone can relate to and offers a refreshing approach to accepting change beyond the recently popular approach of This book is amazing! I expected that it wouldn’t be something I could relate to very much, seeing as I am not an especially creative person, but having gone through a professional journey of walking away from what I once thought to me my life’s passion, I found this book incredibly enlightening and comforting. The way that the author approaches failure puts words to emotions that anyone can relate to and offers a refreshing approach to accepting change beyond the recently popular approach of manifesting, vision board-ing, and “girl wash your face-ing”, which I personally love the idea of but never really comforted me or helped me heal like this book did. I recommend this book to everyone! It is truly wonderful.
    more
  • Rachelle
    January 1, 1970
    And Then We Grew Up... mini biographies of former friends from an exclusive artist's and musician's summer camp for exceptional creatively talented youth are woven together in a research based exploration of growing up. Childhood potential versus the grown child's adult qualities and accomplishments are analyzed and compared to author's own findings and thoughts regarding students' perceived aura of greatness and how this reflects on their future careers and lives.
    more
  • Roxanne
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked the book. I have never been a creative type of person so I did not regret doing anything and then try and come back to it later. But I think the book has some good life lessons on Potential, Effort and Reward, Failure, Being suited to your calling (I am a caregiver), and not being Ordinary. I think we all good at something and when we know that do that.
    more
  • Lorilin
    January 1, 1970
    I learned a lot from this book. It could be a little academic in an annoying way, lots of quotes from other books like this was a college research paper. But I liked her main points, and I found myself comforted by her stories about her former classmates. Full review TK.
    more
  • Carol (Kimiko)
    January 1, 1970
    Good book. Hard to put down.
  • Shannon Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so insightful and surprisingly encouraging. I highly recommend to all former high-achieving kids and anyone who identifies as an artist.
Write a review