Diana
From New York Times bestselling authors Shannon Hale and Dean Hale comes a heartfelt story about making mistakes, learning the hard way, and growing up to become a hero.Eleven-year-old Diana leads an idyllic life on the island of Themyscira. Cut off from the rest of the world, she's beginning to feel more and more isolated. Though she has a loving mother and many "aunties," she is an only child. THE only child child on the island, in fact.After an escapade goes wrong, Diana gets in trouble for not living up to the Amazonian standard. She just can't seem to measure up no matter what she does. Every other person on the island is an adult proficient in their trade and mighty in body, while she is gangly, sometimes clumsy, and not particularly good at anything. She's not Wonder Woman ... yet. What Diana needs is a friend; someone her own age whom she can talk to. But when she decides to take matters into her own hands, she may just make a monster instead of a friend.

Diana Details

TitleDiana
Author
ReleaseJan 7th, 2020
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401291112
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy, Comics, Superheroes

Diana Review

  • Amy Imogene Reads
    January 1, 1970
    Happy Publication Day!This cute, middle grade graphic novel focused on Wonder Woman was full of heart. Artwork: Pacing: Story: Diana is the only child in a community of Amazon warrior women, and she's not exactly having the best time. To put it simply, she's bored. Life isn't exciting when you're the only kid in the world and all of the grown-ups are too busy to play. So, upon hearing the origin story from her mother that Diana was formed from clay and a wish, Diana decides to make her own clay Happy Publication Day!This cute, middle grade graphic novel focused on Wonder Woman was full of heart. Artwork: ★★★Pacing: ★★★★★Story: ★★★★Diana is the only child in a community of Amazon warrior women, and she's not exactly having the best time. To put it simply, she's bored. Life isn't exciting when you're the only kid in the world and all of the grown-ups are too busy to play. So, upon hearing the origin story from her mother that Diana was formed from clay and a wish, Diana decides to make her own clay "friend." She molds her friend together and wishes for "Mona" to be a real girl. Mona animates to life! All of the sudden, Diana has a friend for all of her adventures.But, as Diana soon learns, having a friend is harder than it looks...I found Diana: Princess of the Amazons to be a refreshing and cute middle grade graphic novel. The art was adorable and easy to grasp at a glance, and the story moved along at a fast pace. This would be the perfect novel to read aloud to a younger child—they'd love the pictures, and wouldn't get bored by too much text!Thank you to DC Entertainment for an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Princess Diana is the only child on an island of immortal Amazons. No one has time for here and she feels neglected and alone. When she hears the story of how she was made of clay again, she decides to make her own clay best friend. That's where Mona comes in. However, she may not be the best influence on Diana...This is a nice story for middle graders. The art is reminiscent of illustrated books for that age group with a bit of a cartoony, kidsy feel to it.Received a review copy from DC and Princess Diana is the only child on an island of immortal Amazons. No one has time for here and she feels neglected and alone. When she hears the story of how she was made of clay again, she decides to make her own clay best friend. That's where Mona comes in. However, she may not be the best influence on Diana...This is a nice story for middle graders. The art is reminiscent of illustrated books for that age group with a bit of a cartoony, kidsy feel to it.Received a review copy from DC and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • Bookishrealm
    January 1, 1970
    Soooo good! Check out my full review here: https://bookishrealmreviews.blogspot....
  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic addition to the Wonder Woman titles with great cover appeal for the middle grade set. Diana feels neglected and unappreciated by all the Amazons and crafts her own playmate from discarded clay and sand and names her Mona. Diana gets a big surprise when her playmate comes to life. Will having a friend help Diana to grow and reach her goals? Some great reminders about our relationships with family and friends along with some young super hero action. Will appeal to kids who have loved A fantastic addition to the Wonder Woman titles with great cover appeal for the middle grade set. Diana feels neglected and unappreciated by all the Amazons and crafts her own playmate from discarded clay and sand and names her Mona. Diana gets a big surprise when her playmate comes to life. Will having a friend help Diana to grow and reach her goals? Some great reminders about our relationships with family and friends along with some young super hero action. Will appeal to kids who have loved the Princess In Black series and graphic novels like "Real Friends."Thank you to DC Comics and NetGalley for a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kailey (BooksforMKs)
    January 1, 1970
    Diana is too young to join in the activities of the other Amazons, and she has no companions her own age. She tries to fashion a friend for herself out of clay and sand, attempting to perform magic to breathe life into the figure, but her longing for a friend may plunge the entire island into chaos.I loved this graphic novel! The artwork is colorful and vibrant, showing the clear action and the emotional responses of the characters. It really brings the story to life and creates an energetic Diana is too young to join in the activities of the other Amazons, and she has no companions her own age. She tries to fashion a friend for herself out of clay and sand, attempting to perform magic to breathe life into the figure, but her longing for a friend may plunge the entire island into chaos.I loved this graphic novel! The artwork is colorful and vibrant, showing the clear action and the emotional responses of the characters. It really brings the story to life and creates an energetic mood.The plot is excellent, with many moving parts that propel the story forward. Each scene is interesting and full of excitement and mystery.I loved Diana's young character! You can really feel the struggle she is working through as she tries to figure out who she is and what her place is among the Amazons. She has such a strong personality, and her courage begins to blossom even while she is fighting for her own self-worth. Her emotional reactions as she interacts with other characters are powerful and pull the reader into her shoes.I really hope there will be more graphic novels about Young Diana!Disclaimer: I received an ecopy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a free and honest review. All the opinions stated here are my own true thoughts, and are not influenced by anyone.
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  • Cadence Carr
    January 1, 1970
    "I liked the book because the kids were having fun. The sand person ended up being bad and that scared me." -Cadee, age 7
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Shannon Hale and Diana, Princess of the Amazons? How could that combo go wrong?And true enough, this was a delightful telling of what Diana as a child must have gone through, with everyone being older than she, and her not being able to do the things she wanted to do.The characters were all believable, well, as believable as a bunch of amazons could be, and a child created from clay.It makes me want to read more stories about this version of Diana.Thanks to Netgalley for making this book Shannon Hale and Diana, Princess of the Amazons? How could that combo go wrong?And true enough, this was a delightful telling of what Diana as a child must have gone through, with everyone being older than she, and her not being able to do the things she wanted to do.The characters were all believable, well, as believable as a bunch of amazons could be, and a child created from clay.It makes me want to read more stories about this version of Diana.Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.
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  • Diana
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this, and not only for obvious reasons. :)
  • Murray
    January 1, 1970
    A Wonder Woman origin story geared for 8-12 year old children. Diana is lonely and that she is either too old or too young for somethings so she decides to make a playmate out clay and breath life into her. Mona comes to life and Diana is happy again, but Mona starts asking Diana to take risky choices like opening Doom's Doorway that has various monsters sealed away. Mona and Diana do the unthinkable and Diana and the rest of the Amazons discover that Mona is more than she appears to be. A fun A Wonder Woman origin story geared for 8-12 year old children. Diana is lonely and that she is either too old or too young for somethings so she decides to make a playmate out clay and breath life into her. Mona comes to life and Diana is happy again, but Mona starts asking Diana to take risky choices like opening Doom's Doorway that has various monsters sealed away. Mona and Diana do the unthinkable and Diana and the rest of the Amazons discover that Mona is more than she appears to be. A fun read for kids who are not quite ready for the more teen oriented Marvel or DC graphic novels. As an added bonus is the first chapter of a new graphic novel "Zatanna and the House of Secrets."
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  • Debbie Ohi
    January 1, 1970
    LOVED this. Diana, Princess Of The Amazons is not just a suspenseful and entertaining coming-of-age story about a young Wonder Woman, but it's also about friendship and finding one's place in the world. I especially enjoyed the friendship story thread, how Diana desperately yearns for a companion and does end up finding one....but her new friend begins making demands which initially seem fun but then make Diana increasingly uncomfortable. I wish I had read this book in my childhood; it might LOVED this. Diana, Princess Of The Amazons is not just a suspenseful and entertaining coming-of-age story about a young Wonder Woman, but it's also about friendship and finding one's place in the world. I especially enjoyed the friendship story thread, how Diana desperately yearns for a companion and does end up finding one....but her new friend begins making demands which initially seem fun but then make Diana increasingly uncomfortable. I wish I had read this book in my childhood; it might have helped me be better about recognizing destructive friendships.In addition to wonderful storytelling by Shannon and Dean Hale, I want to also praise Victoria Ying's her ability to convey emotions in Diana's facial expressions and body language...fantastic!Highly recommended.
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  • Shannon ✨
    January 1, 1970
    This was a cute read!
  • Jordan (The Heart of a Book Blogger)
    January 1, 1970
    This review and more can be found at The Heart of a Book Blogger.Diana: Princess of the Amazons is a cute middle grade graphic novel. This story of course focuses on Diana as she’s growing up as the only child around all of the Amazons. She’s lonely since there’s no one her age and she misses her mother’s attention. She finally gains a friend when she brings a girl to life out of clay. It’s not all fun games and adventures, though, as soon this new friend starts getting her into mischief and This review and more can be found at The Heart of a Book Blogger.Diana: Princess of the Amazons is a cute middle grade graphic novel. This story of course focuses on Diana as she’s growing up as the only child around all of the Amazons. She’s lonely since there’s no one her age and she misses her mother’s attention. She finally gains a friend when she brings a girl to life out of clay. It’s not all fun games and adventures, though, as soon this new friend starts getting her into mischief and trouble.This story would be great for tweens struggling with loneliness and pure pressure. Being in middle school is hard and students will be able to relate to Diana’s feelings of being friendless. And once she gets a friend, there’s a good lesson in the story about being pressured into doing something wrong but then deciding to do the right thing—even if it means going against what your friend wants. The artwork is very colorful and fun. The bright colors definitely help establish the tone for a younger audience and the drawings themself are very cute.Overall, Diana: Princess of the Amazons is a fun graphic novel with a good lesson for middle graders!*This ARC was provided to me by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for a honest review.*
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  • Shan
    January 1, 1970
    Gave this a quick read to see whether Clare might like it, and I think she will -- as will any kid (or grownup!) who digs Wonder Woman, The Princess in Black, or Real Friends. Ying's art is charming and dynamic and Diana's concerns are very much those of a young woman figuring out her place in the world. Plus, all-female cast! I could have gone for a slightly longer or more in-depth story, but perhaps there are more Diana stories in the works. In the meantime, I'm looking forward to handing this Gave this a quick read to see whether Clare might like it, and I think she will -- as will any kid (or grownup!) who digs Wonder Woman, The Princess in Black, or Real Friends. Ying's art is charming and dynamic and Diana's concerns are very much those of a young woman figuring out her place in the world. Plus, all-female cast! I could have gone for a slightly longer or more in-depth story, but perhaps there are more Diana stories in the works. In the meantime, I'm looking forward to handing this out left and right at the library.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    From its cover to the final page, Diana: Princess of the Amazons is a pleasure to read and a joy to look at! Shannon and Dean Hale have taken the Wonder Woman mythology and, instead of trying to rewrite it (as seems to be the vogue), they have created a new story of a young Diana. It’s an excellent tale, too, full of danger, excitement, and a shocking plot twist. But it’s also instructive, teaching children that willful disobedience has consequences, and teaching adults about the importance of From its cover to the final page, Diana: Princess of the Amazons is a pleasure to read and a joy to look at! Shannon and Dean Hale have taken the Wonder Woman mythology and, instead of trying to rewrite it (as seems to be the vogue), they have created a new story of a young Diana. It’s an excellent tale, too, full of danger, excitement, and a shocking plot twist. But it’s also instructive, teaching children that willful disobedience has consequences, and teaching adults about the importance of listening to their children.Girls will be able to identify with Diana’s angst at being the only child on an island of mature women. Her loneliness may strike a chord, and they may see themselves when she ‘acts out’, and when she yields to peer pressure from the clay playmate she created. But they will admire her cleverness and cheer her on as she tries to rise above the mess she made and prove herself a true Amazon.A graphic novel is only as good as its artwork and in that area first-time graphic novelist Victoria Ying excels! At every turn she captures Diana’s mood, be it happy or angry, playful or daring. Ying brings out the girl’s strength and determination as the story progresses. Battle scenes are done well, too, and those with multiple characters. And when all Tartarus breaks loose, Ying’s Amazons look exactly like the brave warriors they are. But my favorite thing about the art is the occasional reference to future Diana. As seen on the cover, Ying has depicted her wearing the colors we’re used to seeing in the current comic run and on the big screen. Also on the cover, Diana is using a lasso as a leash for her pet cheetah, when many years later she will be wielding the Lasso of Truth while fighting her archenemy, Cheetah.There are only a couple of nits to pick. The Amazons were renowned in ancient times (and in DC mythology) for their skills at horseback riding, but here the Hales and Ying have chosen to depict them on kangaroo-back. Watching the warriors hop into battle just doesn’t have the same impact as if they had charged in on horses. And, though it may have been corrected in the final release, in the advanced copy Diana tells her friend to watch for a yellow scarf outside her window; on the next page the signal is made with a red scarf instead.This is a terrific graphic novel for Wonder Woman fans of any age. The Hales have written a consistently entertaining story, with a smart, impulsive, and passionate young protagonist, and Ying has drawn her and the whole of Themyscira beautifully!*Disclosure of Material Connection: I would like to thank Netgalley and DC Comics for providing me with an advance reader’s copy of Diana: Princess of the Amazons in exchange for an honest review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    Diana loves her island, her aunties and her mother, but feels left out and lonely as the island's only child, who is too old to be played with and too young to help. A plea for a playmate made out of clay, like her, goes awry, and Diana has to help fix what she's helped cause. This was a complete and utter delight, gorgeous art and gorgeous writing. Every bit of it is relatable to kids, with a really lovely ending.
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  • Elizabeth Moreau Nicolai
    January 1, 1970
    Read this one chapter at a time with my five year old at night time. We both adored it and want another one immediately. It is a great addition to the Wonder Woman universe with Shannon Hale's signature blend of action, humor, feelings, and girl power.
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  • Gabrielle L
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5 stars
  • Jena
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the few DC Ink/Zoom titles written by novel writers that:1. Feels like it's actually targeted to the correct age.2. Is accessible for new readers.3. Captures the essence of the hero.Seems like low bars to jump over, but here we are. This is a very simple but effective story aimed at a middle grade audience. Now that Diana is 11, she's caught in the awkward place between childhood and becoming a teenager. She's self-sufficient, but lonely. She's eager to prove herself, but ignored This is one of the few DC Ink/Zoom titles written by novel writers that:1. Feels like it's actually targeted to the correct age.2. Is accessible for new readers.3. Captures the essence of the hero.Seems like low bars to jump over, but here we are. This is a very simple but effective story aimed at a middle grade audience. Now that Diana is 11, she's caught in the awkward place between childhood and becoming a teenager. She's self-sufficient, but lonely. She's eager to prove herself, but ignored by adults. As Diana feels the sting of being the only child on Themyscira, she thinks on her past and decides to try and create her own child out of clay, just like her mother did. Diana's new clay friend, Mona, pulls Diana out of loneliness...but she may have motives of her own. Diana must stay true to her morals, which isn't easy when Mona is whispering in her ear. I think this story will feel familiar to children, especially only children. While it's intended for a middle grade audience, there's nothing objectionable to a younger child.
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  • Louise
    January 1, 1970
    I read this with my 6 year old and we both really liked it. Totally age-appropriate and with great monster-designs.
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Really fun, really cute, lovely art.
  • Natalie S
    January 1, 1970
    Got this to give to my sister, but upon seeing it I just had to check it out! First of all the art is super well done, and secondly the story is also really good. It is definitely aimed at kids, but was still a really fun read!
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    This reminds me of Anya's Ghost a little because Diana in this story is in need of attention and/or a friend and she creates one out of clay (as she was) but this new friend, is mischievous and ready to incite a battle-- which happens when she "helps" Diana open a door that lets out some monster/demons that the Amazon ladies must battle. Ultimately, as all middle grade novels of any kind go, there's a reckoning with the larger issues, in this case Diana and her mother, that she does indeed love This reminds me of Anya's Ghost a little because Diana in this story is in need of attention and/or a friend and she creates one out of clay (as she was) but this new friend, is mischievous and ready to incite a battle-- which happens when she "helps" Diana open a door that lets out some monster/demons that the Amazon ladies must battle. Ultimately, as all middle grade novels of any kind go, there's a reckoning with the larger issues, in this case Diana and her mother, that she does indeed love her daughter and wants what's best for her but she also needs to be a girl who does right by their land, people, and her own self. I love this type of illustration style with the bubbly colors and lines and of course, it's the Hale's!
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  • Gretchen Alice
    January 1, 1970
    If you’re making a story about kid Diana, it’s a no-brainer to focus on what it’s like to be the only girl on Themyscira. But only Shannon and Dean would tell that story with so much humor and pathos plus a decent twist at the end! I also majorly loved the illustrations from Victoria Ying. A winner all around.
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  • Marti M
    January 1, 1970
    Happy pub date to this adorable graphic novel!Thanks netgalley and the publishers for a free copy of this in exchange for an honest review!This book stars 11 year old Diana who is living the most ideal childhood on Themyscira, but she feels so alone because she is literally the only child on the whole island. She feels like she’s out of place and just can’t seem to measure up to all the other Amazonian warriors. So she makes a friend for herself out of clay and a wish, but the friend doesn’t end Happy pub date to this adorable graphic novel!Thanks netgalley and the publishers for a free copy of this in exchange for an honest review!This book stars 11 year old Diana who is living the most ideal childhood on Themyscira, but she feels so alone because she is literally the only child on the whole island. She feels like she’s out of place and just can’t seem to measure up to all the other Amazonian warriors. So she makes a friend for herself out of clay and a wish, but the friend doesn’t end up being anything like Diana had in mind. We all know the story of Wonder Woman by now, but this is a super cute middle grade friendly version of her story. I think this is great for kids who love Wonder Woman and want to read about her, but parents will appreciate that it’s not so dark as adult DC comics tend to be. It has themes of finding yourself and valuing your own self worth, which is something a lot of middle grade readers need.
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  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    NetGalley ARC.This was a fun, cute graphic novel about a young Diana aka Wonder Woman. She's feeling left out because she's the only child so she creates a friend for herself who gets her into all kinds of mischief and more. Diana learns a couple of valuable lessons by the end.
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  • Aeicha
    January 1, 1970
    Diana: Princess of the Amazons is a thrilling and engaging graphic novel that introduces young readers to Wonder Woman when she was just an extraordinary child living on the island of Themyscira. Shannon and Dean Hale have created a relatable, admirable young Diana, offering readers a fun glimpse into the people, places, and experiences that made Wonder Woman who she is. Victoria Ying wonderfully captures the spirit and wonder of Diana and her home, through her softly colored energetic and cute Diana: Princess of the Amazons is a thrilling and engaging graphic novel that introduces young readers to Wonder Woman when she was just an extraordinary child living on the island of Themyscira. Shannon and Dean Hale have created a relatable, admirable young Diana, offering readers a fun glimpse into the people, places, and experiences that made Wonder Woman who she is. Victoria Ying wonderfully captures the spirit and wonder of Diana and her home, through her softly colored energetic and cute illustrations. A sweet, captivating graphic novel, that perfectly introduces this beloved heroine to a new generation. 
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  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great telling of young Diana full of adventure and beautiful artwork. The themes touch on much one would expect for a child all alone without other children and a mother just wanting to keep her precious gift safe for as long as possible. I have and will continue to recommend Hale's work to young and older readers alike.Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the chance to read this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • (っ◔◡◔)っ ♥ Kasey ♥
    January 1, 1970
    **Disclaimer: I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.**This is a great graphic novel to introduce kids to comics and well-known characters. Young Diana is relatable and her story provides valuable lessons for children in regards to relationships with friends and parents.
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  • Lily Williams
    January 1, 1970
    A fun and sweet story about the fierce and brave Wonder Woman. I loved the story and the fact that it took place at that age when she is feeling all those uncomfortable feelings about not being a kid or an adult... but with the added stress of being Wonder Woman. Beautifully illustrated!
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  • Jordan Henrichs
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a DC fan over Marvel, so I love the likes of Shannon Hale putting her spin on Diana, Princess of the Amazons. This is a charming little graphic novel, suited for the pre middle grade crowd.(Read a digital ARC through NetGalley. Illustrations and story felt pretty complete.)
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