Wonder Woman
She will become one of the world's greatest heroes: WONDER WOMAN. But first she is Diana, Princess of the Amazons. And her fight is just beginning. Based on the New York Times bestselling novel by Leigh Bardugo, this graphic novel adaptation brings to life Diana's first adventure beyond the hidden shores of Themyscira.Diana longs to prove herself to her legendary warrior sisters. But when the opportunity finally comes, she throws away her chance at glory and breaks Amazon law--risking exile--to save a mere mortal. Even worse, Alia Keralis is no ordinary girl and with this single brave act, Diana may have doomed the world.Alia just wanted to escape her overprotective brother with a semester at sea. She doesn't know she is being hunted. When a bomb detonates aboard her ship, Alia is rescued by a mysterious girl of extraordinary strength and forced to confront a horrible truth: Alia is a Warbringer--a direct descendant of the infamous Helen of Troy, fated to bring about an age of bloodshed and misery.Together, Diana and Alia will face an army of enemies--mortal and divine--determined to either destroy or possess the Warbringer. If they have any hope of saving both their worlds, they will have to stand side by side against the tide of war.

Wonder Woman Details

TitleWonder Woman
Author
ReleaseJan 7th, 2020
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401282554
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Young Adult, Fantasy, Comics, Superheroes, Mythology

Wonder Woman Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't like this as much as the original novel. Translating prose to comics is difficult and I think that's what happened here. Trying to include all the narration in the prose version made for some boring passages in the GN. The art was OK, but I didn't like the color palette at all. It was very dark and muted almost as if the whole story took place at dusk. I know this DC Ink line of books has made sparse use of colors in a good way but it just wasn't the same in this one.Received a review I didn't like this as much as the original novel. Translating prose to comics is difficult and I think that's what happened here. Trying to include all the narration in the prose version made for some boring passages in the GN. The art was OK, but I didn't like the color palette at all. It was very dark and muted almost as if the whole story took place at dusk. I know this DC Ink line of books has made sparse use of colors in a good way but it just wasn't the same in this one.Received a review copy from DC and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • The Nerd Daily
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Tom HitchenDiana. Daughter of immortals. Princess of Themyscira. Wonder Woman.The famed DC superhero has many names and she has been adapted and reincarnated many times. First appearing in 1941 before her first feature in 1942, there have been films, TV shows, and books. And now she is once again welcomed back to the comic book page in Louise Simonson’s adaptation of Leigh Bardugo’s Wonder Woman: Warbringer.The story follows Diana Prince, long Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Tom HitchenDiana. Daughter of immortals. Princess of Themyscira. Wonder Woman.The famed DC superhero has many names and she has been adapted and reincarnated many times. First appearing in 1941 before her first feature in 1942, there have been films, TV shows, and books. And now she is once again welcomed back to the comic book page in Louise Simonson’s adaptation of Leigh Bardugo’s Wonder Woman: Warbringer.The story follows Diana Prince, long before her tenure as the legendary Wonder Woman, as she risks exile from her homeland to save a mortal and becomes ensnared in an international plot to stop a world war.This is where the plot gets interesting. The world isn’t being threatened by the usual trigger-happy white men in suits, but by the very girl Diana saves. Alia Keralis is a Warbringer: a direct descendant of Helen of Troy and destined to cause chaos. Together, the two women must overcome their own insecurities and unleash the potential within themselves in order to prevent the world from falling into violence.The novel in which this adaptation is based on manages to inject a fresh new voice into the overcrowded universe of superhero origin stories, and Bardugo establishes her own version of Wonder Woman’s early beginnings with her usual punchy flair.In Simonson’s adaptation, the characters are placed front and centre with Kit Seaton’s illustrations. Seaton, who has also lent her artist prowess to another YA adaptation, Alexandra Bracken’s Brightly Woven, manages to breathe life into the DC Universe with her playful graphic design. The only drawback to Seaton’s art is that at times it fails to deliver impact due to the similar colour choices utilised throughout. The book is a colour wheel of blue and grey, and only occasionally does the novel brighten up with oranges and reds. Wonder Woman has always been a symbol of vibrancy and power, and at times, Seaton’s art disappoints and doesn’t manage to capture that historic essence. Overall, it is enjoyable to look at.Aside from the premise, the plot isn’t anything particularly new, but the magic comes from the main cast. Diana and Alia are joined by the latter’s best friend Nim, a boisterous go-getter with a no-nonsense attitude, and Theo, her brother’s sidekick and crush. Bardugo does character so well and always creates a familiar and realistic portrayal of group friendships. The dynamic between the foursome is both hilarious and uplifting.Wonder Woman returns to her roots in the Warbringer graphic novel with witty dialogue, high stakes and great friendships. Bardugo’s YA novel is honestly depicted through art and speech, and while it doesn’t quite capture the grandeur of a traditional Wonder Woman story, it lands on two feet when it comes to hilarity and character and gives a nod to the future in its conclusion.A worthy entry in the Wonder Woman universe.
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  • JenLovesBooks
    January 1, 1970
    This one had a special place in my heart, especially since it includes Wonder Woman, but mainly because I loved Leigh Bardugo's novel version of this story. I really couldn't get enough of that story and was saddened when it came to an end. So, of course, when I saw this go up, I knew I wanted a chance at reviewing it. Even though this wasn't exactly as the novel, or as detailed, it had much of what I was looking and hoping for. Especially, when it came to the graphics included in this version. This one had a special place in my heart, especially since it includes Wonder Woman, but mainly because I loved Leigh Bardugo's novel version of this story. I really couldn't get enough of that story and was saddened when it came to an end. So, of course, when I saw this go up, I knew I wanted a chance at reviewing it. Even though this wasn't exactly as the novel, or as detailed, it had much of what I was looking and hoping for. Especially, when it came to the graphics included in this version. Plus, come on, it's Wonder Woman and it's Diana all at once, in all her youth that we rarely get to see in other graphic novels, or arc stories of her. That's what made this an even more interesting novel to pick up. And if you loved the DC Icons version of it, definitely give this a go. Yes, like mentioned above, go in it knowing it's not exactly the same, with much cut as this is a shorter and more to the point story, but it doesn't take away from who Diana is in here and all those surrounding her. Let's not forget Alia, making this a double threat. They both work great together to make this an even more interesting read. Another reason why I loved everything about this world created. My only concern, like many others, is that I needed more. Can't wait to see where this world goes and hopefully it brings us more of Diana and her ventures. ***I received this copy from DC Comics, via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.***
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  • Noura Khalid (theperksofbeingnoura)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you DC Ink for the gifted review copy!
  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    I received an e-ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Review can also be found on *Milky Way of Books*The adaptation of Leigh's book gave me an even more amazing Wonder Woman vibe. The story is fairly done and the art is quite well. Diana has always been an amazing character and seeing her in her teens as a warrior was also very exciting. If you have read the book you'll fairly enjoy the graphic novel adaptation too.
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  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    This is a good graphic novel adaptation of the YA novel, but the story is not communicated as well in this medium. If you want to get the full story and also love the graphic novel medium, I would recommend reading the original novel first. Thank you to DC Comics and NetGalley for providing a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Becca
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to DC Comics for providing me with an e-ARC of Wonder Woman: Warbringer in exchange for an honest review.I have a confession to make — Wonder Woman is a character that I don’t care much about. Hear me out, I love who she is & what she does; I love the Amazons & the concept of an island where only women live. I love everything about Wonder Woman.However, I don’t think I’ve found the right Wonder Woman series to consume. What it boils down to is the writer & who’s bringing Thank you to DC Comics for providing me with an e-ARC of Wonder Woman: Warbringer in exchange for an honest review.I have a confession to make — Wonder Woman is a character that I don’t care much about. Hear me out, I love who she is & what she does; I love the Amazons & the concept of an island where only women live. I love everything about Wonder Woman.However, I don’t think I’ve found the right Wonder Woman series to consume. What it boils down to is the writer & who’s bringing her story to life. Therefore, I never found a true reason to consider myself a fan of the character.Which brings me to Wonder Woman: Warbringer. I have yet to read the actual novel that this graphic novel is based on (but! it’s on my soon-to-read TBR!), but I have to say that I truly did enjoy this tale. Perhaps it’s because it’s directed towards YA? & we all know I’m a sucker for YA reads.One of the things I loved about Wonder Woman: Warbringer is the friendships that are formed. Our Warbringer, Alia, gets shipwrecked on Themyscira & is rescued by Diana. This introduces us to a whole lot of fighting enemies & GIRL POWER.Alia is really the show-stealer in Wonder Woman: Warbringer, along with her best friend, Nim. I absolutely adored these two & even more so how they basically welcomed Diana with open arms. Honestly, by the end of it, I just wanted Diana to stay in New York & hang out with her new pals. Can I get a roommate AU or??????Characters and relationships are absolutely phenomenal in Wonder Woman: Warbringer.As this is a graphic novel, there’s more to the story than just the words. Kit Seaton brings Diana and the gang alive with her artwork. A blue color scheme continues throughout the pages, which somehow just felt right. Everything just paired so extremely well together.In all, Wonder Woman: Warbringer is a pretty solid read, especially for fans of Wonder Woman. For fans of YA, I think this graphic novel is a perfect way to introduce yourself to the character and universe.
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    Warbringer is a faithful adaptation of the original story. Having read the source material, I am confident this is one of the best adaptations I’ve read. The plot follows the story, with the art adding to the battle scenes. Fans who find one medium or the other won’t miss anything by choosing one over the other. I actually enjoyed the graphic novel even more than the book!
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Not bad. Quick and engaging read. I didn’t guess the bad guy at all. 3 stars.
  • Georgi
    January 1, 1970
    A bit disappointed, review to come!
  • Sara (A Gingerly Review)
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this reminded me why I enjoy graphic novels. Reading this reminded me why I enjoy graphic novels. ❤️
  • Blue
    January 1, 1970
    You know when you read a graphic novel based on a book and leaves out all the relevant information from the book that is critical to the story but they decided it wasn’t important enough to have it in the graphic novel? Yeah well, that was the case with Warbringer!What I love about how this story the most, is that it isn’t for Hollywood, it isn’t Diana meeting a guy and her world changes and she must do everything she can for him and blahhhh blahhh blah. It is based on two young girls and on You know when you read a graphic novel based on a book and leaves out all the relevant information from the book that is critical to the story but they decided it wasn’t important enough to have it in the graphic novel? Yeah well, that was the case with Warbringer!What I love about how this story the most, is that it isn’t for Hollywood, it isn’t Diana meeting a guy and her world changes and she must do everything she can for him and blahhhh blahhh blah. It is based on two young girls and on friendship. Friendship is more important than a small elephant trunk people! Think of it as short term satisfaction vs long term happiness. I love it when stories break away from the moulding of girl meets guy and then life changes. After all we are strong woman, we don’t need a man.Moving away from the girls saving the day situation, the storyline still held its intensity and was fast paced and overall exciting. And most importantly it doesn’t leave much out that is in the book version of Warbringer. The graphics? I loved it. It’s great to see the amazon woman actually wearing clothes and not scampering around in barely nothing (thanks again Hollywood) but the characters were drawn in a tough, yet beautiful fashion and it was wonderful!
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  • Sasha
    January 1, 1970
    Diana longs to fit in with the other Amazons, all of whom have earned their places in Themyscira, but no matter how hard she tries she will always be the girl of clay her mother shaped. Until a mysterious girl washes up on the shores of her home, and it is up to Diana to save her people and everything she holds dear.This has to be one of my favourite DC comics yet! With Leigh Bardugo's wit, stunning artwork and all the badassery of Wonderwoman, what's not to love?Diana is a determined and brave Diana longs to fit in with the other Amazons, all of whom have earned their places in Themyscira, but no matter how hard she tries she will always be the girl of clay her mother shaped. Until a mysterious girl washes up on the shores of her home, and it is up to Diana to save her people and everything she holds dear.This has to be one of my favourite DC comics yet! With Leigh Bardugo's wit, stunning artwork and all the badassery of Wonderwoman, what's not to love?Diana is a determined and brave young woman, and she has always been one of my favourite DC characters. Throughout this novel, she is determined on doing the right thing and saving her people, and her moral compass is always strong. But she also proves to be a sensitive and loving friend, ready to listen to and love her new companions. I loved her character arc in this comic, as she discovers life outside of Themyscira and struggles to find her place in the world.I loved the secondary characters! Alia is awesome and witty, and I loved her dialogue and openness with Diana. Such an iconic duo. One thing I do feel is that if a lot of things were pointing towards a romance between these two, and I think that would have made a lot of sense, but ah well.Nim was bubbly and enigmatic, of course, I loved her. I do really hope this novel gets a sequel because I'd love to see more of these girls!The art is, of course, stunning. It brings the world and characters to life amazingly, and I especially loved the attention to detail in the characters expressions. The cool tones of the book were beautiful and made the occasional reds stand out even more.The storyline was exciting and captivating, and I read the whole book in less than an hour, I just couldn't put it down! It was a great introduction to Diana and gave a good insight into the ways of Themyscira, which I enjoyed. As well as being full of action and adventure, this novel addresses feminism, inclusion and xenophobia and sends a strong message about the importance of friendship.Wonderwoman: Warbinger was a captivating and entertaining graphic novel which all Diana fans should pick up straight away and a perfect place to start for those wanting to know more about the goddess we call Wonderwoman.
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  • karli
    January 1, 1970
    3/5 stars! ARC provided by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I have tried to read the original novel of this a few times and can just never get into, but I'm just so interested in Diana and wanted to get a new story by Leigh Bardugo. So, when I was approved for this I was really happy. The artwork in this graphic novel is amazing. I loved the characters and the plot was really cool with the gods and lore behind it all. However, I just dont think a graphic novel can get 3/5 stars! ARC provided by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I have tried to read the original novel of this a few times and can just never get into, but I'm just so interested in Diana and wanted to get a new story by Leigh Bardugo. So, when I was approved for this I was really happy. The artwork in this graphic novel is amazing. I loved the characters and the plot was really cool with the gods and lore behind it all. However, I just dont think a graphic novel can get across all the plot points needed, so it just felt either really overwhelming at time or just lacking in any context at all. But, I did enjoy and I'm glad I got to know these characters and see this art.
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this one. It correlated closely to the DC Icons book that it was based from. Diana has always been a super strong female character, so adding her into this graphic novel will definitely be great for future generations. Diana can set a role model in many forms but being able to have the same story translate this story from words to visuals is revolutionary at spreading literacy to younger readers. The art was beautiful and the story was powerful. Loved every second of this. I absolutely loved this one. It correlated closely to the DC Icons book that it was based from. Diana has always been a super strong female character, so adding her into this graphic novel will definitely be great for future generations. Diana can set a role model in many forms but being able to have the same story translate this story from words to visuals is revolutionary at spreading literacy to younger readers. The art was beautiful and the story was powerful. Loved every second of this. Highly recommend.
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  • & She Reads
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided with an arc of this via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review Well its safe to say I loved this as much as I loved the book. I enjoyed the art and I felt like the pace of the graphic novel was well done and matched the pace of the book almost exactly. The graphic novel of Wonder Woman : Warbringer goes along perfectly with the graphic novel for Batman : Nightwaker and I look forward to owning them together.
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  • Anthony ➳ KeepReadingForward ➳
    January 1, 1970
    4/5This Review was first posted on Keep Reading Forward. If you want to see more, check out our other locations as well as here.ARC provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I really didn’t expect to really enjoy reading the novel version of Wonder Woman: Warbringer. I really wanted to read it and when I did, I just got so into it, that I ended up enjoying it a lot more than I expected it to. When I saw that the graphic novel version was available to request and 4/5This Review was first posted on Keep Reading Forward. If you want to see more, check out our other locations as well as here.ARC provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I really didn’t expect to really enjoy reading the novel version of Wonder Woman: Warbringer. I really wanted to read it and when I did, I just got so into it, that I ended up enjoying it a lot more than I expected it to. When I saw that the graphic novel version was available to request and review, I jumped at the opportunity to read it. I really wanted to see the visualization of the novel that I enjoyed so much.Since it is the same story, it pretty much read the same and followed the story pretty well. I actually don’t think that was anything different added for this version to make it interesting in a graphic novel point of view. Of course it read differently, seeing illustrations and quotes instead of the detail in a book that sets the setting. The illustrator did a really good job portraying the details in the book as everything was pretty much what I imagined when I first read the novel.Either way, whatever version is read first, I am sure readers will enjoy both versions. However, I would definitely recommending reading the novel first as the details offers a better story in my opinion.
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  • Becka
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks go to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. When I saw Wonder Woman AND Leigh Bardugo combined in one book, I knew it was going to be something special, and Wonder Woman: Warbringer did not disappoint. As much as I loved the story, perhaps my favorite aspect of the book is the way that the artist combined a mostly cool color palette of blues and grays with judicious use of warm tones at specific parts of the Thanks go to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. When I saw Wonder Woman AND Leigh Bardugo combined in one book, I knew it was going to be something special, and Wonder Woman: Warbringer did not disappoint. As much as I loved the story, perhaps my favorite aspect of the book is the way that the artist combined a mostly cool color palette of blues and grays with judicious use of warm tones at specific parts of the plot. It really enriched the experience of the book as a whole.
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  • Jessica (a GREAT read)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest and voluntary review. I was in no way compensated for this review.The DC Comics team has brought to life yet another DC Icons novel! This time it's Leigh Barudgo's Wonder Woman: Warbinger. Louise Simonson was the adapter and the gorgeous illustrations were created by Kit Seaton! I have to say that I really enjoyed this color scheme! It's very faint colors that make Wonder Woman who she eventually becomes! At least, that's how I saw I received this ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest and voluntary review. I was in no way compensated for this review.The DC Comics team has brought to life yet another DC Icons novel! This time it's Leigh Barudgo's Wonder Woman: Warbinger. Louise Simonson was the adapter and the gorgeous illustrations were created by Kit Seaton! I have to say that I really enjoyed this color scheme! It's very faint colors that make Wonder Woman who she eventually becomes! At least, that's how I saw it!If you've read the novel adaptation then you will know this story well! I love how these graphic novels stay true to the novel themselves. It's truly remarkable and wonderful! The story follows a teenage Diana who is struggling to find her place among the Amazons she calls family, of sorts. She wants to prove to them, herself, and her mother that she is truly one of them when participates in the great race meant to test all the warriors. But Diana gets waylaid in the race when she sees a boat suddenly explode and though she longs to prove herself a warrior to everyone, she worries about the fates of anyone left on board...even if they are from the land of man.As we know, Diana rescues Alia, who she believes is mortal at first, but turns out to be so much more. She is the warbringer and if Diana doesn't get her away from her people, not only will she be killed, but her people might not make it either, for the warbringer is exactly as it sounds.I truly must applaud Kit Seaton for her illustrations in this graphic novel! I loved how the characters practically popped off the page. They were so lush and beautifully drawn that reading this one was a delight and gazing at the drawings was pure pleasure!It's always so hard to review a graphic novel or comic due to the length of the story and I'm not entirely sure what I should be touching on or not. I know that all fans of Leigh Bardugo, Wonder Woman, and Wonder Woman: Warbringer will want to read this one because it's an amazing read and the story is just as enticing in comic form as it was in novel form. It really is something to see since usually the route to go is making a book into a movie. Comic book "books" are an enjoyable treat as well as this series is turning out to be! I love that the story shows through so well even in shortened comic book form! It's definitely a great way to revisit a beloved read in a shorter amount of time!This is most definitely a read to recommend to the aforementioned peoples, fans of Leigh Bardugo and Wonder Woman alike will have a GREAT time with this read! I cannot wait to get a finalized copy of this in order to see the drawings up close and personal! This is truly a work of art!Overall Rating 5/5 starsWonder Woman: Warbringer releases January 7, 2020
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  • Jordan (The Heart of a Book Blogger)
    January 1, 1970
    This review and more can be found at The Heart of a Book Blogger.Actual Rating: 4.5 starsThe Wonder Woman: Warbringer graphic novel is the adaptation of Leigh Bardugo’s DC Icons novel. I haven’t read the novel yet, but this appears to be an excellent adaptation.In Wonder Woman: Warbringer, Diana wants to prove herself to the rest of the Amazons on Themyscira. She’s about to do that in an important race, but then Diana witnesses a ship exploding and rushes to save the human onboard. What she This review and more can be found at The Heart of a Book Blogger.Actual Rating: 4.5 starsThe Wonder Woman: Warbringer graphic novel is the adaptation of Leigh Bardugo’s DC Icons novel. I haven’t read the novel yet, but this appears to be an excellent adaptation.In Wonder Woman: Warbringer, Diana wants to prove herself to the rest of the Amazons on Themyscira. She’s about to do that in an important race, but then Diana witnesses a ship exploding and rushes to save the human onboard. What she doesn’t know is that in saving Alia, she has brought a Warbringer to the island. To save both her home and Alia, Diana must leave Themyscira and bring Alia to a special spring to end the Warbringer line.Wonder Woman: Warbringer is an action-packed story. I loved seeing Diana’s first adventure away from Themyscira and the friendship she starts up with Alia. The art itself is beautiful. The darker color tones age up the story for the YA audience and the pop of bright, bold colors add to the action. There was a mix of different types of panels that kept the story moving quickly.Overall, fans of the DC Icon series will want to check out this adaptation! And if you’re like me and haven’t read the book, the graphic novel is a great way to experience the story.*This ARC was provided to me by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for a honest review.*
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  • Ciera
    January 1, 1970
    "You were my first nothing. I am immortal, and you are a footnote. I will erase you from my history, and you will vanish, unremembered by this world."Considering I had no desire to read the actual book despite my love for Leigh Bardugo, this was the perfect medium to read the book in; it's Wonder Woman, after all. I will admit, however, that I went into this hoping that they were gonna let Diana be gay with the cute black girl, Alia, on the cover. That didn't happen of course, but basically the "You were my first nothing. I am immortal, and you are a footnote. I will erase you from my history, and you will vanish, unremembered by this world."Considering I had no desire to read the actual book despite my love for Leigh Bardugo, this was the perfect medium to read the book in; it's Wonder Woman, after all. I will admit, however, that I went into this hoping that they were gonna let Diana be gay with the cute black girl, Alia, on the cover. That didn't happen of course, but basically the entire inciting incident was just Diana wanting to prove herself's to her mom's girlfriend, so I guess that's acceptable. Plus, Nim was the great queer rep that I needed from at least one person in this graphic novel. This was fun! The art was great, both when it came to style but also the fighting scenes, and the predominately blue color scheme was pleasing to the eye. While there were some weird transitions and some character motives that seemed to come from nowhere, no doubt because this was an adaptation of a novel, the general idea of someone being a descendant of Helen of Troy, and thus a literal warbringer (and not just someone, a black girl at that, which made my heart happy as a black girl who has loved greek mythology) was just pretty cool. First fun slow shift read of 2020!
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  • Mah Marino | Happy Reading Co.
    January 1, 1970
    I've always been curious of Leigh Bardugo writing Wonder Woman and when I saw the opportunity to check the Graphic Novel, I had to get it!And oh I'm so glad I did! This story was very good, from an insecure Diana with the Amazons to the great Diana we've all come to love after being battle-tested. Loved it!!
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    This was a good adaptation of the prose novel, but it wasn't quite as cohesive of a story due to the truncated plot.Check out my full review at Forever Young Adult.
  • Caro
    January 1, 1970
    I cheated and read this before finishing the book but WOW I am so excited for the rest of the book! The art was amazing and I absolutely loved everything about this I cheated and read this before finishing the book but WOW I am so excited for the rest of the book! The art was amazing and I absolutely loved everything about this ❤️
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    I love Wonder Woman so seeing this story told with the new graphics is wonderful. I enjoyed this story more the second round which could have to do with the brilliant illustrations. I'm really glad this series is getting an illustrated version along with the written novels. I love both styles but most people come from the comic books or animated movies and being able to see them is often better. We don't often get to see Diana as a teenager she's always depicted as Wonder Woman so getting an I love Wonder Woman so seeing this story told with the new graphics is wonderful. I enjoyed this story more the second round which could have to do with the brilliant illustrations. I'm really glad this series is getting an illustrated version along with the written novels. I love both styles but most people come from the comic books or animated movies and being able to see them is often better. We don't often get to see Diana as a teenager she's always depicted as Wonder Woman so getting an newer prospective is refreshing. The first half is still my favorite. There is humor and humanization and just watching Diana go to the states and interact with civilization is never not amusing. But this isn't only just about Diana but Alia. Her family and the perils that they begin to face. The whole dynamic of characters are what I enjoy the most. Their interactions and the bonds of friendship is very real. Thanks to Netgalley and DC Entertainment for the free copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Cath (Cather.reads)
    January 1, 1970
    Wonder Woman: Warbringer the graphic novel is filled with beautiful pictures and tells the story of Diana as she saves the life of a young girl, leaves her life-long home, and gets caught up in trying to prevent a war while saving the life of her friend again because she is the warbringer, descended from Helen whose power from the gods caused the battle of troy. The novelization was written by Leigh Bardugo, and it was well adapted for the graphic novel. the pictures were well drawn and the Wonder Woman: Warbringer the graphic novel is filled with beautiful pictures and tells the story of Diana as she saves the life of a young girl, leaves her life-long home, and gets caught up in trying to prevent a war while saving the life of her friend again because she is the warbringer, descended from Helen whose power from the gods caused the battle of troy. The novelization was written by Leigh Bardugo, and it was well adapted for the graphic novel. the pictures were well drawn and the characters had their own unique looks, making it easy to tell who was who and what they were doing. the colors went well together and made it a pleasant experience to read. However, if you are like me and do not normally read graphic novels because they can be hard to follow because of the condensed story plot, I do recommend that you read the full length novel first. It has a lot more to it than can fit in this graphic novel. But, if you enjoy graphic novels, or don't have the time to read the full length novel, this graphic novel is definitely worth your time!
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  • Jeremy Bautista
    January 1, 1970
    I originally went through this story as an audiobook about 2 years ago and at the time I was a bit underwhelmed. I have a feeling that some of that was due to the production quality of the audiobook. It wasn't terrible but was no Star Wars production. Now that I've consumed this story again as a graphic novel, I think I understand what's going on in the story better... And it turns out that maybe it wasn't just the medium that turned me a bit off, but generally, I feel like it's kind of an I originally went through this story as an audiobook about 2 years ago and at the time I was a bit underwhelmed. I have a feeling that some of that was due to the production quality of the audiobook. It wasn't terrible but was no Star Wars production. Now that I've consumed this story again as a graphic novel, I think I understand what's going on in the story better... And it turns out that maybe it wasn't just the medium that turned me a bit off, but generally, I feel like it's kind of an underwhelming story. That's not to say that I didn't appreciate the twists and liberties taken in this version of the DC Universe (i.e. how Amazons got to Themyscira, Diana's initial interaction to Man's World, etc.), but the extended second act of the story simply lacked any strong energy--just an oft interrupted road trip with the reveal of the antagonist in broad daylight to them all along, waiting until the last possible moment to make the reveal. It sincerely felt anti-climactic. That said, the opening and final act were great and I wished that the second act had the same energy and pacing. It's possible that the story was simplified for younger audiences rather than truly target the Young Adult demographic with multiple twists and story arcs. This was kind of a straightforward story and it left me wanting.As a graphic novel, I should comment on the art. Now that I've read a few DC graphic novels that are not comics, I'm generally not happy with this limited palette of colors. There are certain color references made by characters and the paleness of the style does not lend itself well in those situations. This is not the only book like this, but it doesn't have to be this way. The Superman: Earth One artwork is so detailed and engaging. And while Raven had a similar art style, at least the story was more interesting, IMHO. Also, there are mentions of Diana being a supermodel and strikingly beautiful to a complete stranger. When I first went through the audiobook, I fully envisioned Wonder Woman in her traditional, albeit a contemporary version of her costume as portrayed in the 2017 Wonder Woman movie (which is striking but far being overly revealing or intentionally seductive). But instead, she wore long pants and a top that looked more like fitted scrubs. If this was targeted to children not ready for YA content, it makes sense the costume the artist chose, but this is an example where the artwork didn't properly convey what I think the story was getting at.In the end, I think these DC Icons (is it still called that?) stories are fine and I'm glad they're out. This is not a "definitive" Wonder Woman story nor does it give significant insight into Wonder Woman lore, so it's optional reading (prose book and graphic novel alike) for sure. However, if you do decide to pick this one up, I'd suggest going with the graphic novel. The pacing in the middle of the (audio)book really bogs down that story and frankly, it made me forget what was going on in the first place disconnecting the beginning and end. The graphic novel allows for a fast read through that second act.
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  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of Wonder Woman: Warbringer through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Odds are pretty good that you’ve heard of Leigh Bardugo’s novel, Wonder Woman: Warbringer. Set in the DC universe, it followed Princess Diana in her early years. It’s part of a series that DC has been working on lately, and it’s been getting a lot of ink. This is not that novel. But it’s close. This is the graphic novel adaptation of the book. And really, it was just a matter of time before I received a copy of Wonder Woman: Warbringer through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Odds are pretty good that you’ve heard of Leigh Bardugo’s novel, Wonder Woman: Warbringer. Set in the DC universe, it followed Princess Diana in her early years. It’s part of a series that DC has been working on lately, and it’s been getting a lot of ink. This is not that novel. But it’s close. This is the graphic novel adaptation of the book. And really, it was just a matter of time before that happened: DC is known for their comics, after all. As such, this graphic novel is perfect for fans of that novel. Or for new fans that never had time to read it in the first place – don’t worry, we won’t judge! Just go ahead and enjoy it. Back when Diana was still with the Amazons, she desperately longed to be able to prove her worth to them. She didn’t want to just be known as her mother’s daughter. She wanted to make a name for herself. And to prove that she belonged amongst them. Then one day an unexpected change occurred in her life. She risked her life to save Alia, a girl drowning in the barrier around the Amazons. But Alia is not an ordinary girl, and in order for Diana to make it right, she must set out on an even bigger adventure than she ever imagined. As a huge fan of Leigh Bardugo’s writing, I was understandably quite excited to see her work get turned into a graphic novel. And obviously it made complete sense that Warbringer should be turned into a graphic novel. I really enjoyed seeing Diana at a younger point in her life. Her series may be a long-running one, but this is a side of Diana that we don’t get to see too often. So you better believe that I appreciated every moment in this novel. The whole Warbringer plot was actually quite fascinating. I love how Bardugo was able to weave such a classic bit of lore into something that fit into a Wonder Woman story. I know that this is basically how Wonder Woman works, but I was still impressed with how it was handled here. There are plenty of twists and turns to appreciate in both the novel and graphic novel version of this tale. Speaking of, I think they did a pretty solid job of porting the entire plot over. Did it lose some detail? Of course, it did. But that’s to be expected with any adaptation. I really do think that Louise Simonson did a decent job of condensing Leigh Bardugo’s novel into this new format. The artwork behind Wonder Woman: Warbringer was an interesting touch. I loved the stylistic choices that Kit Seaton made in making this graphic novel. It all still read as Diana – but it also was clearly targeting a slightly younger audience. And I sincerely hope that it worked. Part of me is almost sad that this is one concise graphic novel, instead of an entire series. But as far as complaints go, that’s actually pretty minor. Though I would love to see Leigh Bardugo take over writing for Wonder Woman at some point…For more reviews check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • Kate Waggoner
    January 1, 1970
    @kidlitexchange #partnerThank you to @dczoombooks for sharing an advance copy of Wonder Woman: Warbringer (the Graphic Novel) with the #kidlitexchange network. This book will be released January 7, 2019. All opinions are my own. One day, she will be one of the greatest heroes, Wonder Woman, but for now she is a daughter of Earth and princess of the Amazons. Diana feels that she has something to prove to her Amazon sisters as she is not truly one of them. She did not die in battle with a prayer @kidlitexchange #partnerThank you to @dczoombooks for sharing an advance copy of Wonder Woman: Warbringer (the Graphic Novel) with the #kidlitexchange network. This book will be released January 7, 2019. All opinions are my own. One day, she will be one of the greatest heroes, Wonder Woman, but for now she is a daughter of Earth and princess of the Amazons. Diana feels that she has something to prove to her Amazon sisters as she is not truly one of them. She did not die in battle with a prayer to the goddesses on her lips, instead she was created from clay. Diana risks her life as she knows it in order to save a shipwrecked human, Alia. Her good deed however brings doom to her world. Alia is a warbringer and unless she either dies or bathes in a magical spring where Helen of Troy rests, war will come both to the world of man and the world of the Amazons. Together, Diana and Alia must face a series of enemies and their own doubts in order to save both their worlds from being destroyed. I have never really been into superhero stories or comics, but I really enjoyed this graphic novel and found it to be incredibly accessible for readers who aren't familiar with the DC Universe. This is a great way to introduce a new generation to the classic heroes. This book is a YA graphic novelization of Leigh Bardugo's New York Times bestselling novel. It is full of adventure, but also addresses topics of xenophobia, feminism, and inclusion. The book looks at what it means to be an outsider and focuses on the importance of friendship and staying true to who you are. I love the strength (mental, moral, and physical) exuded by Diana and Alia. This story sends a strong message about the power of women and friendship. The color palette is primarily shades of blue of purple, with a few pops of red/orange. I think the palette lends itself to the themes addressed in the novel adding to the overall message. While this is a YA graphic novel, it is still appropriate for middle school students. It does include violence, but nothing too extreme that it wouldn't be appropriate for 7th and 8th grade students.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    There's a certain point when reading Elseworlds or alternate universe stories of popular characters that reach when veers away for the character's essential traits or character and into more a vehicle for the author's tropes or stories. I also think of Kelly Sue DeConnick's saying that people like a story or character because it resonates something within them.I read the DC Ink Breaking Glass, which diverges from the usual Harley Quinn story and loved it because I like the stories Mariko Tamaki There's a certain point when reading Elseworlds or alternate universe stories of popular characters that reach when veers away for the character's essential traits or character and into more a vehicle for the author's tropes or stories. I also think of Kelly Sue DeConnick's saying that people like a story or character because it resonates something within them.I read the DC Ink Breaking Glass, which diverges from the usual Harley Quinn story and loved it because I like the stories Mariko Tamaki tells. I couldn't enjoy this adaptation of Leigh Bardugo's Wonder Woman: Warbringer because it was just Leigh Bardugo with some Wonder Woman touches (like Todd Philip's Joker movie).I don't like the chosen one trope and it leaned heavily on the three main characters being endowed with mythical qualities and their (underwritten) human friends occasional vessel for possession by the gods. Questions about how Jason, Alia, and Tek were written. Another favorite trope of Bardugo's is the lead is seduced by the Big Bad before finding out he's the Big Bad. I couldn't suspend my disbelief of the villain being so powerful so quickly and all his machinations in the background was undetected.Also, Kit Seaton's art didn't work with the story. At one point Alia is described as wearing a golden dress but the book's only colors are blue and red, so her dress is a light blue I interpreted as silver. Clothes porn is another Bardugo trope and the artist wasn't quite up to that task. Also, the ethnicity of the characters were hard to tell visually. The limited color pallette might be one reason, but the way Alia's braids were drawn was not that good. Other Amazons from different countries were generically and roughly drawn, so you have to either rely on cultural clothes and dialogue (background characters in a sari or a gele would reference goddesses from there culture).I'd stick with the prose book if you're a Leigh Bardugo fan because the art didn't help elevate the graphic novel adaptation.
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