The Last Passenger (Charles Lenox Mysteries, #0.3)
From bestselling author Charles Finch comes the third and final in a prequel trilogy to his lauded Charles Lenox series.London, 1855: A young and eager Charles Lenox faces his toughest case yet: a murder without a single clue. Slumped in a first-class car at Paddington Station is the body of a young, handsome gentleman. He has no luggage, empty pockets, and no sign of violence upon his person - yet Lenox knows instantly that it's not a natural death.Pursuing the investigation against the wishes of Scotland Yard, the detective encounters every obstacle London in 1855 has to offer, from obstinate royalty to class prejudice to the intense grief of his closest friend. Written in Charles Finch's unmistakably warm, witty, and winning voice, The Last Passenger is a cunning and deeply satisfying conclusion to the journey begun in The Woman in the Water and The Vanishing Man.

The Last Passenger (Charles Lenox Mysteries, #0.3) Details

TitleThe Last Passenger (Charles Lenox Mysteries, #0.3)
Author
ReleaseFeb 18th, 2020
PublisherMinotaur Books
ISBN-139781250312204
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Historical Mystery

The Last Passenger (Charles Lenox Mysteries, #0.3) Review

  • Charles Finch
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote this one! Does that make me biased? Yes, I know this book's flaws better than anyone. I will send you an annotated list upon request.Nevertheless, 5 stars.
  • Emma Rose Ribbons
    January 1, 1970
    What a wonderful, wonderful installment in the Charles Lenox Mysteries series. I had REAL trouble putting it down. I loved it. Charles's family and friends all urge him to find romance but Charles is asked by a rather incompetent but nice enough policeman to help in a murder case - a body was found on a train from Manchester to London, stripped of all clothing, and what appears at first to be a rather petty theft, turns out to have far-reaching ramifications as Lenox realises the unknown man may What a wonderful, wonderful installment in the Charles Lenox Mysteries series. I had REAL trouble putting it down. I loved it. Charles's family and friends all urge him to find romance but Charles is asked by a rather incompetent but nice enough policeman to help in a murder case - a body was found on a train from Manchester to London, stripped of all clothing, and what appears at first to be a rather petty theft, turns out to have far-reaching ramifications as Lenox realises the unknown man may have been a victim of the anti-slavery movement going on in America.There are LOADS to love about this book:1/ The writing is superb, and while this was an advanced copy and it had a couple of typos, Charles Finch's prose is seriously good, you're always in good hands with him.2/ Charles Lenox is a hero I can root for - he's morally just and learns a great deal in the process of investigating what slavery was really like. There's a conversation at the end of the book that shows just how much he's grown and I thought his development as a character was believable and deeply touching.3/ You always learn something about Victorian England with Charles Finch and he didn't disappoint here. The research is impeccable, and while I've read quite a number of books on the era, I learned a lot still. There are interesting comparisons between America and England's class systems (and Lenox is always deeply aware of the injustices of his system, which is nice), a whole paragraph about the letter N (it sounds ludicrous but I promise it serves a purpose), a bit about a tax on fur, and loads more. This book references a lot of political events, streets, clubs, everyday things, in such a way that they become alive. Some of them will be familiar to you (Wilberforce) and others you'll want to read more about. There's always just the right amount of historical tidbits that make for fascinating reading, really flesh out Charles Lenox's world and open doors to more. It would also make for wonderful rereading.4/ The secondary characters are excellent. There's a newspaper boy in this who was so funny and so endearing I kept rereading his scenes. I also loved Mr Cobb and Lady Jane and Graham as usual. You can picture everyone clearly, they've got a life of their own and every time Charles Lenox speaks to someone, you can tell to whom just by the way they talk, they're that distinctive.5/ This book was in turns funny (I laughed out loud in a few different places) and full of wisdom. For example, I thought I'd understood the title to be a reference to the murder I mentioned previously but the meaning of 'the last passenger' becomes clear only at the very end of the book in a very poignant exchange between Lenox and a former slave, Hollis. 6/ The plot was flawless and while intricate, the investigation was clear and easy to follow. I didn't feel lost at any point and I like that the first conclusion wasn't the right one too, it had a lot of surprises.7/ This book features a romance that was well-written and surprising, especially its conclusion (even though of course you'll be spoiled for the conclusion if you've read any of the subsequent books) and it highlights the plight of women at the time in a way that I thought was very well-done and realistic.I seriously loved The Last Passenger and read it almost in one seating. It's a worthy addition to the series and bridges the gap between the prequels and A Beautiful Blue Death (at the end of the novel, Charles and Lady Jane end up in a scene right before the first book in the series) while expanding the canon in the best way. I'm so happy. I hope and pray more books following the initial timeline are to come out soon for I'll miss those characters very much indeed.Happy Halloween!-My endless thanks to NetGalley and St Martin's Press for this advanced copy. I've read all of the Lenox books in the series and would have bought it myself but it's pretty special to be able to read a book almost 4 months before its publication.
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  • Judy Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press Minotaur Books for an e-galley of this novel.This is the third book in a trilogy of prequels giving readers insights into how Charles Lenox progressed toward a successful career as a private investigator. This was definitely my favorite of the three books and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The mystery on this one proved most difficult for Lenox (and me!) to solve because everything possible had been done to keep the identity of the victim obscured. All the Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press Minotaur Books for an e-galley of this novel.This is the third book in a trilogy of prequels giving readers insights into how Charles Lenox progressed toward a successful career as a private investigator. This was definitely my favorite of the three books and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The mystery on this one proved most difficult for Lenox (and me!) to solve because everything possible had been done to keep the identity of the victim obscured. All the labels in the clothing of the victim had been removed showing that the murderer was willing to run the risk of being discovered with the body on the train; keeping the identity of the victim unknown was that important. And it did turn out to be just that important.In this book I was aware of the more intimate aspects of the life of Charles Lenox, something I had begun to sincerely miss from some of the more recent books. Charles was fun again and he was still vulnerable enough to be hurt by being cut in society by men he had attended school with. Everybody seemed to be against him taking up this profession he was designing for himself. He did have some support from family and friends but not universal acceptance in society. Lady Jane Grey features very prominently in this prequel and my questions about her marriage were covered to my satisfaction. Having read many of the books in this series I found myself glad about reading this final book in the prequel. I read the other two, but this is my favorite. Now I'm ready to get back to the "present" with Charles in the next book. It was like taking a refresher course; I found out a lot about a subject I had thought I already knew about. That turned out to be a very good thing.
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  • Kate Baxter
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 / 5 starsAuthor Charles Finch has done it again! Thirteen books into this series and the writing is still fresh and keeps getting better with each installment. If you're a fan of well conceived and delightfully written historical fiction, then I commend this book to you, without reservation.The story opens in London - October, 1855 with our young protagonist, Charles Lenox, being introduced to all the young ladies of London who are marriage suitable for a man of his standing. Initially, he 4.5 / 5 starsAuthor Charles Finch has done it again! Thirteen books into this series and the writing is still fresh and keeps getting better with each installment. If you're a fan of well conceived and delightfully written historical fiction, then I commend this book to you, without reservation.The story opens in London - October, 1855 with our young protagonist, Charles Lenox, being introduced to all the young ladies of London who are marriage suitable for a man of his standing. Initially, he finds it all rather tedious. There is one who caught his eye but who knows how all that will turn out. Meanwhile, tippling Inspector Hemstock appears at Charles' home hoping to engage Charles' assistance in solving a murder down at Paddingtron Station. Not rushing to the inspector's aid, Charles eventually heads off to Paddington and arrives there even before the inspector. It's a messy business. The eviscerated young victim had no identification and it all appeared to be a mystery with no clues. Fear not; Charles Lenox is on scene and happy to offer his services in aiding the Yard to solve yet another crime. Charles is never boastful but he is clever and has had some success to his credit.This is the third installment in the Charles Lenox mystery prequels. Of the three, this one by far is the best, in my opinion. Lenox is at a pivotal point in his rather lonesome life. Charles Finch does a spectacular job sharing with us the gravitas of decisions Lenox makes and how they will impact his future. We all are exposed to Lenox's vulnerable side and frustration with himself when he falls short of perfection. But one of his best traits is his desire for at least justice when fairness cannot be easily obtained. Lenox has a gentle soft spot for the folks who struggle through life owing to the lives into which they were born. He sees industrious and clever young Willikens selling papers, tobacco and mints on the train platforms, hustling to be present and available as each train disembarks. Willikens is a child born into poverty and abandoned. It pulls on Charles' heartstrings and results in some kindnesses extended to the boy. Finch is superb at his character development. The humorous banter between Lenox and those he holds dear is absolutely charming. There are quite a few red herrings as the book progresses but when all is said and done, it is an extremely satisfying yarn which has been spun. I cannot wait to see what Lenox gets himself into next.I am grateful to author Charles Finch and his publisher, Minotaur Books for having provided a free e-book through NetGalley. Their generosity, however, has not influenced this review - the words of which are mine alone.
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  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I am sorry this is the last of the young Charles Lenox mysteries. I have enjoyed them and getting to meet these characters and seeing their relationships develop. This is a particularly interesting one as it deals with slavery in the U.S. A young American comes to England to enlist British support in stopping slavery in the U.S. He is found brutally murdered and all identifying marks removed. A particularly inept policeman calls Lenox in to help investigate and the case leads interesting places. I am sorry this is the last of the young Charles Lenox mysteries. I have enjoyed them and getting to meet these characters and seeing their relationships develop. This is a particularly interesting one as it deals with slavery in the U.S. A young American comes to England to enlist British support in stopping slavery in the U.S. He is found brutally murdered and all identifying marks removed. A particularly inept policeman calls Lenox in to help investigate and the case leads interesting places. I really liked meeting the former slave that accompanied the murdered man and discovering his story. It was fascinating including his theory on theft. The case is complex and leads to both foreign shores and members in high places of authority. Lenox has his hands full. Meanwhile, he discovers he is lonely and with the encouragement of Lady Jane and his mother he looks for love. His brush is heartwarming but gives him some life lessons. It's nice to see him exploring the world. This was a touching book with an interesting, complex story. I enjoyed it. Thanks to NetGalley for a copy of the ARC in exchange for a fair review.
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  • EileenNH
    January 1, 1970
    I happened to be lucky and reach this book first. Charles Finch knows how to write a great story.
  • Jenny
    January 1, 1970
    Finch is back with another (young) Charles Lennox mystery. I’ll admit to being nervous during the first 20-30 pages of the book as it seemed like he was veering towards a retelling of the Thomas Briggs murder, but I was relieved once it became obvious that was not what was happening. Over a dozen Lennox books in and they haven’t gotten stale yet. While other authors in this genre write progressively worse books each year, Finch is reliable and enjoyable, running circles around the rest of them. Finch is back with another (young) Charles Lennox mystery. I’ll admit to being nervous during the first 20-30 pages of the book as it seemed like he was veering towards a retelling of the Thomas Briggs murder, but I was relieved once it became obvious that was not what was happening. Over a dozen Lennox books in and they haven’t gotten stale yet. While other authors in this genre write progressively worse books each year, Finch is reliable and enjoyable, running circles around the rest of them. The denouement could have been a little more developed, but overall, I was satisfied and will eagerly await the next installment. Here’s hoping the streak of good writing continues. Received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I came to this series late with “The Vanishing Man” and was excited to download the last and final in a prequel trilogy to the Charles Lenox series. Another great period piece that opens on October 1, 1855 when the city of London, England decides that it is time for Charles Lenox to be married. While not the central theme of the story it does help move it along together with Lenox’s contemplation of his profession and whether that course is sustainable. The characteristics of dry wit, humor and I came to this series late with “The Vanishing Man” and was excited to download the last and final in a prequel trilogy to the Charles Lenox series. Another great period piece that opens on October 1, 1855 when the city of London, England decides that it is time for Charles Lenox to be married. While not the central theme of the story it does help move it along together with Lenox’s contemplation of his profession and whether that course is sustainable. The characteristics of dry wit, humor and a smidgeon of self-deprecation that Finch attributes to Lenox win out on every page making him so very human and likable.The story is involved and is not a straightforward investigation by Scotland Yard into a murder that has too many questions and no blatant answers. The murder is the front and center story but its resolution requires meandering down many lanes and alleys and as far afield as the time’s prevalent politics in the United States. Of course there is the murder, but attention is also paid to friendship, public and private conscience, an examination of class structure, prejudice and greed. It took no effort to become reacquainted with Lenox’s inner circle; his butler Graham, good friend and next door neighbor Lady Jane, and his brother Edmund. His introduction of new characters was done skillfully and served to enhance the story through their distinct personalities.There is no doubt that I have to and will read each and every book in this series.Thank you NetGalley and Minotaur Books for a copy.
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  • Gardener0126
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third of three prequels to the Charles Lennox mystery series. I’ve now read all three of them and very much enjoyed them. Finch is a master story teller. He skillfully knits together bits of Lennox’s personal life, his relationships, some historical facts and a mystery to create a very satisfying novel. This one kept me up until 2 in the morning. Lennox comes across as such a real person. He’s smart and intuitive, brilliant at times but he also makes mistakes. He can be very This is the third of three prequels to the Charles Lennox mystery series. I’ve now read all three of them and very much enjoyed them. Finch is a master story teller. He skillfully knits together bits of Lennox’s personal life, his relationships, some historical facts and a mystery to create a very satisfying novel. This one kept me up until 2 in the morning. Lennox comes across as such a real person. He’s smart and intuitive, brilliant at times but he also makes mistakes. He can be very vulnerable. He truly cares about people and wants to serve them. I like the snippets about his everyday life and relationships just as much as the mystery.This novel depicts some of the tensions and issues that ultimately culminated in the American Civil War. I found the historical context just as interesting as the mystery, which is a good one, well plotted and full of twists and turns. An unknown passenger on a train is found brutally murdered. Thanks to Lennox’s skills, he is soon identified, Scotland Yard is on the case, and they aren’t crazy about Lennox getting into their business. However, Lennox identifies the victim for them......and then they pretty much have to let him in on the case, although they aren’t at all gracious about it. But, identification is just the tip of the iceberg. The plot thickens...and thickens.....Highly recommended for anyone who enjoys a well researched historical mystery with a great plot and characters.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of Charles Finch's Charles Lenox books from my introduction to his first book. And, THE LAST PASSENGER was not an exception---they are engrossing stories with a rich historical footing. I enjoy most historical novels, but occasionally it feels like the author "cuts and pastes" historical facts into the narrative to fill space or justify calling it an historical novel. That is definitely not the case with this series.Finch takes the reader right into the sophisticated society of I have been a fan of Charles Finch's Charles Lenox books from my introduction to his first book. And, THE LAST PASSENGER was not an exception---they are engrossing stories with a rich historical footing. I enjoy most historical novels, but occasionally it feels like the author "cuts and pastes" historical facts into the narrative to fill space or justify calling it an historical novel. That is definitely not the case with this series.Finch takes the reader right into the sophisticated society of his detective and the characters are so brightly drawn that , after reading, I feel like I could aptly cast the tv series or movie. As someone who reads for character, more than plot, that is something I look for in a book, and appreciate when I find it.I felt the abolitionist theme of this mystery was a bit tedious at times, but my pleasure in finding a new Charles Lenox story was sufficient to overlook that point. I hope that there will be many more encounters with Mr. Lenox, his associate Graham, and his most charming friend, Lady Jane.NetGaley provided me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for a candid review.
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  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    Like so many books I have found through NetGalley I had never read any of the books in the Charles Lenox series. I am so happy that I was given access to the ARC for The Last Passenger, and I can’t wait to explore the entire series. The Last Passenger is actually a prequel to the series and focuses on Charles as a younger man, which was good for me since I did not have any other point of reference for him. The story involves the murder of a man who has no form of identification and then winds Like so many books I have found through NetGalley I had never read any of the books in the Charles Lenox series. I am so happy that I was given access to the ARC for The Last Passenger, and I can’t wait to explore the entire series. The Last Passenger is actually a prequel to the series and focuses on Charles as a younger man, which was good for me since I did not have any other point of reference for him. The story involves the murder of a man who has no form of identification and then winds along a path that leads to the “peculiar institution” (slavery) and how it is dealt with in England and America. There are also romantic moments as Charles tries to find his future wife. The historical fiction components of this book are excellent with lots of interesting facts thrown in about the time period and the origins of phrases and practices. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and have already started on The Vanishing Man. Thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    The Last Passenger is the third in the prequels for Finch's Charles Lenox series. It has been interesting to read these books about the young Lennox, who wants to establish himself as a detective since I've liked the plots and characters in the original books with the mature Lenox. The series is one of my favorite historical mystery/detective series, and I enjoyed the latest book as well. Young Charles Lenox is encouraged by his mother to marry, and Charles is a desirable husband--except for the The Last Passenger is the third in the prequels for Finch's Charles Lenox series. It has been interesting to read these books about the young Lennox, who wants to establish himself as a detective since I've liked the plots and characters in the original books with the mature Lenox. The series is one of my favorite historical mystery/detective series, and I enjoyed the latest book as well. Young Charles Lenox is encouraged by his mother to marry, and Charles is a desirable husband--except for the fact that he continues to pursue a career as a detective, which is not highly thought of in his social class. Inspector Hemstock seeks Charles' help when the unidentified body of a young man is discovered at Paddington Station, and Charles is eager to be involved with the Scotland Yard investigation.As usual, there are many historical details that add to the plot, the characters are well-developed, the writing is excellent, and the mystery intriguing. Read in Oct. NetGalley/St. Martin's PressHistorical Mystery. Feb. 18, 2020. Print length: 304 pages.
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  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    The Last Passenger is the third prequel in the Charles Lenox mystery series. A man is found dead on a train in Paddington Station. All manner of identification has been removed, including his taylor's tags. There doesn't seem to be a clue on who he is, or why he was killed. We know with Lenox on the case all will be discovered in time. There is also the relationship between him and Scotland Yard that could either help or hinder his investigation. We also learn more about Lenox and his personal The Last Passenger is the third prequel in the Charles Lenox mystery series. A man is found dead on a train in Paddington Station. All manner of identification has been removed, including his taylor's tags. There doesn't seem to be a clue on who he is, or why he was killed. We know with Lenox on the case all will be discovered in time. There is also the relationship between him and Scotland Yard that could either help or hinder his investigation. We also learn more about Lenox and his personal life, is he ready for another love than his adoration for Lady Jane? Lady Jane and Deere have their own story with chess games, military life and true love. Another completely enjoyable book in the series. Thank you to #NetGalley for the chance to read #TheLastPassenger, a highly recommendable read. The characters and plot line are strong and the book is hard to put down.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    This is a brilliant third prequel in the Charles Lenox historical mystery series set in 1850's London.In this outstanding installment, we again meet a younger Lenox, Lady Jane (and her husband), and Graham, but this time, as they were dealing with the murder of a train passenger whose clothing had all of its tags removed, making it difficult for police to identify the body.I especially loved how author Charles Finch wove in details about the U.S. and American slavery to create an exceptionally This is a brilliant third prequel in the Charles Lenox historical mystery series set in 1850's London.In this outstanding installment, we again meet a younger Lenox, Lady Jane (and her husband), and Graham, but this time, as they were dealing with the murder of a train passenger whose clothing had all of its tags removed, making it difficult for police to identify the body.I especially loved how author Charles Finch wove in details about the U.S. and American slavery to create an exceptionally interesting plot. One of my favorite mystery series and, as always, highly recommended!!(I received a copy from the publisher, via Net Galley, in exchange for a fair and honest review).
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    1855. Charles Lenox is called on by Inspector Hemstock to view a body at Paddington Station, discovered in the Third Class car train. His clothing stripped of all identifying marks, and no luggage it would seem a diffcult case to solve. But it will have far reaching consequences. An enjoyable and well-written historical mystery, with a likeable style of writing and good plotting.Aided by its likeable main characters. The secondary characters are also well-developed and so add to the story.A 1855. Charles Lenox is called on by Inspector Hemstock to view a body at Paddington Station, discovered in the Third Class car train. His clothing stripped of all identifying marks, and no luggage it would seem a diffcult case to solve. But it will have far reaching consequences. An enjoyable and well-written historical mystery, with a likeable style of writing and good plotting.Aided by its likeable main characters. The secondary characters are also well-developed and so add to the story.A NetGalley Book
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  • Pat Dupuy
    January 1, 1970
    Quiet. Reflective. That's what I think of whenever I read a story with Charles Lenox. His relationships with family and friends. His desire to learn how to serve his clients and profession better. His fears of not succeeding. His character is so appealing. I enjoy every case he's on and this one is no exception. It is a multi-layered mystery and it is a pleasure to read as layers are revealed by Lenox, his assistant, and others.
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  • Jerry
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book I've read by Charles Finch, and if it is any indication of his style, I will definitely be back for more in the Charles Lenox Mystery Series. Just good old fashioned period British murder mystery dripping with atmosphere, suspicious characters, and plenty of twists and surprises.My copy was an ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss.
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  • Karen Troutman
    January 1, 1970
    I was given an ARC by Net Galley. Thanks! I had never read a book by Charles finch and I love a good mystery so this book was a treat for me. Will definitely read more by this author! REcommend!
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Can hardly wait to read this book. The Charles Finch pre-quells are the best; Finch continues to excel as a writer!!!
  • Faith Fullerton
    January 1, 1970
    Charles Finch is amazing and I love all of the Charles Lennox series. I can't wait to read the next prequel " The Last Passenger" should be well worth the wait! Keep 'um coming Charles Finch!
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    As I gave the first two prequels 5 stars each... I predict this one will also be! Can’t wait for February!
  • Jean Hamilton
    January 1, 1970
    I am giving this 5 stars even though I have not read it yet. The reason? I have read every other book in this series and am a huge fan. Can't wait for this to come out in February!
  • Sandra Pipitone
    January 1, 1970
    Very good tale of old injustice, to people of color! Had lots of twists and turns, more than most do. set in a time most of us never knew! Will keep you wondering!
  • Paula
    January 1, 1970
    London, 1855. A young and eager Charles Lenox faces his toughest case yet: a murder without a single clue. Slumped in a third-class car at Paddington Station is the body of a handsome young gentleman. He has no luggage, empty pockets, and no sign of identification on his person. And putting together the clues to the mystery of the man’s identity only raises more questions, when Lenox discovers that the crime has a significant connection to America.In all of my years of reading, I have never come London, 1855. A young and eager Charles Lenox faces his toughest case yet: a murder without a single clue. Slumped in a third-class car at Paddington Station is the body of a handsome young gentleman. He has no luggage, empty pockets, and no sign of identification on his person. And putting together the clues to the mystery of the man’s identity only raises more questions, when Lenox discovers that the crime has a significant connection to America.In all of my years of reading, I have never come across a book that in any way talks about the impact of America’s race relations on the UK. This book did and it was clear that Mr. Finch had done a lot of research into the issue. And he has created a very readable book. I was caught up in the mystery but the addition to the back story of Lady Jane and Lenox was also interesting. I was a bit worried that I wouldn’t like that part but I did. And I learned an amazing amount about the impact of cotton and tobacco on the slave trade.As always, I am looking forward to the next Charles Lennox story. I thank Netgalley and the publisher for a copy of the book. The review is my own.
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  • EileenNH
    January 1, 1970
    I can not say enough about Charles Finches writing, story plot, characters, and learning about London is the late 1800's.
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