The Last Uncharted Sky (The Risen Kingdoms, #3)
The Three Musketeers meets Jules Verne in Curtis Craddock's concluding novel in the critically-acclaimed high fantasy Risen Kingdoms series, an engrossing tale of courtly intrigue and breathtaking magic.Isabelle and Jean-Claude undertake an airship expedition to recover a fabled treasure and claim a hitherto undiscovered craton for l'Empire Celeste. But Isabelle, as a result from a previous attack that tried to subsume her body and soul, suffers from increasingly disturbing and disruptive hallucinations. Disasters are compounded when the ship is sabotaged by an enemy agent, and Jean-Claude is seperated from the expedition.In a race against time, Isabelle must figure out how to ward off her ailment before it destroys her and reunite with Jean-Claude to seek the fabled treasure as ancient secrets and a royal conspiracry threaten to undo the entire realm."A gripping tale of a woman who refuses to be defined by her physical and magical limitations, thwarting both assassins and all who see her as a pawn. A great read!"--#1 New York Times bestselling author Brandon Sanderson, on An Alchemy of Masques and MirrorsThe Risen Kingdom series#1 An Alchemy of Masques and Mirrors#2 A Labyrinth of Scions and Sorcery

The Last Uncharted Sky (The Risen Kingdoms, #3) Details

TitleThe Last Uncharted Sky (The Risen Kingdoms, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 11th, 2020
PublisherTor Books
ISBN-139780765389657
Rating
GenreFantasy, Science Fiction, Steampunk, Adult

The Last Uncharted Sky (The Risen Kingdoms, #3) Review

  • Lukasz
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5The Last Uncharted Sky opens with a bang. Jean-Claude burns down a temple, loses a reliquary, and lets a dangerous lunatic escape. Meanwhile, Isabelle and Bitterlich face unexpected dangers on their expedition to the highest point of the world.When last we left our heroes, things have turned (or, rather, seemed to have turned) out well for them. Isabelle and Bitterlich prepared to explore unknown parts of their world, together. Jean-Claude proved there was a method to his madness and gained 4.5/5The Last Uncharted Sky opens with a bang. Jean-Claude burns down a temple, loses a reliquary, and lets a dangerous lunatic escape. Meanwhile, Isabelle and Bitterlich face unexpected dangers on their expedition to the highest point of the world.When last we left our heroes, things have turned (or, rather, seemed to have turned) out well for them. Isabelle and Bitterlich prepared to explore unknown parts of their world, together. Jean-Claude proved there was a method to his madness and gained an apprentice. Even Marie found a vocation. Rather lethal, but who am I to judge?Before starting the book, I expected plenty of thrills and surprises, and I got them. Craddock surprised me with how dark, daring, and nerve-wracking the story was. All key players had to prove themselves not only to survive but to save their relationships and the kingdom. Craddock has done his best to break them, physically and emotionally. Especially Bitterlich’s past hides painful secrets that explain his work ethics, focus on work, and a level of distrust toward others.Isabelle suffers from increasingly disturbing and disruptive hallucinations, a consequence of the events portrayed in The Labyrinth of Scions and Sorcery. If she won't figure out how to ward off her ailment before it destroys her, her mission will fail. And failure is not an option since it would mean undoing the entire realm.Craddock introduces new characters. I’m sure readers will find Rebecca, a young and fierce pick-pocket, endearing and likable. Without spoiling things to you, I can tell her role in the story is much bigger than anyone could expect. Let’s leave it at that.Craddock wraps up all dangling plot points, he throws a ton of surprises into the mix, and gifts readers with a surprisingly complicated romantic arc. He also develops, deeply, all of his characters, from the main to the supporting ones. Not only do Isabelle and Bitterlich become even more intriguing (both separately and as a couple), but so do their friends and enemies. Speaking of which, I need a novella about Marie. Or, better yet, a series focusing on her. An enormous part of the trilogy’s success and readability comes from how interesting everyone in this world is.The Last Uncharted Sky is intense, dramatic, and thoroughly satisfying. It has it all - the tightly written plot, first-class worldbuilding, and absolutely stellar character development. A glorious conclusion to The Risen Kingdom trilogy.ARC through NetGalley
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  • Ivan
    January 1, 1970
    "Poslednje neucrtano nebo" Kertisa Kradoka je finale njegove trilogije "Alhemija obrazina i ogledala" i bogami je pravo veliko finale. Roman je napisan odlično i leksički i stilski, karakterizacija je sjajna (po običaju) i vidi se napredak u autorovom umeću. Svet se širi, "sistem magije" dodatno pojašnjava - a i odgonetaju se neki elementi mizanscena koji su u prve dve knjige bili tek napomenuti. Pisac prilično vešto upliče u potku sve konce koji su u prva dva romana ostali da vise i na prilično "Poslednje neucrtano nebo" Kertisa Kradoka je finale njegove trilogije "Alhemija obrazina i ogledala" i bogami je pravo veliko finale. Roman je napisan odlično i leksički i stilski, karakterizacija je sjajna (po običaju) i vidi se napredak u autorovom umeću. Svet se širi, "sistem magije" dodatno pojašnjava - a i odgonetaju se neki elementi mizanscena koji su u prve dve knjige bili tek napomenuti. Pisac prilično vešto upliče u potku sve konce koji su u prva dva romana ostali da vise i na prilično zadovoljavajući način rešava sudbinu glavnih likova.Ovo bi inače bilo za 5*, ali u nekoliko navrata u radnji ima previše slučajnosti koje eto tako lepo idu na ruku kako priči tako i protagonistima. Tih 3-4 prevrtanja očima koja su me zadesila bila su dovoljna da smanjim ocenu za *. Međutim, ovo je i dalje trilogija koja vanredno dobro premošćava jaz između YA fantastike i fantastike za odrasle, sasvim je lep melanž žanrova da predstavlja vanredno osveženje u vremenu kada fantazijom dominira ili YA ili grimdark, a da istovremeno zadržava elemente i jednog i drugog - i svakako bih ovu trilogiju preporučio za objavljivanje bilo kojoj našoj izdavačkoj kući koja ima izgrađenu komunikaciju sa svojom publikom kada su po sredi ovakva izdanja. 4*
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  • Emma Cathryne
    January 1, 1970
    This has been my favorite book of the series so far!The Last Uncharted Sky continues our swashbuckling tale of adventure, romance, and intrigue, this time with a new setting: the open sky. The newly minted Capitaine Isabelle has been given command of her own ship and a missive by Impreratrice Sireen to investigate a strange new land beyond the whirling Bittergale that is rumored to contain the legendary Vault of Ages. Along with her wily adoptive father Jean-Claude, the dashing, shape-shifting B This has been my favorite book of the series so far!The Last Uncharted Sky continues our swashbuckling tale of adventure, romance, and intrigue, this time with a new setting: the open sky. The newly minted Capitaine Isabelle has been given command of her own ship and a missive by Impreratrice Sireen to investigate a strange new land beyond the whirling Bittergale that is rumored to contain the legendary Vault of Ages. Along with her wily adoptive father Jean-Claude, the dashing, shape-shifting Bitterlich, Fellhand Marie and the scrappy orphan Rebecca, she embarks on her latest quest. The flying ships have always a fascinating aspect of the world-building to me, so I was thrilled that our crew finally got to take to the sky! The whole novel was well-paced, and felt like "Three Musketeers" met an 'Age of Discovery' tale of the high seas. Maybe it is because I'm partial to pirate stories, but I felt like Craddock was at home in creating a story that flashed and flowed within this particular genre. Not once did the action flag, and I enjoyed getting to explore strange new lands and learn more about the air-balloon dwelling Gyrine. There were some cool new additions to the index of sorcery in this one---I thought the magic of the Windcallers was fascinating, as were the shifty fortune telling powers of the villanous pirate Ivar. Though I enjoyed the escapades of all the characters, I have to say my favorite by far was Isabelle. I found her struggle to remain an individual while meeting and healing the wounds of her ancestral choir to be extraordinarily compelling. It was an interesting meditation on inherited trauma and the lengths that we do and should go to fulfill the vendettas of our progenitors. Our newest addition to the crew, Rebecca, was also delightful and clever, and her addition felt refreshing rather than forced. Jean-Claude was as sly and funny as always, though I admit to being on the edge of my seat with anxiety for most of his chapters. Bitterlich was the perfect leading man, at once debonair and sympathetic. And Marie--for lack of a better word--remains a total badass. Fingers crossed she and that one other Gyrrine Fellhand girl start to date. My one complaint with this story was that the ending felt FAR too rushed compared to the events of the rest of the novel. Loose ends were hurriedly swept up without really being meditated on. I thought the last 10% of the book could easily have been three times as long. This also led to the final confrontation feeling very anticlimactic. Even so, that feeling didn't negate the fact that I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. It's rare that the last book in a trilogy manages to claim my favoritism, but I could not be happier labeling this one the best of the group.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't even read the second book yet, but I'm so keen for this!
  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    This saddest thing about The Risen Kingdom series is the lack of love it gets. I love Isabelle throughout the series. She's kind, smart and fiercely loyal to her loved ones. Her world isn't nice which makes her a beautiful contrast. People with powers think having abilities means that they have a soul while people without powers are beneath them. Each book looks deeper into the different powers and different floating countries. As nice as this ending is, I do wish that there will more about this This saddest thing about The Risen Kingdom series is the lack of love it gets. I love Isabelle throughout the series. She's kind, smart and fiercely loyal to her loved ones. Her world isn't nice which makes her a beautiful contrast. People with powers think having abilities means that they have a soul while people without powers are beneath them. Each book looks deeper into the different powers and different floating countries. As nice as this ending is, I do wish that there will more about this world. I could already see the political problems that could arise at the ending. I'm just sad it's over.This review is based on an advanced copy provided by Netgalley for an honest review.
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  • Mackay
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsThe triumphant (and moving) conclusion to one of the most creative and imaginative F trilogies of all time. I loved these characters, and this world with its myriad forms of magic, and while the trilogy is finished, all that will live on in my memories as long as I have memories! Highly recommended.(But I have to say, Tor should be ashamed of the poor copy editing given this wonderful book.)
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    I read and enjoyed the first in this series when it came out several years ago (long enough ago that I didn't remember that much), and somehow missed the middle one. But there was enough "previously-on" that I didn't feel too confused. It's a wonderful high-concept swashbuckler, with a world of floating skylands and skyships plying between them, multiple imaginative types of sorcerers, political intrigue, religious fanaticism, ancient magical artefacts, action, adventure, exploration, quests, es I read and enjoyed the first in this series when it came out several years ago (long enough ago that I didn't remember that much), and somehow missed the middle one. But there was enough "previously-on" that I didn't feel too confused. It's a wonderful high-concept swashbuckler, with a world of floating skylands and skyships plying between them, multiple imaginative types of sorcerers, political intrigue, religious fanaticism, ancient magical artefacts, action, adventure, exploration, quests, espionage, loyalty, friendship, mentorship, twue wuv... really, it has a bit of everything, but doesn't feel patched together as a result. All of the elements are well handled, and the multiple plot threads are brought to a rousing and satisfying conclusion. Unfortunately, in the pre-publication ARC I got from Netgalley, it's clear that the author is an extremely sloppy typist and has a slightly smaller vocabulary than he thinks he does, two things that will take a lot of work from a good editor to correct. Hopefully it will get that work, because it is a terrific story. And the protagonist is exactly the kind of protagonist I love: an intelligent, capable woman who is also unshakeably determined to do the right thing, which is the kind thing; who wins over others (even the crazy memories of her awful ancestors) by her goodness and insight and empathy, without ever being weak or foolishly idealistic, and accepts risk herself rather than pushing it onto others. Now I want to read the second volume.
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  • John Kusters
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve just now finished reading Curtis Craddock’s third, and sadly final, book in his Risen Kingdoms novels. This was a joy to read. The characters remain fresh and surprising yet entirely consistent with the previous stories. The novel is full of swashbuckling daring-do, (aero)nautical adventure, and twists and surprises at every turn. The author continues to bring strong, smart, and capable female characters to the fore, in every way equal to the men in the setting. I’m sad that this is the fin I’ve just now finished reading Curtis Craddock’s third, and sadly final, book in his Risen Kingdoms novels. This was a joy to read. The characters remain fresh and surprising yet entirely consistent with the previous stories. The novel is full of swashbuckling daring-do, (aero)nautical adventure, and twists and surprises at every turn. The author continues to bring strong, smart, and capable female characters to the fore, in every way equal to the men in the setting. I’m sad that this is the final chapter we’ll get in the lives of these characters, but I’m hopeful in time the author will return to the setting to explore some of the other nations and cratons floating above the gyre. Even if he doesn’t I’m quite satisfied in the way the story ended.
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  • Ascian
    January 1, 1970
    Does justice to the series and to the characters. Wonderful finale. I'm very happy with it.As with the other books in the trilogy by Curtis Craddock, The Last Uncharted Sky is very well written. Beautiful language and phrasing. Quite funny, too. Delicious dialogue.Jean-Claude continues to be my favorite character, but Marie is also very well depicted in this book.
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