House of X
Mutants are the future, and the future begins now! Superstar writer Jonathan Hickman (INFINITY, SECRET WARS) takes the reigns of the X-Men universe with artists Pepe Larraz and R.B. Silva to change the way you look at every X-Men story. HOUSE OF X and POWERS OF X intertwine to reveal the secret past, present, future, and far future of Mutantkind! It all starts when Charles Xavier reveals his new masterplan for Mutantkind, one that will bring mutants out of the shadow of humanity and into the light.COLLECTING: House of X 1-6, Powers of X 1-6

House of X Details

TitleHouse of X
Author
ReleaseDec 24th, 2019
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302915704
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Superheroes, Marvel, Graphic Novels, X Men, Graphic Novels Comics, Comic Book

House of X Review

  • Tiago
    January 1, 1970
    Mutants have been persecuted throughout the entire Marvel history, they've been killed and abused over and over again.... NO MORE!Jonathan Hickman wrote one of the best franchise relaunches I have ever read, he built the foundation for the future of the X-Men in such a exciting way that I fear writers are going to struggle to live up to the expectations once he is gone.It all started when Cyclops told Captain America (in AvX) that the Avengers stood by and did nothing when the mutants were attacked and persecuted m Mutants have been persecuted throughout the entire Marvel history, they've been killed and abused over and over again.... NO MORE!Jonathan Hickman wrote one of the best franchise relaunches I have ever read, he built the foundation for the future of the X-Men in such a exciting way that I fear writers are going to struggle to live up to the expectations once he is gone.It all started when Cyclops told Captain America (in AvX) that the Avengers stood by and did nothing when the mutants were attacked and persecuted multiple times, they never acted upon their adversaries, all those villainous human and mutant groups that attacked them, where were the Avengers when the mutants were being exterminated and depowered?The mutants tried multiple times to found their place in the world, but the humans never allowed them to remain there in peace, millions of mutants have been murdered, they've been on the verge of extinction more than once, and it's finally time for the X-Men mutants to do something about it. In the words of Charles Xavier "Here is a new truth: while you slept, the world changed" and so the big three, Xavier, Magneto and Cyclops declared the island of Krakoa as the new sovereign nation state for the mutants. In exchange, the human nations can now buy a new revolutionary drug from them, capable of curing multiple diseases as well as prolonging life itself, as long as they don't interfere in their business.Hickman found a way for all the mutants, friendly and villain, to be part of a single faction, even Apocalypse agreed and joined Krakoa, its so innovative and revolutionary, a council was formed and together they established the first three laws:MAKE MORE MUTANTSMURDER NO MANRESPECT THE LAND OF KRAKOA This no longer feels like the X-Men, because it isn't anymore, they have a nation now and with it a new authority that is new to the franchise. But if you think this is all this book has to offer, you're in for a ride, I don't want to spoil everything in case you're reading this review without picking up the book first, but let's just say that there is a new group called The Five and Goldballs have become one of the most important mutants.House of X has a little bit of everything that made the X-Men great and then some, plenty of heartful family/camaraderie moments, a thrilling last stand mission, a fresh time travel idea, multiple timelines, brutal twists that hopefully will produce some of the coolest storylines ever, deaths and rebirths and a new sense of belonging...This feels like the end of an era and the start of a new one, one where the mutants finally have a place to call home, Krakoa. It has a sense of conclusion while introducing a plethora of new ideas.One final thumbs up for the stellar art by Pepe Larraz and others that elevated this book to a new level, at times this books feels like real science fiction, not only because of the way Hickman wrote it but also because of the way it was illustrated, wonderful visuals, beautifully colored.I'll go ahead and call this my favorite Marvel book ever.
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  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    A masterpiece and an instant classic. Quite possibly the best thing Hickman's ever written, and I'm almost sure the best X-Men run... ever. Easily the best thing to happen in comics all year, which is no small feat since 2019 in particular saw an insane amount of fantastic comics. But really, nothing could compare to the sheer grandness and genius that Hickman brought to the world of Marvel's mutants. (Well... maybe the final year of Giant Days. But nothing will ever be as good as Giant Days, so that b A masterpiece and an instant classic. Quite possibly the best thing Hickman's ever written, and I'm almost sure the best X-Men run... ever. Easily the best thing to happen in comics all year, which is no small feat since 2019 in particular saw an insane amount of fantastic comics. But really, nothing could compare to the sheer grandness and genius that Hickman brought to the world of Marvel's mutants. (Well... maybe the final year of Giant Days. But nothing will ever be as good as Giant Days, so that book is in a category of its own). I already can't wait to re-read this thing (I admit, those X2 and X3 timelines flew a bit over my head in particular), and I can't believe that this is only just the beginning of the run. Go HiX-men.
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  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    House of X made X-Men a MUST read title once more. The thing is I didn't hate recent X-Men runs. One a few years ago by Bendis was pretty good, I liked some of Taylor's run as well as Astoning X-Men by Soule. I even enjoyed the more recent first half of Rosenberg's run. Saying that, while they were all good, we needed great. The X-men have been down for far too long. Enter Hickman to pick them back up and make them grand again. Right off the bat the world is set different Xavier, Cyclops, and a House of X made X-Men a MUST read title once more. The thing is I didn't hate recent X-Men runs. One a few years ago by Bendis was pretty good, I liked some of Taylor's run as well as Astoning X-Men by Soule. I even enjoyed the more recent first half of Rosenberg's run. Saying that, while they were all good, we needed great. The X-men have been down for far too long. Enter Hickman to pick them back up and make them grand again. Right off the bat the world is set different Xavier, Cyclops, and a lot of other familiar faces stand firm on bringing the X-Men and mutants in general to a new safe haven named Krakoa. But first Xavier sets ground rules. Avengers, fantastic four, and more do not come into their land demanding shit. This is the land of mutants, and they are united like never before. They set out rules though, such as Kill no Human, Respect the land of Krakoa, and the biggest one...Make more Mutants. Make more mutants? No no no, this isn't a sex story. Though that would be interesting. Then how is Xavier going to create more humans? That is the mystery and when revealed it might make you go "oh shit...that's kind of brilliant."Why this works well is Hickman's ability to grab the past characters, so many you might relate to or love, and make a compelling story of their future. Instead of creating another dozen or so new mutants we focus on ones already here. The moving forward storyline, filled with sci-fi and politics, keeps this title extremely fresh. The end result with two great artist really helps this series shine. My only negative is in the Power of X we have a lot of time skips. And in doing so the future storylines might not seem as interesting. Even in the end I didn't love them all but I did love the way it all tied up. To say Hickman's idea is ambitious alone would be unfair. It's both Ambitious and GREAT. The artwork helps further it into a status that makes this must read for X-Men fans. I don't know what awaits for our favorite mutants but I can't wait. A 4.5 out of 5.
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  • Malum
    January 1, 1970
    If any comic need a hard reboot it was the X-Men, and this was a really good one at that. The only negatives are that it was a bit confusing in places (I had to read an article explaining a bit of it) and I think there is a plot hole: (view spoiler)[when they regrow Wolverine in an egg, does he have his adamantium? Because if he does that wouldn't make any sense (hide spoiler)]. This is Marvel, so in another year or two we are going to get a big event where Krakoa g If any comic need a hard reboot it was the X-Men, and this was a really good one at that. The only negatives are that it was a bit confusing in places (I had to read an article explaining a bit of it) and I think there is a plot hole: (view spoiler)[when they regrow Wolverine in an egg, does he have his adamantium? Because if he does that wouldn't make any sense (hide spoiler)]. This is Marvel, so in another year or two we are going to get a big event where Krakoa gets annihilated and half of these characters all die/switch sides/get shot into space/whatever, but for now I'm excited to see where they are going to go with this.
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  • Anas
    January 1, 1970
    Tingles... This was perfection. I can't wait to see where the Dawn of X takes us.. Strap in folks, Hickman's taking us for a wild ride!
  • GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)
    January 1, 1970
    I read this in singles. 1 each week and each week Hickman blew my mind. This isn't just a reboot of the X-men...its literally a whole new way of looking at Mutant kind in general.These 12 books, respectively, are the stepping stones into a whole new era of Mutants and how they relate to the Marvel universe in general.Holy shit I cant wait to see where this all leads...what a trip its gonna be.Fantastic stuff. Five easy stars.
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  • Will Robinson Jr.
    January 1, 1970
    Unlike anything being published in superhero comics. A triumphant return to true X-men storytelling. Jonathan Hickman returns to Marvel to bring the X-men back to prominence with a tale that without a doubt changes how fans will see the mighty mutants of the Marvel Universe going forward. It is a bit unfair to judge this book without stating that everything that happens in this volume works in unison with its sister volume, Power of X. Hickman spares no time by jumping us right into the action. Unlike anything being published in superhero comics. A triumphant return to true X-men storytelling. Jonathan Hickman returns to Marvel to bring the X-men back to prominence with a tale that without a doubt changes how fans will see the mighty mutants of the Marvel Universe going forward. It is a bit unfair to judge this book without stating that everything that happens in this volume works in unison with its sister volume, Power of X. Hickman spares no time by jumping us right into the action. I mean the first issue is filled with pod people, mind control and strange mutant languages. But Hickman does a great job of simplifying the world and showing the reader what the world for mutants going to be like going forward. There are some incredible reveals in the mystery Hickman is building with the X-men. Issue#2 probably had one of the greatest surprises X-men fans have ever seen in the history of the book. Hickman has certainly placed himself with this series alone among one of the great X-men writers besides my two favorite X-men scribes Joss Wheedon & Grant Morrison. I will point out that fans who are not use to reading a Hickman book may have to realize that he writes a long narrative that builds towards something that only scratches the surface before an incredible climatic ending. Just read his Avengers run it starts with Avengers, Volume 1: Avengers World and ends with Secret Wars. I also really enjoyed his Fantastic Four series which starts with Fantastic Four, Volume 1 and ends with Fantastic Four, Volume 6. The artwork in this series was outstanding and the color palette was astounding as well. I especially loved the art in issue#3. Some of favorite moments in the book include Cyclops interaction with the Fantastic Four and the dialogue between Wolverine and Nightcrawler. This is definitely a series that should not be spoiled. I am really happy about where Hickman is taking this series. It is so layered and warrants a reread.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Wow...frigging hell, that was a good read.If I were to refer a science fiction fan to a superhero or Marvel comic -- I'd refer them to House of X and Powers of X, which are basically, Chapter 1, then Chapter 2 in a series. Also you don't need to know the back story -- it works on its own as an interesting speculative science fiction series. Incorporating various elements from writers such as Octavia Butler, Maria Doria Russell, Philip K. Dick, Doris Lessing, CJ Cherryth, Ursula Le Qu Wow...frigging hell, that was a good read.If I were to refer a science fiction fan to a superhero or Marvel comic -- I'd refer them to House of X and Powers of X, which are basically, Chapter 1, then Chapter 2 in a series. Also you don't need to know the back story -- it works on its own as an interesting speculative science fiction series. Incorporating various elements from writers such as Octavia Butler, Maria Doria Russell, Philip K. Dick, Doris Lessing, CJ Cherryth, Ursula Le Quinn, Alfred Bester, Robert K. Heinlein, Issac Asimov...It also manages to take the graphic novel or comic book format to a new level, reminding me a little of what Alan Moore did with Watchmen, or Frank Miller with Dark Knight in the 1980s. Granted, I shouldn't get two excited this is just chapter 2. But, I'm rather impressed with the intertwining of world-building, science, story, and character -- it's suspenseful, tightly plotted, not boring, yet packed with a lot of "hard" science fiction content. Some of it we may have seen before elsewhere in places such as Ron Moore's BattleStar Galatica and Caprica, or even Age of Apocalypse. Although I'd say it is far better written than Age of Apocalypse was and a little less soapy.Hickman has pulled the X-men out of the soap opera superhero quagmire that it been mucking about in for so long now. And come up with an interesting scope and world that is reminiscent of Claremount's epic "Days of Future Past", later turned into one of the better X movies. Although I'd say this is slightly better done, and far less didactic. What I like about Hickman is he pulls back from the moralizing and sermonizing that so many of the writers fall prey to, and shows instead of tells. Mr. Sinister is depicted in a fascinating manner -- and at a distance. We don't get the cheesy moustach twirling unkillable super-villain, but an amoral and somewhat opportunist geneticist who pushes the barriers to the point of almost destroying his own species, and in an effort to defect to the winning side -- outsmarts himself and is finally killed. This is all told in the fine print, yet is gripping and quite satisfying, in how smartly it is rendered. I found it amusingly ironic, and far better told in summary. And this is just one example. Too often a writer feels the need to tell the reader everything, leaving little to the imagination, but as any true genre fan knows -- it's so much more fun when they don't do this. When they trust their readership -- and Hickman not only trusts his readers, he expects them to be smart.Hickman is aided in this endeavor by the incredibly talented R.B Silva (artist and inker) and Marte Gracta color artist. This is done by hand and well done. Art is important in a comic book -- particularly consistent art. If done poorly it will pull you out of the story, if done well you will fall into it as if it were a movie playing out in your mind. I can't emphasize enough how important the role of the artist is here -- and it has to be an artist that works well with the writer. Silva, much like Pepe before him (on House of X), truly does. Not only that but Silva and Pepe's styles compliment each other so that the books flow seamlessly.This has got to be one of the best comics I've read in a very long time. I can't wait for the next issue. And Cyclops, my fav, didn't appear once, and I didn't miss him -- I was so enthralled with the story and new characters. Bravo.
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  • Jon Auerbach
    January 1, 1970
    My previous exposure to the X-Men were the 90's animated series and the various movies. I've never been a regular comic reader, and my previous foray into Hickman's Marvel work ended in frustration with the number of cross-overs and seemingly meaningless storylines. But with House of X and Powers of X, Hickman has solved both the problems with the unique structure of these intertwined series. The 6 issues in each series alternate weekly (or semi-weekly) and the story is entirely self-contained i My previous exposure to the X-Men were the 90's animated series and the various movies. I've never been a regular comic reader, and my previous foray into Hickman's Marvel work ended in frustration with the number of cross-overs and seemingly meaningless storylines. But with House of X and Powers of X, Hickman has solved both the problems with the unique structure of these intertwined series. The 6 issues in each series alternate weekly (or semi-weekly) and the story is entirely self-contained in the 12 issues, meaning you don't have to hunt for some random issue in some other series to understand what happened previously. As for the story itself, I won't say much more than it really brings a fresh lens to the mutant/human/machine conflict. Having watched all of the MCU movies to date and being a bit underwhelmed with how that conflict was portrayed in the previous X-Men movies, I was struck by how different it felt in these series, and am really excited to see how the X-Men and mutants are finally introduced into the MCU. I'm also excited to dive into the six Dawn of X series that will start in the coming weeks.
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  • TJ
    January 1, 1970
    Damn. What a story! The writing and art are both just incredible. It’s a bit all over the place, but I’m sure it reads better when read all at once. I’m sure this’ll be remembered as one of the biggest, best X-Men stories of all time. A great hoping on point for new readers, and a challenging yet interesting change for longtime fans. The hype surrounding this was well deserved. I can’t wait to see where the X-Men go following this new direction. 5/5 stars
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  • Anthony
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This'll deserve a more in-depth review when I read it collected, but even reading it each week it was fantastic! Hickman takes not just the X-men but the idea of Marvel characters themselves in a bold direction here and it's brilliant. The artworks amazing. The story hooks you to keep coming back week after week. I can't wait for his new X-men books to start!
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  • Adam Fisher
    January 1, 1970
    Jonathan Hickman is a miracle worker. Every time he puts his hands on Marvel property, the status quo changes. This is no exception. I not only read these in single issue on their release date, but also purchased all the single issues. For someone like me who thrives in the graphic novel world, I usually am never a single issue buyer. THIS STORY WAS THAT IMPORTANT TO ME.I'll leave a much more detailed review when I reread this story again soon, partially to not leave any spoilers (though I Jonathan Hickman is a miracle worker. Every time he puts his hands on Marvel property, the status quo changes. This is no exception. I not only read these in single issue on their release date, but also purchased all the single issues. For someone like me who thrives in the graphic novel world, I usually am never a single issue buyer. THIS STORY WAS THAT IMPORTANT TO ME.I'll leave a much more detailed review when I reread this story again soon, partially to not leave any spoilers (though I already have in my periodic updates), but also because if you are reading this review and haven't read this comic, STOP reading this and go read that NOW.House of X / Powers of X is one of the most important events in all of X-Men history. It changes the future for all mutants in the Marvel Universe and shines a light on their history at the same time. Highest recommend. Joins the pantheon of great comic stories for me.
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  • Ed Barredo
    January 1, 1970
    Hickman is giving us everything that's been missing from the X-Men for the last two decades.
  • Scratch
    January 1, 1970
    This is a strange, surreal story.The writing impressively brings together some of the X-Men's best hits. Elements of the X-Men mythology over the course of decades. Phalanx, Krakoa, the fact Mr. Sinister likes to experiment on mutants? All used. It tries to recognize some of the big events, like Genosha's destruction; or how Scarlet Witch wiped out mutants, reducing them to just a population of 198. But it does all this... Poorly. Without regard for actual continuity. Like how it had This is a strange, surreal story.The writing impressively brings together some of the X-Men's best hits. Elements of the X-Men mythology over the course of decades. Phalanx, Krakoa, the fact Mr. Sinister likes to experiment on mutants? All used. It tries to recognize some of the big events, like Genosha's destruction; or how Scarlet Witch wiped out mutants, reducing them to just a population of 198. But it does all this... Poorly. Without regard for actual continuity. Like how it had been established (years ago) that while there were maybe only 198 known registered mutants after Wanda's "No More Mutants," the actual total was closer to 300. Continuity is definitely the biggest problem here.CBR and other comic news sites keep giving announcements about the events of these comics. But the conceit of this "reboot" of X-Men is that a main character has reincarnated multiple times, reliving her life in such a way she lives through divergent realities.... So I have no idea whether the primary events in this miniseries are even in our reality.We briefly see Scott interact with the Fantastic Four. And their conversation seems to indicate that these are indeed the 616 Fantastic Four that we're used to. Probably. But does that mean that the X-Men we see in House of X are going to be the same version of the X-Men who interact with the Avengers, Spider-man, the Fantastic Four, etc. in the wider Marvel universe? IS THIS 616 OR NOT!?We definitely seem to be watching other versions of Scott and Jean, who are dressed differently and acting aloof. At least compared to their long-awaited, triumphant reunion (and kiss) in Uncanny X-Men just a few months ago. Are they clones? Alternate reality versions? Mind controlled? I don't know. Will the surviving X-Men from the conclusion of Uncanny X-Men show up and fight Xavier, Magneto, and Apocalypse for creating this mutant nation with a bunch of clones of themselves and their dead friends? You have to remember that there were a LOT of deaths. ... And some of the people who died during the most recent run of Uncanny X-Men are here, alive and well, during House of X-- without explanation. Like Illyana. There is an explanation provided in this story about how a mutant COULD be brought back from death, but not whether that is specifically what happened with OUR X-Men. The writers have not made it clear that the Illyana we see in this story is the same Illyana who died in Uncanny X-Men a few months ago. It is currently ambiguous. Did she go through the egg cloning method after she was killed a few months ago, or is this just a different reality and she was never the version of Illyana who died a few months ago in the first place?It is unsatisfying to watch some of my favorite people act in unfamiliar, uncharacteristic ways. I don't feel safe. I don't know if these characters are my friends, or if they will even be okay.It's like the writers read a summary of the biggest *events* in X-Men comics, but didn't actually live through those years as a fan. Sure, we all know Nathaniel Essex (Sinister) started out as a human doctor in Victorian England. Here, it is revealed where Mr. Sinister obtained his X-gene, and it's a low-key revelation to the reader. The X-gene came from Thunderbird, according to House of X. But... That's wrong. X-Men fans who lived through the 90s know that there is an obscure mutant character known as "Courier" who was a shapeshifter. He/she was sort of an early version of a transwoman, because the character was born a man but forced into a woman's body as a default shape. (Yet another reason to be unsure about pronouns; this person did not CHOOSE to permanently transition into a female body.) We already know that Sinister applied Courier's X-gene to himself, and that's why Sinister has had some degree of shapeshifting for decades. So, is the reason HoX is claiming Sinister got his X-gene from Thunderbird because this is an alternate reality? Or is Marvel just trying to retcon the existence of Courier? And how should the LGBT community feel about such a decision to nullify the existence of a transwoman?And Sinister isn't goofy. Or foppish. Or effeminate and dramatic. This is all just... Wrong.The description of Proteus here suggests the writer thinks he is a combination of Xavier and Moira's DNA. And for some reason Proteus is given a neverending supply of Xavier clone bodies to inhabit. Does this mean the writers think Xavier is his dad? A guy in college told me that was the case in the Ultimate comics. (I refused to read those.) Could the writers possibly be that confused? The original Proteus story was all about his search for Joseph MacTaggert-- his father. So... Either the writers are deeply confused, or we are in some kind of alternate reality?Monet is the most true to herself with the few lines she is allotted. Her personality is as it should be. But she claims her codename is Penance? And she displays powers she isn't supposed to have. Do the writers think they can just make random changes to X-Men history and we won't notice or question it? Otherwise, this is just an alternate reality and none of it matters.
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  • Josh Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Read this issue to issue. Absolutely incredible. Hickman good.
  • Christian Zamora-Dahmen
    January 1, 1970
    I read both House of X and Powers of X in single issues. Today was published the last episode and, boy, was my mind blown away--These series are a definite game changer for the X-Men, as they move from the generic feared-and-hated-heroes, into their next logical step. It's a natural evolution, just as when any discriminated community reaches a point where the "dream" is not enough, and action needs to be taken. For how long they were going to get hunted and killed, while responding with a I read both House of X and Powers of X in single issues. Today was published the last episode and, boy, was my mind blown away--These series are a definite game changer for the X-Men, as they move from the generic feared-and-hated-heroes, into their next logical step. It's a natural evolution, just as when any discriminated community reaches a point where the "dream" is not enough, and action needs to be taken. For how long they were going to get hunted and killed, while responding with a sympathetic smile? They've had it and I'm so happy for it.Socially speaking, Hickman's take on the X-Men makes so much sense. Empowered communities just stop begging for love and support, and fight for their right to exist. This is what these new X-Men are about and I will give it a stand up ovation.
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  • AprilMarie
    January 1, 1970
    This series (along with Powers of X) is the single greatest Marvel story I have ever read.
  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    After telling sprawling, epic tales of the Fantastic Four and the Avengers several years back, Jonathan Hickman's take on the X-Men (an intellectual property for which he has proclaimed his long lasting love) was hotly anticipated. And let me tell you, it did NOT disappoint. Hickman breathes new life into Marvel's mutants, who sadly had been swept under the rug in recent years--but thanks to Marvel getting the film rights to the characters back in their hands, it seems that they are ready to shi After telling sprawling, epic tales of the Fantastic Four and the Avengers several years back, Jonathan Hickman's take on the X-Men (an intellectual property for which he has proclaimed his long lasting love) was hotly anticipated. And let me tell you, it did NOT disappoint. Hickman breathes new life into Marvel's mutants, who sadly had been swept under the rug in recent years--but thanks to Marvel getting the film rights to the characters back in their hands, it seems that they are ready to shine a bright spotlight back onto the X-corner of the Marvel Universe. And they are off to a damn good start. Hickman tells an intricate tale across two books whose narratives weave around each other, and half of the fun reading this week to week was speculating what was going to come next, or how seemingly disparate aspects of the story were going to end up tying together. Hickman is a meticulous planner, so that kind of analysis is never wasted. Now that the entire story is out, I look forward to reading it all together and digesting it all in one sitting, rather than a chapter at a time. Hickman is the kind of writer that demands and rewards careful reading, so being able to read through the whole story together will certainly illuminate details that were overlooked on my first reading. The entire premise of the story involves a major retcon to a long-standing supporting X-Men character--it's done in a really inventive, exciting way that not only makes perfect sense, but changes EVERYTHING. From there Hickman sets up a scenario in which mutants are clearly intended to become major players in the Marvel Universe again. The story jumps back and forth through different timelines in such a way that it's fairly confusing at first, but as the information is slowly portioned out, the picture starts to become clear. There are plenty of surprises right up to the end, however. There was one major revelation in the last issue that referred back to an earlier mystery I'd completely forgotten about, so when this thing finally came back I literally had a Keanu Reeves "whoa" moment. Infographics are interspersed throughout the story (readers of Hickman should be no stranger to these) that enhance the information we get in the narrative and add more depth of knowledge to what we get through the narrative itself. I personally think it's a great device for adding supplemental lore without feeding it to the reader through clunky dialog. It's also really exciting when a piece of infographic data that was previously redacted suddenly becomes revealed later in the story. Oh, and the art! The art by Pepe Larraz and R.B. Silva is consistently stunning to look at. I could get lost in some of those panels for quite a while. They do redesigns of a lot of the costumes which are a lot of fun, and two of the new characters in the future portion of the story are so well designed that I really hope we see more of them outside this book. This book absolutely lives up to every bit of hype. My only complaint was that I wish it had been longer. The X-books have quite a lot to live up to with this very solid foundation that Hickman has built. I know that sooner or later one of them will inevitably fumble the ball, especially after Hickman departs from overseeing these books to move on to other things. But man, I haven't been so excited or optimistic about the X-Men since I first started reading them in the 1990s.
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  • Adam Williams
    January 1, 1970
    Obviously I read this in individual issues, since the collection hasn't been released. But damn if this isn't one of the greatest X-Men stories I've ever read.Hickman clearly knows and loves these characters, Larraz and Silva's artwork is really beautiful, and colorist Marte Gracia unites the two series seamlessly with a stunning palette. Hickman's X-Men reinvention is ambitious and compelling, closing out just enough of the story to feel complete while leaving countless plot threads Obviously I read this in individual issues, since the collection hasn't been released. But damn if this isn't one of the greatest X-Men stories I've ever read.Hickman clearly knows and loves these characters, Larraz and Silva's artwork is really beautiful, and colorist Marte Gracia unites the two series seamlessly with a stunning palette. Hickman's X-Men reinvention is ambitious and compelling, closing out just enough of the story to feel complete while leaving countless plot threads open for future stories, and I could probably nitpick about two or three things if I really wanted to, but why bother with something this good?My brain has functionally already categorized the three definitive X-Men eras as Chris Claremont's Uncanny #94–280, Grant Morrison's New X-Men, and Jonathan Hickman's Dawn of X. After this launch, I can't wait to see Hickman's X-Men play out.
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  • Carlex
    January 1, 1970
    House of X/Powers of XExcelsior! (four and half stars)I like Marvel comics and I have read a lot of them when I was a young fanboy (in times when Galactus attended kindergarten), but today I can consider myself a inexpert of superhero comics, with a little more than a superficial knowledge. Although I have read a lot of X-Men stories ( (they are one of my preferred comic series), it is a pleasure to discover that with the same characters created by Stan Lee over 50 years House of X/Powers of XExcelsior! (four and half stars)I like Marvel comics and I have read a lot of them when I was a young fanboy (in times when Galactus attended kindergarten), but today I can consider myself a inexpert of superhero comics, with a little more than a superficial knowledge. Although I have read a lot of X-Men stories ( (they are one of my preferred comic series), it is a pleasure to discover that with the same characters created by Stan Lee over 50 years ago, there is someone capable of offering an original point of view, a new iteration taking into account all the (impossible) past of these eternally young superheroes. So this a sort of reboot very well-thought-out.The responsible in this case is Jonathan Hickman, apparently the author of the moment (and deservedly so), at least in Marvel comics. I must point that I have also enjoyed the captivating drawings of Pepe Larraz.
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  • Robert Kirwan
    January 1, 1970
    House of X finished last week with the individual issues and it was FANTASTIC!!! I really love Hickman's work in re-vitalising the series. He took old tropes and completely flipped them on their heads. Fantastic run, fantastic art
  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic and instantly massive X-Men comic from Jonathan Hickman. Reading the first issue of House of X is like being shot out of a cannon. This is the most interesting X-Men book I've read in years. Oh and it's easy on the eyes too. Must read for X fans.
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  • Jose R Araiza
    January 1, 1970
    a very intelligent soft reboot of the X-men status quo. A great point to jump back into the X-Universe if you, like me, had grown bored of the same-old un-impactful stories of the last 10 years
  • AJ Luna
    January 1, 1970
    I don't have enough time to write down all of my thoughts about House of X. I just don't. That's because this book is one of the strangest things I've ever seen, in more ways than one!I also feel like it was in some ways specifically made for someone like me. That is, a life-long lover of the X-Men, a longtime fan of Hickman (Secret Warriors, East of West, his Fantastic Four run, and his Avengers/Secret Wars run are among my favorite comic stories of all time), as a lover of deep, ch I don't have enough time to write down all of my thoughts about House of X. I just don't. That's because this book is one of the strangest things I've ever seen, in more ways than one!I also feel like it was in some ways specifically made for someone like me. That is, a life-long lover of the X-Men, a longtime fan of Hickman (Secret Warriors, East of West, his Fantastic Four run, and his Avengers/Secret Wars run are among my favorite comic stories of all time), as a lover of deep, character-driven stories, Big Idea sci-fi, and comic stories that use continuity not as an obligation or burden to be borne but rather an opportunity to enrich.The story is a knockout, obviously. It's revolutionary, I'd say more so than Morrison's run, already. The only X stories that rank above it in sheer importance and landmark, status-quo shifting status in these comics are probably #1, Deadly Genesis, and the Dark Phoenix Saga. I have never in my life seen so many people talking about X-Men comics, from so many walks of life, and with such an excitement. People are texting me to ask about the story, either to ask if they should jump in or if we can talk about it. It's an amazing time! I know this sounds all very hyperbolic, especially since the story just started with this volume, but that really is how things feel right now. I can only hope that down the line it only feels moreso!But, quickly, to the specifics of the story. I genuinely think it's brilliant. On the HOX side of things, I think it's especially strong. (POX is amazing as well, obviously, but I do think that the far future stuff, so dense and alien and heady, is the hardest to swallow--the most "Hickman-ass B.S." as we affectionately call it in my house.) The Moira reveal is something so maddeningly simple, yet somehow so complex and fascinating that I'm genuinely boggled that it hasn't been done before. Putting her at the center of this thing, flanked by a Charles and Eric that she somewhat molded yet also who may rebel in their frustrating ways, is a masterstroke. Her issue, HOX #2, should probably win awards. I read it twice in a row and thought about it so much in the week until the next issue, and beyond.Her conversation with Xavier in the park has quickly become iconic as well. The dreamy strangeness of it all is so unlike what you normally find in superhero books--haunting and creepy and intricate, like the book itself. The Orchis antagonists are Very Hickman, an extension of the stuff he did in Secret Warriors and Avengers with the various agencies intertwining. This feels like a logical endpoint for those alphabet soup groups, to stop trying to fight one another and to band together into a morally questionable fight against what they see as an extant threat to humanity. The sabotage strike mission in issues four and five are out of this world. Tense, beautiful, horrifying, utterly heartbreaking and expertly crafted.The resurrection engine with the five is not only game-changing in a very real way that challenges and vivifies so much of the medium and the genre. It's a massive fix to so many problems but in such a clever way that raises so many story opportunities as well. Also! I was so happy to see Hope, Eva Bell, Goldballs & Elixrr! I love the 2000s & 2010s for X-books (pre-Lemire, Death of X, etc) and I was so happy to see some of my faves from that era represented and made so important.All of the nation building and international intrigue was also Extremely My Shit, in a way that I can't believe is also in this story alongside all of the superhero and sci-fi madness!The villains. How exciting is it to have all of these villains alongside everyone else?? Just like everything else here, the opportunities for story are so, so rich. Such deep veins to mine. So much can go wrong! It's great!Last thing I'll mention may seem silly, but it's a real thought--X books have always been a place for queer people and people who feel a bit outside the norms, and I feel like the emphasis on sex in this story "the already iconic 'Make More Mutants'" and the implications of polyamory and the like is a pretty exciting thing for folks who care about that kind of thing. (Of which I am one.) I hope they lean into the queer stuff going forward, as I could've done with more of that.So yeah, I think it's a terrific book. There's a few things I'd maybe tweak--I'd like more from certain characters who took a back seat or seem changed, a couple other things, but I'll wait to see how the ongoing series go until I get into them too deep, as they could address that. Suffice it to say that sometimes Hickman can be so obtuse or circular or maybe a little bit cold/distant that it can bounce people off. I was surprised, however, at the amount of warmth here! I want to hand this book to so many people, because it seems to be such a jumping on point for folks, but to me it seems so steeped in X-Men lore! Like, characters appear on page and there is zero context for who they are or what they do or what they're about. They say the name Doug Ramsey & X-book people are like "oh interesting" but wouldn't new readers be like "...okay?" Same with an ominous shot of Apocalypse. So much else. It's hard sometimes, when you're as neck deep in a life of comic book bullshit, such as I am, to see how something would look to fresh eyes. But obviously it seems to be working! And I really, really couldn't be happier. I can't wait to see where it goes. I have so many theories and hopes. It's so exciting to be so excited!
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  • John Wiswell
    January 1, 1970
    House of X/Powers of X is the ambitious start of something fresh for mutants. Thanks to time travel, we learn three harsh truths:-Xavier's dream of humans and mutants coexisting always ends in extinction.-Magneto's dream of mutant domination always ends in extinction.-No matter what we do, Sentinels will come into existence.The twin stories of House of X/Powers of X are a response to this, because knowing the old ideologies won't work means needing to radically chan House of X/Powers of X is the ambitious start of something fresh for mutants. Thanks to time travel, we learn three harsh truths:-Xavier's dream of humans and mutants coexisting always ends in extinction.-Magneto's dream of mutant domination always ends in extinction.-No matter what we do, Sentinels will come into existence.The twin stories of House of X/Powers of X are a response to this, because knowing the old ideologies won't work means needing to radically change what they've been working towards. Xavier, Magneto, and an enormous cast of old favorites band together to create a country for mutants. It won't be isolationist; they create products that only mutants could concoct, and they want to trade with the rest of the world. They'll be separate and self-governing, but also part of the world stage, with economic and religious partners. Like any country, they'll also have their dark secrets.We know from the start that this is going to be complicated. One of the first scenes is Mystique, Toad, and Sabretooth trying to steal something from the Fantastic Four, and Cyclops offering them cover. But another scene is optimistic, with Xavier assuring the oft-resurrected Jean Grey that once in this nation she is finally home and safe. This is going to be wild.This rewrite is a colossal endeavor that incorporates as much X-Men lore as possible. Krakoa, the living island that once swallowed an X-Men team, is growing and will become the continent upon which the mutant country exists. Mr. Sinister, Beast, and Forge are brought in on a method to facilitate mutant growth and save lives. The Hellfire Club is approached to become part of the economic wing of the country. And the government of Krakoa will have twelve seats, requiring wisdom from characters from across the X-Men's history, only beginning with Xavier, Magneto, and White Queen.You'll have your beefs. Many important characters get little time on the page, and there are retcons. I detest that this new Xavier isn't disabled anymore, and loses that rare marginalized identity just as soon as he's ascended to being important in the Marvel Universe after so long.While it includes massive retcons, it does as much faithful work to the history as possible. The genocide of Genosha happened. The battles between Xavier and Magneto happened - and they have to overcome their bitterness now to build a viable future. Apocalypse is out there, and as he's watched much of the world's progress, he's had fingers in this since before we knew. Ultimately, House of X/Powers of X isn't a big crossover story. It is a long establishment of a new status quo that needs its length to show how much depth it's going to cover. This is a book from which all the other X-Men stories can flow out from. All mutants can now share a home, and we'll have stories about Wolverine and Omega Red having to share it, and some mutants needing to be rescued from their host countries, and Namor the mutant king of Atlantis struggling with which place he belongs.
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  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    Reading these two series in ongoing, on a weekly basis was a really cool experience. That's typically my main problem with reading single issues or ongoing series. One month gap between single issues and 6 months gap between volumes is just too long. I tend to forget what was the storyline and it's get harder to get back on board. Here it was managed beautifully, like a TV show. And I was eagerly waiting for a new episode each week.The review:* The world-building here is amazin Reading these two series in ongoing, on a weekly basis was a really cool experience. That's typically my main problem with reading single issues or ongoing series. One month gap between single issues and 6 months gap between volumes is just too long. I tend to forget what was the storyline and it's get harder to get back on board. Here it was managed beautifully, like a TV show. And I was eagerly waiting for a new episode each week.The review:* The world-building here is amazing. In general, that's Hickman's strength. And in this book, supported by X-Men lore over the last few decades - it shines from the fist page. Also, it's less boring than the first volume of East of West, because a lot of stuff Hickman can just show to get the response w/o over-explaining the world and the characters from scratch.* The story is ok. The main problem with Hickman's storytelling - it can get cold and mathematical, because it's a world-building detached from characters. Here it's not as visible. Hickman uses cool cliffhangers and scenes (drawn beautifully by Silva and Larraz). So the story moves. Not in every issue (e.g. some middle issues are boring, and the final PoX6 seems as a weaker ending compared to HoX6). Still, it works.* The ending is meh. It's not a self-condensed story. It's a primer for further series. And that's my main critique of Hickman's style. He's just not good with endings. He needs to learn a little bit from Brian K. Vaughn.* The themes, the sci-fi elements, the infographics and the art are amazing. Production values are superb here.* Hickman knows X-Men lore really well and uses it wisely. Also, he's a master of a great retcon.
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  • Simon M.
    January 1, 1970
    Hickman does a stellar job of rebooting a franchise... not so much at telling a great story. Now. I get it. This is just the setup. Fans are loving it, and if you know a lot about the X-men, you will appreciate the effort he put in redeveloping concepts from the comics... but, in doing so, no character is the protagonist. No character goes through anything in this double series. Every important development (with the exception of Moira) happens in the outskirts of the narrative. Hickman plays fas Hickman does a stellar job of rebooting a franchise... not so much at telling a great story. Now. I get it. This is just the setup. Fans are loving it, and if you know a lot about the X-men, you will appreciate the effort he put in redeveloping concepts from the comics... but, in doing so, no character is the protagonist. No character goes through anything in this double series. Every important development (with the exception of Moira) happens in the outskirts of the narrative. Hickman plays fast and loose moving from one setting to the next, and while it certainly adds re-read value, you're still left with a story where characters come in and out without any momentum or organic development, thus creating stilted speeches to catch up and give some depth to the story. I don't know. I feel like the whole thing being told here should've been the story. Instead, this is just the setup for something else, but it's such a massive thing that it reads like he hypercompressed huge moments into nothing, like a bullet-point summary of a 100 issue story. It's great to read all the paratextual stuff, all the redevelopment of things, but it doesn't make up for some very awkard pacing (some issues were full of plot points, then others lost pages and pages in relatively small aspects of the story). Anyway. It's still the most interesting thing that has happened to the mutants since Morrison, quite possibly (I haven't read everything in between, but... yeah).
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  • Alan
    January 1, 1970
    You know I think, I might be wrong, the last time I began and completed an X-Men arc, of any title, was Joss Whedon's run (where I did have an issue with a big factor of its ending).Who the writer is what brought me to this arc. I liked Hickman's Fantastic Four work where he made some of the run the science/adventure title that it kind of began as (part of Kirby's influence at the start was the work he had done with Wally Wood on Challengers of the Unknown-end of digression). Hickman You know I think, I might be wrong, the last time I began and completed an X-Men arc, of any title, was Joss Whedon's run (where I did have an issue with a big factor of its ending).Who the writer is what brought me to this arc. I liked Hickman's Fantastic Four work where he made some of the run the science/adventure title that it kind of began as (part of Kirby's influence at the start was the work he had done with Wally Wood on Challengers of the Unknown-end of digression). Hickman brings science fiction elements to this tale, a constant in Hickman's Image and Marvel work.No real spoilers, but this arguably the biggest shakeup of the status quo since Grant Morrison's run, and Hickman makes that part of his tale. Whereas mutants are the next stage of human evolution, per Morrison, Hickman adds some factors to make that more of a question instead of a fact. In addition, Hickman does a good job of setting up what Mutant society could look like (and it's better than Geonsha ever was). And, he's willing to take a chance that by the time this all works out there might be a happy ending.For anyone (how GoT).Disclaimer-read as digital floppies.
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  • Ani
    January 1, 1970
    I’m a long-time X-Men fan, and I have a lot of conflicted feelings about this book. There are ways in which it’s amazing and ways in which it’s infuriating.The artwork is great, and the dialogue flows naturally between the characters. The story feels like a big important step forward for mutants and the X-Men stories after several years in which the main flagship books weren’t that great. The suspenseful plot made me want to read more.And yet...having grow up liking the m I’m a long-time X-Men fan, and I have a lot of conflicted feelings about this book. There are ways in which it’s amazing and ways in which it’s infuriating.The artwork is great, and the dialogue flows naturally between the characters. The story feels like a big important step forward for mutants and the X-Men stories after several years in which the main flagship books weren’t that great. The suspenseful plot made me want to read more.And yet...having grow up liking the mutant metaphor, I’m yet again disappointed by the decisions made in this book. The plot focuses on the plans of a few characters with little to no character development for other mutants affected by the decision to make Krakoa the mutant nation. There’s little diversity in the main cast. And to top it all off, the book resurrects lots of mutants — including horrible villains — while coming up with a plot reason why a particular queer character has to stay dead. In addition, the future plotline feels pointless, and I say that as someone who loves extra world building.
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  • Afreen Aftab
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing reboot I am completely flabbergasted! This has totally convinced me to continue this Xmen series which hasn't happened many times before.Jonathan Hickman has totally reinvented the mutantdom whilst still managing to maintain the essence of them. So many storylines and retcons and yet theres a feeling of familiar nostalgia for classic X men throughout the series. Is it complicated and a little difficult to follow for new x men fans? yeah..kinda. I had to look up explan What an amazing reboot I am completely flabbergasted! This has totally convinced me to continue this Xmen series which hasn't happened many times before.Jonathan Hickman has totally reinvented the mutantdom whilst still managing to maintain the essence of them. So many storylines and retcons and yet theres a feeling of familiar nostalgia for classic X men throughout the series. Is it complicated and a little difficult to follow for new x men fans? yeah..kinda. I had to look up explanations for some stuff even though ive been reading xmen comics all my life (I would suggest looking up this website if you feel a little lost reading the series). But its definitely worth it!
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