The List of Things That Will Not Change
After her parents' divorce, Bea's life became different in many ways. But she can always look back at the list she keeps in her green notebook to remember the things that will stay the same. The first and most important: Mom and Dad will always love Bea, and each other.When Dad tells Bea that he and his boyfriend, Jesse, are getting married, Bea is thrilled. Bea loves Jesse, and when he and Dad get married, she'll finally (finally!) have what she's always wanted--a sister. Even though she's never met Jesse's daughter, Sonia, Bea is sure that they'll be "just like sisters anywhere."As the wedding day approaches, Bea will learn that making a new family brings questions, surprises, and joy.

The List of Things That Will Not Change Details

TitleThe List of Things That Will Not Change
Author
ReleaseApr 7th, 2020
PublisherWendy Lamb Books
ISBN-139781101938096
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Contemporary, Fiction, LGBT, Family

The List of Things That Will Not Change Review

  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Things That Will Not Change:1. Rebecca Stead writes pitch-perfect middle grade.2. She really GETS how kids think and act, especially around guilt and anxiety.3. She writes vivid characters who jump off the page.4. She writes warm, loving families of all kinds.5. THE LIST OF THINGS THAT WILL NOT CHANGE is a book you won't want to put down, even after you've finished.
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  • Trin
    January 1, 1970
    Wholesome, heartfelt, adorable -- but also incredibly real, never sugar-coated. Stead is a master of POV. I flew through this, got choked up, had all the feelings. A delight.
  • Monica Edinger
    January 1, 1970
    Wowee. This is one of the most piercing character-focused middle-grade books I've ever read. Stead reaches deep into protagonist Bea's very soul here as she copes with various elements in her life. Beautiful and spare as to expect from Stead.
  • DaNae
    January 1, 1970
    Subtle and powerful. I wish I'd had this to read as a child.
  • Patrick
    January 1, 1970
    Absolute perfection. So happy I got to read an advanced copy. So sad other readers will have to wait so long to read. Bea will be in my heart for a long long time.
  • Amy B.
    January 1, 1970
    The thing about Rebecca Stead's books is that they seem so simple, but of course, they're not. The prose is straight-forward and the stories, although they may have those epic twists, are also so cozy and every-day. I was fortunate to receive an arc of this book and felt the familiar warmth that seems to come with every Rebecca Stead book - I will add this one to my elementary school collection when it comes out.
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  • Kristen Unger
    January 1, 1970
    I’d love to place this in the hands of every anxious kid out there. Stead has not forgotten all the paralyzing parts of growing up and her readers all benefit from the way she writes from a place of compassion for our younger, often muddled selves.
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  • Bel
    January 1, 1970
    I *loved* this mid grade book. The characters feel so real that you could almost touch them. I was truly sorry when the book was over.
  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    Got the ARC. A good read.
  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful read from one of the best in middle grade. Stead gives us fully fleshed characters that are beautiful and flawed and real. I appreciate her giving readers access to feelings of guilt, anger, forgiveness, and most of all, love. I am also thankful that she didn’t shy away from family confrontation that is uncomfortable and unfinished. We take people where they are, we lose people we love, we are disappointed in those we care about, but we continue to live and to love.
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  • Laura Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Wendy Lamb Books and NetGalley for providing an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. The book will be published on April 7th, 2020.10-year old Bea has largely adjusted to the big changes in her life — 2 years before her parents divorced so that her father could be the gay man he had always known himself to be. Bea alternated living with each parent day by day and weekend by weekend. Now her father and his boyfriend Jesse are getting married and Bea might be Thank you to Wendy Lamb Books and NetGalley for providing an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. The book will be published on April 7th, 2020.10-year old Bea has largely adjusted to the big changes in her life — 2 years before her parents divorced so that her father could be the gay man he had always known himself to be. Bea alternated living with each parent day by day and weekend by weekend. Now her father and his boyfriend Jesse are getting married and Bea might be getting a sister — something she has always wanted.While not as creative as some of Stead’s earlier books, this is a well-done dive into the experiences of a young girl struggling to understand the massive changes in her life. The book serves as an excellent template for how to handle a divorce. The eponymous “List of Things That Will Not Change” is for Bea when she finds out about the divorce — my favorite: “We are still a family, but in a different way.” And indeed, that is how they behave. Bea also sees a therapist — Miriam — and the advice she recollects at various points is clear and useful. I’m not a big fan of therapy, but I found this summary of the process and techniques for Bea to be excellent. This would be a useful book for both the target 8-12 year olds and their parents. If I had one small complaint about the book, it is that the focus is all on Bea and the new life of her gay father. Her mother doesn’t get to have much of a new life and although portrayed lovingly, doesn’t get a lot of air time.
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  • CEB Library
    January 1, 1970
    What I really love about this book is the protagonist's authentic voice. (Shout out to all you 6 + 1 Writing Traits educators!)The story arch truly follows the perspective of the main character, with no omniscient narrator and no manipulation through 'adult wisdom'. An adult reader may be able to see, and fear, the ramifications of her actions, but Bea can't, and it makes this book magical.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    "The List of Things That Will Not Change" by Rebecca Stead is a middle-grade novel about a girl whose dad is getting married -- to another man. While the depiction of Beatrice's new stepfather is overwhelmingly positive, the difficult transition "Bea" experiences splitting her time between two households (her mother's and her father's) is relatable and well done. While the subject matter (same-sex marriage) is a relatively new theme addressed in middle-grade fiction, the pacing and tone of the "The List of Things That Will Not Change" by Rebecca Stead is a middle-grade novel about a girl whose dad is getting married -- to another man. While the depiction of Beatrice's new stepfather is overwhelmingly positive, the difficult transition "Bea" experiences splitting her time between two households (her mother's and her father's) is relatable and well done. While the subject matter (same-sex marriage) is a relatively new theme addressed in middle-grade fiction, the pacing and tone of the story is gentle and pleasant, without too much drama or narrative twists. I thought the stepsister relationship might be more fraught with some secret character defect being revealed -- that her stepsister might be more troubled or rebellious-- but (spoiler alert), the stepsister just has a different way of handling this big family transition than Bea does. The scenes with Bea and her therapist, Miriam, are well done. Miriam is a likable, clever, and competent guide. As other reviewers have mentioned, this story might help normalize and destigmatize the idea of therapy for school-aged kids. Bea's acknowledgement of her problems with impulse control and how she manages it, while still remaining a likable narrator, is one of the story's special charms. Recommend.Note: I am grading this title a little harder than I might because the author is Rebecca Stead, the author of one of my favorite books, the Newbery Medal winner, "When You Reach Me." Because Stead has set the bar high, I expect outstanding work from her; this book is very good.Thank you to Wendy Lamb Books and NetGalley for providing an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. The book will be published on April 7th, 2020.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Bea is twelve, but this is the story of the year she was ten. Because that was the year she discovered a lot of truths, often with the help of her therapist, Miriam. There was a lot going on that year, what with her dad getting remarried, her cousin Angelica suffering from Bell's Palsy, and the anticipation of getting a new sister. It's no wonder Bea's worries were getting the better of her. What sets this book apart from the next realistic fiction story about a kid with anxiety is Rebecca Bea is twelve, but this is the story of the year she was ten. Because that was the year she discovered a lot of truths, often with the help of her therapist, Miriam. There was a lot going on that year, what with her dad getting remarried, her cousin Angelica suffering from Bell's Palsy, and the anticipation of getting a new sister. It's no wonder Bea's worries were getting the better of her. What sets this book apart from the next realistic fiction story about a kid with anxiety is Rebecca Stead's trademark plot twists mixed in with the themes of divorce, gay marriage, friendship, and forgiveness.☀️🌙🌽Despite some heavy topics, there is a lightheartedness to this book that reminds me a little of Ramona Quimby stories. I was relieved this wasn't a story with a missing, dead, or delinquent mother. Because let's face it, lots of kids struggle with their emotions, even when they have amazing parents like Bea's. And Stead does an excellent job of unpacking complex family dynamics, which everyone can relate to.♥️I'll be ordering this book for my school library, of course. I recommend this book for students in Grade 3+.Release date: April 2020
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  • Kathie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author and publisher for sending an ARC for #bookportage to review.What a wonderful story, and there are so many aspect of this book that I loved! Bea is such a delightful character, and at 10, she's still at a stage of innocence and hopefulness that don't see often enough in middle grade fiction. At 215 pages, this is a book appropriate for younger middle grade readers, but with enough substance and maturity that it will also appeal to older readers. I love that Bea has so many Thank you to the author and publisher for sending an ARC for #bookportage to review.What a wonderful story, and there are so many aspect of this book that I loved! Bea is such a delightful character, and at 10, she's still at a stage of innocence and hopefulness that don't see often enough in middle grade fiction. At 215 pages, this is a book appropriate for younger middle grade readers, but with enough substance and maturity that it will also appeal to older readers. I love that Bea has so many loving role models in her life, despite the fact that her parents are divorced and her dad is getting remarried (Bea's dad is gay, but her parents have both remained friends and support each other). Not everyone in this story is happy about the marriage, and although these issues are explored (both in terms of blended families and same sex marriage), it's done in a way that doesn't make the story feel too heavy, despite the large impact it has.I'd recommend this story for readers who liked Weekends with Max and His Dad by Linda Urban.THE LIST OF THINGS THAT WILL NOT CHANGE releases on April 7, 2020, and I will definitely be adding it to my library's collection.
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  • Lukas Holmes
    January 1, 1970
    Well this was just outstanding. I've never read any of Rebecca Stead's books, but after this one, I'll be sure to pick up the rest. Her ability to capture the voice of Bea is astonishing. Her descriptions of guilt and anger and fear feel to true you can't help but be taken back to your own childhood. A really positive portrayal of therapy which I always appreciate. But more than anything, the book is so layered. A story of family love that is changing and evolving seems to be the initial Well this was just outstanding. I've never read any of Rebecca Stead's books, but after this one, I'll be sure to pick up the rest. Her ability to capture the voice of Bea is astonishing. Her descriptions of guilt and anger and fear feel to true you can't help but be taken back to your own childhood. A really positive portrayal of therapy which I always appreciate. But more than anything, the book is so layered. A story of family love that is changing and evolving seems to be the initial concept, right? Oh, this is a story about a child coming to terms with a divorce and remarriage. But it's more than that. It's more than the story of the remarriage being a same sex one. It's more than Bea's feelings and longing for connection. It's about the truly complex nature of not only such a complex story and series of events she's going through, but of childhood itself. It's about accepting the feelings we have, the mistakes we've made, and the love we deserve. I cannot wait to share this one with my kids.
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  • Aaron
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the author, and publisher for this copy to read and review with the group Book Portage.What I really loved about this book is how deeply we feel along with Bea as she goes through many life changing events. Her parents divorce, her father is about to remarry a man, she makes mistakes that anger her friends or classmates, and she is mistreated by friends and family as well. The List of Things That Will Not Change is a list in the book that keeps Bea grounded. When life feels a little Thanks to the author, and publisher for this copy to read and review with the group Book Portage.What I really loved about this book is how deeply we feel along with Bea as she goes through many life changing events. Her parents divorce, her father is about to remarry a man, she makes mistakes that anger her friends or classmates, and she is mistreated by friends and family as well. The List of Things That Will Not Change is a list in the book that keeps Bea grounded. When life feels a little out of control, these are the things that add stability. It is one of the many tools that Bea learns to use to help her manage the layers of feelings that she has. Rebecca Stead takes on a journey through many of Bea's feelings such as anger, sadness, anxiety, love, joy and forgiveness. Bea is a nicely flawed character who makes mistakes and learns to love and forgive others and more importantly, herself. Another highly enjoyable book from Rebecca Stead.
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  • Kristine
    January 1, 1970
    Playfully written without too much drama, this is a great choice for middle grade readers looking for more complex realistic fiction. It is the story of Bea, whose father is about to get remarried to his boyfriend, Jesse. Bea loves her dad and Jesse. She loves her mom. And they love her. It’s at the top of her list of things that won’t ever change. But during the days leading up to the wedding, some uncomfortable things come to light. Bea’s courage and honestly help see her through. Bea learns Playfully written without too much drama, this is a great choice for middle grade readers looking for more complex realistic fiction. It is the story of Bea, whose father is about to get remarried to his boyfriend, Jesse. Bea loves her dad and Jesse. She loves her mom. And they love her. It’s at the top of her list of things that won’t ever change. But during the days leading up to the wedding, some uncomfortable things come to light. Bea’s courage and honestly help see her through. Bea learns that with change comes new possibilities and that family is more than just blood ties and marriage vows. A new family can be built, must be built, on understanding, acceptance, and forgiveness. Stead does a wonderful job of capturing Bea’s worries and anxiety. And as always, I appreciate her nod to the scifi genre. May she live long and prosper!
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  • Tory
    January 1, 1970
    I'M NOT CRYING YOU'RE CRYINGUnf but seriously, these are the books everyone needs to read. Everyone who worries; everyone learning about themselves; everyone who has good friends and bad days and picks themselves up and who keep going. So so so much of this is applicable to so many people. "What does a feeling feel like?" Think it through. Learn yourself. REBECCA STEAD, HOW DO YOU DO IT???"'...you might as well know right now that there are people who will try to make you choose between who you I'M NOT CRYING YOU'RE CRYINGUnf but seriously, these are the books everyone needs to read. Everyone who worries; everyone learning about themselves; everyone who has good friends and bad days and picks themselves up and who keep going. So so so much of this is applicable to so many people. "What does a feeling feel like?" Think it through. Learn yourself. REBECCA STEAD, HOW DO YOU DO IT???"'...you might as well know right now that there are people who will try to make you choose between who you are and who they want you to be.'"This is such a fantastic book for middle-graders learning how to process complex emotions. It would be a great read-aloud for younger kids, too -- start that dialogue early! And the lovely queer storyline is icing on the cake; great discussions about acceptance and mixed families and love and reconciliation. SO GOOD.
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  • Patti Sabik
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so glad I reviewed this book via an ARC provided by NetGalley. If I had only read the description, I may have passed over this gem by Stead because it mentions the protagonist as a 10-year-old and my 6th through 8th graders usually are not interested in reading about kids below their age. However, it is narrated when she is 12 (nearly 13) and is reflecting back on her 10-year-old self. The voice and content is definitely appropriate for 4th through 8th grade readers making this a brilliantly I'm so glad I reviewed this book via an ARC provided by NetGalley. If I had only read the description, I may have passed over this gem by Stead because it mentions the protagonist as a 10-year-old and my 6th through 8th graders usually are not interested in reading about kids below their age. However, it is narrated when she is 12 (nearly 13) and is reflecting back on her 10-year-old self. The voice and content is definitely appropriate for 4th through 8th grade readers making this a brilliantly written work. There were so many issues being dealt with throughout the story, it was not a one dimensional read. The characters were well-developed and three dimensional; all with wonderful flaws, fears, and heroism. Amazingly real story with a touching surprise, yet real, ending. What an amazing read!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    A new book from Rebecca Stead is always a cause for celebration, and LTTWNC does not disappoint. As always, Stead takes reader's deep into the interior life of a child--in this case, Bea, whose parents are divorced and whose father is getting remarried to a man. Bea is happy about the marriage, but worries about her mom's feelings and how she will get along with her new step sister, Sonia. She also worries about her cousin Angelica and what happened when she fell out of the loft of their A new book from Rebecca Stead is always a cause for celebration, and LTTWNC does not disappoint. As always, Stead takes reader's deep into the interior life of a child--in this case, Bea, whose parents are divorced and whose father is getting remarried to a man. Bea is happy about the marriage, but worries about her mom's feelings and how she will get along with her new step sister, Sonia. She also worries about her cousin Angelica and what happened when she fell out of the loft of their family's vacation cottage last summer. These things are all tied together, and the connections converge in true Stead style--that is, deliberately and satisfyingly, like pieces of an emotional puzzle. A pleasure to read and a pleasure to mull over for days afterward. This is a book that feeds you.
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  • Ms. Arca
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, this one cuts in the best and in important ways. Beautifully written. A sincere recounting of a tough summer, and the ups and downs of being 10. It’s messy, happy moments can have sad moments woven in, life is tinged full of all the feelings (sometimes some feelings hiding behind another.. or another.. like when fear hides behind anger). My heart felt this one. I especially loved the way Bea’s talks with her therapists were included in this one (and done so well!). For some reason or other Wow, this one cuts in the best and in important ways. Beautifully written. A sincere recounting of a tough summer, and the ups and downs of being 10. It’s messy, happy moments can have sad moments woven in, life is tinged full of all the feelings (sometimes some feelings hiding behind another.. or another.. like when fear hides behind anger). My heart felt this one. I especially loved the way Bea’s talks with her therapists were included in this one (and done so well!). For some reason or other I honestly didn’t otherwise love the characters that much.. but even so, it was beautifully done and I can appreciate a good book when I read it. This is one of those. It’s just beautiful work. Always want more from Rebecca Stead!
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  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    Great story about family, acceptance, and change. A quick (224 pages) but emotional read.Bea is a worrier and anxious. She also has a secret that has been gnawing away at her for a year. Bea's parents divorce because her father is gay. Bea is split between the two apartments, but it works. She has her list of things that will not change and she is happy. Then she is told that her dad is marrying Jesse - good news, she will now have a sister - great news, and she finds out about an uncle that no Great story about family, acceptance, and change. A quick (224 pages) but emotional read.Bea is a worrier and anxious. She also has a secret that has been gnawing away at her for a year. Bea's parents divorce because her father is gay. Bea is split between the two apartments, but it works. She has her list of things that will not change and she is happy. Then she is told that her dad is marrying Jesse - good news, she will now have a sister - great news, and she finds out about an uncle that no one talks to anymore - bad news. When she finds out her cousin is sick, she thinks it may be her fault.. Told through the 12-year-old's perspective, we learn a lot about Bea and how to be the person you are meant to be - warts and all.DRC from Netgalley and Wendy Lamb books
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    When you are eight years old, and your parents reveal that they're getting a divorce and that Dad is gay, it probably feels like everything in your world is turned upside down. Bea's parents make her a list of things that will not change and she adds to it throughout the book with help from her family, friends, and therapist. Most of the action takes place when Bea is ten, but her voice, thoughts, and actions seem a bit more juvenile to me. Dad's wedding is approaching an almost everyone is When you are eight years old, and your parents reveal that they're getting a divorce and that Dad is gay, it probably feels like everything in your world is turned upside down. Bea's parents make her a list of things that will not change and she adds to it throughout the book with help from her family, friends, and therapist. Most of the action takes place when Bea is ten, but her voice, thoughts, and actions seem a bit more juvenile to me. Dad's wedding is approaching an almost everyone is supportive. There are a few hiccups along the way in the blending of a new family, but overall it's a gently emotional examination of love in many forms.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Truly sweet and big-hearted, this book made me happy. Rebecca Stead is masterful. This is the first book of hers that doesn't seem to have a big mystery to it, and it's certainly a quieter book than some others, and I adored it all the same. Bea's realistic anxiety and her fears that she's a bad person just because she's done some bad things are handled so carefully and with such assurance. I loved the honest relationships between her and all her parents - the scene with Jesse at the colonial Truly sweet and big-hearted, this book made me happy. Rebecca Stead is masterful. This is the first book of hers that doesn't seem to have a big mystery to it, and it's certainly a quieter book than some others, and I adored it all the same. Bea's realistic anxiety and her fears that she's a bad person just because she's done some bad things are handled so carefully and with such assurance. I loved the honest relationships between her and all her parents - the scene with Jesse at the colonial breakfast made my heart ACHE - and I loved how quietly Stead handles Bea's mom in the background, trying to be supportive while she watches her ex husband marry a man. This is just lovely.
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author and Random House Kids for sharing an early copy with our #bookexpedition group. Absolutely loved this middle grade novel about love, listening, and family. Bea is a character who jumps off the page, begging you to get to know her. This is a book for kids dealing with anxiety, for kids who share their lives in two homes, and for kids who want to be a good friend but need some grace getting there. Will definitely purchase for my classroom library when it publishes in April Thank you to the author and Random House Kids for sharing an early copy with our #bookexpedition group. Absolutely loved this middle grade novel about love, listening, and family. Bea is a character who jumps off the page, begging you to get to know her. This is a book for kids dealing with anxiety, for kids who share their lives in two homes, and for kids who want to be a good friend but need some grace getting there. Will definitely purchase for my classroom library when it publishes in April 2020.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    This might just be my second favorite Rebecca Stead book ever! (Yes, I have read them all.)A perfect sister book to The Best Man, by Richard Peck (RIP you brilliant Illinoisan). Quintessential top-quality MG by one of the best in the field. So happy she continues to tap into the hearts and minds of young people. KUDOS to Rebecca and her partner in editorial crime, WL. You two are a great team!
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! It was a quick but meaningful read. It explored family dynamics and friendships. It was also interesting to see a main character in a middle grade novel suffer from eczema. It added a realistic tone to the story, and I think it will help kids learn and relate. This book was funny, heart-felt, and sad. It was also nice to see a kid going to therapy and gaining something from it. A well-balanced, fun read! #Netgalley
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  • Kimberly Larsen
    January 1, 1970
    Rebecca Stead just GETS IT. This is such a touching story. Protagonist with mental health challenges. Parents /child relationships. Blended families. Bea, 12, deals with friends, family and trying to manage her feelings. The writing nails the middle grade "situation" and a plot twist near the end makes the reader ponder. Great for Gr. 5-7
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Bea's life is about to change in a big way. Her Dad is gay and her parents are divorcing, so Bea starts a list of things that won't change in her life. But as they say, change is constant and Bea needs to learn to adjust to a constant set of new realities in life. This story is heart-warming and powerful. Loved it!
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