Eat, Fast, Feast
The New York Times bestselling author and senior fellow at the Discovery Institute blends science and religion in this thoughtful guide that teaches modern believes how to use the leading wellness trend today—intermittent fasting—as a means of spiritual awakening, adopting the traditions our Christians ancestors practiced for centuries into daily life.Wellness minded people today are increasingly turning to intermittent fasting to bolster their health. But we aren’t the first people to abstain from eating for a purpose. This routine was a common part of our spiritual ancestors’ lives for 1,500 years.Jay Richards argues that Christians should recover the fasting lifestyle, not only to improve our bodies, but to bolster our spiritual health as well. In Eat, Fast, Feast, he combines forgotten spiritual wisdom on fasting and feasting with the burgeoning literature on ketogenic diets and fasting for improved physical and mental health. Based on his popular series “Fasting, Body and Soul” in The Stream, Eat, Fast, Feast explores what it means to substitute our hunger for God for our hunger for food, and what both modern science and the ancient monastics can teach us about this practice.Richards argues that our modern diet—heavy in sugar and refined carbohydrates—locks us into a metabolic trap that makes fasting unfruitful and our feasts devoid of meaning. The good news, he reveals, is that we are beginning to resist the tyranny of processed foods, with millions of people pursuing low carb, ketogenic, paleo, and primal diets. This growing body of experts argue that eating natural fat and fasting is not only safe, but far better than how we eat today.Richards provides a 40-day plan which combines a long-term “nutritional ketosis” with spiritual disciplines. The plan can be used any time of the year or be adapted to a penitential season on the Christian calendar, such as Advent or Lent.Synthesizing recent science with ancient wisdom, Eat, Fast, Feast brings together the physical, mental, and spiritual benefits of intermittent fasting to help Christians improve their lives and their health, and bring them closer to God.

Eat, Fast, Feast Details

TitleEat, Fast, Feast
Author
ReleaseJan 7th, 2020
PublisherHarperOne
ISBN-139780062905208
Rating
GenreChristianity, Catholic, Religion, Health, Nonfiction, Food and Drink, Food

Eat, Fast, Feast Review

  • Ebookwormy1
    January 1, 1970
    While I'm hearing a lot about intermittent fasting from the health/ medical field, I'm stunned to not be hearing more about it from Christians, or Jews, who have practiced fasting as spiritual discipline for thousands of years. Into this void writes Jay Richards. The new book summary released Nov 2019 references that Richards has written on this topic for The Stream. My spouse and I are starting to read these 14 articles. Link here...https://stream.org/tag/fastingbodyand...A study guide was While I'm hearing a lot about intermittent fasting from the health/ medical field, I'm stunned to not be hearing more about it from Christians, or Jews, who have practiced fasting as spiritual discipline for thousands of years. Into this void writes Jay Richards. The new book summary released Nov 2019 references that Richards has written on this topic for The Stream. My spouse and I are starting to read these 14 articles. Link here...https://stream.org/tag/fastingbodyand...A study guide was posted. We are enjoying the book and working through the study guide for Lent, review to follow...https://dk4dsgfbgkmll.cloudfront.net/...I'm excited for this book to come out and hear what Richards has to say!
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  • Cate
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting one. I picked it up from the new nonfic shelf at the library and was pleasantly surprised to read a foreword by Dr. Jason Fun AND to learn that the author was Catholic. While the food recs werent for me (lots of meat suggested), I found the little historical tidbits about fasting fascinating and I liked having a layout for easing into fasting and progressing towards longer fasts. While I dont like the reference to friendly and enemy foods (foods being morally neutral), I This was an interesting one. I picked it up from the new nonfic shelf at the library and was pleasantly surprised to read a foreword by Dr. Jason Fun AND to learn that the author was Catholic. While the food recs weren’t for me (lots of meat suggested), I found the little historical tidbits about fasting fascinating and I liked having a layout for easing into fasting and progressing towards longer fasts. While I don’t like the reference to “friendly” and “enemy” foods (foods being morally neutral), I enjoyed reading the science behind ketosis being a better starting point for fasting as well as reading about the medical benefits of a fast. There were less references to the spiritual benefits to fasting than I expected, but all in all a good read.
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  • Nadia
    January 1, 1970
    Intermittent fasting has been a hot topic in the health and wellness blogsphere for years! Through this time I've been searching for a Catholic perspective on fasting as not just to improve physical health but for spiritual strength. Jay Richards was interviewed by Patrick Coffin in early 2020 to discuss this new book, and I quickly pre-ordered a copy with the intention to apply these principles through Lent 2020! Highly recommend this book. I've already handed out half a dozen copies to Intermittent fasting has been a hot topic in the health and wellness blogsphere for years! Through this time I've been searching for a Catholic perspective on fasting as not just to improve physical health but for spiritual strength. Jay Richards was interviewed by Patrick Coffin in early 2020 to discuss this new book, and I quickly pre-ordered a copy with the intention to apply these principles through Lent 2020! Highly recommend this book. I've already handed out half a dozen copies to friends.
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  • Maurisa Mayerle
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful and thorough treatment of the history and science of fasting. While Richards is a Catholic and much of his treatment of fasting and feasting comes from that perspective, this book is perfectly accessible to any Christian tradition. Ive tried several of Richards fasting recommendations and can honestly affirm that they do make real fasting much easier. Wonderful and thorough treatment of the history and science of fasting. While Richards is a Catholic and much of his treatment of fasting and feasting comes from that perspective, this book is perfectly accessible to any Christian tradition. I’ve tried several of Richards’ fasting recommendations and can honestly affirm that they do make real fasting much easier.
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  • Meg Prom
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect preparation for lent and not another new agey self-help diet book. He makes great connections between early Christian fasting practices and upholds the critical link between prayer and fasting. If youve ever wanted to be better at fasting READ THIS. Perfect preparation for lent and not another new agey self-help diet book. He makes great connections between early Christian fasting practices and upholds the critical link between prayer and fasting. If you’ve ever wanted to be better at fasting READ THIS.
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  • Kerry Schafer
    January 1, 1970
    It was more about methods for fasting and not as much about the spiritual side of fasting. The reasons and history of fasting in the church were discussed but most of the book was how to adapt to a fasting lifestyle. Interesting and easy to read.
  • Nic
    January 1, 1970
    SORRY TO SHOUT BUT EVERY CHRISTIAN NEEDS TO READ THIS.CATHOLICS ESPECIALLY.One of the few books I checked out from the library that I'll be purchasing soon. Shouting it from the rooftops, baby. What a great book!!!
  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed reading this book. I can't wait to apply what I learned about fasting to this coming Lent. Also, I have been hearing a lot about Ember Days from other sources, so reading more about this fasting practice has encouraged me to adopt it.
  • Doris
    January 1, 1970
    Not just intermittent fasting with a religious spin to it, but a promotion of ketogenic diet. Not very helpful with regards to the ketogenic aspect: too many question left unanswered.
  • Jacinta Boudreau
    January 1, 1970
    Very informative; just what we needed today as Christians!
  • Patrick Park
    January 1, 1970
    Great bookThis book really helped me understand fasting and how our bodies benefit from it. It also helped understand feasts and their spiritual connection to our bodies.
  • Darris McNeely
    January 1, 1970
    Richards lays out a viable plan to make fasting a part of your lifestyle without it being the burdensome exercise normally associated with fasting. Let's face it, it is hard to fast. I get hungry even thinking about fasting!I have already incorporated part of his plan into my life with positive results. I will read this book again. It has good material for teaching on the topic. We hope to interview Jay Richards for an upcoming Beyond Today segment.
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  • Al Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    I have to admit that in years past when I read of fasting in scripture it seemed somehow daunting to me. The thoughts of harsh cravings came to mind, making fasting, certainly longer fasting, seem somehow out of reach for me. I guess I thought the saints of old were somehow more fervent than me. A few years ago I tried a ketogenic diet to lose weight and was amazed at much it affected my appetite, drastically reducing the cravings. I began to understand the affects our high sugar diet has on our I have to admit that in years past when I read of fasting in scripture it seemed somehow daunting to me. The thoughts of harsh cravings came to mind, making fasting, certainly longer fasting, seem somehow out of reach for me. I guess I thought the saints of old were somehow more fervent than me. A few years ago I tried a ketogenic diet to lose weight and was amazed at much it affected my appetite, drastically reducing the cravings. I began to understand the affects our high sugar diet has on our lives, but somehow I failed to connect this with the ability to fast. In this book, Jay does a really good job of simplifying and explaining the effects sugar has on our body (and our cravings) and how our bodies are designed to withstand periods of food drought (from a Biblical worldview)by burning fat and not sugar. He outlines a simple plan to bring fasting (and prayer) into our normal daily routine to not only increase our spiritual growth, but to increase our physical health over the long term. I feel more equipped to make fasting a routine part of my daily life. Suddenly the scripture passages referring to fasting (and there are many) jump out to me and somehow have more meaning. I look forward to many years of fasting (producing spiritual an physical health and growth) followed by feasting (celebrations of life and God’s gifts).
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  • D'Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Fasting for both spiritual and physical health is covered in this book. Easy to read as it explains why Western Christianity has watered-down our view of true fasting from food and how that relates to our obesity epidemic. Lots of info on how our body behaves during fasting, benefits of fasting, and types of fasting. I was especially interested in what he had to say about intermittent fasting.I didnt like the chapter staggering of spiritual and physical. I would have appreciated all like Fasting for both spiritual and physical health is covered in this book. Easy to read as it explains why Western Christianity has watered-down our view of true fasting from food and how that relates to our obesity epidemic. Lots of info on how our body behaves during fasting, benefits of fasting, and types of fasting. I was especially interested in what he had to say about intermittent fasting.I didn’t like the chapter staggering of spiritual and physical. I would have appreciated all like chapters to have been grouped together. In fact, I skipped around and grouped them for myself.Helpful and motivating book.
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