Rules for Being a Girl
It starts before you can even remember: You learn the rules for being a girl. . . .Marin has always been good at navigating these unspoken guidelines. A star student and editor of the school paper, she dreams of getting into Brown University. Marin’s future seems bright―and her young, charismatic English teacher, Mr. Beckett, is always quick to admire her writing and talk books with her.But when “Bex” takes things too far and comes on to Marin, she’s shocked and horrified. Had she somehow led him on? Was it her fault?When Marin works up the courage to tell the administration what happened, no one believes her. She’s forced to face Bex in class every day. Except now, he has an ax to grind.But Marin isn’t about to back down. She uses the school newspaper to fight back and she starts a feminist book club at school. She finds allies in the most unexpected people, like “slutty” Gray Kendall, who she’d always dismissed as just another lacrosse bro. As things heat up at school and in her personal life, Marin must figure out how to take back the power and write her own rules.

Rules for Being a Girl Details

TitleRules for Being a Girl
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 7th, 2020
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN-139780062803399
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Feminism, Fiction, Realistic Fiction, Young Adult Contemporary, Romance

Rules for Being a Girl Review

  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Rules for Being a Girl is Young Adult contemporary fiction.This is a YA book by two authors that I enjoy. In their author's note they call it "A YA book with a feminist message for the times".There is some romance in this book. But I would hesitate to call it a YA contemporary romance. Because this book is so much more than that.The narrator is 17 year old Marin (high school senior - 1st person POV). Her best friend is Chloe. They are co-editors of the student newspaper together. Something Rules for Being a Girl is Young Adult contemporary fiction.This is a YA book by two authors that I enjoy. In their author's note they call it "A YA book with a feminist message for the times".There is some romance in this book. But I would hesitate to call it a YA contemporary romance. Because this book is so much more than that.The narrator is 17 year old Marin (high school senior - 1st person POV). Her best friend is Chloe. They are co-editors of the student newspaper together. Something happens with the teacher who supervises the paper. And this becomes a big focus of the book.I really enjoyed this book. It felt very relevant. And I am extremely happy that I read it.This was a quick read. But it dealt with such an important subject. This book was so different than any other YA book that I have read. I like reading books that make me think. And this book definitely made me thing.*There was a very interesting author's note at the beginning of the book. But I am glad that I read it at the end, as to me it contained spoilers that I did not want to know before reading the book. However after looking at the book blurb, I see the same spoilers listed. I know some people like to know what a book is about before reading it. But to me I was much happier not knowing exactly which direction this book was going to take.Thanks to edelweiss and Balzer + Bray for allowing me to read this book.
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  • booksneedcaffeinetoo
    January 1, 1970
    finally a book where the teacher is called out for being a fucking pedo. this book sounds like it has moxie vibes and i'm here for it.
  • Sarah Perchikoff
    January 1, 1970
    Feminism alert!! If you couldn't tell, I love a book with feminism as it's theme especially when it's a YA book. I will forever be amazed at what teenagers know these days when it comes to feminism. I was still covered in internalized misogyny and they are talking about intersectionality and toxic masculinity. I LOVE to see it!Rules for Being a Girl tells the story that is all too familiar. A teacher is inappropriate with a student and when the student comes forward, she is not believed and then Feminism alert!! If you couldn't tell, I love a book with feminism as it's theme especially when it's a YA book. I will forever be amazed at what teenagers know these days when it comes to feminism. I was still covered in internalized misogyny and they are talking about intersectionality and toxic masculinity. I LOVE to see it!Rules for Being a Girl tells the story that is all too familiar. A teacher is inappropriate with a student and when the student comes forward, she is not believed and then put through hell. I almost stabbed my computer while reading. Let's get to the review!Marin just wants to fit in and be liked and so far in her high school career, she's been pretty great at that. She's got good grades, she edits the school newspaper with her best friend, and she's on her way to Brown University if everything goes as planned. She even has her English teacher, Mr. Beckett (aka Bex), telling her how great her writing is.But Bex is not the great person he seems (excuse me while I puke). One day, Bex tells Marin that the book he's been wanting to give her for months is still at his apartment so why don't they go over there together to go get it...(MY 30-YEAR-OLD BRAIN IS ON FIRE WITH THE AMOUNT OF RED FLAGS AND SIRENS GOING OFF.)When they get there, everything seems to be normal until...Bex kisses her. Have you ever wanted to set an apartment on fire?? Because I would like to set Bex's apartment on fire.Marin immediately pulls away and is like WTF!! which I really appreciated. A lot of books don't have the character recognize when a bad/wrong thing has happened (and we will get into that in a minute), but this one does. Marin is immediately like "BYE BYE!" and runs out of the apartment.What follows is what you might expect if you've been paying attention to the news or social media over the past year or two.At first, Marin wonders what she did to make him do that. Did she lead him on or did she give some indication that it was ok? (of course NOT!) Then she wonders if she should tell somebody and if so, who?The first person she tells is her best friend, Chloe and... let's just say, it doesn't go well. Then Bex talks to her about what happened to make sure they are "ok". That leads to Marin writing a scathing and perfect article/essay for the school newspaper about the rules girls have to follow that boys don't.Needless to say, it BLOWS UP!And she loses her best friend and boyfriend (who is a major douche), and when she eventually does tell the administration what happened, they don't believe her so she has to continue to have class with Mr. Asshat.But one teacher does take an interest in her and together they start a feminist book club. It's a small step, but it gives Marin a way to talk about issues that are affecting her. It also shows her that other people at her school feel the same way she does. AND...it also introduces her to a boy named Grey. She knew him before but didn't realize how lovely, nice, sweet he was. Through the book club, she find new friends who support her, new purpose, and new confidence. It also gives her a support system to lean on when the school won't do anything about Bex and everyone else seems to be against her.But Marin, along with her parents, won't give up. Marin even commits a bit of vandalism (I FULLY APPROVE #teamMarin) when Bex tries to use his influence to stop her from achieving her dreams. Angry girls and woman with revenge on the mind are kind of my jam.As Marin's article makes it's way through the school, she finds out she's not the only one Bex abused. With more girls affected, the school finally starts to take notice and do something about it.I loved this book. It's teen girls fighting for what they deserve! What more could you want? I wasn't thrilled with the ending but that's more a me situation than due to any issues with the book. The ending makes me want a sequel which is probably a good thing.Marin is a star of a main character and while her sister, Grace, wasn't in it a ton, I loved their interactions. They made my feminist heart glow. I also loved Marin's relationship with Grey. He definitely wasn't what she expected and I liked that she was able to let him in despite having a bad experience with a dude. He proved his worth.I also really appreciated how the book handled the girls who Bex preyed upon who didn't immediately think of his actions as bad. Marin knew right off the bat that what he did was wrong, but not all girls would know or feel sure enough to say no.Teen girls shouldn't have to deal with this bullshit to begin with. Knowing whether an adult's behavior is harmful or not can be so confusing and a clusterfuck to your head. The book gives these girls a voice as well and I love that.Rules for Being a Girl reminded me of Moxie and Rebel Girls and if you've read those, you will LOVE this. I'm giving it 4 out of 5 stars. I love these types of books where girls fight real life problems. I just hope we see more of them with teens of color (if you know any, PLEASE tell me in the comments).Rules for Being a Girl by Candace Bushnell and Katie Cotugno comes out April 7, 2020.Thank you to Edelweiss and Balzer and Bray for the free eARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Rahma Abdelrahman
    January 1, 1970
    Honestly, this sounds a lot like Amelia Westlake Was Never Here, but I'm here for it!
  • Carly Faith
    January 1, 1970
    god, i could go OFF about this book and how TRASH it was. i definielty think author is someone i can't read ever again.i will leave a link to my rant review because it got me that heated. MY REVIEW: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEyGm...rate: 1.5/5
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    **Thank you to Harper Collins Canada and HCC Frenzy for giving me an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.**Reading the synopsis to this book, I knew that this was going to be an important book and one that I wanted to check out. In a time where it still feels like women are having to fight for all of their rights, to fight to be heard, this is a fantastic book for young girls.Marin has a traumatic and uncomfortable experience with an authority figure, and it changes how **Thank you to Harper Collins Canada and HCC Frenzy for giving me an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.**Reading the synopsis to this book, I knew that this was going to be an important book and one that I wanted to check out. In a time where it still feels like women are having to fight for all of their rights, to fight to be heard, this is a fantastic book for young girls.Marin has a traumatic and uncomfortable experience with an authority figure, and it changes how she sees the world around her. So many thoughts and worries come to her mind as she navigates the experience, her new outlook, how people react to her following the revealing of the event, and just navigating life and high school in general.I was incredibly surprised when the beginning of the novel made me uncomfortable. At first, I didn't know what to do with my feelings of discomfort at what I was reading. But as I sat with the thoughts and emotions, I realized what a testament it is to these authors amazing abilities to bring forth those kinds of emotions and thoughts from me. This was the first time I have felt genuinely uncomfortable reading a book, and I think that speaks volumes. While the character might not have had immediate discomfort, I knew that something was wrong. And I think that speaks to an individual woman's experiences and knowledge of these unwritten "rules" for being a girl.I could not believe the range of emotions that I felt throughout this book - I was uncomfortable, laughing, cringing, smiling, angry, crying, and hopeful. It is rare for a book to evoke so many emotions from me, so strongly. There were moments in the book that I wanted to reach into the pages and give Marin the biggest hug, to join in the book club that she created to bring feminism to people's minds, and to stand with her when she was ostracized for her writing and honesty.This story is set in a private school, where all of the students where uniforms and there is a mandatory dress code. And I think that is why I had such a strong reaction at times. I went to a private school with uniforms. Like Marin, I actually liked wearing a uniform, but I could also see the double standards that happened throughout my life between what was expected of the boys and girls. Heaven forbid that my calves are showing or I wear my skirt too short, but it doesn't seem to matter if the boys break every dress code rule or that it is for "their benefit" that we need to wear our kilts longer. It took me back to a time of confusion and anger at the double standards that society invokes from a young age.Anyways, the characters that these authors wrote were amazing. They were so real, and I could think of people I had met in my life that mirrored these characters so well. As most women know, this kind of experience or something similar is unfortunately a common one. I loved the addition of the character Gray and what he added to the story in so many ways. I don't want to go too far into it, because I think not knowing a lot about the story is better.I will mention that one of my absolute favourite parts of the novel was the piece that Marin writes for the school paper, listing out all of the rules that girls must follow. That list. I honestly wanted to take photos and shout it out to the world because I know that every single girl and woman who reads that piece will 100 percent agree with it. We have all experienced those rules in some form, not even necessarily knowing that they are rules. And it is always a somewhat heartbreaking moment when you encounter some of them. If you read this book for no other reason, read it for that part.I will mention some trigger warnings: sexual assault, swearing, drinking, bullying.I would highly recommend this book if you enjoy YA contemporaries. I think this could be seen as a pretty important read this year, and I am hoping that more hype can bring this book to more girls attentions!
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    Marin was at the top of her game. In the running for valedictorian? Check. Popular, athletic boyfriend? Check. Co-editor of the school newspaper? Check. A shoe-in for acceptance to her dream school, Brown? Check. Everything seemed to be going according to plan, until her English teacher, Bex, made sexual advances towards her.As she struggled with confusion and guilt over the situation, Marian also had to deal with blowback from reporting such a beloved teacher. As things began to spiral out, Marin was at the top of her game. In the running for valedictorian? Check. Popular, athletic boyfriend? Check. Co-editor of the school newspaper? Check. A shoe-in for acceptance to her dream school, Brown? Check. Everything seemed to be going according to plan, until her English teacher, Bex, made sexual advances towards her.As she struggled with confusion and guilt over the situation, Marian also had to deal with blowback from reporting such a beloved teacher. As things began to spiral out, Marin became more and more determined to take back some power, and decided to rewrite the rules for being a girl.This was such a wake up call for Marin, and it prompted her to really examine her life. Her experience opened her eyes up to a world, that had always been there, but she never really noticed. From her boyfriend's passive-aggressive comments to the school's dress code hypocrisy, Marin was fed up with it all. She wanted to see some changes, and she was starting with herself.As a woman, who went to engineering school in the early 90s, and worked in IT, I am well aware of the rules for being a girl. It's always amazed me how society has conditioned us to accept and conform to these unwritten rules, and I love when they are challenged. The authors did such a wonderful job calling out the double standard, and allowing the characters to thoughtfully explore the issues at hand, while also making this feel like a very honest and realistic journey for a teen girl.Marin came for a family of fierce women, who I absolutely loved. I felt that fire, when her mother learned about Bex, and her grandmother, my heart, she was phenomenal. There were so many special and meaningful moments shared between Marin, her mother, her grandmother, and her sister, and I loved them all.I also loved feminist book club. Yes, you heard me. At one point, Marin questioned, why all the books they read were written by not only men, but white men. Instead of getting another one way ticket to the principal's office, Marin channeled that frustration into forming a book club. There, she made new allies and rebuilt her support system. I loved the mix of people, who joined her club, and though they don't get too in depth, many different topics are touched upon during group discussions.I found myself getting quite fired up as I read this book, and I hope others will too. It's 2020, and books like this still need to be written, which makes me sad, but I am still hopeful, as I have seen things improve, though rather slowly. I think Rules for Being a Girl is a great conversation starter, and I hope it will inspire many open and honest discussions about equality, sexual harassment, and those unwritten social norms we unwittingly subscribe to.*ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Vee_Bookish
    January 1, 1970
    As someone who has been in an abusive relationship with a teacherThis is gonna be a hard readI hope she smashes his kneecaps :D
  • caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    Review copy courtesy of Edelweiss.This was an interesting look at a high school seniors feminist awakening, triggered by an unwanted advance by a beloved teacher who ends up sabotaging her grades and college prospects. Perfect for fans of Moxie. Review copy courtesy of Edelweiss.This was an interesting look at a high school senior’s feminist awakening, triggered by an unwanted advance by a beloved teacher who ends up sabotaging her grades and college prospects. Perfect for fans of “Moxie.”
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  • Fer Bañuelos (myownlittlebookshelf)
    January 1, 1970
    most anticipated book of the year peeps
  • Melannie :)
    January 1, 1970
    I loved it. Review closer to pub date.
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    This book is an important one for all young girls. It speaks the truth, it speaks volumes, and I will cherish it. I want my daughter to read this book when she's old enough. I want her to know that whatever happens in her life, I will ALWAYS support her, I will always be there for her. That's what I wanted to tell Marin. When no one believed her, when her life seemed to crash around her, I thought that her parents were her rock. A certain boy too, but I, as a parent, saw how important it was to This book is an important one for all young girls. It speaks the truth, it speaks volumes, and I will cherish it. I want my daughter to read this book when she's old enough. I want her to know that whatever happens in her life, I will ALWAYS support her, I will always be there for her. That's what I wanted to tell Marin. When no one believed her, when her life seemed to crash around her, I thought that her parents were her rock. A certain boy too, but I, as a parent, saw how important it was to be there, always.Many thanks to HarperCollins Canada for the complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Umairah | Sereadipity
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars
  • Aly
    January 1, 1970
    This was such an easy, but, IMPORTANT read. I freaking loved it and immediately pre-ordered it.
  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    Harvey Weinstein, one of the most high profile and powerful sexual predators of the twenty-first century, was recently sentenced to spend the rest of his miserable life in jail for what he did to the women under this thumb. For this reason alone, this book is as relevant as it could be and an utterly timeless reminder of how women are treated in these situations.Full review at Write, Read, Repeat. Thanks to HCC Frenzy for the ARC! I've been reading a few more feminist-centric stories as of late, Harvey Weinstein, one of the most high profile and powerful sexual predators of the twenty-first century, was recently sentenced to spend the rest of his miserable life in jail for what he did to the women under this thumb. For this reason alone, this book is as relevant as it could be and an utterly timeless reminder of how women are treated in these situations.Full review at Write, Read, Repeat. Thanks to HCC Frenzy for the ARC! I've been reading a few more feminist-centric stories as of late, and while this is far from gritty and raw, it is still a story that many, if not all women will be able to relate to. It's not the most thought-provoking feminist read, but it has a lot to recommend it. It's certainly hard to stomach because this sh*t happens far too much. The man does something he absolutely should not have to a woman, no matter what her age. And yet he gets off scot-free, and no one believes her when she comes forward because she was:a) asking for itb) misunderstood what happenedc) trying to ruin someone for no good reasonIn this case, Marin's English teacher makes a move on her, and all three options listed come to apply to her by those in her life. Bushnell and Cotugno do a phenomenal job in unravelling this story. They even place a little shred of doubt in the reader's mind, as both us and Marin try to figure out where to place blame. She wasn't asking for it, no, but she did have a crush on this older and wiser man. And what about how she was always going to him to talk things through, discuss personal things better saved for time with friends? No. None of that matters. She is a minor who did not ask for her teacher to do what he did. Who never deserved what happens in the aftermath of being brave enough to come forward and say something. And that's just it, isn't it? Too many men (and, admittedly, some women, since this problem can go both ways) get away with it for so long because too many women (yes, and men) are too scared to come forward. Because few believe them and will push them down into the dirt. Having a strong support system is so crucial, and it was nice to see what Marin had at her back. She can't rely on her boyfriend of best friend, which hurts, but she was never alone. Her family is a solid base for her, with both parents in her corner and believing her unequivocally. She starts a feminist book club at school that broadens her support circle. And she gets close to Grey, and do we ever stan a boy who listens, cares, and understands consent. As much as some people would like to deny it, women are still at a disadvantage in so many areas of life inhabited by both men and women. A prime example in this book is the school uniform. Boys wear pants and shirts and that's that. But girls, oh boy, heaven forbid your skirt is shorter than your fingertips, and how dare you wear knee-high socks instead of full stockings? You might distract the boys. Heavens, imagine the uproar if you wore a tank top.I highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a quick and easy read that will give their sense of girl power a bit of a boost.
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  • Taschima
    January 1, 1970
    "There are so many unspoken rules for navigating high school--for navigating life, maybe--that I can't help but try to figure out which one I broke to get myself into this situation. There are so many rules for girls."This book is definitely not my usual read--however, it was really engaging (read it in two days) and it shows a situation that a lot of young woman experience in their lifetime (no matter if it is from a teacher or another person in power in their life). Therefore, I think it is a "There are so many unspoken rules for navigating high school--for navigating life, maybe--that I can't help but try to figure out which one I broke to get myself into this situation. There are so many rules for girls."This book is definitely not my usual read--however, it was really engaging (read it in two days) and it shows a situation that a lot of young woman experience in their lifetime (no matter if it is from a teacher or another person in power in their life). Therefore, I think it is a must read. Maybe "Rules for Being a Girl" will open your eyes too about what is going out around you and how to better educate ourselves on our current culture (just like the MC)."It's like now that I'm looking for inequality I'm seeing it everywhere, categorizing a thousand great and small unfairnesses everywhere I go. Why didn't I really see this before?"I love how this book touches on different messages and ideas that we tackle on a daily basis--maybe the girl misconstrued the situation, maybe she is exagerating, maybe she got confused, maybe, just maybe she is making it up! (using "she" in this instance because the book is about a "she" but it COULD HAPPEN TO ANYBODY) These are messages that we hear way too often, and are part of the problem of why people don't come forward..."But maybe he doesn't owe me an apology? After all: I went to his house. I flirted with him. It's not like I hadn't thought about it before."...and even the things you tell yourself in order to ratianalize the situation.There are other interesting components to the story--the break with Marin's best friend, a lot of awesome recs on feminist literature, the realization of dating a douchbag and finding someone you can connect with on a deeper level... It was all great, but the book is super short and mainly focuses on the situation and how this event in Marin's life affected/changed her."Bex and I weren't equal partners in some doomed flirtation, he was the authority figure, and I was a kid in his class."I do think Rules for Being a Girl only scratches the surface of the issue. It is an introduction on this kind of issue, and doesn't go too deep into the politics of the situation. It could have been uglier, and often times it is. But it is still a solid read.
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  • Jessica G
    January 1, 1970
    Hell to the yes. It's been a while since I read such a fierce feminist-YA read, and WHATAMIDOINGWITHMYLIFE.This book was legen-wait-for-it...dary. I love YA novels that get it right. This book was an anthem for my soul, and was a reminder of all the things I fight for every day.It brings you right back to the times in which you've been discriminated against, and made to follow these rules for being a girl. And it sucks. And this book gets it.The way this story was structured was absolutely Hell to the yes. It's been a while since I read such a fierce feminist-YA read, and WHATAMIDOINGWITHMYLIFE.This book was legen-wait-for-it...dary. I love YA novels that get it right. This book was an anthem for my soul, and was a reminder of all the things I fight for every day.It brings you right back to the times in which you've been discriminated against, and made to follow these rules for being a girl. And it sucks. And this book gets it.The way this story was structured was absolutely brilliant. I was worried at the beginning where it could go, but OH MY LORDY LORD, this book has me sold. And what I love about this book oh-so-much, is it's like a first-book of feminism for YA readers. Why?It starts off with a regular teenage-story, and then things start to feel a little uncomfortable. Like things could either work out, or things could go right down the drain. And then reactions of people who treat the situation like they shouldn't, and ones that treat it the way it deserves to be treated. This book is like positive reinforcement - it's like a gentle (but somehow also a firm) nudge in the direction of feminism. And it's not just white-feminism either. It's FEMINISM. I freaking love it.
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  • honestlyjasminereads
    January 1, 1970
    ℝ𝕦𝕝𝕖𝕤 𝔽𝕠𝕣 𝔹𝕖𝕚𝕟𝕘 𝔸 𝔾𝕚𝕣𝕝⭐⭐⭐⭐/5I want to ask her if she also feels like there are all these guidelines were supposed to be following in exchange for the alleged privilege of walking around this world as a teenage girl: be flirty but not too flirty. Be confident but not aggressive. Be funny but in a low-key, quiet way. Eat cheeseburgers, dont get fat. Be chill but dont lose control.Rules for being a girl is a contemporary YA that is written from the point of view of Marin, a young women who is about ℝ𝕦𝕝𝕖𝕤 𝔽𝕠𝕣 𝔹𝕖𝕚𝕟𝕘 𝔸 𝔾𝕚𝕣𝕝⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5“I want to ask her if she also feels like there are all these guidelines we’re supposed to be following in exchange for the alleged privilege of walking around this world as a teenage girl: be flirty but not too flirty. Be confident but not aggressive. Be funny but in a low-key, quiet way. Eat cheeseburgers, don’t get fat. Be chill but don’t lose control.”Rules for being a girl is a contemporary YA that is written from the point of view of Marin, a young women who is about to graduate school with big plans of heading to Brown when she graduates to study journalism. All of a sudden her world is thrown upside down when a teacher I really enjoyed reading this and would recommend if you’re looking for something that explores feminism, has an extremely likeable and relatable protagonist and is just an all round easy book to get into and read. Thank you Pan Macmillan Australia and Netgalley for the ARC, in exchange for an honest opinion.Authors - Candace Bushnell & Katie CotugnoPublisher - Pan Macmillan Australia
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  • Rebecca Rowlands
    January 1, 1970
    "Be flirty but not too flirty. Be confident but not aggressive. Be funny but in a low key quiet way. Eat cheeseburgers but don't get fat."I wish I had read this book at 15, 17, 18, 21. It really smarty touches so many topics, including why feminism has to be intersectional which was really cool. Its informative and too the point without being condescending and all of these lessons are wrapped around a story that, while awful, is necessary. It's really good. Its definitely YA but even at "Be flirty but not too flirty. Be confident but not aggressive. Be funny but in a low key quiet way. Eat cheeseburgers but don't get fat."I wish I had read this book at 15, 17, 18, 21. It really smarty touches so many topics, including why feminism has to be intersectional which was really cool. Its informative and too the point without being condescending and all of these lessons are wrapped around a story that, while awful, is necessary. It's really good. Its definitely YA but even at almost-30 I still enjoyed the entire thing and found it engaging and a really good book, it's basically the story of how Ezra and Aria's relationship in PLL should have been. I felt inspired and like I've learnt something and I've had a good few hours reading it. It's the type of book I want my niece to read when she's able. 5/5.
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  • gem
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars max.This had the potential to be great, but I didnt think enough happened. I liked the book club element, but it didnt really stand out as being a major point of difference from other books Ive read with a similar storyline.Bex is a twat.Marin is ok, but I feel like she couldve kicked off more and her parents shouldve gotten involved, especially because of the whole Brown thing.Chloe is so annoying and the ending made me even more frustrated with her.Meh, I feel underwhelmed. 2.5 stars max.This had the potential to be great, but I didn’t think enough happened. I liked the book club element, but it didn’t really stand out as being a major point of difference from other books I’ve read with a similar storyline.Bex is a twat.Marin is ok, but I feel like she could’ve kicked off more and her parents should’ve gotten involved, especially because of the whole Brown thing.Chloe is so annoying and the ending made me even more frustrated with her.Meh, I feel underwhelmed.
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  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    Marin is on track to get everything she's ever worked for...until she is derailed. The result is her recognition of casual sexism, double standards, and inequality between boys and girls. Hits just the right tone for a YA book about serious issues. Not too confrontational but definitely illuminates the issues dealt with. I was immersed in Marin's world, unabashedly privileged, but empathized with her problems. A great read for pre- and young teens.Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the Marin is on track to get everything she's ever worked for...until she is derailed. The result is her recognition of casual sexism, double standards, and inequality between boys and girls. Hits just the right tone for a YA book about serious issues. Not too confrontational but definitely illuminates the issues dealt with. I was immersed in Marin's world, unabashedly privileged, but empathized with her problems. A great read for pre- and young teens.Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read this book.
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  • Steph
    January 1, 1970
    This made me all kinds of angry, disgusted, happy and sad. I love that Marins family were so lovely. Team Grey all the way. The power of believing a persons truth and their story, versus a battle of power. She was treated so unfairly, but shes a fighter. Theres so much truth in this book and it made me cross for women all over the world. This made me all kinds of angry, disgusted, happy and sad. I love that Marin’s family were so lovely. Team Grey all the way. The power of believing a person’s truth and their story, versus a battle of power. She was treated so unfairly, but she’s a fighter. There’s so much truth in this book and it made me cross for women all over the world.
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  • Fanna
    January 1, 1970
    - "feminist novel"- deals with sexual harassment and sexism- unapologetic female protagonist-
  • Felicia Mathews (Bookishly Slytherclaw)
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 15%. I plan to try it again, but at this time I wasn't in the mood to read it.
  • Brianna Benton
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this book. I felt like the pacing was perfect and the ending was completely satisfying. I got a little emotional during (view spoiler)[some of the tougher the scenes with her grandma who has Alzheimers because it reminded me of my grandma but it was handled well and thankfully just a short snippet (hide spoiler)]. Highly recommend this book. I absolutely loved this book. I felt like the pacing was perfect and the ending was completely satisfying. I got a little emotional during (view spoiler)[some of the tougher the scenes with her grandma who has Alzheimer’s because it reminded me of my grandma but it was handled well and thankfully just a short snippet (hide spoiler)]. Highly recommend this book.
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  • Leah Grover
    January 1, 1970
    RULES FOR BEING A GIRL rights at least one wrong from the Sex and the City television series (you know the episode I'm thinking of), and its cast boasts a searing reality and cultural awareness that Carrie and friends can't quite match. In many ways, Marin's arc is a best-case scenario--which isn't to say that this was an easy read. After all, how many of us know women who have struggled with the choice to report the inappropriate advances of an authority, or have done so personally? Cotugno and RULES FOR BEING A GIRL rights at least one wrong from the Sex and the City television series (you know the episode I'm thinking of), and its cast boasts a searing reality and cultural awareness that Carrie and friends can't quite match. In many ways, Marin's arc is a best-case scenario--which isn't to say that this was an easy read. After all, how many of us know women who have struggled with the choice to report the inappropriate advances of an authority, or have done so personally? Cotugno and Bushnell have crafted a narrative that is timely, riveting, and honest; in short, all the characteristics necessary for an excellent contemporary YA.
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  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    My first favorite book of 2020. More when I gather my thoughts. But please, please read this book.
  • Cozy Ink
    January 1, 1970
    Ew. This sort of read like they wrote this a few years ago and decided it was topical now without updating the pop culture references. Example : Lemonade (the album), eating tide pods, and other stuff I don't recall but it annoyed me enough to mention. Additionally, for all the people saying this is like moxie, I agree. It's just like moxie. I am not a fan of message books, especially when I am familiar with the message. It follows the plot structure of moxie almost down to a T, and I'll save Ew. This sort of read like they wrote this a few years ago and decided it was topical now without updating the pop culture references. Example : Lemonade (the album), eating tide pods, and other stuff I don't recall but it annoyed me enough to mention. Additionally, for all the people saying this is like moxie, I agree. It's just like moxie. I am not a fan of message books, especially when I am familiar with the message. It follows the plot structure of moxie almost down to a T, and I'll save you a bit of time and just describe it. Basically, white girl who has never considered herself a feminist has an inciting incident. Then all her friends leave her for being too feminist, when she isn't actually that feminist at all. She finds a new friend group, with a token black girl & lesbian. They educate her appropriately on intersectionalism, though it is consigned to a sentence to a paragraph. Then she gets what she wants (usually administration sanctioned justice ((ie firing or suspension))) then her friends all come back to her and everything is good! But she's feminist now!! Anyway. This didn't really explore feminist issues to any deep extent. (In fact, I might hesitate to call it feminist at all. It's really just, woman is wronged, woman reads about wrongs, wrong is righted. It doesn't explore a ton.) I think this is good for perhaps eight to ten year olds, were it edited a bit. I just found it redundant. Despite all I've said, it wasn't awful. It was just...somewhat unnecessary to me.
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  • Amy (novelteahappyme)
    January 1, 1970
    Speak up, but dont be too loud. Be assertive, but not bossy. Be friendly, but dont lead him on. The rules go on and on.An unapologetically feminist YA novel about a girl who fights to expose sexism at her school after a run-in with a predatory teacher, Rules For Being A Girl is co-written by best-selling authors Candace Bushnell and Katie Cotugno. Set to be released April 7th, 2020, this is one compulsively readable story you will not want to miss.Marin has always been good at navigating these “Speak up, but don’t be too loud. Be assertive, but not bossy. Be friendly, but don’t lead him on.” The rules go on and on.An unapologetically feminist YA novel about a girl who fights to expose sexism at her school after a run-in with a predatory teacher, “Rules For Being A Girl” is co-written by best-selling authors Candace Bushnell and Katie Cotugno. Set to be released April 7th, 2020, this is one compulsively readable story you will not want to miss.Marin has always been good at navigating these unspoken guidelines. A star student and editor of the school paper, she dreams of getting into Brown University. Marin's future seems bright—and her young, charismatic English teacher, Mr. Beckett, is always quick to admire her writing and talk books with her. But when "Bex" takes things too far and comes on to Marin, she's shocked and horrified. Had she somehow led him on? Was it her fault? When Marin works up the courage to tell the administration what happened, no one believes her. She's forced to face Bex in class every day. Except now, he has an ax to grind. But Marin isn't about to back down. From start to finish I thoroughly enjoyed this YA feminist read. I will admit that the flow and introductory plot had me some what worried that the book would be a bit stale and redundant. However, the further I read, the more invested I became in Marin’s story and the more compelling I found her spunk and refusal to allow someone else control the narrative of her experience. A wonderfully crafted main character, authors Bushnell and Cotugno offer Marin as a layered young woman who struggles to balance not only the multifaceted roles of a highschool senior but also that of an emerging feminist from a white heterosexual cisgendered perspective. At times, the novel hints at the intersectionality of both feminine identity and feminist ideals but doesn’t fully dive into to some of the grittier and more needed conversations around this topic.Nonetheless, “Rules For Being A Girl” is a standout read amongst a gaggle of feminist minded reads in 2020 and one that should be be missed.
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  • Dawn Woods
    January 1, 1970
    Marin is an intelligent A-grade student, co-editor of the school newspaper with eyes on getting into a prestigious college to study journalism. Her relationship with her best friend is great, her boyfriend is in the popular sporty crowd. Their English teacher, Mr Beckett, is young and is supportive of the school newspaper and enjoys discussing a wide range of books with all students. But one day, having accepted a lift from him Marin finds he steps over the line. She stops him and leaves, but Marin is an intelligent A-grade student, co-editor of the school newspaper with eyes on getting into a prestigious college to study journalism. Her relationship with her best friend is great, her boyfriend is in the popular sporty crowd. Their English teacher, Mr Beckett, is young and is supportive of the school newspaper and enjoys discussing a wide range of books with all students. But one day, having accepted a lift from him Marin finds he steps over the line. She stops him and leaves, but she then finds navigating a new narrative uncomfortable. Should she tell someone? Should she avoid him? Was it her fault? She does tell Chloe her best friend expecting shock and some advice, but finds Chloe’s incredulous reaction difficult to comprehend. But when prompted to report Mr Beckett after an unjust grade on an essay Marin also finds other adults and pupils including her boyfriend do not believe her either. To try to express her frustration Marin writes ‘Rules for being a girl’ about the everyday sexism girls face and starts a feminist bookclub.Matters get worse when Mr Becket takes his strategy of interfering with Marin’s future career further. Although Marin has the support of her parents, she doesn’t involve them to take a great injustice forward. However, she does find her own way to expose the truth. Although I wanted Marin to expose Mr Beckett earlier, trying to deal with the situation herself is something many young people will do. Marin doesn’t always get things right, but this realism makes her a more fully rounded character. This novel raises the question of victim blaming, questions of double standards, of women v men which starts at an early age and are unusually completely overlooked by those institutions who should be educating everyone equally. It raises many valid points to think about for someone coming to read what they thought would be an enjoyable YA school/romance. For discussion it has endless possibilities and should be in every school library.
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