All Eyes on Us
Pretty Little Liars meets People Like Us in this taut, tense thriller about two teens who find their paths intertwined when an anonymous texter threatens to spill their secrets and uproot their lives.PRIVATE NUMBER: Wouldn’t you look better without a cheater on your arm? AMANDA: Who is this?The daughter of small town social climbers, Amanda Kelly is deeply invested in her boyfriend, real estate heir Carter Shaw. He’s kind, ambitious, the town golden boy—but he’s far from perfect. Because behind Amanda’s back, Carter is also dating Rosalie.PRIVATE NUMBER: I’m watching you, Sweetheart. ROSALIE: Who IS this?Rosalie Bell is fighting to remain true to herself and her girlfriend—while concealing her identity from her Christian fundamentalist parents. After years spent in and out of conversion “therapy,” her own safety is her top priority. But maintaining a fake, straight relationship is killing her from the inside.When an anonymous texter ropes Amanda and Rosalie into a bid to take Carter down, the girls become collateral damage—and unlikely allies in a fight to unmask their stalker before Private uproots their lives.PRIVATE NUMBER: You shouldn’t have ignored me. Now look what you made me do…

All Eyes on Us Details

TitleAll Eyes on Us
Author
ReleaseJun 4th, 2019
PublisherMargaret K. McElderry Books
ISBN-139781534404403
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, LGBT, Thriller, Contemporary

All Eyes on Us Review

  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Last year, Kit Frick burst onto the scene with her stellar debut See All the Stars. Now, she has returned with All Eyes on Us and there is no sign of a sophomore slump here! All Eyes on Us delves into the subject matter of LGBTQ relationships and the issue of being yourself when it is unwelcome in your family (to the point of conversion camps, nonetheless.) or being who your family wants you to be - being forced to date the wealthy boy so you can continue to put on a show when your own wealth is Last year, Kit Frick burst onto the scene with her stellar debut See All the Stars. Now, she has returned with All Eyes on Us and there is no sign of a sophomore slump here! All Eyes on Us delves into the subject matter of LGBTQ relationships and the issue of being yourself when it is unwelcome in your family (to the point of conversion camps, nonetheless.) or being who your family wants you to be - being forced to date the wealthy boy so you can continue to put on a show when your own wealth is gone. Interspersed throughout the YA struggles we find Rosalie (our LGBTQ character) and Amanda (our former wealthy popular girl) receiving threatening anonymous texts. Told through multiple perspectives, we get all the fun and glitz of Gossip Girl and all the scheming and OMG-Gasping moments of Pretty Little Liars. Well done on book #2, Kit Frick. I'll certainly be looking forward to book #3. Thank you to Margaret K. McElderry Books for an advance copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Kit Frick
    January 1, 1970
    Update 6/4/19: All Eyes on Us is out in the world today! So excited to introduce you to Rosalie Bell & Amanda Kelly. But beware, S O M E O N E ' S W A T C H I N G ...It's true--All Eyes on Us is my second stand-alone YA thriller with S&S/McElderry Books, and it's coming your way in summer 2019! Here are a few reasons I'm excited to share my second book with all of you:*Girls taking charge of their destinies in the face of immense--and immensely unhealthy--pressure from their families and Update 6/4/19: All Eyes on Us is out in the world today! So excited to introduce you to Rosalie Bell & Amanda Kelly. But beware, S O M E O N E ' S W A T C H I N G ...It's true--All Eyes on Us is my second stand-alone YA thriller with S&S/McElderry Books, and it's coming your way in summer 2019! Here are a few reasons I'm excited to share my second book with all of you:*Girls taking charge of their destinies in the face of immense--and immensely unhealthy--pressure from their families and communities: In All Eyes on Us, we meet Amanda Kelly, the daughter of status-hungry small town social climbers, and Rosalie Bell, the oldest daughter of a family in the Fellowship of Christ fundamentalist denomination. The girls' lives seem quite different at first blush, but both are torn between their true selves and the expectations hanging over them.*Dual-POV: the narrative alternates between Amanda and Rosalie as their stories intertwine until they eventually come together to face the stalker who threatens to uproot both their lives.*Through Rosalie's storyline, All Eyes on Us takes on the unscientific, ineffective, and deeply harmful practice variously known as conversion therapy, reparative therapy, ex-gay ministry, sexual reorientation, and Sexual Orientation Change Efforts (SOCE). Lawmakers and advocates at the National Center for Lesbian Rights, the Southern Poverty Law Center, the Human Rights Campaign, and elsewhere are working tirelessly to ban conversion therapy nationwide and internationally, but there is still a long way to go. All Eyes on Us will include a resource section for LGBTQ+ community members, allies, and advocates who want to join the fight to end conversion therapy.*Did I mention All Eyes on Us is a thriller? The novel tackles some very serious topics within the framework of a suspenseful narrative that I hope will keep you turning pages. A few things you can expect: girls kicking serious ass; a stalker with a private number and major grudge against local golden boy Carter Shaw; an on-page, interracial f/f relationship; parents who make massive mistakes; lavish galas and church basements in small town West Virginia; unlikely friendships and hopeful futures.Content notes: intense flashback scenes depicting abusive conversion "therapy" tactics; homophobia; parental alcoholism; bullying/threats of violence
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  • Kelsea
    January 1, 1970
    FINALLY! A diverse YA thriller that I can wholeheartedly recommend. I suppose I should add a disclaimer here that I have not read ALL of the YA thrillers, so there may be some wonderful diverse stories I’ve missed, of course. (If you know of any, LMK -- I want to read them all!) But from my previous personal experience, I’ve noticed that the thriller genre as a whole (YA and adult) has been rather lacking in diversity.Because of this, I went into reading All Eyes on Us with both a lot of anticip FINALLY! A diverse YA thriller that I can wholeheartedly recommend. I suppose I should add a disclaimer here that I have not read ALL of the YA thrillers, so there may be some wonderful diverse stories I’ve missed, of course. (If you know of any, LMK -- I want to read them all!) But from my previous personal experience, I’ve noticed that the thriller genre as a whole (YA and adult) has been rather lacking in diversity.Because of this, I went into reading All Eyes on Us with both a lot of anticipation and an equal share of trepidation. What if this book just wasn’t as good as I’d hoped?Thankfully, my fears were allayed quite quickly. The book drew me in right from the start. The title is written into the story early on and begins to take on further meaning as the plot progresses. I loved that! It’s always a bonus when the title is meaningful within the context of the story. And the characters and setup? I can tell you I’ve read a TON of thrillers in the last few years (I should count them up, but I’m guessing somewhere around 100) and this premise was truly unique. Not an easy feat these days.All Eyes on Us is told from two perspectives -- AND, rather refreshingly for YA, they are NOT the perspectives of two characters you’re intended to ship together. Neither are they best friends or direct enemies. As it turns out, they’re two teenage girls dating the same guy.I will admit that this had my eyebrows raised -- and it will probably cause some readers to hesitate when they hear it. There is cheating in this story. It’s a thriller and no, it’s not exactly condoned, but at least one character who is a cheating party is set up as a sympathetic character. If that’s an absolute no for you, then here’s your heads up. But if you’re willing to accept imperfect main characters (which, truth to be told, is almost every thriller MC) and let them show you why they’ve become who they are (someone willing to cheat), I think you’ll be in for a real treat.All Eyes On Us goes deep -- especially for a thriller. Kit Frick manages to walk that line between the fun mystery that thriller readers seek and the depth of a well-thought-out YA contemporary that addresses very real issues. Namely, the book shows us the harmfulness of conversion therapy and also serves to highlight what happens when teenagers are put under way too much familial pressure.(As a side note, I’ve seen some mention of the conversion therapy portions feeling extraneous or going too in-depth. And while I absolutely believe that everyone is entitled to their opinion and we won’t all agree on what’s “too much”, I didn’t personally find these sections gratuitous. I thought the scenes were written with exactly the right amount of detail for readers to imagine how horrific it must be for kids and teens who are put through exactly this kind of “therapy” -- it fit well within the bounds of YA thriller territory and offered readers a chance to understand what it must be like and why it needs to be stopped.)I enjoyed the fast pacing and the mystery and creep factor of the anonymous texter. This story was an enjoyable who-dun-it that kept me guessing throughout! The ending was fairly typical for a thriller, but that’s almost certainly a perspective gained through reading WAY too many thrillers. I think experienced thriller readers will enjoy the wrap-up and new thriller readers will LOVE how it ends.I highly recommend this incredible novel and can’t wait to read Kit Frick’s next book -- and her previous book, which is now on my TBR!4.5 stars!Advanced copy provided by Simon and Schuster through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Please note that this review is of the finished book, which I received for an Instagram book tour (no review required). All opinions are my own.
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  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    I will never stop laughing at myself for getting so mad at how "obvious" the answer was and then just...being wrong. Good job, me. Also, really happy they re-did this cover, as I think this one is a way better fit for the content and I hope it gets the book more eyes. I think I recommend this to fans of PEOPLE LIKE US? That's where my brain was going.
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  • Rachel Solomon
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to read an early version of this, and it is EXCELLENT.
  • Iris
    January 1, 1970
    I... I can't decide whether this book sounds horrible or amazing.
  • c,
    January 1, 1970
    On my blog. Rep: lesbian mc, Latina lesbian li, gay side charactersCWs: graphic descriptions of conversion therapy, homophobiaGalley provided by publisherLike the fool that I am, I went into this book believing the two girls in the blurb to be the endgame of this book. They are not. About 80 pages in, when I realised this, my motivation to read it plummeted. And that definitely did affect my rating of the book, but there were other things I was less than comfortable with (one other thing really On my blog. Rep: lesbian mc, Latina lesbian li, gay side charactersCWs: graphic descriptions of conversion therapy, homophobiaGalley provided by publisherLike the fool that I am, I went into this book believing the two girls in the blurb to be the endgame of this book. They are not. About 80 pages in, when I realised this, my motivation to read it plummeted. And that definitely did affect my rating of the book, but there were other things I was less than comfortable with (one other thing really. But it was pretty major).All Eyes on Us is told from two points of view: Amanda’s and Rosalie’s. Amanda is the golden girl dating the golden boy, Carter. Rosalie is also dating Carter, but to get her fundamentalist Christian parents to stop scrutinising her after four years of conversion therapy and praying after she came out to them. Then Amanda starts getting these text messages from an unknown number, telling her that Carter is not all he seems.Except the one thing I struggled with is that Amanda already knows that Carter is cheating on her with Rosalie. She also knows he’s done it in the past. So actually what we ended up with was less two girls who don’t know they’re each being cheated on (even if one of the relationships is a sham), and more of Amanda hating on Rosalie. Amanda has never met Rosalie, Carter is clearly the person in the wrong here, and I know that, sure, Amanda may be struggling to be wholly nice about Rosalie because she loves Carter, but. But. It’s 2019 and I don’t feel like reading a book where the character I’m supposed to feel sympathetic towards is actually horrible to everyone around her, even her supposed friends.And then there’s the problem of Rosalie’s plotline. Rosalie is a lesbian. She came out to her parents four years previously leading to lots of prayers and some conversion therapy. Which we get the occasional graphic flashback to. Now here’s my first issue: if these flashbacks had been explicitly framed as some kind of trauma, maybe PTSD, then I could have stood them. I may have missed some subtext here, for sure, but it just felt… gratuitous almost. It’s clear her parents are homophobic, she says that a lot in the narrative, she mentions the conversion therapy. One thing I do not need is the graphic descriptions of it. I struggle reading books about this, even when the author is themselves part of the LGBT community, even when it’s something they’ve experienced (possibly that’s when I struggle most), so to have these scenes added, essentially just to show us her parents are homophobic and actively harming her? That felt unnecessary.But really, this is what Rosalie’s side of the story revolves around. She’s dating Carter to keep her parents away (while also dating Paulina). She has the opportunity to leave her house, become “extradited” by her church, but she won’t because of her little sister. The private number plays on this by threatening to out her, and by telling Amanda to out her. (The one good thing about this storyline is that she doesn’t get outed, Amanda doesn’t do it, and the private number also suddenly seems to drop that plan.) I never felt like it got more in depth than this. Granted, I didn’t have that much of a clearer picture of Amanda’s motives, and she didn’t feel particularly fleshed out either, but it’s a tiring narrative to read. At this point, I only take the conversion therapy/religious family narratives from ownvoices authors, because it feels kind of like an overrepresented narrative (mostly because it’s all straight authors seem to be able to write about when it comes to lesbian characters especially, but I digress). Why not make Rosalie dating Carter about compulsory heterosexuality? Discuss that instead. But no, it’s just this tiring and overdone plotline for Rosalie.Despite all that complaining, I did like a few things about this book. The writing is very readable, almost compulsively so. I definitely did not see the twist coming either (though I did pick one person who was involved, I didn’t pick the other, and the actual perpetrator was a HOLY SHIT moment). Finally, this is only the second book I’ve read this year that actually has the main character call herself a lesbian (and given the number of f/f books I’ve read, that’s depressing).But ultimately, it was just that storyline with the lesbian character that disappointed me.
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  • Atlas
    January 1, 1970
    * * * * 4 / 5~review to come~This was fun! Like Pretty Little Liars but one of the girls is super rich and the other is part of an extreme Christian movement whilst being a lesbian. Read my reviews on my blog: http://atlasrisingbooks.wordpress.com
  • Lydia Hephzibah
    January 1, 1970
    a pretty solid ya mystery/thriller! I did guess the ending quite a bit before, so it didn't pack nearly as much punch as it could have, but I don't know if that's because it was too obvious or I just read enough of this genre for it to be clearthanks to Netgalley for an eARC!
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  • Karen Whittard
    January 1, 1970
    I you like pretty little liars, Riverdale and Gossip girl, then this is the next book for you. This book is littered with suspense, it is a great book and I really hope that there will be more in the series.
  • Kristi Housman Confessions of a YA Reader
    January 1, 1970
    This sounds sooooo good! I need it now!!!Seriously, this sounds like the perfect book for me. I can't wait to read it.
  • Steff
    January 1, 1970
    Truthfully, All Eyes On Us by Kit Frick isn't really my kind of novel. And I had trouble rating it as a result. I wondered how much of my preconceived opinions about thrillers was playing a role and how much it was actually based on the novel. Eventually, after much deliberation, I arrived at a solid three. All Eyes On Us is a story that follows to girls, Amanda and Rosalie who are both dating the same boy. Amanda, Carter's first girlfriend, has been with him for a long time and appears to be th Truthfully, All Eyes On Us by Kit Frick isn't really my kind of novel. And I had trouble rating it as a result. I wondered how much of my preconceived opinions about thrillers was playing a role and how much it was actually based on the novel. Eventually, after much deliberation, I arrived at a solid three. All Eyes On Us is a story that follows to girls, Amanda and Rosalie who are both dating the same boy. Amanda, Carter's first girlfriend, has been with him for a long time and appears to be the serious one. She and Carter are both from the same upper echelons of society and there's basically a pretty big expectation that the two of them will eventually get married. Amanda sees him as her forever, the only future she really has and this is partially influenced by the fact that her parents are deep in debt and they see their daughter as the cash cow to get them out once she inherits the giant real estate monopoly that Carter's family owns by marrying him. Rosalie is the girl Carter is cheating on her with, someone who lives in a more lower-middle class household. The catch, of course, is that Rosalie is a lesbian who is only dating Carter to appease her conservative, excessively Christan parents who have been submitting her to conversion therapy since she was very young. It's her way of keeping them off her back and keeping her own real relationship with Paulina a secret.Then suddenly Amanda begins receiving somewhat threatening texts that eventually boil down to a stranger telling her she needs to break up with Carter. Due to the fact that Amanda already knows Carter is cheating, she is quick to assume that it is Rosalie who is sending the disturbing messages. There's a lot of girl hate that ensues, which is understandable and I was definitely in that boat as a teenager once upon a time, but it wasn't something I particularly enjoyed about this book and definitely made me feel less sympathetic toward Amanda, who was quick to act like a Grade A bitch as a result, blaming Rosalie instead of Carter for the disgusting behavior. Of course, as Rosalie is not the one texting Amanda, soon both girls are receiving texts from this stranger who is dead set on taking down Carter and basically breaking his heart as publicly as possible.Admittedly, my biggest issues with this book came primarily from the fact that it was moderately predictable and incredibly dull. I had the hardest time getting through it as I spent much of the novel growing increasingly bored, which I imagine is not what's supposed to happen when someone reads a thriller. I didn't feel deeply worried for any of the characters, certain that there would be a good ending for the both of them. There never seemed to be any suspense at all and barring the anger I felt toward Christianity and the church for their disgusting treatment of Rosalie, I never felt much about the story. And the people involved in the threats? I pinned all but one.I'll give the author credit for the fact that I never actually suspected the person who turned out to be the stalker-y texter hellbent on destroying Carter's life. But while I did not have this person pinned down, the reveal didn't matter to me in the slightest. I didn't feel anything when the name came forward nor did I really even care about it? The texter's motivations were dumb to me, though I suppose I could see it? Ultimately I just didn't really care about anything that happened and by the time I got to the end of the novel I was just ready to be done reading.Ultimately, I think it's just very clear that thriller is not a genre I enjoy.I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.| Twitter | Reader Fox Blog | Instagram |
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  • xander
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by goodreads cause I Won It In A Giveaway!okay, let’s start the review. i’m generously rounding my 2.5 rating to 3. so a WHOLE 3 out of 5 stars! *whispering* but really it’s 2.5CONTENT WARNINGS FOR THIS BOOK: excessive description of violent conversion therapyIN THIS BOOK:amanda is dating carter. carter is dating amanda. carter is also dating rosalie. rosalie is dating paulina, because rosalie is a closet lesbian. rosalie is only dating carter because she needs a beard. sorta, amand ARC provided by goodreads cause I Won It In A Giveaway!okay, let’s start the review. i’m generously rounding my 2.5 rating to 3. so a WHOLE 3 out of 5 stars! *whispering* but really it’s 2.5CONTENT WARNINGS FOR THIS BOOK: excessive description of violent conversion therapyIN THIS BOOK:amanda is dating carter. carter is dating amanda. carter is also dating rosalie. rosalie is dating paulina, because rosalie is a closet lesbian. rosalie is only dating carter because she needs a beard. sorta, amanda is carter’s beard. it’s complicated, but not really. amanda starts getting texts from a private number trying to ruin her life. soon rosalie is caught up in the mess. PROBLEMS I HAD WITH THIS BOOK:almost all of it, honestly.-first of all, i got the ARC, but i hope to everything that is good in this world that in the actual copy there is a warning for the very serious CW in this book. -the slang is very outdated and honestly, cringe. please don’t put slang in your books, guys. it will make them outdated and cheesy. -if you’re going to describe your book as “PRETTY LITTLE LIARS MEETS (WHATEVER OTHER PIECE OF MEDIA THEY SAID)”, please, please, please, don’t make your book pretty much exactly like pretty little liars. like, i get that Every Idea Has Been Done Before, and Nothing Is New, and all that, but like, idk. this was too much. -i did not like any of the characters. not one. not one character was likable in my eyes. -rosalie lost most likability as soon as i realized she knew carter had a girlfriend and kept dating him. i know she was protecting herself at all costs, and i GET that, trust me, i do, but. hmph. and amanda was just like. no thanksNOW ONTO THE THING I ENJOYED -the ending. thats it-at first i was like, ok. kinda unpredictable but like, not all the way. and then i was like OK BETTER -so i liked that -and then (view spoiler)[when rosalie moved out of her parents house, i don’t love her but It’s What She Deserves Dot Gif (hide spoiler)]-and i’m glad rosalie and amanda were friends in the end-mostly i’m glad it wasn’t a cliffhanger or a twist ending FINAL THOUGHTSi’m so bummed because i won this book and i really wanted to love it a lot. but in the end, it wasn’t a winner for me. GET IT??? A WINNER. BECAUSE I WON IT. LMAO. okay bye
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  • Tiffany Neal
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, NetGalley for the digital ARC of this YA novel.Kit Frick does an incredible job creating a mystery in a story told from two teenage girls’ perspectives. I found the book to be fast paced, written well, and the characters were easy to get to know and root for. The bigger reason this book is powerful and important deals with the message behind the both MCs’ lives. Amanda’s parents are trying to direct her life so that they can live in a certain social and financial bracket, preventing h Thank you, NetGalley for the digital ARC of this YA novel.Kit Frick does an incredible job creating a mystery in a story told from two teenage girls’ perspectives. I found the book to be fast paced, written well, and the characters were easy to get to know and root for. The bigger reason this book is powerful and important deals with the message behind the both MCs’ lives. Amanda’s parents are trying to direct her life so that they can live in a certain social and financial bracket, preventing her from becoming who she should be and Rosalie’s parents are forcing her to believe in a religion which says she shouldn’t exist. The danger of these religious beliefs is real and Kit Frick brings these serious issues to light. While this could be controversial, it is the reality that many teens face and this book could be the saving grace for these adolescents to escape the abuse their families bring upon them.
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  • Krystianna
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.I am never a fan of thrillers, but lately, I am! All Eyes on Us was no exception, as I was pleasantly surprised and did not see any of the twists and turns coming. The story follows the POVs of two characters, which instantly made the story more interesting for me. I'm a sucker for reading through more than one POV, and two POVs is usually just p I received this book for free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.I am never a fan of thrillers, but lately, I am! All Eyes on Us was no exception, as I was pleasantly surprised and did not see any of the twists and turns coming. The story follows the POVs of two characters, which instantly made the story more interesting for me. I'm a sucker for reading through more than one POV, and two POVs is usually just perfect. So, the reader is immediately introduced to Amanda and Rosalie, two girls who just so happen to be dating the same guy: Carter. Now, Carter is kind of an ass. First of all, he's so ignorant to believe that Amanda, his first girlfriend, has no clue that he's dating another, yet, of course she does. WELL, stuff gets crazy as soon as both Amanda and Rosalie start getting this creepy text messages from a private number. Crazy, right? This number keeps sending them weird messages, like telling Amanda that she needs to break up with him, and then when she doesn't, decorating her entire locker in stuff that looks peculiarly similar to blood. I thoroughly enjoyed this book because of how mysterious it was. I really thought that I knew the direction that the book was taking, and then all of a sudden it went elsewhere! I love it when that happens. I was completely surprised when I found out who the private number actually was. I also loved that this book featured an LGBT character with Rosalie. She's actually just dating Carter because of her family and their opinions towards the fact that Rosalie is LGBT. They even forced her to do conversion therapy and sent her to camps because they weren't happy with her, which is why she fake dates Carter. I loved Rosalie... in fact, she was my favorite character. She grows immensely throughout the novel, and same with Amanda.I would definitely recommend this book, there were so many twists and turns to the point where it was reminiscent of Pretty Little Liars, but in a good way!
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  • Jessica M.
    January 1, 1970
    Rating is 3.5 stars. I received an ARC of this novel due to release in June 2019. It follows two girls named Amanda and Rosalie who are receiving anonymous text messages that turn threatening to their lives. The twist about the person who was sending the messages was great but other parts were predictable. It was an entertaining YA thriller.
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  • Crowinator
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 3.5 stars
  • K8
    January 1, 1970
    I’m slipping through the crowd, making eye contact and smiling, when my phone chimes. Instead of the usual message preview, the words Private Number light up the screen. I glance around, then step out of the hall and into the entryway. Perched on the lip of the Shaws’ stone fountain, my red Louboutins flashing against the blue marble floor that looks like the ocean, I open the text.New Year, New You. Wouldn’t you look better without a cheater on your arm? – Effectively suspenseful and thrilling I’m slipping through the crowd, making eye contact and smiling, when my phone chimes. Instead of the usual message preview, the words Private Number light up the screen. I glance around, then step out of the hall and into the entryway. Perched on the lip of the Shaws’ stone fountain, my red Louboutins flashing against the blue marble floor that looks like the ocean, I open the text.New Year, New You. Wouldn’t you look better without a cheater on your arm? – Effectively suspenseful and thrilling– Characters are easy to empathize with– Characters and motivations are realistic– No huge logic jumps or unrealistic character transformations in the reveal– Beginning when it seems like girls are pitted against each other kind of meh– Author put a lot of research and consideration into depicting Rosalie's experience– Some telling over showing– Some "feels" in prose at key points– Switching between calling parents Mom/Dad and Linda/JackThere's not much to say about All Eyes on Us. In almost every sense, it's.... adequate. All Eyes on Us is primarily a thriller. It never strives to excel in the genre or exceed expectations. However, it never falls short of what it promises. So in this regard, it is solid and satisfactory, but never extraordinary.The one place All Eyes on Us shines is in its character presentation and growth. Chapters switch between first-person narratives of golden girl Amanda Kelly and desperately closeted Rosalie Bell. Amanda is nearly utterly unpleasant at first: who cares about some rich girl with boy trouble? But the reader warms up to her once her stress at home comes to light. Amanda's once rich parents are struggling behind the scenes to climb back to the top after the recession, she faces pressure from her disillusioned and alcoholic mother—who never gave up their rich lifestyle—to stay together with and eventually marry Carter Shaw. The Shaws have real, reliable money.On the flipside, we have Rosalie. Rosalie is instantly a sympathetic character. With working-class roots and an upbringing in the cult-like Followers of Christ branch of Christianity, she is both relatable for her humble origins and easy to feel for in her suffering. She's dating Carter as a smokescreen, assuring her parents the abusive conversion therapy she twice endured worked, while dating her real girlfriend, Pauline, in secret. Rosalie hates living a lie but convinces herself the sacrifice is worth it to avoid revealing the more painful truth.Although the author put an enormous amount of consideration and research into Rosalie's situation, she does come down a little too hard about her living a lie and suffering sometimes, and it feels a twinge inauthentic in those times. But overall, she wrote a relatable character with a hopeful narrative.Again, it's an adequate thriller. It doesn't grip early enough and although it's engaging and page-turning in a casual way, it's never something you'd sacrifice sleep/eating/socializing to finish. The high point is that it feels realistic: the secret admirer never does anything too outlandish or unbelievable, there are multiple smart red herrings along the way, characters never make any poor jumps in logic and when the secret admirer comes to light, their motives are suitably sympathetic but never to the degree the reader would prioritize them over the girls. In the beginning, it does suck a bit at first when it seems like Amanda and Rosalie will be working against one another, but they eventually team up—and in the finale especially—they're a pretty awesome team.The author's writing style was, again, adequate. It's readable, both sophisticated and conversational, and genre-appropriate. There are a few instances of telling over showing, but they never bog the book down. Likewise, there are some filter words—mostly feels—at some key points, but they never do any massive damage to the narrative. My biggest complaint in this department is how the author kept switching between calling the girl's parents by mom/dad/mother/whatever and their given names. In terms of style, it's something a good editor should've caught, and generally, it's just weird hearing Amanda say Mother in one sentence and Linda in the next. Likewise for Rosalie to say Dad and Mom in one breath and Richard and Julia in the next. Pick one that makes sense for the relationship, please.The setting was, well, adequate. It was more Pennsylvania than not, I suppose and you definitely get a feel for the areas the girls are from and in individual settings. A couple of scenes stood out, but overall, it was functional but not exceptional.When it comes to representation, I feel like the author did do a pretty good job of the stuff she did incorporate. Alcoholic parents, parents who place pressure on you, going through a traumatic experience, etc. And I do feel comfortable with how Rosalie's experience was handled, even if was a bit heavyhanded at times. As much as she's gone through, her character arc ends on a positive note. I do wish there were more characters of colour involved. Pauline and her family are excellent, but definitely on the sideline and Amanda's friend is Japanese but... not Japanese? As in, it's great there is an Asian character, but she's Japanese in name in only—the author could easily control+f "Japanese" and replace it with Russian or Jamaican or Cambodian and nothing would change.All Eyes on Us is a decent thriller and nice for a change of pace. But I wouldn't label it a "must read" or prioritize it. It's completely fine, but not exceptional. 
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  • Harker
    January 1, 1970
    Content Warnings: intense flashback scenes depicting abusive conversion "therapy" tactics; homophobia; parental alcoholism; bullying/threats of violence, gaslightingRep: Rep: F/F relationship (1 MC, 1 Mexican-American SC), M/M relationship (SCs)The weight of expectations, the fear of them, are heavy upon the shoulders of Amanda and Rosalie. Amanda's relationship with Carter, the golden boy of the town, is supposed to save her secretly debt ridden family. Rosalie has to keep her girl, Paulina, a Content Warnings: intense flashback scenes depicting abusive conversion "therapy" tactics; homophobia; parental alcoholism; bullying/threats of violence, gaslightingRep: Rep: F/F relationship (1 MC, 1 Mexican-American SC), M/M relationship (SCs)The weight of expectations, the fear of them, are heavy upon the shoulders of Amanda and Rosalie. Amanda's relationship with Carter, the golden boy of the town, is supposed to save her secretly debt ridden family. Rosalie has to keep her girl, Paulina, a secret and continue "dating" Carter or risk being sent back to conversion therapy by her evangelical parents.Then, PRIVATE contacts them.The stakes are insanely high for Amanda and Rosalie, but the ramifications of the actions in All Eyes on Us reach farther than they'd ever expect. What they'll have to do is figure out not only who PRIVATE is, but who they are now and who they're going to be in their respective futures, if they can reclaim them from the spectre of this blackmailer.All Eyes On Us was a book that was hard to put down. It was unnerving because of the eerie feeling of someone watching you over your shoulder, of someone texting you out of the blue and saying the sort of thing that PRIVATE did. How Amanda and Rosalie managed...What I EnjoyedThe characterization of the main characters was enjoyable, even when things were not going particularly well or they were not being "good".Amanda's "better than you" attitude was interesting because it's less crass than I've read in other novels. Instead of overloading the reader with language that's snotty, Amanda's observations of, for example, Ben (a member of her social circle via her boyfriend) felt more polished, like she is more thus her insight is supposed to be. From her noticing the fit of his too-short pants to a too-big coat, she's points these things out without sounding lowbrow.She was multifaceted, even as she was being pressed into what her mother wanted her to be. The glimpses of what she desired, such as pursuing her love of the French language and what that might lead to, the music that she enjoyed even if it wasn't something Carter liked, and so on.Rosalie, basically, because I felt a connection with her. The secrets she has to keep in order to remain close to her girlfriend (Paulina) and her little sister are a lot, but considering her parents are members of a vehemently homophobic church, it's necessary. When she came out to them at thirteen, they forced her, among other things, into conversion therapy. To avoid that again, she pretends to date Carter which is something that leads to the primary dilemma of the book.The "relationship" that Amanda and Rosalie develop was interesting and I liked that. How they end up working together, where they end up, etc.Paulina's family, which unfortunately we don't get to see quite enough, were lovely.What I Didn't EnjoyIt was sometimes a bit difficult to keep track of the side characters, particularly when reading Amanda's point of view because most if not all of the adults were called by their first names. I suppose it was a mark of how they viewed their children as adults in their own right who are taking on responsibilities in social settings that may or may not be beyond their years. Amanda, for example, ruminates early on about how she is being groomed to be at her boyfriend Carter's side, the two of them taking the place of their parents at the head of the town's society. That didn't make it any less confusing. >.<One thing I really didn't like was this line from the end of the book:(view spoiler)[He got really close to destroying both our lives. But if Carter hadn't ruined almost everything, Amanda wouldn't be going to Paris. And I wouldn't be the happiest I've ever been - out, living in Pittsburgh, not looking back. (hide spoiler)]This quote feels very dismissive of Amanda and Rosalie and their own strengths. As if they had to be put through the trauma they experienced from PRIVATE to be able to get to where they are at the end of the book. That irked me a lot.To Sum It UpAll Eyes on Us is an engaging thriller with some content that I would say should be read with caution and particular attention paid to the content warnings.I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Quotes included are from an advanced reader copy and may not reflect the finalized copy.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    I'll preface this review by stating I am a huge fan of the Pretty Little Liars book series.This is billed as PLL-esque, and it is. To a point. This isn't a bad novel by any means -- I quite enjoyed it. But outside of the main characters (Amanda and Rosalie) being blackmailed by a mysterious person who they nickname "Private", this book really isn't much like PLL. PLL's A was almost superhuman at times, but in a deeply unsettling way -- and of course A was never afraid to get their hands dirty I'll preface this review by stating I am a huge fan of the Pretty Little Liars book series.This is billed as PLL-esque, and it is. To a point. This isn't a bad novel by any means -- I quite enjoyed it. But outside of the main characters (Amanda and Rosalie) being blackmailed by a mysterious person who they nickname "Private", this book really isn't much like PLL. PLL's A was almost superhuman at times, but in a deeply unsettling way -- and of course A was never afraid to get their hands dirty and do some very horrible stuff.But "Private" never really takes things that far. There is one incident that is very A-ish, but that's it. Private is pretty tame. And that's what led me to guess the twist about 1/3 of the way into this book. One thing that hurts the book is that, despite the large cast of *introduced* characters, we rarely see outside Amanda and Rosalie's tiny home-life spheres. At least with Rosalie it makes sense, but not so much with Amanda. That's another strike against the PLL comparison. In PLL, you could really feel the difference between Emily and the other Liars' lives in terms of economic status. Here, not so much. PLL sometimes relies too much on brand-name-dropping to make its point, but Amanda's world never really feels like it embodies that kind of uppity nouveau-rich class.It's hard not to compare this book to PLL, but for fairness' sake, I'll touch upon some things I liked:+ Amanda being a decent human being who wouldn't out someone even when threatened with blackmail. After painting Amanda as a semi-snobby rich-bitch, this helped humanize her.+ Rosalie's entire journey regarding her parent's cult-like religion and past trauma with "conversion therapy". I liked how the book took care to present it sensitively while also not shying away from how horrible it is. This reminded me very much of one of my favorite books, The Miseducation of Cameron Post , and that was a huge plus for me.+ Amanda and Rosalie's friendship. + Amanda's circle of friends, who all seemed genuinely supportive and nice for the most part. + The diversity. Outside of Amanda and her girlfriend, Paulina, Amanda has two male friends who are boyfriends. Additionally, Paulina is Latina, and the book makes a point of showing how very white the town of Culver Ridge is (and Roselina is aware that this makes her girlfriend uncomfortable). All in all, it was a solid read. The writing was tight and the plot nicely paced. The characters sounded and acted like real people. I wish it could have been a 500 page book so that some points could have been expanded upon more; I really wanted to spend more time in this world and dig in a bit deeper.If you can't help but compare it to PLL, I think it'll seem a bit disappointing overall. But to be fair, PLL was a story that spanned 18 (!) books. All Eyes on Us is only one novel. Personally, I am interested to see more from Kit Frick.
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  • Kait Armada
    January 1, 1970
    This is a review for an ARC that I received from a friend. Some key items might have changed from my copy to the actual published book. All thoughts are my own.Slowly but surely I’ve been making my way into the YA thriller genre. I was worried at first since YA shouldn’t be passing a certain level of darkness, but All Eyes On US just spoiled me. It had all things that I’ve been craving in its adult counterparts - good twists, believable characters, and a depth that’s more than good guy versus ba This is a review for an ARC that I received from a friend. Some key items might have changed from my copy to the actual published book. All thoughts are my own.Slowly but surely I’ve been making my way into the YA thriller genre. I was worried at first since YA shouldn’t be passing a certain level of darkness, but All Eyes On US just spoiled me. It had all things that I’ve been craving in its adult counterparts - good twists, believable characters, and a depth that’s more than good guy versus bad guy. Though the book didn’t have a morally grey antagonists, the book had a diverse story based in truth. All the things you might have guessed at the beginning of the book… well, don’t set your heart on them. A portion of the foreshadowing was too obvious. I clearly got half of the ending, but while you’re looking at the author waving her left hand, she pulls out a knife with her right hand. Looking back, I can see the obvious signs now. They aren’t in neon lights, but they’re there. This is a great reminder that just because it’s a YA book, does not mean that good storytelling is missing.But it also doesn’t mean the book isn’t a little vanilla - the main reason I couldn’t give the story five stars. That click wasn’t there for me. Maybe I couldn’t connect with the main protagonists. Maybe the all consuming entertainment factor was missing, though I did practically binge the book in two days. Maybe the constant repeat of the characters’ emotions and thoughts was boring. It’s just that the it factor was missing for me. Some of the events felt a little overly dramatic instead of a key part of the story. And the cheating, an integral part to the plot, might cloud a few reader’s thoughts. It was like the annoying bug flying around your head that you can’t ignore. All Eyes On Us is definitely the diverse book needed not just in the thriller genre but in the YA genre as well. Tastefully done, Frick just showed the world that you can make any book diverse, and not just by adding in a diverse character that never goes deeper than surface level. She created an LGBTQ cast and then threw in conversion therapy on top off that. It felt like a lot at times, the flashbacks in Rosalie’s chapters slowed down the story, but how else can the topic be covered in such depth - unless you want to read a depressing book just on conversion therapy. Since the book is so entertaining, most readers will probably stick with it too. The story showed Rosalie and what kids like her go through to get out. And that’s just one character in the story. Look a little deeper and you’ll see a lot of other important topics covered. Overall, All Eyes On Us was a beautifully done book that felt believable in every way. With two distinct point of views, Frick covered manipulative relationships, family struggles, money struggles, and conversion therapy. With that long list, none of it felt too much. Somehow, all the topics blended seamlessly into the overall story. Frick is a new master that we should keep an eye on. A diverse author that I think has a lot still in her tank.
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  • Ruthsic
    January 1, 1970
    Warnings: homophobia, conversion therapy (flashbacks), parental abuse, physical violence, gun violence, deception and gaslightingRep: One of the protagonists is a lesbian, with a Latina love interest; a couple of queer minor charactersA thriller about two girls tied to the same guy, and being harassed because of him, All Eyes of Us has a plot that leaves you guessing to the identity of their anonymous stalker. Amanda and Rosalie are both Carter's girlfriends, and though being aware of the other, Warnings: homophobia, conversion therapy (flashbacks), parental abuse, physical violence, gun violence, deception and gaslightingRep: One of the protagonists is a lesbian, with a Latina love interest; a couple of queer minor charactersA thriller about two girls tied to the same guy, and being harassed because of him, All Eyes of Us has a plot that leaves you guessing to the identity of their anonymous stalker. Amanda and Rosalie are both Carter's girlfriends, and though being aware of the other, they are quiet about it - Amanda because she thinks Rosalie is just a phase he will grow tired of, and because she doesn't want to lose the privilege of being the future Mrs Shaw; Rosalie because Carter is the one way she can make her devout Christian parents believe that she has been 'healed from her homosexuality' through the 'counseling' sessions by the pastor. The girls are at odds at the start, because Amanda doesn't know about Rosalie's real reason to date Carter, and Rosalie fears Amanda's anger over her dating Carter. The anonymous texts start out subtle, but soon progress to threats. As they do so, the suspect pool in the plot increases, but of course the common factor is yet to be found. Every time I thought this person could be it, there isn't enough motive as the threats go up in stakes. As for the girls, they both don't have adults they could turn to, to help them out of their situation. Amanda's mother downplays her fears and basically tells her to suck it up; Rosalie is being threatened to be outed to her parents about the existence of her girlfriend. I wouldn't say this is a typical mystery per se, but it is more of the fears being weaponized against these girls. Amanda's entire identity and image in her town is tied to being Carter's girlfriend, and fear of her mother's ire keeps her in place; she has to learn to break away from those expectations. Now, Rosalie's fear is quite visceral because she has been subjected to conversion therapy twice and she is still traumatized by it; her arc is also to finally break away from the expectations of her family.The voice of the two protagonists and the writing was well done, though Amanda using her parents' first names was confusing at times. Additionally, I felt most of the secondary characters were like props or at the most, red herrings, and underutilized. Overall: it is a good thriller plot, and has well fleshed-out protagonists. Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review from Margaret K. McElderry Books, via Netgalley.
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  • Ally Harris
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't picked up a Kit Frick book before now but the premise of this really intrigued me and I'll definitely be checking out more of their work in future.This follows dual perspectives from both Amanda and Rosalie, girls who are involved with a boy called Carter. The girls start receiving anonymous messages with threats and its clear the girls are being watched. The girls are desperate to find out who 'Private' is before its too late...The way this is written really makes it a quick and easy I haven't picked up a Kit Frick book before now but the premise of this really intrigued me and I'll definitely be checking out more of their work in future.This follows dual perspectives from both Amanda and Rosalie, girls who are involved with a boy called Carter. The girls start receiving anonymous messages with threats and its clear the girls are being watched. The girls are desperate to find out who 'Private' is before its too late...The way this is written really makes it a quick and easy read. I will say that for the first maybe 40% of the book I felt it was lacking in feeling a little. Very much a tell but not show vibe but it improved as the story went on. I honestly preferred the character of Rosalie, the struggles her character faces were so real and jarring and her motives felt clear and understandable. Now, I read a lot of mysteries and I always love to be someone who figures out the whodunnit element and I kind of feel let down by this reveal. When I started this book I honestly said to my husband "I bet its soandso because they're who you least expect." and it totally was. The reveal was handled well I think, there were lots of red herrings so that even when one character is certain another is doubting so you doubt with them so I enjoyed that. After that however, the ending happened so fast, the scene escalated so quickly that it felt really unbelievable for me.***SPOILERS***Amanda was just to stereotyped for me. Throughout the majority of the story she states that shes with Carter because she loves him and everyone knows because their families are well off they're meant to be together. She comes to the realisation almost too late in my opinion that she doesn't actually love him and that just made it difficult for me to like her as much personally.One thing that I'm annoyed about with this is when Rosalie is waiting at Amanda's house, she repeatedly calls the PI to no avail while he follows her girlfriend. Why do we never find out why? Its almost like the PI is just completely forgotten about, and yes while I understand that he didn't solve the case he was still involved. Like, tie up that lose end next time please.***SPOILERS***Overall I think this was enjoyable and at times I couldn't put it down.3/5 Stars
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  • Olivia Farr
    January 1, 1970
    GOSSIP GIRL meets PRETTY LITTLE LIARS in this YA thriller. ALL EYES ON US follows Rosalie and Amanda in back to back chapters. From nearby towns, they lead socioeconomically different lives. Rosalie came out to her parents when she was in middle school, and they put her into horrific conversion therapy that left her with (undiagnosed) PTSD. She now pretends to date Carter to keep her parents from getting too suspicious until she turns 18 and can move away with the girl she loves, Paulina. Carter GOSSIP GIRL meets PRETTY LITTLE LIARS in this YA thriller. ALL EYES ON US follows Rosalie and Amanda in back to back chapters. From nearby towns, they lead socioeconomically different lives. Rosalie came out to her parents when she was in middle school, and they put her into horrific conversion therapy that left her with (undiagnosed) PTSD. She now pretends to date Carter to keep her parents from getting too suspicious until she turns 18 and can move away with the girl she loves, Paulina. Carter doesn't know that she is using him- but he is also cheating on his girlfriend.Amanda is Carter's long-term girlfriend and likely wife one day. Her parents have groomed her for high society where they, Carter's parents, and other socioeconomically elite parents have dictated what their children's lives will be like. Amanda's parents were keeping up the farce of their wealthy lifestyle for years, and her mother now drinks heavily and is likely an alcoholic. Amanda is not sure she wants to be with Carter, not least of which is because she knows how often he cheats on her- however, this is just the way things must be. However, Amanda soon is receiving threatening texts from a private number and fighting to keep herself afloat while uncovering the villain. As we bounce between Amanda and Rosalie, we see the tangled web around their lives.I was pleasantly surprised that I did not guess the ending as easily as I thought I had- I love to be wrong in thrillers! I was not sure whether I liked any of the characters, but it did not matter because I still wanted to know who was behind the private texts and what was happening. One of the really interesting and important elements was about conversion therapy in evangelist/fundamental Christianity and the harm that this can cause. This can start some important discussions.The pacing was pretty well done, though I found it to drag a little in the middle, being caught in what felt like a loop, but it did maintain the thriller/suspense feel all the way through. If you are looking for a dark and twisty GOSSIP GIRL-style read, I would highly recommend picking this one up!Please note that I received an ARC from the publisher through netgalley. All opinions are my own.
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  • Mari Johnston
    January 1, 1970
    This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl.Content Warnings: conversion therapy, homophobia, alcoholism, underage drinking, kidnapping, violence, minor being drugged, gaslightingGoing into All Eyes on Us I wasn’t expecting anything other than a thriller, but Kit Frick delivered so much more. We see two girls, who were once enemies, band together to take down the anonymous texter threatening their lives. A story of survival, hope, and choosing your own destiny, All This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl.Content Warnings: conversion therapy, homophobia, alcoholism, underage drinking, kidnapping, violence, minor being drugged, gaslightingGoing into All Eyes on Us I wasn’t expecting anything other than a thriller, but Kit Frick delivered so much more. We see two girls, who were once enemies, band together to take down the anonymous texter threatening their lives. A story of survival, hope, and choosing your own destiny, All Eyes on Us is one you’ll want to read and tell your friends about.It took me about 120 pages before I felt fully invested in this story. From the beginning, I liked Amanda, but not well enough to really care. Rosalie was the one I fell instantly in love with and I found myself looking forward to her POV chapters more than Amanda’s. Seeing the trauma and lasting effects from her conversion therapy broke my heart. I admired her resilience and courage to continue being who she was despite all of the odds being stacked against her.The overall thriller aspect of the novel never really appealed to me. I didn’t ever feel like the stakes were high enough, until the very end, to make me want to keep turning pages. If it weren’t for my desire to see these characters stand up for themselves and take charge or their lives, I probably wouldn’t have continued. I just wish there had been a lot more action as opposed to mostly threats from an anonymous texter.What makes this book completely worth reading are the themes present throughout. Amanda is a very messy and not always good character who was groomed to believe she had to marry the appropriate person. The self-worth she discoveries is so important and something so many young girls struggle with while dealing with all the pressures of who they should be. This story also shows that after being faced with unspeakable trauma, life can go on. It won’t necessarily be easy, but it’s possible.TL;DR: A story of survival, hope, and choosing your own destiny, All Eyes on Us is one you’ll want to read and tell your friends about.A digital ARC was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 STARSAmanda knows how the rest of her life will play out. She’ll marry Carter Shaw, you know, the son of the real estate tycoons. Like her mother, she’ll host charity fund raisers on the arm of her husband. Rosalie just wants to avoid being sent back for conversion therapy. She’s only dating rich guy Carter Shaw to appease her parents and hopefully avoid being caught with her girlfriend Pauline. Then both girls start getting anonymous texts about dating a cheater. Things are about to get dan 3.5 STARSAmanda knows how the rest of her life will play out. She’ll marry Carter Shaw, you know, the son of the real estate tycoons. Like her mother, she’ll host charity fund raisers on the arm of her husband. Rosalie just wants to avoid being sent back for conversion therapy. She’s only dating rich guy Carter Shaw to appease her parents and hopefully avoid being caught with her girlfriend Pauline. Then both girls start getting anonymous texts about dating a cheater. Things are about to get dangerous.Kit Frick writes prose that flows seamlessly from page to page. Both Rosalie and Amanda were flawed, yet sympathetic characters. Rosalie hopes to survive the few months until her eighteenth birthday and graduation so she and Pauline can get an apartment and start college, away from the holy roller church her parents attend. Her parents and the church were as one dimensional as you’d expect, not a flaw in Frick’s writing but the reality of a homophobic church.Amanda is in her own family prison, though she’s only realizing the extent that her mother is willing to use her for future financial security and social climbing. No one has ever told her she can be more than the future Mrs. Shaw, or that she should want more for herself.I honestly didn’t see what either girl saw in Carter. Rosalie used him as a beard, but also seemed to like his personality. Amanda loved him, but I didn’t see the draw, especially after she found out he was cheating. I felt so sorry when her mother basically said to suck it up.The mystery as to Private’s identity had changing theories right and left. The best part of ALL EYES ON US was the big reveal, which I never saw coming.I didn’t enjoy Frick’s sophomore effort ALL EYES ON US as much as her debut, SEE ALL THE STARS. The story moved slowly and lacked tension until the last 20%. Most readers will enjoy the story, though I don’t think they’ll rush to re-read or list it as a favorite.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to EdelweissPlus and the publisher for providing me with an eARC of this title for review. All opinions are my own.Unfortunately, this was not the mystery/thriller that I was expecting to read. Frick's first novel was fantastic and I was very excited to get my hands on this one. BUT, I was somewhat disappointed. It wasn't truly a thriller until over halfway through and it wasn't really a contemporary realistic story either. It tried to straddle the line of a mystery/thriller with ano Many thanks to EdelweissPlus and the publisher for providing me with an eARC of this title for review. All opinions are my own.Unfortunately, this was not the mystery/thriller that I was expecting to read. Frick's first novel was fantastic and I was very excited to get my hands on this one. BUT, I was somewhat disappointed. It wasn't truly a thriller until over halfway through and it wasn't really a contemporary realistic story either. It tried to straddle the line of a mystery/thriller with anonymous, threatening texts and two girls who are trying to figure out who is after them, while also trying to be a story about the constraints for young women living in a patriarchal society that has placed certain expectations on them. And, sadly, it falls a bit short on both marks without every fully realizing its potential. Part of this is because there was a serious lack of editing in the first half of the book-there were repeated conversations, thoughts, actions, etc partly due to the dual narrative and partly due to the fact that there was very little action and lots of thought about possible actions. Final verdict: this is a second or third purchase for large YA collections with fans of mystery/thrillers featuring dual perspectives. The perspective of Rosalie is interesting and unique since she is a lesbian who has gone through conversion "therapy" due to her family's belief in the Fellowship of Christ church doctrines, but there isn't enough information given on her time in "treatment" to really do that narrative credit. Which is unfortunate, because that is a topic that kids need to read about.
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  • Louise
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to netgalley and simon and schuster for provinding an e copy in exchange for an honest review.All Eyes on Us is the second book from author Kit Frick, I hadn’t read her first one. So I went into this one just from the synopsis and loved it. I’m a sucker for thrillers and young adult books, so combine the two and I’m sold. Reading this at first, I did find myself disliking Amanda slightly. She is popular and her family are social climbers. They care about keeping up appearances and buyi Thank you to netgalley and simon and schuster for provinding an e copy in exchange for an honest review.All Eyes on Us is the second book from author Kit Frick, I hadn’t read her first one. So I went into this one just from the synopsis and loved it. I’m a sucker for thrillers and young adult books, so combine the two and I’m sold. Reading this at first, I did find myself disliking Amanda slightly. She is popular and her family are social climbers. They care about keeping up appearances and buying expensive things. It’s a world I know nothing of. As the story progressed, Amanda’s character evolved, and you could see that a lot of this was due to her upbringing. Rosalie is a very different character. She is struggling to keep who she is a secret from her deeply religious Christian family. Seeing her girlfriend while dating Carter, Amanda’s boyfriend, to keep her secret. The book was a little slow to start with, introducing the two characters but it did pick up quite quickly. The anonymous texter reminiscent of Pretty Little Liars. Private was like A, though unlike Pretty Little Liars I wasn’t left annoyed, or confused after the big reveal. (PLL fans, you know how disappointing that reveal was at the end of the 7th season!)I found myself keeping guessing as to who was behind the private number, and keep changing my mind as to who I thought this was. Some people may think the culprit is obvious, but other like me, wont.I think if you liked the show Pretty Little Liars, you’ll like this.
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  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    I received a digital ARC of this title from Edelweiss for an honest review.Amanda and Carter have been dating for years. Small Town royalty, they're expected to marry after college. But Amanda's keeping the secret of their family's extreme debt a secret from everyone and is just trying to hold on to Carter until they eventually marry. Rosalie is happy in a relationship with her girlfriend Pau, but living in an extreme fundamentalist Christian family, she has to hide who she is to keep from havin I received a digital ARC of this title from Edelweiss for an honest review.Amanda and Carter have been dating for years. Small Town royalty, they're expected to marry after college. But Amanda's keeping the secret of their family's extreme debt a secret from everyone and is just trying to hold on to Carter until they eventually marry. Rosalie is happy in a relationship with her girlfriend Pau, but living in an extreme fundamentalist Christian family, she has to hide who she is to keep from having to return to conversion "therapy" and to maintain a relationship with her little sister. So, she begins dating Carter to appease her parents. But soon both girls are getting threatening text messages, threatening to harm them and/or Carter if they don't fess up.Rosalie's story was SO hard to read. And I really disliked Amanda in the beginning. But once we found out more about her, I really turned around. This books was good, but it was very difficult to read.
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  • C.L. Greenwald
    January 1, 1970
    These Kit Frick thrillers just keep getting better and better. It's so rare for authors to truly nail dual POV with two female protagonists, but both Rosalie and Amanda's voices drip off the page, the wholly compelling narrative of how their one commonality -- boyfriend Carter -- turns into a stalking case that intertwines their lives more and more. Both narrators are fully complex, compelling, breathing characters, Frick inviting us into each of their different searches for happiness and identi These Kit Frick thrillers just keep getting better and better. It's so rare for authors to truly nail dual POV with two female protagonists, but both Rosalie and Amanda's voices drip off the page, the wholly compelling narrative of how their one commonality -- boyfriend Carter -- turns into a stalking case that intertwines their lives more and more. Both narrators are fully complex, compelling, breathing characters, Frick inviting us into each of their different searches for happiness and identity and watch as these futures are slowly unraveled within the thriller plot. Twists around every corner, a mystery that I ultimately didn't see coming, and an extremely poignant look at both feminist and LGBTQ+ struggles and triumphs. And then, of course, Frick's prose is gorgeous as always. Highly recommend!!
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