Little Leaders
'Athletes, especially black athletes, must use every resource at their command to right things that are wrong' - Arthur Ashe FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, VASHTI HARRISON Meet the little leaders. They're brave. They're exceptional. They changed the world.Did you know that the father of African cinema was originally a bricklayer?Or that Vogue's editor-at-large read his first Vogue magazine in his local library?Learn all about the exceptional black men who broke barriers and fought injustice to realise their dreams and make the world a better place.With Vashti Harrison's beautiful illustrations and illuminating writing, discover the stories of black men from all walks of life, including:Doctor Harold MoodyDiplomat Kofi AnnanActivist Paul StephensonArchitect Sir David AdjayeComic book author Dwayne McDuffie Musician PrinceYour own little leaders will be inspired to take on the world after learning about these incredible men.

Little Leaders Details

TitleLittle Leaders
Author
ReleaseNov 21st, 2019
PublisherPuffin
ISBN-139780241407158
Rating
GenreHistory, Childrens, Cultural, African American, Nonfiction

Little Leaders Review

  • MarQuis
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve had such a deep admiration for Vashti Harrison’s “Little Leaders” series since I bought the very first book for my then 4-year-old little sister. I was so grateful that such a book existed so that everyone, especially young Black girls, could connect with Black history and to be able to identify with the extraordinary historical figures represented in the book. I was beside myself (squealed with glee even) when Vashti Harrison announced that this book centering Black male historical figures I’ve had such a deep admiration for Vashti Harrison’s “Little Leaders” series since I bought the very first book for my then 4-year-old little sister. I was so grateful that such a book existed so that everyone, especially young Black girls, could connect with Black history and to be able to identify with the extraordinary historical figures represented in the book. I was beside myself (squealed with glee even) when Vashti Harrison announced that this book centering Black male historical figures was forthcoming. And I’m completely unembarrassed to say that I bought this book for myself, a 28 year old Black male-identifying person. More specifically, I bought it for my young boy self. It’s the sort of book I didn’t know I needed and yet yearned for in my developing years as a reader. I hugged this book to my chest as I’d have done as an 8-year-old and read it slowly, taking in four figures at a time. I was elated as I read about people familiar to me and people whose stories I was discovering for the very first time, such as Eddie Mabo and Charles Henry Turner. What I love most about the art is that the historical figures, who achieved much of what they’re known for as adults, are drawn like young boys which further encourages the connection young children should make with history and the people who shape it. This would make a perfect Christmas gift for everyone but especially those Black boys (and men) who were made to believe, as Arturo Schomburg had been, that Black people had achieved nothing and had no history worth learning about. This book, and the MANY others beyond children’s literature that preceded it, completely disproves such a destructive lie.
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  • Jourdan Coliman
    January 1, 1970
    I just got this book for our school library. I think this is a great addition and helps bring diversity into our library collection. In this book the reader is exposed to various men in black history who are considered legends. It provides vignettes of various men. There are a couple ways that this could be used in the classroom. First, it could be done as a read aloud and then followed but comprehension questions/ discussion. Second, we could do one man a week or day and then follow up doing I just got this book for our school library. I think this is a great addition and helps bring diversity into our library collection. In this book the reader is exposed to various men in black history who are considered legends. It provides vignettes of various men. There are a couple ways that this could be used in the classroom. First, it could be done as a read aloud and then followed but comprehension questions/ discussion. Second, we could do one man a week or day and then follow up doing additional research. I would have students keep a research journal and write their findings for each legend. The third way this could be taught is by doing a storyboard activity. Students would move around the room and each legend would be a different station. Each station would include reading the page of the book, and activity, and a writing response. The possibilities are endless and creativity can abound while using this book in the classroom.
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