Jubilee
Adapted from historical texts and rare African-American cookbooks, the 125 recipes of Jubilee paint a rich, varied picture of the true history of African-American cooking: a cuisine far beyond soul food.Toni Tipton-Martin, the first African-American food editor of a daily American newspaper, is the author of the James Beard Award-winning The Jemima Code, a history of African-American cooking found in--and between--the lines of three centuries' worth of African-American cookbooks. Tipton-Martin builds on that research in Jubilee, adapting recipes from those historic texts for the modern kitchen. What we find is a world of African-American cuisine--made by enslaved master chefs, free caterers, and black entrepreneurs and culinary stars--that goes far beyond soul food. It's a cuisine that was developed in the homes of the elite and middle class; that takes inspiration from around the globe; that is a diverse, varied style of cooking that has created much of what we know of as American cuisine.

Jubilee Details

TitleJubilee
Author
ReleaseNov 5th, 2019
PublisherClarkson Potter Publishers
ISBN-139781524761738
Rating
GenreFood and Drink, Cookbooks, Food, Cooking, Nonfiction, Reference

Jubilee Review

  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    Like with most modern and recent cookbooks, Jubilee is beautifully photographed. Along with these food-porn worthy shots are wonderfully researched recipes. She uses her expertise (and I’m sure her expansive library) to introduce us to 200 years of African American cooking and its influence on not only Southern but American cuisine.Although the book is not jam packed with recipes, what is included is quality stuff. Since the thermometer is dipping down to freezing here some nights, I immediately Like with most modern and recent cookbooks, Jubilee is beautifully photographed. Along with these food-porn worthy shots are wonderfully researched recipes. She uses her expertise (and I’m sure her expansive library) to introduce us to 200 years of African American cooking and its influence on not only Southern but American cuisine.Although the book is not jam packed with recipes, what is included is quality stuff. Since the thermometer is dipping down to freezing here some nights, I immediately went to the soup section and landed on a rich but simple sounding recipe: Peanut Soup.Tipton-Martin made this soup even richer by increasing the peanut butter and using cream instead of plain milk.I whipped this up in about thirty minutes, from chopping board to table. It’s a perfect weeknight meal.As the holidays near, I will be delving into the “Sides and Vegetables” section (A Little Bit of This, a Little Bit of That). I have my eye on most of the sides like Baked Beans, Black-Eyed Peas and Rice, Louisiana Red Beans and Rice, Red Rice, Okra Pilaf, Rice and Peas with Coconut and Baked Macaroni and Cheese.Also, has the holidays near, I would like to suggest that this book could make a fantastic holiday present for the cook on your gift list.
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  • Reading Fool
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a history book as much as it is a cookbook. Toni Tipton-Martin honors more than 200 years of African-American cooking in the 125 recipes in this book. Most of the recipes remind me of a culinary tour of the South, and it made my mouth water and left me itching to get in the kitchen and start cooking. Which I did. I have prepared the Seafood Gumbo, Fruit Fritters, and Lamb Curry. All were a delight to make and to share with my family. The photography in the book is stunning. This This book is a history book as much as it is a cookbook. Toni Tipton-Martin honors more than 200 years of African-American cooking in the 125 recipes in this book. Most of the recipes remind me of a culinary tour of the South, and it made my mouth water and left me itching to get in the kitchen and start cooking. Which I did. I have prepared the Seafood Gumbo, Fruit Fritters, and Lamb Curry. All were a delight to make and to share with my family. The photography in the book is stunning. This would make a wonderful gift for all home cooks, novice and experienced alike.Thanks for the free book, @clarksonpotter!
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  • Dominique
    January 1, 1970
    I was pleasantly surprised to find this book at my door (thanks for the free book, @clarksonpotter). Not only does it have a wide variety of recipes that sound amazing, like crawfish bisque & coconut-lemon layer cake, it provides a historical look at recipes I might not have found otherwise (gumbo from 1881 & crab soup from 1930, for example) & stories about the author's experiences. The photography is appetizingly beautiful. I can't wait to cook my way through this book.
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  • Elizabeth Psyck
    January 1, 1970
    I was familiar with this author from The Jemima Code, so I knew it was going to be good, but this book exceeded all of my expectations. The photography is beautiful, the recipes are accessible, and the writing style really pulled me in. I rarely read the little vignettes or background information in cookbooks, but with this book, I read them all. I learned so much about the history of African American cooking, cuisine, and social history.Thanks for the free book, @ClarksonPotter!
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Well written, and beautifully photographed. I learned a lot about the history of African-American cooking and how much more it is than fried chicken and soul food.My favorite part was the inclusion of recipe snippets taken from Tipton-Martin's extensive collection of antique cookbooks. They added a fascinating dynamic to modern recipes.
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