The Real Sherlock
Sherlock Holmes is the most portrayed fictional character of all time, and he has been reimagined by actors, playwrights and directors over centuries - but who is the creator behind the detective?Arthur Conan Doyle’s own life was often stranger than fiction, and his most famous characters’ stories and personalities bear more than a passing resemblance to his own life and his closest friends. Biographer and broadcaster Lucinda Hawksley gains unprecedented access to a treasure trove of Doyle’s never-before-seen personal letters and diaries. This is a chance for Sherlock fans to see their detective hero and his creator as they’ve never seen them before.Through interviews with Doyle aficionados, academics, actors and family members, we explore Doyle’s travels and sailing adventures across the globe, his pioneering work as a doctor, his life in the Freemasons and his fights against miscarriages of justice. As well as his many triumphs, we will also explore the challenges he faced, from the death of his first wife and son to the initial rejection he faced as an author.We will also look beyond Sherlock to Doyle’s other great works including his fantasy and science fiction novels and hear how one of his most famous - The Lost World - part-inspired Michael Crichton’s book of the same name, which became the successful Jurassic Park film franchise.As an Audio Show - free for members - when you add The Real Sherlock to your library, you'll get all 6 episodes, each with a runtime of about 25 minutes. ©2019 Audible, Ltd. (P)2019 Audible, Ltd.

The Real Sherlock Details

TitleThe Real Sherlock
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 15th, 2020
PublisherAudible Original
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Biography, Audiobook, History

The Real Sherlock Review

  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    I have read a few Sherlock Holmes books and enjoyed them. I never knew anything about Sir Author Conan Doyle. He had quite an interesting life! It was great that we were able to hear old recordings from his daughter and interviews with some great grandchildren. I found his story was told too succinctly. I feel there is a lot more to know. The narration was good. There were a lot of voices and I know there was one person narrating, one person reading diary excerpts, one person reading other I have read a few Sherlock Holmes books and enjoyed them. I never knew anything about Sir Author Conan Doyle. He had quite an interesting life! It was great that we were able to hear old recordings from his daughter and interviews with some great grandchildren. I found his story was told too succinctly. I feel there is a lot more to know. The narration was good. There were a lot of voices and I know there was one person narrating, one person reading diary excerpts, one person reading other things etc. and then the interviews. I couldn't keep them straight. So that's why overall, it's 4 stars out of 5.
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  • MTK
    January 1, 1970
    Boring and pointless. This is a series of interviews about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, mostly with people who have never met him, like academics who wrote about him and actors who performed his characters, aside from his daughter. None of the things they have to say is of much interest, nor do they offer any particular insight. Even for Holmes fans (and I am one), it was a waste of time; I am just glad I didn't pay anything for this. Also, the running time is about half of what it says in the Boring and pointless. This is a series of interviews about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, mostly with people who have never met him, like academics who wrote about him and actors who performed his characters, aside from his daughter. None of the things they have to say is of much interest, nor do they offer any particular insight. Even for Holmes fans (and I am one), it was a waste of time; I am just glad I didn't pay anything for this. Also, the running time is about half of what it says in the description, as there is a lot of repetition.
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  • A.M.
    January 1, 1970
    Like a lot of Doyle fans I read the Holmes books as a child, and covered them with plastic - it was my librarian phase - what can I say?I remember later, discovering that Doyle had dabbled in the occult and the supernatural and that always seemed so odd to me; the Cottingley Fairies being one of the more infamous ones. But as someone pointed out in this, that case didnt get debunked until the 1980s.And really, it makes a lot of sense that people who had lost so many people they loved in both the Like a lot of Doyle fans I read the Holmes books as a child, and covered them with plastic - it was my librarian phase - what can I say?I remember later, discovering that Doyle had dabbled in the occult and the supernatural and that always seemed so odd to me; the Cottingley Fairies being one of the more infamous ones. But as someone pointed out in this, that case didn’t get debunked until the 1980’s.And really, it makes a lot of sense that people who had lost so many people they loved in both the Boer War and the First World War would be looking for ways to keep in contact with them even if it meant knocking on a table.This doesn’t go into a lot of depth but interestingly it has recording of Doyle, and his daughter talking about his life. And his descendants share his journals, memorabilia and a few extra items - like his nightshirt? Wtf?But really, getting actors who played him to talk about what they THINK he was thinking/ feeling is a big stretch.One for the die hard fans, perhaps.But do yourself a favour and go download all his NON Sherlock works from Amazon; they’re all free so you have no excuses.3 stars
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    You can never tell with these free Audible productions, but this one was worth listening too, if nothing more than they talk about his non-Holmes books as well. I don't think I have read anything but his Holmes, but I do like historical fiction so I now have some more books added to my list.The other areas of interest are his activities during the Boer War, his interest and concern in the build up of Germanic militarism before WWI, and the interviews with his daughter. He was a colourful, You can never tell with these free Audible productions, but this one was worth listening too, if nothing more than they talk about his non-Holmes books as well. I don't think I have read anything but his Holmes, but I do like historical fiction so I now have some more books added to my list.The other areas of interest are his activities during the Boer War, his interest and concern in the build up of Germanic militarism before WWI, and the interviews with his daughter. He was a colourful, amazing man who lived life to the full. He was kind hearted and fought for the underdog. He never sacrificed his artistic integrity for cash. A worthy hero in his own write (apologies for the bad pun). 😊
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  • Željko Filipin
    January 1, 1970
    I've read all books on Sherlock Holmes and I really liked them. I was looking forward to learning more about it's creator. I liked the "book" (actually a few podcasts). It was somehow annoying that at the end of every episode there was a short teaser for the next one, and pretty much the same teaser was then repeated at the beginning of the next episode. If you listen to multiple episodes in a row (as I frequently do) you hear the same teaser two times in a few minutes. Then, when you finally I've read all books on Sherlock Holmes and I really liked them. I was looking forward to learning more about it's creator. I liked the "book" (actually a few podcasts). It was somehow annoying that at the end of every episode there was a short teaser for the next one, and pretty much the same teaser was then repeated at the beginning of the next episode. If you listen to multiple episodes in a row (as I frequently do) you hear the same teaser two times in a few minutes. Then, when you finally hear the content, it's the third time you're listening to the exactly same thing in the last 10-30 minutes.
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  • Rob Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting series which uncovers the man behind Sherlock Holmes. They're mostly composed of interviews with actors and academics. Relevant snippets of his works are read out too. There is some repetition:- this is what I'll tell you,- this is what I told you,- and, this is what I'm going to tell youMaybe have fewer, and slightly longer episodes instead? Worth listening to, if you're going to embark on his reading his books.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    A surprisingly interesting documentary bio about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - doctor, contemporary of Winston Churchill, inspirer of Michael Crichton, and ultimately, author of the Sherlock Holmes series of stories.
  • Blair Hodgkinson
    January 1, 1970
    These short podcasts shed some interesting light on the life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I had read a little on the subject before, but I still learned some new information in these brief chapters. For fans of Holmes or Doyle, this podcast should be quite welcome.
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    3.25
  • Emma Dargue
    January 1, 1970
    Good audio book about the creator of one of the greatest detectives but also goes into good detail about his private lives and his other literary creations.
  • Pamela Scott
    January 1, 1970
    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres...I enjoyed listening to this Audible Show. Im a fan of Sherlock Holmes. I own the complete collection of his works from Audible and listened to the whole thing when I briefly worked night-shift last year. I knew very little about his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle. The Real Sherlock is fascinating. I knew Michael Crichton wrote a book called The Lost World which led to the Jurassic Park film franchise but had no idea that Arthur Conan Doyle started it all. Im https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres...I enjoyed listening to this Audible Show. I’m a fan of Sherlock Holmes. I own the complete collection of his works from Audible and listened to the whole thing when I briefly worked night-shift last year. I knew very little about his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle. The Real Sherlock is fascinating. I knew Michael Crichton wrote a book called The Lost World which led to the Jurassic Park film franchise but had no idea that Arthur Conan Doyle started it all. I’m the kind of reader who loves to know about the personal life and inner workings of writers so The Real Sherlock was a treat.
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