So Lucky
IS ANYONE’S LIFE . . .Beth shows that women really can have it all.Ruby lives life by her own rules.And then there’s Lauren, living the dream.AS PERFECT AS IT LOOKS? Beth hasn’t had sex in a year.Ruby feels like she’s failing.Lauren’s happiness is fake news.And it just takes one shocking event to make the truth come tumbling out…Fearless, frank and for everyone who’s ever doubted themselves, So Lucky is the straight-talking new novel from the Sunday Times bestseller. Actually, you’re pretty f****** lucky to be you.Pre-order the bold new novel from Dawn O’Porter, the bestselling author of The Cows.‘A total joy’ Matt Haig‘Compulsively gripping and taps into the shame and self-hatred we *all* battle with. It is also very, very funny’ Sara Pascoe

So Lucky Details

TitleSo Lucky
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 31st, 2019
PublisherHarperCollins
ISBN-139780008126070
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary

So Lucky Review

  • Brooke - One Woman's Brief Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    *www.onewomansbbr.wordpress.com*www.facebook.com/onewomansbbr**4.5 stars**So Lucky by Dawn O'Porter. (2019). Is anyone's life as perfect as it looks? Beth shows that women really can have it all; Ruby lives life by her own rules; Lauren is living the dream. But. Beth hasn't had sex in a year. Ruby feels like she's failing. Lauren's happiness is really just fake news. All it takes is one shocking event to make the truth come tumbling out...This book is seriously funny. As in, genuine laugh out *www.onewomansbbr.wordpress.com*www.facebook.com/onewomansbbr**4.5 stars**So Lucky by Dawn O'Porter. (2019). Is anyone's life as perfect as it looks? Beth shows that women really can have it all; Ruby lives life by her own rules; Lauren is living the dream. But. Beth hasn't had sex in a year. Ruby feels like she's failing. Lauren's happiness is really just fake news. All it takes is one shocking event to make the truth come tumbling out...This book is seriously funny. As in, genuine laugh out loud and snorting at parts. However...if you are at all prudish, this humour is not for you. Consider yourself warned. What I also really liked about this story was that it really pushed the point that EVERY woman has her own respective struggle going on that others cannot see, and sometimes we are our own harshest critics. The narrative alternates between Ruby and Beth, with pages here and there describing Lauren's Instagram posts and highlighting the variety of comments that followers post. Lauren does get a bigger look in the last third but through Beth/Ruby's perspectives. A fabulous read for me that was super easy to get through and kept me engaged the whole time - happily recommend for those who like a bit of cheeky humour along with some important themes.
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  • Abbie | ab_reads
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you @tandemcollectiveuk for my free copy of So Lucky by Dawn O’Porter! A little outside of my usual comfort zone, but I’m finding more and more that books that push me out of that zone are a lot of fun! This book certainly serves up a tonne of cheeky fun, but there are more serious themes tackled here too..The story is told via the alternating perspectives of Ruby and Beth (and occasional Instagram posts from social media celebrity Lauren). Ruby is struggling to manage a health condition Thank you @tandemcollectiveuk for my free copy of So Lucky by Dawn O’Porter! A little outside of my usual comfort zone, but I’m finding more and more that books that push me out of that zone are a lot of fun! This book certainly serves up a tonne of cheeky fun, but there are more serious themes tackled here too..The story is told via the alternating perspectives of Ruby and Beth (and occasional Instagram posts from social media celebrity Lauren). Ruby is struggling to manage a health condition which severely affects her self esteem, as well as struggling to bond with her three and a half year old daughter as a single mum. Beth is a wedding planner, planning the celebrity wedding of the year with her assistant Risky while her husband (who refuses to touch her) looks after their newborn son at home..I read half of of So Lucky on the train and honestly I was snorting with laughter, praying the person behind me couldn’t read it! I liked how O’Porter embraced female sexuality, and Risky was hilarious if a little over the top at times. The characters are far from perfect people, but she makes them likeable all the same in the end. She also made a great point about how often, even today, dads performing at the bare minimum are lauded are super dads when actually they are just BEING A PARENT and the mother would be expected to do all that and more with not a glimmer of recognition..Social media also plays a large role in the book, as the third character, Lauren, is initially portrayed as having the perfect life on Instagram, reminding us that while it might seem like everyone’s having a grand old time on the Internet, you never know what’s going on in their lives or their inner struggles - I’m not sure whether this would have been more effective a few years ago, OR whether the bookstagram corner of the internet is just more open with their struggles, but I feel like people are more aware now of the pitfalls of social media. Still, it’s good to be reminded and some people might still not realise this!.A saucy, funny, quick read!
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  • Sheri
    January 1, 1970
    I loved The Cows, so I was thrilled to be invited to read Dawn O’Porter’s new book, and it was indeed a fantastic read.Ruby struggles both with her three-year-old daughter Bonnie, who she finds difficult to manage, and with a physical condition which she finds deeply shaming and isolating. New mother Beth - in a reversal of stereotype - can’t deal with her husband’s lack of interest in sex (though their problems clearly run deeper). And “social media influencer” Lauren, about to be married to I loved The Cows, so I was thrilled to be invited to read Dawn O’Porter’s new book, and it was indeed a fantastic read.Ruby struggles both with her three-year-old daughter Bonnie, who she finds difficult to manage, and with a physical condition which she finds deeply shaming and isolating. New mother Beth - in a reversal of stereotype - can’t deal with her husband’s lack of interest in sex (though their problems clearly run deeper). And “social media influencer” Lauren, about to be married to celebrity entrepreneur Gavin, shows off her Instagram-perfect life and body to adoring fans, but the rumours about her fiancé just won’t go away.All are involved in different ways in selling images of perfection. Ruby earns her living - well aware of the ironies and dodgy ethics - by digitally altering photographs to make women appear flawless; Lauren portrays a carefully curated image of her perfect life and gorgeous self on social media; Beth and her young assistant, the strangely named Risky, plan perfect weddings for the rich and famous (and Beth has an apparently enviable marriage of her own).This book is spot on in so many ways, from swipes at celebrities who express “fashionable” mental health issues and “keeping it real” in terms of body image while constantly portraying unrealistically perfect lives and bodies, to Beth’s assistant’s well meant and sincerely held but sometimes naive conceptions of feminism.Ultimately it’s about accepting and making visible - literally, in some cases - what lies beneath the surface, and ends with the deceptively simple question: “Who are you?”.
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  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    Wishes really do come true! I was so happy when the publishers granted my wish and provided me with a copy of So Lucky via NetGalley before it's release date. Unfortunately I didn't get a chance to read it until now, but I'm still so thankful I was given the opportunity.So Lucky focuses on three female characters,who from the outside all appear to have a perfect life, but are all struggling with certain problems of their own, whether that be marriage, physical conditions or doing anything to Wishes really do come true! I was so happy when the publishers granted my wish and provided me with a copy of So Lucky via NetGalley before it's release date. Unfortunately I didn't get a chance to read it until now, but I'm still so thankful I was given the opportunity.So Lucky focuses on three female characters, who from the outside all appear to have a perfect life, but are all struggling with certain problems of their own, whether that be marriage, physical conditions or doing anything to gain followers on social media.Dawn O'Porter is spot on with the way society is judgemental and toxic. How many of us believe we need to live up to certain standards surrounding us. I loved how true to life the characters were, I think every woman can relate to them.This book is brutally honest, frank and gritty. A range of emotions ebbs and flows over the reader whilst you progress through the chapters. The empowerment towards of the end of the book is just brilliant.Honestly, if you haven't yet picked up this book, just buy it. I don't think you will be disappointed.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I follow Dawn O'Porter on Instagram and find her instagram stories hilarious. She's a very witty person but her humour doesn't show up in this book. I think I laughed out loud once. I wouldn't say the synopsis matches the actual story. The story mainly features two different women. Beth, a new mother who has returned to work as a Wedding Planner whilst her husband Michael has taken Paternity Leave to care for their 4 month old baby. Beth is struggling not because of returning to work but because I follow Dawn O'Porter on Instagram and find her instagram stories hilarious. She's a very witty person but her humour doesn't show up in this book. I think I laughed out loud once. I wouldn't say the synopsis matches the actual story. The story mainly features two different women. Beth, a new mother who has returned to work as a Wedding Planner whilst her husband Michael has taken Paternity Leave to care for their 4 month old baby. Beth is struggling not because of returning to work but because her husband no longer wants to have sex with her! So much so, it has driven Beth to obsess over sex! Beth has a young assistant called Risky who is having a lot of sex. I can see that Risky was meant to be a quirky, hilarious character but it didn't really work for me. I found the humour lacking.Then we have Ruby. Ruby has a 'condition' (no spoilers). She was married for a brief time but her husband humiliated her at their wedding (we don't find out how until near the end of the book). They have a 3 and a half year old daughter called Bonnie. Ruby looks after Bonnie all week (although puts her in Nursery 8 am - 5.00 pm) and her estranged husband Liam has Bonnie every weekend. Now I know Dawn O'Porter has two children but I found Bonnie's language was too adult! There were no mispronounced words common for a child that age instead she was just written with adult language which seemed too advanced for that age range. Ruby hasn't particularly bonded with Bonnie. This is due to her 'condition' and her own relationship with her mother. Ruby's job is to touch up photographs to make people look perfect.The book is told from alternating POV's from Beth and Ruby. Although we also get to read Instagram posts from Lauren who is marrying a famous person, Gavin. Beth is arranging their Wedding and Ruby works for the photographer Lauren uses. It becomes clear throughout the snippets we get from Lauren's instagram that she also doesn't have a perfect life. The male characters are very one dimensional. At one point, Ruby befriends a man in the park who comes most days to clean the bird poo from the bench he has dedicated to his dead daughter. It didn't take me long to work out who he is and how he is linked to the storyline! When it does come to light, I just found it a bit too convenient and unoriginal.The timeline is odd. Although I've read the unedited copy so maybe this will be picked up on during the editing process but if I'm correct, the whole book takes place over a fortnight yet at times the wedding is mentioned as in 2 days time by Beth then Ruby mentions it's next weekend. I found it hard to work out which day it was supposed to be and which week! The pacing of the story is not executed well as then everything seems to happen too quickly near the end.There is a theme of Sisterhood (by the end all the female characters are best friends). In the beginning I found myself liking Beth but disliking Ruby but by the end I liked Ruby but started to dislike Beth (is her husband really at fault for her subsequent actions?!).The ending felt rushed and maybe a bit incomplete. It made me wonder if there is to be a sequel? I read this book in one sitting. It held my attention but I don't find Dawn's writing to be that good. She's a mediocre writer that has probably gained a book deal because of her fame. Her writing is rather simplistic but it was an easy read. Recommended if you like 'chick lit'.ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    This was the second book I have read by this author and I absolutely loved it as much as the first one. It dealt with and highlighted real issues in a funny relatable way. It had me laughing out loud quite a lot but was also quite emotional as well. Fantastic read and would definitely recommend this. One of my favourite books this year so far.
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  • Aoife
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI received a free digital copy of this book from the publishers/author via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Beth, Ruby and Lauren are all women who from the outside could possibly have it all. Good jobs, comfortable lives and in Lauren's case, a very successful social media career. However, each women is suffering; Ruby from a condition causing excess body hair that she's allowed to rule her life, Beth's husband doesn't appear to fancy her anymore and Lauren is struggling with 3.5 starsI received a free digital copy of this book from the publishers/author via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Beth, Ruby and Lauren are all women who from the outside could possibly have it all. Good jobs, comfortable lives and in Lauren's case, a very successful social media career. However, each women is suffering; Ruby from a condition causing excess body hair that she's allowed to rule her life, Beth's husband doesn't appear to fancy her anymore and Lauren is struggling with anxiety yet is being told to hide it.This book is comedic in nature, with some real laugh-out-loud moments but also covers some important topics such as PCOS, female sexuality and sensuality as well as hiding real females and struggles behind the perfect Instagram grid. I did like each woman (though this book mostly follows Beth and Ruby - we didn't get a true look at Lauren until the end), and though Ruby is a slightly unlikeable person because of her fears and struggles with her body hair, I also admired her attitude sometimes to say exactly what she was thinking, and not put up with anyone's bullsh*t.There were some parts of the book that appeared a bit over the top but I also think this is partly Dawn O'Porter's style. She likes to go there and isn't afraid to put her characters in crazy situations. I did think some of Ruby's descriptions about her hair were very extreme and I wonder how that could effect someone else suffering from excess hair due to PCOS and if it could help or trigger them.I did enjoy the book and I liked the occasional laughs it gave me. I will continue to read Dawn O'Porter's books as I love just seeing where she'll dare to go with her characters, and her books are always entertaining.
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  • Cheryl M-M
    January 1, 1970
    To be completely frank I found it dark, depressing, I disliked it and it made me angry. Why? Because O'Porter is just spot on with the portrayal of her characters. Too real. She hits the nail on the head when it comes to the judgmental and toxic atmosphere women live in and with. Believing they have to adhere to physical, emotional and psychological standards set by a patriarchal society, and what's often worse when those standards are demanded of them by other women.As the story evolved I found To be completely frank I found it dark, depressing, I disliked it and it made me angry. Why? Because O'Porter is just spot on with the portrayal of her characters. Too real. She hits the nail on the head when it comes to the judgmental and toxic atmosphere women live in and with. Believing they have to adhere to physical, emotional and psychological standards set by a patriarchal society, and what's often worse when those standards are demanded of them by other women.As the story evolved I found myself nodding and snarking at the words 'so lucky' throughout. It's what society tells us we are supposed to be and supposed to feel. The implication being that we shouldn't dare to want more than we have or dare to ask for the fulfillment of our needs, wishes, dreams and desires. No, we should be lucky with our lot, no matter how that may look and regardless of whether we are happy or not.Ruby is caught in a vicious cycle of emotional neglect, which she is repeating with her young daughter Bonnie. She hates her body, has no self-esteem and spends her entire life pushing people away and battling anxiety.Beth has to cope with a husband who seems to have lost interest in her since she gave birth to her baby. She is a working mother with a raging libido. Is it only a question of time until her marriage starts to implode?Watch out for the mother-in-law in Beth's part of the story. I would be burying the woman in the back garden - no doubt about it.Then there is Lauren, the Insta-famous and Insta-perfect celebrity living her best life and well on her way to marrying a global celebrity. Interjected intermittently are her Instagram feeds and comments, which really set the tone for the level of perfection everyone expects and simultaneously are willing to fake to get followers, likes and fame.O'Porter has her hand on the pulse of femininity, women, sexuality and also how conflicted women are at times. It's not easy being pulled in so many different directions at the same time or being judged for every choice and decision.It's pithy and brutally frank women's fiction. The author takes no prisoners, and kudos to her for the honest approach. It's a gritty, moving and sincere piece of fiction. There is never a dull moment when you read a book by O'Porter. She wants her readers to laugh, to cry and to get angry. It's pure empowerment, even if it doesn't appear to be anything like that at the beginning.*I received a courtesy copy*
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  • Rachel Bridgeman
    January 1, 1970
    'So Lucky' describes how I feel about reading the newest novel from one of the UK's most dynamic and fearless women writers-it also describes the throwaway remark that most of us unwittingly use to dismiss the success of others.Especially women.We do this to ourselves all the time, men rarely underplay their achievements but a woman going 'hell yes I have worked hard for this home/promotion/personal goal' is nearly always framed by 'being in the right place at the right time,'or good fortune. It 'So Lucky' describes how I feel about reading the newest novel from one of the UK's most dynamic and fearless women writers-it also describes the throwaway remark that most of us unwittingly use to dismiss the success of others.Especially women.We do this to ourselves all the time, men rarely underplay their achievements but a woman going 'hell yes I have worked hard for this home/promotion/personal goal' is nearly always framed by 'being in the right place at the right time,'or good fortune. It is almost always given away to outside forces rather than our own sheer hard work.And by the same token, whether in work or out of it, our female centric standards are always holding us to be better, more beautiful, thinner, faster, smarter, just more until we disappear into the perception of what we should be,and are forever yellow stickered and abandoned on the reduced shelf, living a half life.This is what the characters in 'So Lucky' deal with daily-Ruby, the single parent whose style everyone has opinion on, Beth the mother who finds that being one is so much harder when the 'perfect' mother in  law is breathing down her neck, and Lauren whose very lifestyle exists as a yardstick by which other women are measured.I suspect every reader will relate to all of these women depending on where they are in their life at the time, but one of them more than the other two. For me, it was Ruby, as a single parent the weight of other people's expectations of failure was suffocating. Being on your own signified to the world that you were unable to hold down a relationship, there must have been something about you that was 'unlovable'. Give her a wide berth, you could see it in other people's eyes.The women's journies to learning to accept themselves, and casting off expectations is truly brilliant and I defy anyone reading this not to punch the air in recognition of the following-bad sexawesome sexso-so sexhating your kidsloving them so hard you cannot breathewondering who you are and where you are going(and will you ever get there?how will you know?)acknowledging that no-one has it all together, no matter what image they projectI cannot think of enough superlatives for this book and could easily bang on for another thousand words about the cover design which is dynamic and brilliant as well as appearing effortlessly cool.The black and white of what life expects of you and as well as you expect of yourself straddled with the glistening pink doughnut of being a woman in the 21st Century.The hole in the middle, the constant feeling of missing some vital part of yourself, versus the carby delight of scoffing the whole thing.But I digress! AGAAIN!There is genuinely only one thing this book review can be boiled down to-Dawn is an incredible writer who nails each and every single thing in this book. Humour, sexiness (as well as the lack thereof), the brutal reality of parenthood, social media 'standard' setting and bullshit detecting .The whole package is a stunning and emotive portrait of modern womanhood that sticks two fingers up to the world, unbuttons your jeans and reaches out for an extra biscuit.Because life is too short to live by impossible standards.All you can do is live in the moment,try to learn to love yourself and find it in you to let go of what is pulling you down. And on days when things seem unsurmountable, just remind yourself we are all doing the best we can. But most importantly, the hardest people on our backs are usually ourselves.So let's stop, redefine our boundaries and start over again. And if we don't manage it today, let's give it a go again tomorrow. We are women, we are sisters , let's try and be a littler kind to ourselves and each other, what do you say?Liberating, fearless and contemporary, Dawn O'Porter's 'So Lucky' is a book to be read, treasured and re-read.And bought as a present. And borrowed from libraries. And generally shouted about as purely excellent craftsmanship and story telling.
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  • Amber Baker
    January 1, 1970
    WHO RUN THE WORLD GIRLS!.. . . . . . . . . . .Firstly Thankyou to my wonderful friend Gemma for gifting me a copy of ‘So Lucky’. It was my second audio book and a bloody good one at that!.Beth a business woman shows you can really have it all. Ruby has attitude and lives by her own rules and Lauren is an Instagram influencer living the celeb life with the man of her dreams. However not all is what it seems... three very different women who are struggling beneath the surface! Beth hasn’t had sex WHO RUN THE WORLD GIRLS!.. . . . . ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ . . . . . .Firstly Thankyou to my wonderful friend Gemma for gifting me a copy of ‘So Lucky’. It was my second audio book and a bloody good one at that!.Beth a business woman shows you can really have it all. Ruby has attitude and lives by her own rules and Lauren is an Instagram influencer living the celeb life with the man of her dreams. However not all is what it seems... three very different women who are struggling beneath the surface! Beth hasn’t had sex in a year and is a new mum. Ruby is living with a condition in which she has to hide herself from the world and Lauren’s celeb life is really just one big filter. Literally. .I loved listening to this! It definitely made a day at work in an office fly by!I couldn’t stop listening! These three women are pure examples of what girl power means! You have to read this! I can’t say too much without the risk of spoiling it! .Prepare yourself for full Beyoncé mode!
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  • Karen Mace
    January 1, 1970
    Forget teenage angst, there's nothing more stressed, pissed off and downright angry than a woman and that is what this book is based around! The issues that make us grumpy, the pressures we all put ourselves under, the absurdities of life in the Instagram world we now live in - motherhood, relationships, body image, modern life - it's all here and perfectly pitched by the author in a savage but humourous story that I thoroughly enjoyed and ended up finding really touching and poignant!The two Forget teenage angst, there's nothing more stressed, pissed off and downright angry than a woman and that is what this book is based around! The issues that make us grumpy, the pressures we all put ourselves under, the absurdities of life in the Instagram world we now live in - motherhood, relationships, body image, modern life - it's all here and perfectly pitched by the author in a savage but humourous story that I thoroughly enjoyed and ended up finding really touching and poignant!The two main characters are Ruby and Beth. Both very different women, but both struggling! Ruby is struggling with motherhood - it's more downs than ups with her daughter Bonnie who she seems in a constant battle with! Ruby isn't the most patient of people so she seems to spend most of her days raging at the world and getting nowhere. As you learn more about her you understand she has always had a bad relationship with her mother which hasn't helped her confidence, and neither has a medical condition she has which means she' always conscious of her body. You can't help feel sorry for her and just want to give her a big hug at times to let her know she should go easier on herself! Her line of work sees her retouching photographs - very apt in the world we now live in where you can airbrush your lumps and bumps away - so the concept of body image is always playing on her mind. Is she being a good role model to her daughter or is just history repeating itself?And Beth is a new mum to Tommy, and married to Michael who seems to have serious issues with sex (he's a weird one!!) and being cruel towards her about her weight and coming up with reasons not to have sex with her again. Not very happily married for a woman who is a wedding planner for the rich and famous!Her newest client is an Instagram celebrity and this brilliantly allows that whole world be dissected and analyzed - the image doesn't always match up to the reality and I found that really fascinating to see portrayed especially as Beth starts to feel sorry for her client, Lauren, who posts amazing pictures and quotes but in reality she seems to be very unsure of herself.As these women's lives wobble from bad to worse, I really enjoyed seeing and hearing their thoughts on issues that affect us all, and the fact that by talking to friends or a stranger in a park allows them to confront the realities in their life and how they can go about changing things, finding good in themselves and taking back control.There were many laugh out loud moments when things went wrong, or got a little too graphic (there's a lot of sex talk going on!), but it was also very poignant when reality hits home for these women and I just loved how honest and frank it was. Nothing is sugarcoated!!The story does a great job of showing just how complex life can be, especially as a woman, be it with relationships, friendships, work, and in general how we all view ourselves and how we all judge others. It's only when we get to know the person behind the image that we begin to understand that we're all messed up! No matter what image we try to share, there's always something that links us and shows us that the grass isn't always greener. Whether it is society that makes us constantly pick holes in ourselves, or it's just the way we are, I found this to be an engrossing read that just got better the more it went on, and found it really empowering and thought provoking!
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  • Sarahk
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the cows so was looking forward to reading this. I did not like it. It was mediocre at best.
  • Catalina
    January 1, 1970
    Once again a bunch of not very likable characters. Seems to be Dawn's guilty pleasure to give us complex female characters that one may or may not like but somehow always end up rooting for. Such wit and such humor. Despite my annoyance with the characters(Ruby in particular) I was really enjoying it until the last 1/3. The constant "all's well that ends well" ending of modern books is really, really getting on my nerves. I really feel it cheapen this particular one. It just made it into a Once again a bunch of not very likable characters. Seems to be Dawn's guilty pleasure to give us complex female characters that one may or may not like but somehow always end up rooting for. Such wit and such humor. Despite my annoyance with the characters(Ruby in particular) I was really enjoying it until the last 1/3. The constant "all's well that ends well" ending of modern books is really, really getting on my nerves. I really feel it cheapen this particular one. It just made it into a stupid chick lit book and that's so annoying as I like Dawn's take on feminism(if you like), on relationships between women, her smart criticism and infusion of reality info fantastical rhetoric. I particular liked Ruby's evolution. She was despicable to begin with and the always playing the victim due to her condition and upbringing was annoying the hell out of me. But she really learned her lessons and finally understood one can always be better that the social conditioning constantly portrayed as the main factor dragging us all down. It just takes courage, and she managed to get there, yay Ruby. Beth on the other hand was more balanced and did the right thing, but ended up not learning what she was suppose to learn and may do the same mistakes again! Also it was quite interesting to observe the biased attitude of the other women reading the book at the same time as I was(I've read this as a serialization on The Pigeonhole). I was particularly appalled at a sexual abuse scene where all took the side of Beth, failing to notice that she forced herself on her husband ...I am 100% sure where the role reversed we wouldn't have heard the end of their outrage!
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  • Cathy Fogg
    January 1, 1970
    3 women who on the outside appear to have it all but as we all know, it’s not always the case. Brilliantly honest & laugh out loud funny, this is another fantastic read from Dawn O’Porter. I read it in one sitting! 5*****Thanks to NetGalley, the publisher & Dawn O’Porter for the ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Bridget
    January 1, 1970
    If your favoured reading material is a compelling tale with a good sprinkling of humour, sadness, self-doubt, imperfection and destructive relationships then feel free to read So Lucky by Dawn O’Porter. Ruby, Lauren and Beth all have their individual issues: Ruby is so sad as she hides her body from everyone and her low self esteem affects her relationship with her young daughter Bonnie; Beth is funny, lovely and vivacious but her husband constantly rejects her body. Both women face their If your favoured reading material is a compelling tale with a good sprinkling of humour, sadness, self-doubt, imperfection and destructive relationships then feel free to read So Lucky by Dawn O’Porter. Ruby, Lauren and Beth all have their individual issues: Ruby is so sad as she hides her body from everyone and her low self esteem affects her relationship with her young daughter Bonnie; Beth is funny, lovely and vivacious but her husband constantly rejects her body. Both women face their insecurities at the same time, coming together for Lauren's wedding. Lauren is an Instagram star who appears to have a perfect life. Ruby, Beth, Lauren and Risky, Beth's personal assistant, meet and join together to support one another and I was awed by Ruby's bravery, Beth's determination, Lauren's attempts to start again and Risky's reassessment of perfection in relationships.Dawn O'Porter looked at serious issues, the conflict women often face being mothers, the fallout of not having a good mother, juggling a career with parenthood, as well as what constitutes a happy and successful marriage, with a huge amount of hilarity but also, sensitivity.I marvelled at Dawn O’Porter’s skill at portraying the characters’ raw, honest feelings, through her very individual, laugh-out-loud funny, thoughtful and at times, downright filthy, writing-style. The more I learned about these women and their lives, the more I found myself empathising with them. It was very hard to say goodbye to them and I found myself wishing all of of them well for the future.The way the Dawn O’Porter managed to link their lives together was very clever and thought-provoking. I was completely drawn into this novel right from the start, fully appreciating all of the absolutely priceless scenes and also the slightly shocking ones.So entertaining and engaging, this book certainly gave me plenty of food for thought, leaving the characters still in my head for a long while after I’d finished reading. So Lucky is definitely well worth the time invested. Dawn O'Porter could quite possibly become one of my favourite authors.Thank you to Dawn O’Porter and Pigeonhole for giving me the opportunity to read this book. This review is my own unbiased opinion.
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  • Sonny Side Books
    January 1, 1970
    The story of three women, three different lives, three different views. This was the first ever audio book I have purchased, and I must say, I was happy to hear Dawn herself reading part of the book.I will be the first to admit that Cows was one of my favourite books of recent years. A laugh out loud, shockingly twisty book that I happily recommended to my friends. So Lucky was possibly one of my most anticipated books of 2019. I'm a huge fan of Dawn O'Porter so I couldn't wait to get my hands The story of three women, three different lives, three different views. This was the first ever audio book I have purchased, and I must say, I was happy to hear Dawn herself reading part of the book.I will be the first to admit that Cows was one of my favourite books of recent years. A laugh out loud, shockingly twisty book that I happily recommended to my friends. So Lucky was possibly one of my most anticipated books of 2019. I'm a huge fan of Dawn O'Porter so I couldn't wait to get my hands on this book.As much as I wanted it to, So Lucky didn't grip me as much as I had hoped it would. There were moments of laughter, emotional and poignant moments, but also moments that left me thinking that it was trying too hard. I follow the author on social media, and could identify the aspects of her real life that were throughout the book, and not just with one character, but I did struggle to feel a connection with any of the characters. An explosive scene in the book put on all the lightbulbs revealing the links between the characters, it wasnt until this part though that I felt the book became something I wanted to pick up because of the story and not just because of the anticipation of wanting to like this book so badly.It's a story that explores relationships in every form, from lovers, to friendships to family and even our relationships with social media and ourselves. It discussed and shone a light on the very real struggles women experience with ourselves, with society, with our professional lives and the expectations that are there at every step of the way. The book made me smile, it gave me a warm feeling of friendship towards the end, and I felt that I cared about the characters, even if I hadn't fallen in love with them and at times, didnt really like them. It was a book that grew on me as I delved further in, but for me it just missed the mark.I would rate this book a 3.5 ⭐/5
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  • Indra
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book in a day, which, coming from someone who falls asleep a lot and is generally half-dead most of the time, is quite an accolade. I simply couldn’t put it down, but not because of the high fantasy world I’d been pulled into or the thrill of wanting to know ‘who dunnit’. This is book is so real. The women in So Lucky aren’t just characters, they’re brilliant examples of everyday women walking the streets of London, or anywhere in the world.The stories of the lives of these women I read this book in a day, which, coming from someone who falls asleep a lot and is generally half-dead most of the time, is quite an accolade. I simply couldn’t put it down, but not because of the high fantasy world I’d been pulled into or the thrill of wanting to know ‘who dunnit’. This is book is so real. The women in So Lucky aren’t just characters, they’re brilliant examples of everyday women walking the streets of London, or anywhere in the world.The stories of the lives of these women maybe fiction, but so much of what they are going through and have done in the past rings true. The situations aren’t overly fanciful or far fetched and this keeps you reading. Everything is so easy to relate to, either to yourself or to someone you may know.The use of Instagram to build up the character of Lauren was a brilliant idea, you get to know more about her, but in the edited way that social media allows you to. The entire portrayal of Lauren and Instagram is a great reflection on the modern addiction and reliance that many have with social media. Once you actually meet Lauren in the flesh, it’s a great reminder that social media isn’t a window onto a person’s life, it’s a curated and edited snapshot. We don’t see the bad times, the pain or the issues a person maybe having and it’s often far to easy to remember that nobody has the perfect life.So Lucky is a book that is more than a novel, it’s a social critique and examination of the differing standards and rules we use for ourselves and others. Once you finish and close the book, you are left reflecting on yourself and others, questioning the walls you may have put up or the judgement you have cast upon others. Any book that makes the reader asks questions and guides them to being a kinder and more open person, should be on every shelf.Full review on www.bookbloglondon.co.uk Reviewed from an ARC
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  • Megan Jones
    January 1, 1970
    Beth shows that women really can have it all. Ruby lives life by her own rules. Then there’s Lauren, living the dream. As perfect as it looks? Beth’s marriage is struggling. Ruby feels like she’s failing. Lauren’s happiness is fake news. It just takes one shocking event to make the truth come tumbling out.‘So Lucky’ is such a fun and addictive book to read. I was hooked with O’Porter’s characters instantly and quite happily took them in as friends and enjoyed following their ride throughout this Beth shows that women really can have it all. Ruby lives life by her own rules. Then there’s Lauren, living the dream. As perfect as it looks? Beth’s marriage is struggling. Ruby feels like she’s failing. Lauren’s happiness is fake news. It just takes one shocking event to make the truth come tumbling out.‘So Lucky’ is such a fun and addictive book to read. I was hooked with O’Porter’s characters instantly and quite happily took them in as friends and enjoyed following their ride throughout this book. At first glance, they appear to have perfect lives but the truth is bubbling underneath and is desperate to get out. I adored how O’Porter teases the truth about the characters and takes her time to reveal the truth. It meant I was turning pages desperately trying to get to the reveal, whilst having fun guessing what they could be of course!This is a fun, entertaining read but O’Porter tackles difficult, important subjects as well, I will not be specific as you too need to guess the truth, but despite the hilarity and frolics that were going on, I appreciated the serious subjects underneath and it helped bring a sense of realness to the read.The characters are of course splendid, I loved getting to know them and following them during this book and it was great to read a book about women supporting women and being there for each other. It sounds like a cliché but this book really is a journey for the characters as they learn to accept who they really are and reveal their truth to the world.‘So Lucky’ is a highly entertaining read that had me laughing along with it, do not be fooled there are serious subjects aplenty throughout and O’Porter strikes the balance perfectly. This is hilarious and very addictive.Thank you to NetGalley and Harper Collins UK for an advance copy.
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  • Stacey Breslin
    January 1, 1970
    A easy-breezy term time page-turner that didn't leave me feeling too mentally challenged. I didn't enjoy this anywhere near as much as The Cows, which would have wholeheartedly earnt its five stars from me, but there was no denying that I binge read the entire thing in a matter of days due to the pure enjoyment factor it provided me with. What I love about Dawn's characters, is that they always provide us with uninhibited and honest models of modern womanhood. So often this is dominated by A easy-breezy term time page-turner that didn't leave me feeling too mentally challenged. I didn't enjoy this anywhere near as much as The Cows, which would have wholeheartedly earnt its five stars from me, but there was no denying that I binge read the entire thing in a matter of days due to the pure enjoyment factor it provided me with. What I love about Dawn's characters, is that they always provide us with uninhibited and honest models of modern womanhood. So often this is dominated by filters and faux-positivity, that to see us there in all our messy glory feels like a celebration of being human. Each of them have some kind of facet/attribute that whether or not you'd care to admit, exists in an echo chamber of living in a social media dominated world such as ours that demands us to have it all. The pressures that preside over women are always ubiquitous in these worlds. In true Dawn style, in spite of the visceral moments of shame and self-loathing from the characters, there are also outrageous moments of humour. Never one to shy away from really "going there" with how far she can stretch a shocking instant, I love how unabashed she is in the treatment of her characters, but moreover how they are glittering multi-facted examples of human beings, never one-dimensional and as frustrating as they are entirely loveable.
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  • Ms C Bruen
    January 1, 1970
    I would have read this all in one sitting if it hadn't been for the need to sleep. As it was I read most of it in one night, thought about it throughout the day and then last night, there it went and I was a little bereft because oh my days, I loved this book!I read The Cows last year (I think!) and because that was her first adult fiction book and because I needed to read more Dawn O'Porter I read Paper Aeroplanes and started waiting for this book. I was not disappointed.I love her writing I would have read this all in one sitting if it hadn't been for the need to sleep. As it was I read most of it in one night, thought about it throughout the day and then last night, there it went and I was a little bereft because oh my days, I loved this book!I read The Cows last year (I think!) and because that was her first adult fiction book and because I needed to read more Dawn O'Porter I read Paper Aeroplanes and started waiting for this book. I was not disappointed.I love her writing style, the fact that she holds nothing back and that she doesn't rely on overused cliches. There's no girl meets boy, girl either falls in love with boy or falls in hate with boy, girl then loves boy, but then something happens that tears them apart and in the denouement, it all comes right. Her books are about lives lead by women, lives that can be messy, women who can be unlikeable but who you want to see come good anyway. It's not about fairytale happy ever after, but - in this book - women coming together and no necessarily overcoming all, but finding a strength together that they didn't have alone. So, I loved it from beginning to end and now I guess I just have to sit and wait for her next book. I don't doubt for one minute that I will fall in love with her writing all over again.
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  • my bookworm life
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a great read, filled with plenty of moments that made me laugh out loud, moments that were raw and emotional, and plenty of filthy frank and blunt moments too!. It has a bit of everything and it flows brilliantly too, i loved the different characters having their own focused chapters so we really got to know each one properly and see what they were dealing with. The character progression for each of them was brilliant too, the writing and building for each one done so well!. They This was such a great read, filled with plenty of moments that made me laugh out loud, moments that were raw and emotional, and plenty of filthy frank and blunt moments too!. It has a bit of everything and it flows brilliantly too, i loved the different characters having their own focused chapters so we really got to know each one properly and see what they were dealing with. The character progression for each of them was brilliant too, the writing and building for each one done so well!. They were all people you felt you knew, could relate to one some levels and i think with the issues they were dealing with it will connect with so many women i think that is amazing!. I haven't read her previous book 'Cows' yet but i will be boosting it higher up my TBR pile now!, and i can't wait to see what she brings out next!. This is such a gem in women's fiction, and i recommend this highly to anyone honestly!, but just a little word of warning...it isn't for the prudish! ha. Dawn doesn't shy away from the bluntness of sexual discussions and terminology, which is kinda great to see to be honest! but it won't be for everyone.I was very kindly sent a copy of this book from the publishers to read and review, but all views are my own.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    I have not read anything by this author before and to be fair, I realised quite soon after starting reading it, that I am obviously not the intended target audience. The premise is an interesting one, using different women's pov's to explore body image in particular with regard to Instagram and social media, and the pressures our modern world places upon women trying to live up to impossible body and beauty standards. The book also explores marital and mental health issues.This isn't just a I have not read anything by this author before and to be fair, I realised quite soon after starting reading it, that I am obviously not the intended target audience. The premise is an interesting one, using different women's pov's to explore body image in particular with regard to Instagram and social media, and the pressures our modern world places upon women trying to live up to impossible body and beauty standards. The book also explores marital and mental health issues.This isn't just a fluffy beach read, because it does tackle some relevant and important issues, but it is still chick lit and would still work as a good quick easy read.I didn't find the book particularly funny, or warm to the characters, but have no doubt I will be in the minority so my experience should not put anyone else off. I would just offer a word of caution, and that is that if you are bothered by very adult subjects and no holds barred language, this is probably not going to work for you either.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    I had never read anything by Dawn O'Porter before but had heard great things so I just had to request this when it popped up on NetGalley and it did not disappoint.Beth has the best husband and a new baby. She is also currently arranging the biggest showbiz wedding of the year.But her life is far from perfect and she can't even bring herself to confide in her over-sharing assistant/friend, Risky, about it.Ruby is neglecting her 3 year old daughter because she is obsessed with hiding something I had never read anything by Dawn O'Porter before but had heard great things so I just had to request this when it popped up on NetGalley and it did not disappoint.Beth has the best husband and a new baby. She is also currently arranging the biggest showbiz wedding of the year.But her life is far from perfect and she can't even bring herself to confide in her over-sharing assistant/friend, Risky, about it.Ruby is neglecting her 3 year old daughter because she is obsessed with hiding something from the world that unfortunately defines her and stops her living her life the way she'd like to.Lauren is marrying one of the biggest celebrities in the public eye. Her upcoming status and overbearing mother mean that she lives a lie through her Instagram photos.They are connected by one thing that hugely impacts each of their outlooks on life..I found this quite a slow read but that didn't stop me enjoying reading it and getting to know the characters so much. 😊
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  • Josephine
    January 1, 1970
    What’s it About? Two women, primarily: Beth, and Ruby, whose stories told in alternating chapters make up a social commentary of parenthood, love, feminism and social media.What I liked: I liked it more than I liked The Cows, for starters which I was super disappointed in. It had a lot of valid things to say and it made those points for the most part, pretty well. I was interested in Beth and Ruby - Ruby a little more so I think, her story having a tenderness to it that surprised me. I loved how What’s it About? Two women, primarily: Beth, and Ruby, whose stories told in alternating chapters make up a social commentary of parenthood, love, feminism and social media.What I liked: I liked it more than I liked The Cows, for starters which I was super disappointed in. It had a lot of valid things to say and it made those points for the most part, pretty well. I was interested in Beth and Ruby - Ruby a little more so I think, her story having a tenderness to it that surprised me. I loved how one of the stories was told via a character's instagram posts, that was clever and worked well, really cleverly demonstrating the whole issue of instagram versus reality. Overall, I liked it, this is a pretty good - and fast - read.What I liked Less: I felt like the male characters needed more depth - I'm all for books about feminism featuring strong female characters, but they lose something for me if the men are two dimensional. So frustrating. Also, I don't know what the deal is with O'Porter and the sex stuff - I'm not a prude; I read about sex, I have sex, I'm pretty sex positive, I think, but, like in The Cows I felt like O'Porter is trying to shock and that just bugs me; she's a good writer, she doesn't need to try this hard for a reaction. There's also one scene that really reminded me of a scene from The Cows and the repetition made me roll my eyes. Also also, the blurb doesn't match the book. So annoying.
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  • Jesika
    January 1, 1970
    This book quite ambitiously tackles a multitude of issues facing women - the gruelling beauty standards we reinforce whilst hating them, the difficulties of trying to balance being a mum and have an ambitious career, the painful way those with mental illnesses are attacked for having them. It is all incredibly valuable, and in many ways I liked this book for tackling so much of it at once.It was a quick read, and I'm wondering if that was the problem for me? This is a book which quite casually This book quite ambitiously tackles a multitude of issues facing women - the gruelling beauty standards we reinforce whilst hating them, the difficulties of trying to balance being a mum and have an ambitious career, the painful way those with mental illnesses are attacked for having them. It is all incredibly valuable, and in many ways I liked this book for tackling so much of it at once.It was a quick read, and I'm wondering if that was the problem for me? This is a book which quite casually tackles several heavy hitting topics and as a reader I think I prefer for one to be tackled with more depth. That said, that is very much a personal preference and if you enjoy books that manage to consider the entire shitshow that can be the female experience in a light-hearted way, then this is the book for you.
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  • Hayley
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve loved all of Dawn O’Porter’s novels to date, especially The Cows, and So Lucky is another brilliant read!So Lucky follows three women: Beth who has a new baby but is very unhappy in her marriage, Ruby who feels she needs to keep her entire body covered at all times, and Lauren who we mainly see through her Instagram posts and seems to have a perfect sparkly life.I read So Lucky in one sitting as once I started reading it I just didn’t want to put it down. Dawn O’Porter is so good at I’ve loved all of Dawn O’Porter’s novels to date, especially The Cows, and So Lucky is another brilliant read!So Lucky follows three women: Beth who has a new baby but is very unhappy in her marriage, Ruby who feels she needs to keep her entire body covered at all times, and Lauren who we mainly see through her Instagram posts and seems to have a perfect sparkly life.I read So Lucky in one sitting as once I started reading it I just didn’t want to put it down. Dawn O’Porter is so good at capturing what it is to be a woman in the modern age and the pressure we all feel to conform to society’s norms. There is a sense that women should be perfect – we should remove all of our body hair and be smiley and happy at all times. Life just isn’t like that!Beth is besotted with her young baby but she also loves her career so she’s back at working planning Lauren’s wedding but she’s also pumping breast milk and trying to be a good wife. Her husband has had no interest in sex ever since she got pregnant and Beth just wants to feel desired. She’s also having to deal with her interfering mother-in-law who her husband seems to always defer to. I felt really sorry for Beth, it’s so difficult to be in a relationship where your partner won’t discuss issues. My ex was awful for sweeping everything under the carpet and pretending nothing was wrong, it makes for such stress in the home.Ruby is separated from her husband but she’s cordial with him because they have a three year old daughter, Bonnie. I really felt for Ruby, she had a difficult time as a child and she can’t seem to relate to her own child now. She also has a secret that means she feels she has to keep her body covered at all times. Her attempting to get a wax with her child in the room was so tense and I wanted to climb through the pages and help Ruby.It was brilliant to read a novel like this where the women are close to my own age. I still have so many insecurities as a 40 year old but it’s not always represented in novels as much as it is for younger women. It felt like Beth represented the not being allowed to be who you are and to talk openly about what you want in life, and Ruby represented all the body issues that women have. They were both such real women to me though and I could see myself, and women I know, in both of them.Lauren is a younger woman on the verge of marrying the man of her dreams. We get to know her through her instagram posts that are full of inspirational hashtags and often sponsored. She seems to have a perfect life. As the novel progresses we find out that Beth is Lauren’s wedding planner, and Ruby is going to work on the wedding photos so through them we get to meet Lauren in real life, and it seems all is not quite as glossy as it seems on her Instagram. She has an over-bearing mother and fears that her fiance might be attracted to other women. It really showed how social media allows us to give the impression that our lives are so perfect but the reality is that everyone has their insecurities and their problems but we forget that sometimes and think we’re the only one.I love how real all three women felt in this novel, and how we gradually get to know why they are the way they are and we see how they try to accommodate for what they see as their inadequacies. There are some utterly mortifying moments in the novel, which were toe-curling in the embarrassment factor but I loved that because life is like this. Things often aren’t as we might imagine them to be!Ultimately, I found this a really relatable, moving novel that also saw the funny side of things too. I very much enjoyed this book and I already can’t wait to read Dawn O’Porter’s next book! I highly recommend this one!This review was originally posted on my blog https://rathertoofondofbooks.com
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  • Kerry A
    January 1, 1970
    OMG I'm 'so lucky' to have received an advance copy of Dawn O'Porter's new book, the author most likely to make me laugh hysterically on public transport. Underneath the sharp humour lie some mighty big issues - body image, family breakdown, society's expectations and self-esteem. The story revolves around three women trying to find their way in the world. Ruby, full of self-loathing, photoshops supermodel magazine pictures for a living. It's hard enough to deal with with her own body-image OMG I'm 'so lucky' to have received an advance copy of Dawn O'Porter's new book, the author most likely to make me laugh hysterically on public transport. Underneath the sharp humour lie some mighty big issues - body image, family breakdown, society's expectations and self-esteem. The story revolves around three women trying to find their way in the world. Ruby, full of self-loathing, photoshops supermodel magazine pictures for a living. It's hard enough to deal with with her own body-image issues without having to look at supermodels all day. Beth, who seems to have the perfect life/husband/baby/business, is not getting any love from her husband and while her hormones run riot, gigantic cracks start to appear in her marriage. Risky, her personal assistant, is a brilliant offsider and totally hilarious. Lauren is a supermodel who's wedding to London's most eligible bachelor, brings all the characters together. She's gorgeous and a mess. Terrific!
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  • Samantha Owen
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely Laugh out Loud funny. This is not my usual go to genre, but I could not put this book down. It had me gripped. Relatable content, believable characters. Just a really good, funny with serious tones read. Thank you Netgalley for my advanced copy. Dawn 'o Porter fab job.
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  • Emily Fordham
    January 1, 1970
    Sharp, witty, had me laughing out loud at times and then also made me think very deeply at others. Very much one for the insta-generation. I loved all three main characters and thought the plotting of the story and the way it weaved together was very clever.
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  • Kirsten
    January 1, 1970
    I found this a bit odd to begin with but then I fell in love with it and cried big fat tears (in a public place!) when it ended.
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