Monster, She Wrote
Meet the women writers who defied convention to craft some of literature’s strangest tales, from Frankenstein to The Haunting of Hill House and beyond. Frankenstein was just the beginning: horror stories and other weird fiction wouldn’t exist without the women who created it. From Gothic ghost stories to psychological horror to science fiction, women have been primary architects of speculative literature of all sorts. And their own life stories are as intriguing as their fiction. Everyone knows about Mary Shelley, creator of Frankenstein, who was rumored to keep her late husband’s heart in her desk drawer. But have you heard of Margaret “Mad Madge” Cavendish, who wrote a science-fiction epic 150 years earlier (and liked to wear topless gowns to the theater)? If you know the astounding work of Shirley Jackson, whose novel The Haunting of Hill House was reinvented as a Netflix series, then try the psychological hauntings of Violet Paget, who was openly involved in long-term romantic relationships with women in the Victorian era. You’ll meet celebrated icons (Ann Radcliffe, V. C. Andrews), forgotten wordsmiths (Eli Colter, Ruby Jean Jensen), and today’s vanguard (Helen Oyeyemi). Curated reading lists point you to their most spine-chilling tales.Part biography, part reader’s guide, the engaging write-ups and detailed reading lists will introduce you to more than a hundred authors and over two hundred of their mysterious and spooky novels, novellas, and stories.

Monster, She Wrote Details

TitleMonster, She Wrote
Author
ReleaseSep 17th, 2019
PublisherQuirk Books
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Horror, Feminism, History, Writing, Books About Books, Biography

Monster, She Wrote Review

  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Is your TBR becoming shorter? Neither is mine and now the wishlist is even longer. These authors want you and I to know that there are tons of great Gothic/horror/ terror filled books out there and they are all written by fantastic female writers- some names I knew(Daphne Du Maurier, Shirley Jackson) but there were many more that were whispering from the shadows " I'm still here." Which sounds quite spooky but it fits with the whole atmosphere of this non fiction. Divided into six categories, th Is your TBR becoming shorter? Neither is mine and now the wishlist is even longer. These authors want you and I to know that there are tons of great Gothic/horror/ terror filled books out there and they are all written by fantastic female writers- some names I knew(Daphne Du Maurier, Shirley Jackson) but there were many more that were whispering from the shadows " I'm still here." Which sounds quite spooky but it fits with the whole atmosphere of this non fiction. Divided into six categories, the authors take us from the 17th century(the founding mothers) all the way up to the 21st century( the new Gothic). Each author has a short biography, an analysis of her literary contribution to the genre, and most importantly tons of related reading to dive into. What more could a curious reader ever ask for? With Halloween just around the corner, this book will definitely spur a number of readers into a Gothic fiction read-a-thon. Thanks to Netgalley and Quirk Books for a digital galley in exchange for an honest review. Goodreads review published 28/08/19Publication Date 17/09/19
    more
  • Sadie Hartmann Mother Horror
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this was only my second time reading a nonfiction book about the origins of horror and I must say that this was a lot of fun. I learned a lot, I took notes and I have a bunch of books I'd like to look for the next time I'm a secondhand bookstore. Currently writing my review for Scream Mag and it will be published this October 2019I will say that horror fans looking for some Gothic Lit or some dark, obscure reads that probably inspired modern horror writers, should pick this up!
    more
  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    Will I ever tire of books about books? (Answer: no.) This one was great fun, and was a pleasant reminder of my favourite course during my English Lit undergrad, on the Female Gothic. It's a very brief overview, but I found the selections interesting, and I've added several new books to my to-read list. The more modern selections had some strange omissions (no Hotel World by Ali Smith? No Beyond Black by Hilary Mantel? No Amelia Gray or Camilla Grudova?) and focused on some lightweight YA authors Will I ever tire of books about books? (Answer: no.) This one was great fun, and was a pleasant reminder of my favourite course during my English Lit undergrad, on the Female Gothic. It's a very brief overview, but I found the selections interesting, and I've added several new books to my to-read list. The more modern selections had some strange omissions (no Hotel World by Ali Smith? No Beyond Black by Hilary Mantel? No Amelia Gray or Camilla Grudova?) and focused on some lightweight YA authors when it would have made more sense to focus on literary authors who are writing great and unusual books while also really engaging with the topics mentioned. But still, I really enjoyed it, and would have happily read it at twice the length.
    more
  • Michael Hicks
    January 1, 1970
    My review of MONSTER, SHE WROTE can be found at High Fever Books.Almost immediately, I had to come to grips with what Monster, She Wrote is versus what I had hoped and wanted it to be. Without knowing much about the book beyond the awesome illustrated cover art and the premise as revealed in the title (The Women Who Pioneered Horror and Speculative Fiction), I had expected a more thorough study exploring the various authors and a deep-dive into their eras, their work and legacies, and how they s My review of MONSTER, SHE WROTE can be found at High Fever Books.Almost immediately, I had to come to grips with what Monster, She Wrote is versus what I had hoped and wanted it to be. Without knowing much about the book beyond the awesome illustrated cover art and the premise as revealed in the title (The Women Who Pioneered Horror and Speculative Fiction), I had expected a more thorough study exploring the various authors and a deep-dive into their eras, their work and legacies, and how they shaped an entire genre. Instead, Monster, She Wrote is more of a reference guide to the hundreds of women authors working in the horror and speculative fiction genres. We’re introduced to these writers, given a very brief biographical sketch and an overview of their most relevant works, followed by a short reading list naming a singular must-read title from their bibliography, a second book to try, and some related works by other authors exploring similar themes and topics. Because of the large number of authors Kröger and Anderson are compiling here, each of the women featured here are only given a few pages worth of space to touch upon their biography, influences and interests, and their most relevant titles to the genre at hand (some of these women wrote romance, young girls fiction, and nonfiction titles, as well, which obviously fall outside of the scope of Kröger and Anderson ‘s examinations). The book itself is arranged into eight parts, starting with The Founding Mothers and the modern horror genre’s roots in Gothic literature of the late 1700s — 1800s, sparked by Ann Radcliff, who helped popularize the genre. She and the writers that followed wrote in the Gothic style that had begun with Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto, claiming the genre for their own and making it a literary force to be reckoned with and one that explored their own gruesome nightmares. Without these women, Kröger and Anderson argue, we wouldn’t have films like Suspiria or the domestic horrors explored by Shirley Jackson. It was these women that made Gothic horror so popular that enabled and influenced enormous swathes of horror and spec fic authors to come, including Stephen King. From there, Kröger and Anderson move into the various subgenres that grew naturally from their Gothic origins, moving into stories dealing more directly with the supernatural, like ghosts and hauntings, and the occult as society, science, and philosophers of the late 19th Century began to explore the question of what happens after death, as well as attempted to scientifically explore psychic phenomena. Although male authors like Charles Dickens used ghosts in their fiction, it was, again, the women authors that really led the forefront and used their writings to explore societal and political issues of the time, cementing the horror genre into a form that would become more recognizable for 21st Century readers, paving the way for the paperback horrors of the 1980s from VC Andrews, Kathe Koja, Ruby Jean Jensen, and The New Goths, like Anne Rice and Susan Hill.While I certainly appreciate Kröger and Anderson’s work here, and believe that it will help readers (myself included — and rest assured, I’ve made note of a number of titles mentioned throughout this book) discover a number of strong, and perhaps overlooked, voices in the genre, it was the prefaces that began each section that I found most interesting. When Monster, She Wrote dug into discussions of the Spiritualist movement and occult societies that help inspire the women writers of that era, I was supremely fascinated and wanted to know about that history and how those works fed off each other. I wanted a deeper exploration of how these women used their writings to further civil rights and support abolition movements. Although some readers decry politics in their fiction (primarily, I’ve come to note, politics they disagree with), the simple fact is that art and politics are inextricably intertwined and always have been and always will be. I would have loved to have read a deeper examination of this topic in regards to women in horror and how their (counter-culture) attitudes fueled the genre in its earliest stages. Monster, She Wrote gets close to these topics, but never steps into the muck to get its hands dirty. It’s not the central focus of this work at all, but it is at its most interesting during these instances and if Kröger and Anderson ever opt to take a deep dive into these issues I’ll be sure to read the hell out of it. That said, you can at least explore these topics and issues through the women and their stories that Kröger and Anderson have selected to highlight as most relevant. Also of interest, and again something I wish were explored more deeply and thoroughly, were the later discussions of the lost women writers of the pulp era, who influenced other creatives like HP Lovecraft and the creator of Dungeons & Dragons, and the paperback horror boom of the 80s, which saw many works disappear entirely following the horror market’s collapse as publishers went out of business and various titles went out of print.Where Monster, She Wrote is most successful, though, is in showcasing the women of horror themselves, and in this regard it’s very much an indispensable reference guide. Every February, the horror genre celebrates Women In Horror Month, and readers devote the shortest month of the year to discovering strong new voices or overlooked classics. There’s more than enough horror stories by women to fill an entire calendar year and then some, and Monster, She Wrote is a solid starting point to discovering these authors and enriching your library with their voices. Beyond the central handful of figures that Kröger and Anderson have selected to best represent each era of horror fiction, you’ll find plenty of leads toward other women authors of the time, as well as more recent 21st Century examples that were inspired by those earlier writers and best recapture the spirit of those themes or genre hallmarks. Monster, She Wrote is also a handy book to have on hand just in case you run into some especially dimwitted man who foolishly thinks women don’t, can’t, or shouldn’t write horror, so you can throw the book at them or crack them over the head with it. Maybe you’ll luck out and knock some sense into them![Note: I received an advance readers copy of this title from the publisher via NetGalley.]
    more
  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    I’m not the biggest nonfiction fan in the world but this has everything I love! Awesome info about horror and speculative fiction women writers, cool and creepy drawings, and all around interesting! Plus it had me by having the word monster in the title!
    more
  • Gizem-in-Wonderland
    January 1, 1970
    This book has been created with the idea of bringing together all the dark queens of literature.I am completely clueless when it comes to genres of horror, gothic fiction, paranormal literature, ghost stories, and haunted environment and I wanted to learn about the most important/famous examples of these genres and it seemed a great starting point reading this book although it focuses only on women, which I believe is a good thing, since, behind most pseudonyms used in literature, there is a wom This book has been created with the idea of bringing together all the dark queens of literature.I am completely clueless when it comes to genres of horror, gothic fiction, paranormal literature, ghost stories, and haunted environment and I wanted to learn about the most important/famous examples of these genres and it seemed a great starting point reading this book although it focuses only on women, which I believe is a good thing, since, behind most pseudonyms used in literature, there is a woman trying to hide her real identity as a writer.This unique collection of female authors, who have written unconventional stories, and their most prominent works and masterpieces are listed under special categories such as ghost stories, haunted homes, vampires, horror and speculative fiction. It is great to read their life journey and how it shaped the way they write about such unusual topics.Female authors are often expected to be creative in romantic love stories and the examples in this book display the shocking fact that women can be as intense and unconventional as men when it comes to supernatural phenomena, suspense and horror, ghost stories and haunted houses, gore, and murder, violence, and erotism and paranormal activities. However, it is not easy to be accepted in society and publish your works since you're supposed to be all elegant and fragile as a woman(!). These brave women push the boundaries of society and dance beautifully around gender roles. A great read for the lovers of the related literature and even though I do not really fancy the genre, I have enjoyed it and learned a lot. The only downside is my TBR list has skyrocketed.(I have received an ARC from Quirk Books and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review)
    more
  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received this finished copy courtesy of Quirk Books. I am grateful for the opportunity to review an ARC for my readers, but this will not influence my final rating. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and based solely on the book. This was such a fun, atmospheric read! I read this in and out of car rides while I was on vacation, and it was perfect. It was easy to pick it up and set it down, all while still being enticing to pick it back up. These are the nonfiction sto Disclaimer: I received this finished copy courtesy of Quirk Books. I am grateful for the opportunity to review an ARC for my readers, but this will not influence my final rating. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and based solely on the book. This was such a fun, atmospheric read! I read this in and out of car rides while I was on vacation, and it was perfect. It was easy to pick it up and set it down, all while still being enticing to pick it back up. These are the nonfiction stories that I love. It provided enough of a history to be interesting/not boring, so I was always pretty invested. With each female writer that this book takes on, we are given the following: a brief history of critical points in the author's life; some descriptions of their famous works; how well those works were received; must read reading material from that author; and related female authors whose work is like the one you are reading about - all with creepy quotes and pictures. Here are a few things that I absolutely loved about this format:I got to see deeper into the lives of this crusading and pioneering ladies - some of their lives were as drama-worthy as a soap operaI knew a handful of these authors, but it really doesn't matter - whether I knew the author or not, the authors of this story made each writer's story intriguing and freshThe descriptions of the stories gave me enough to want to dive so much deeper - some provided some interesting little snippets that will have me bringing this back out as a glossary of books I will be using as supplemental fillers for my Spooky September TBR BECAUSE THEY SOUND SO GOODSeriously, I have so many new things to check out because they all sound so great - and I also know which stories perhaps to skip on/go first for - PLUS all the related stories, too so the neverending storyyyyyyyyyyyyyWhile I enjoyed the shortness of the stories since I got to have more of them and it was never boring, the one big issue that I had was I wished some things were expanded a bit more on. I felt like sometimes the biographies weren't quite well detailed or the summaries of the stories weren't enough. I actually wanted more??? I wished some things were just more, and I felt some incompleteness with some of them. That was really the only issue that I had with the story, or else, this would have totally been an all the crowns read. rating: Ariel because I did want a tiny bit more from our main heroinesrepresentation: there were many different authors from different nationalities and sexual orientationscontent warnings: mentions of gore included in the horror novels that they write
    more
  • Leah Rachel von Essen
    January 1, 1970
    "Perhaps the weirdest tale," write Lisa Kröger and Melanie R. Anderson in MONSTER, SHE WROTE: THE WOMEN WHO PIONEERED HORROR & SPECULATIVE FICTION, "is how we've managed to forget the women who created such amazing stories." This incredible book gave me a reading list 30 books long. Despite knowing more about feminist speculative fiction than the average person, I knew very few of the authors referenced in this book, which outlines the long history of women writers and authors in the horror "Perhaps the weirdest tale," write Lisa Kröger and Melanie R. Anderson in MONSTER, SHE WROTE: THE WOMEN WHO PIONEERED HORROR & SPECULATIVE FICTION, "is how we've managed to forget the women who created such amazing stories." This incredible book gave me a reading list 30 books long. Despite knowing more about feminist speculative fiction than the average person, I knew very few of the authors referenced in this book, which outlines the long history of women writers and authors in the horror genre, including many queer women (I was especially excited about the classics and classical authors that turned out to be queer—did you know Daphne du Maurier was queer, for example? I didn't!). This book is a great way to expand your to-read shelf. I plan to go out and buy a ton of these to tackle in October.I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. MONSTER, SHE WROTE is out September 17.
    more
  • Bex Wiles
    January 1, 1970
    "These genres of fiction are instruments with which women writers can shake up society and prod readers in an uncomfortable direction... It's no surprise that women's fiction focuses on voice and visibility. Women might be told to be quiet, but they still speak up."Monster, She Wrote is a refreshing and interesting overview of many female writers of the wider horror genre. It profiles the more well-known writers (Mary Shelley and Anne Rice), as well as many who have been influential but are in d "These genres of fiction are instruments with which women writers can shake up society and prod readers in an uncomfortable direction... It's no surprise that women's fiction focuses on voice and visibility. Women might be told to be quiet, but they still speak up."Monster, She Wrote is a refreshing and interesting overview of many female writers of the wider horror genre. It profiles the more well-known writers (Mary Shelley and Anne Rice), as well as many who have been influential but are in danger of being forgotten. This is an excellent guide: I would recommend getting it in print as opposed to a digital copy, as it is a book that you would want to revisit for reference. It is accessible to a wide audience, and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it.Thank you to NetGalley for the advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Keith Chawgo
    January 1, 1970
    Women and horror are two things that are not normally associated with each other outside of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein but with this new book by Kroger and Anderson, we have a list of authors that show that this is commonly an untrue statement.Starting in a time before Shelley’s Frankenstein hit the scene, we have a myriad of authors who wrote gothic fiction and had very successful careers. The book details a number of female authors through until modern time that have made a career or dip thei Women and horror are two things that are not normally associated with each other outside of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein but with this new book by Kroger and Anderson, we have a list of authors that show that this is commonly an untrue statement.Starting in a time before Shelley’s Frankenstein hit the scene, we have a myriad of authors who wrote gothic fiction and had very successful careers. The book details a number of female authors through until modern time that have made a career or dip their toes into the genre. The book gives a very detailed look into these women.The book is well detailed and gives a background on each of the authors that is covered. Well researched and given plot details on some of their most famous work. Kroger and Anderson even do one better but given a further reading section to those are interested into diving deeper into the author and authors who are likeminded in their approach. The book is divided into section and each chapter highlights another author. This is done fantastically and this was a real joy to read. This book would sit comfortably on any shelf and provides a detail reference when looking for a new author to explore and devour.Overall, this is a great book full of worthwhile information. The only drawback will be to the pocketbook or wallet as I have now ordered extensively off ebay and Amazon to dig into these new found authors Kroger and Anderson have turned me on to. This is a definite must for all people interested in horror and I have already started singing its praises to many of fans of the horror genre.
    more
  • Liesl
    January 1, 1970
    An exceptional compendium of female authors within the horror and speculative fiction genres. I have recently become more interested in exploring books within these fields during the last few years, especially after completing a reader's advisory training on horror last month, and this book has served to further fuel this curiosity. Authors are included from the 1600s through present day, covering a wide variety of topics related to the genres; I like how essential titles from each author are hi An exceptional compendium of female authors within the horror and speculative fiction genres. I have recently become more interested in exploring books within these fields during the last few years, especially after completing a reader's advisory training on horror last month, and this book has served to further fuel this curiosity. Authors are included from the 1600s through present day, covering a wide variety of topics related to the genres; I like how essential titles from each author are highlighted within the reading lists and that the related work sections serve as a way to mention additional writers of interest. The introductions of each group of writers are informative and occasionally amusing, and I like how the book's authors explore the future of the genres as well as break down the antiquated notion that these types of stories are solely the territory of male writers. Kröger and Anderson have clearly done a vast amount of research that I fully appreciate and I will definitely be buying this book to use as a reference to direct my future reading.Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an ARC of this title.
    more
  • Mish
    January 1, 1970
    I loved reading this (uncorrected) prepub. I'm so excited for it to come out of edits and into published form, because I want to see the afterwords and bibliographies and etc.(Yes, Nerd + Librarian present and accounted for, thanks!)I really enjoyed all the information, and I'm amazed at the breadth of writing represented here.Definitely looking forward to the published version!N.B. I got this as part of a shipment of prepubs & arcs to my place of work, so there was not even a need for this I loved reading this (uncorrected) prepub. I'm so excited for it to come out of edits and into published form, because I want to see the afterwords and bibliographies and etc.(Yes, Nerd + Librarian present and accounted for, thanks!)I really enjoyed all the information, and I'm amazed at the breadth of writing represented here.Definitely looking forward to the published version!N.B. I got this as part of a shipment of prepubs & arcs to my place of work, so there was not even a need for this review, I just felt strongly enough to leave one.
    more
  • Lacy
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this through GoodReads giveaways.I already had this on on my want-to-read list, but I'm really glad I had a chance to read it in advance of the release date. I have to say, that there are very few books that I read as soon as I get them, but the design of this book is so fantastic (including the wonderful illustrations throughout) that I couldn't resist opening it up and taking a peek. And once I did, I just kept reading. This book serves as an informative and entertaining t I received an ARC of this through GoodReads giveaways.I already had this on on my want-to-read list, but I'm really glad I had a chance to read it in advance of the release date. I have to say, that there are very few books that I read as soon as I get them, but the design of this book is so fantastic (including the wonderful illustrations throughout) that I couldn't resist opening it up and taking a peek. And once I did, I just kept reading. This book serves as an informative and entertaining timeline of women writers of horror and speculative fiction. Not only does it give insight into these women's lives and work, it provides a look at their influences and inspirations. The book takes readers from The Founding Mothers to The Future of Horror and Speculative Fiction, covering the strange, Gothic, haunting, horrific, weird, and everything in between. If you're a fan of women writing spine-tingling tales of any variety, I would definitely recommend Monster, She Wrote. I'm going to have a list of books, stories, and new-to-me authors to check out now that I've made it through this delightful look at women, both past and present, who have innovated dark fiction.
    more
  • Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits)
    January 1, 1970
    See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsI started reading Monster, She Wrote, with a pencil and notebook by my side thinking to jot down a few titles and authors that caught my attention. I would like to start this review by saying Do Not Do This! Within just a few chapters I had patted myself on the back for already having read Frankenstein and The Yellow Wallpaper, and having an Ann Radcliffe collected works downloaded since reading Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey (note to self, R See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsI started reading Monster, She Wrote, with a pencil and notebook by my side thinking to jot down a few titles and authors that caught my attention. I would like to start this review by saying Do Not Do This! Within just a few chapters I had patted myself on the back for already having read Frankenstein and The Yellow Wallpaper, and having an Ann Radcliffe collected works downloaded since reading Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey (note to self, Read the Radcliffes!). However I had also already blunted my pencil on a TBR of suffocating proportions and I wasn't even a quarter of the way through this book yet. If you truly want horror, the realisation of just how many important women authors I haven't read was terrifying!I am, of course, partly joking here, but also partly serious. Monster, She Wrote is an excellent resource for horror and speculative fiction fans, and also for readers such as myself who want include as wide a variety of influences as I can. Nesrine Malik's We Need New Stories, which I recently reviewed, clarified my thoughts around how the stories we read and hear informs our social and cultural expectations. Monster, She Wrote is a perfect accompaniment because it shows me hundreds of stories already in existence. Perhaps we don't only need new stories, but to make sure that these older stories continue to exist and aren't forgotten.Kroger and Anderson have done an excellent job in drawing this book together. At times the sheer number of books and authors they cross reference is bewildering, but it's also a superb statement of pride in the history of female authors in what are commonly mis-assumed to be male-dominated genres. I liked the progression through time from the 1600s to the present day and also the grouping of authors by genre where possible. The illustrations are a wonderful idea too. They are brilliantly evocative of classic horror themes. So I now have a real burst of enthusiasm for historic horror, a teetering TBR, and the kernel of an idea for a Monster, She Wrote reading challenge - I just need to make a list of every book Kroger and Anderson namecheck, and then read them!
    more
  • Julia O'Connell
    January 1, 1970
    Monster, She Wrote takes on the ambitious task of covering the progression of horror and speculative fiction and all of the major female writers who played a part in it over the course of four centuries. Meticulously organized, the book is divided into eight parts, grouping authors into categories both thematic and chronological. Within each part, the contributions of half a dozen specific authors are examined. Each chapter contains a section on the woman's life and one on her works, followed by Monster, She Wrote takes on the ambitious task of covering the progression of horror and speculative fiction and all of the major female writers who played a part in it over the course of four centuries. Meticulously organized, the book is divided into eight parts, grouping authors into categories both thematic and chronological. Within each part, the contributions of half a dozen specific authors are examined. Each chapter contains a section on the woman's life and one on her works, followed by a reading list organized into "Not To Be Missed," "Also Try," and "Related Works." Intriguing quotes from the works being discussed are interspersed throughout the chapters, and the book is also beautifully illustrated by Natalya Balnova. No matter how much you think you know about these genres, I assure you that Monster, She Wrote will introduce you to more than a few works you've never heard of before. With such a dizzying number of authors, story titles, and book editions being thrown about, you'll definitely want to keep a pen and paper (or notepad app) by your side to build your to-be-read list as you read! This book will be going directly onto my reference shelf, and I'm sure I'll turn back to it many times as I work on future posts for my blog.See my full review at TheGothicLibrary.com
    more
  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    Is your TO READ pile getting shorter? This book will solve your problems! I know the authors Lisa Kroger and Melanie R. Anderson from their hosting the Know Fear Cast along with Matt Saye (http://www.knowfearcast.com/ ). I really enjoyed how each chapter begins with an introduction that explains the era and its representative styles. It then follows with a number of exemplars of that era and style in both short and long fiction formats. I thought I was pretty well researched, but this book intro Is your TO READ pile getting shorter? This book will solve your problems! I know the authors Lisa Kroger and Melanie R. Anderson from their hosting the Know Fear Cast along with Matt Saye (http://www.knowfearcast.com/ ). I really enjoyed how each chapter begins with an introduction that explains the era and its representative styles. It then follows with a number of exemplars of that era and style in both short and long fiction formats. I thought I was pretty well researched, but this book introduced me to a large number of writers who I want to experience. One that is wiggling up to the top of my pile is Mary Noailles Murfree, who is a regionalist writer of post reconstruction Appalachian country.And Quirk Books delivers again with the physical copy of this book. The layout is exceptional and O! The illustrations! Each chapter has illustrations in repeating patterns like could inhabit some creepy wallpaper, with subjects related to a number of the particular stories covered there. I loved the pulp panel in particular with Shambleau by C.L. Moore and The Canal by Everil Worrell – which ran as Episode 648 of PseudoPod earlier this year (http://pseudopod.org/2019/05/17/pseud... ). I loved seeing a shout-out to PodCastle and narrator extraordinaire Dave Robison, and I’m looking forward to reading more of the stories highlighted herein.
    more
  • Emmy
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really fun book. If you're interested in learning about classics of the horror genre, especially ones that might have been overlooked, then this book is an excellent starting point. Just as every reader has their own specific interests, this book is perfectly tailored to help the horror reader find titles more in their preferred sub-genre. For example, I was completely drooling over the Gothic novels section!The best part of the book is that not only does it highlight a whole slew of This was a really fun book. If you're interested in learning about classics of the horror genre, especially ones that might have been overlooked, then this book is an excellent starting point. Just as every reader has their own specific interests, this book is perfectly tailored to help the horror reader find titles more in their preferred sub-genre. For example, I was completely drooling over the Gothic novels section!The best part of the book is that not only does it highlight a whole slew of authors, but it also gives recommendations, including titles that are MUST READS, those that also come highly recommended, and supplementary materials by different authors (both male and female), and even by other artists, such as films and TV shows, to give the reader a whole host of terrifying entertainment.
    more
  • Lizzy
    January 1, 1970
    *This is an ARC GoodReads First Reads Giveaway!*While I am not an avid reader of Gothic or Horror, I feel like I learned a lot about the history of women's literature in general while reading this book. I loved learning about the lives of the authors and how the genre changed over time. I was impressed with how the book is organized, and thought the biopics per author were the right length.
    more
  • Penelope (Penelope’s Picks)
    January 1, 1970
    5/5This book is chock full of every sort of horror that you could possibly want to read, and BONUS: it’s written by badass women! What more could you want? 5/5 stars ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ See my Booktube Channel for full review 👻🕷(Link in bio.)Thank you to Quirk Books for sending me this book for review! 5/5This book is chock full of every sort of horror that you could possibly want to read, and BONUS: it’s written by badass women! What more could you want? 5/5 stars ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ See my Booktube Channel for full review 👻🕷(Link in bio.)Thank you to Quirk Books for sending me this book for review!
    more
  • Stephanie Wytovich
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely inspired! I can’t recommend this enough. Mandatory reading for all Speculative Fiction writers.
  • edh
    January 1, 1970
    "[a] superb little directory [covering] women authors of the gory and fantastic, past and present."⭐review in Booklist 6/1/19! Read my review here: https://www.booklistonline.com/Monste...
  • J Earl
    January 1, 1970
    Monster, She Wrote: The Women Who Pioneered Horror and Speculative Fiction from Lisa Kroger and Melanie R Anderson is a fun and quick introduction to not just the pioneers but the history of women writers in the genre(s).This isn't written as an actual history since it focuses on the writers themselves rather than creating a coherent and comprehensive narrative. I think this works better for a light popular introduction. This is not even remotely an academic book but it does do much more than ju Monster, She Wrote: The Women Who Pioneered Horror and Speculative Fiction from Lisa Kroger and Melanie R Anderson is a fun and quick introduction to not just the pioneers but the history of women writers in the genre(s).This isn't written as an actual history since it focuses on the writers themselves rather than creating a coherent and comprehensive narrative. I think this works better for a light popular introduction. This is not even remotely an academic book but it does do much more than just provide a reading guide. An academic work would potentially get bogged down in the minutiae of creating a complete timeline without gaps while a reading guide would have focused on the works rather than the authors. There is certainly connections made between authors as well as between works, which does provide some history without getting trapped into making a narrative. After discussing each writer, reading suggestions are made both for that author as well as similar writers and works, usually from the same time period.The last section looks forward and speculates about what the future holds. This is a fun section as well as possibly introducing some new names.Like any list, and this is essentially a long annotated list, there will be writers we would have preferred to have seen included as well as ones we question their inclusion. That is part of what makes lists fun since there is no definitive way to claim a name "should" or "should not" have been included, well, unless we think we are THE authority on the subject. If any of us are that delusional, then maybe instead of reading this fun book you should write your own since your authority is certainly acknowledged by all, right? Okay, maybe not, talk to your therapist.I would definitely recommend this to anyone who likes to read in the genre(s) and might want some background on the writers of the past, present, and future. Whether a couple of your degrees are in this area or you simply enjoy knowing literary history, this book should remind you of much you've likely forgotten and offer some new tidbits as well as reading suggestions.Reviewed from a copy made available through Goodreads First Reads.
    more
  • Gizem-in-Wonderland
    January 1, 1970
    This book has been created with the idea of bringing together all the dark queens of literature.I am completely clueless when it comes to genres of horror, gothic fiction, paranormal literature, ghost stories, and haunted environment and I wanted to learn about the most important/famous examples of these genres and it seemed a great starting point reading this book although it focuses only on women, which I believe is a good thing, since, behind most pseudonyms used in literature, there is a wom This book has been created with the idea of bringing together all the dark queens of literature.I am completely clueless when it comes to genres of horror, gothic fiction, paranormal literature, ghost stories, and haunted environment and I wanted to learn about the most important/famous examples of these genres and it seemed a great starting point reading this book although it focuses only on women, which I believe is a good thing, since, behind most pseudonyms used in literature, there is a woman trying to hide her real identity as a writer.This unique collection of female authors, who have written unconventional stories, and their most prominent works and masterpieces are listed under special categories such as ghost stories, haunted homes, vampires, horror and speculative fiction. It is great to read their life journey and how it shaped the way they write about such unusual topics.Female authors are often expected to be creative in romantic love stories and the examples in this book display the shocking fact that women can be as intense and unconventional as men when it comes to supernatural phenomena, suspense and horror, ghost stories and haunted houses, gore, and murder, violence, and erotism and paranormal activities. However, it is not easy to be accepted in society and publish your works since you're supposed to be all elegant and fragile as a woman(!). These brave women push the boundaries of society and dance beautifully around gender roles. A great read for the lovers of the related literature and even though I do not really fancy the genre, I have enjoyed it and learned a lot. The only downside is my TBR list has skyrocketed.(I received this book as an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for honest review.)
    more
  • David Simms
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. For anyone claiming to be a horror fan, this is an essential.While I'm somewhat embarrassed to not recognize many of the names in this book, I'm also thrilled by it.After meeting Lisa Kroger, talking to her until she ran away screaming (kidding, I think), I was wowed by the breadth of the insight both authors had into the importance of female writers behind the horror canon. Sure, we all know Mary Shelley and Ann Radcliffe, but the others between the covers?This is a treasure trove of amazi Wow. For anyone claiming to be a horror fan, this is an essential.While I'm somewhat embarrassed to not recognize many of the names in this book, I'm also thrilled by it.After meeting Lisa Kroger, talking to her until she ran away screaming (kidding, I think), I was wowed by the breadth of the insight both authors had into the importance of female writers behind the horror canon. Sure, we all know Mary Shelley and Ann Radcliffe, but the others between the covers?This is a treasure trove of amazing tidbits and histories of women who shaped the genre as we know it. From pure adventure to Gothic romance to science fiction to all out horror, Kroger schools the reader on what's crucial to filling in the holes in readers' learning about what makes horror what horror truly is.Dive in and enjoy - then blame them for the money you'll want to shell to track down these authors who need to be read.Five stars isn't enough here - it's crucial, essential to the history of any true horror fan (or just fans of women who bucked the system and challenged what was accepted).You will NOT be disappointed. My interview with the authors will be posted on Monster Librarian soon. Check it out - these two women know their histories and explain it well. They've hooked me.
    more
  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    From Gothic ghost stories to psychological horror to science fiction, women have been primary architects of speculative literature of all sorts. And their own life stories are as intriguing as their fiction and this book really makes for a fascinating insight into some incredible women. I loved reading this book. Finding out about all these glorious women has increased the books I need to read so much but I can only imagine it’s going to be worth it, as these women’s lives are so interesting and From Gothic ghost stories to psychological horror to science fiction, women have been primary architects of speculative literature of all sorts. And their own life stories are as intriguing as their fiction and this book really makes for a fascinating insight into some incredible women. I loved reading this book. Finding out about all these glorious women has increased the books I need to read so much but I can only imagine it’s going to be worth it, as these women’s lives are so interesting and how these two writers write makes for a book that just grabs you - it can make you laugh and make you feel, but you will never be disappointed. In combination with this, the artwork works so well throughout the book. I love the art style and pops up to compliment the writing so well throughout, particularly in the supernatural chapter which covers Elizabeth Gaskell - a writer I only thought of for Cranford, but now is going to be one of the authors I’ll be reading for the rest of the year, especially ‘The Old Nurse’s Tale’.A really great book about the amazing women who begun a genre that stays with us today, this is a visual and literary treat that’s perfect for the upcoming spooky season!(I received an ARC from Netgalley for honest review).
    more
  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    Though I probably would not have picked this selection up at a bookstore, I was still pretty excited to read it after receiving an advance copy through a Goodreads giveaway. I've leaned a bit more into the horror/thriller genres lately, and since I can be pretty picky about which types of these stories I like I was looking forward to getting some more authors and titles on my to-read list. And on that front, I was not disappointed. The book covered even more authors than I expected, and the orga Though I probably would not have picked this selection up at a bookstore, I was still pretty excited to read it after receiving an advance copy through a Goodreads giveaway. I've leaned a bit more into the horror/thriller genres lately, and since I can be pretty picky about which types of these stories I like I was looking forward to getting some more authors and titles on my to-read list. And on that front, I was not disappointed. The book covered even more authors than I expected, and the organization by genre was helpful in discerning which sections I'd be more interested in. I think there were almost a few too many authors discussed though; with so many women covered in each section, it was hard to internalize and remember all of them. I wanted a deeper dive into some of the authors, and I think the sections could've been better edited to include fewer authors with more information. The suggested reading lists at the end of each author's section (which were great) seemed like a good spot to include those women whose sections were a bit sparse.But overall, I enjoyed this book for both the entertainment it gave as well as the history I learned from it.
    more
  • Steph Myers
    January 1, 1970
    I don't typically read much reader's advisory, but this one sounded like it might hold some gems and boy does it. There is homage to all the horrible greats I grew up with (totally inappropriately during middle and high school.):Anne RiceVC AndrewsShirley Jackson (Especially, We Have Always Lived in the Castle!! - OMG. Soooo creepy.)There were a fair number of writers I was unfamiliar with and am now on the hunt to find through Interlibrary Loan. Examples:Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho I don't typically read much reader's advisory, but this one sounded like it might hold some gems and boy does it. There is homage to all the horrible greats I grew up with (totally inappropriately during middle and high school.):Anne RiceVC AndrewsShirley Jackson (Especially, We Have Always Lived in the Castle!! - OMG. Soooo creepy.)There were a fair number of writers I was unfamiliar with and am now on the hunt to find through Interlibrary Loan. Examples:Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho (I know. In today's time, it sounds a little like porn. But it's really a book of terror published in 1794 and she inspired Poe. Come on. Give it up for the lady.)Charlotte Riddell's Weird Stories (Because I love me some ghost stories and I love me some short stories. Two in one.)Everill Worrell's Leonora (short and creepy and in the Weird Tales archive apparently.)I'm going to randomly try anything from the following living authors, because for whatever reason, I keep meaning to read them and then get distracted by the latest shiny thing. Like this book.They are: Tanith Lee, Susan Hill and Helen Oyeyemi.Great women and some great stories about them and their stories.
    more
  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    I only gave this three stars, because it was really more of a reading guide rather than a book. (Still counts for my end of year tally though.) I learned a ton about the history of the horror genre. It is so much more than gratuitous violence and pulpy gore. The book starts off with the women writers of the 1600s and 1700s who crafted the genre, moves into haunted houses, vampirism, spiritualism and the occult, and ends with a forward-looking chapter about contemporary writers taking the genre i I only gave this three stars, because it was really more of a reading guide rather than a book. (Still counts for my end of year tally though.) I learned a ton about the history of the horror genre. It is so much more than gratuitous violence and pulpy gore. The book starts off with the women writers of the 1600s and 1700s who crafted the genre, moves into haunted houses, vampirism, spiritualism and the occult, and ends with a forward-looking chapter about contemporary writers taking the genre in new and different ways. I abhor horror movies, but horror fiction seems like I could handle it. Especially the way that the authors describe some of the more famous horror writers' styles--super dark magical realist essentially. And I had the same response reading theses synopses as I did when reading Circe. There is something intensely morbid reading about these supernatural/magical/mythical/horrifying tales, something very very satisfying about a narratively perfect twist. It keeps you on the edge of your seat. I have so much on my to-read list now...
    more
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    "There seems to be an unspoken assumption that women aren’t interested in horror and speculative fiction, despite ample evidence of the opposite (p. 269)."Monster, She Wrote provides this ample evidence. It is fantastic overview of women writers throughout history that have made their marks in the weird fictions. I am not a big horror reader so this book was a great exploration into genre. The horror writers I am familiar with are majority men so it was wonderful to read about new to me authors "There seems to be an unspoken assumption that women aren’t interested in horror and speculative fiction, despite ample evidence of the opposite (p. 269)."Monster, She Wrote provides this ample evidence. It is fantastic overview of women writers throughout history that have made their marks in the weird fictions. I am not a big horror reader so this book was a great exploration into genre. The horror writers I am familiar with are majority men so it was wonderful to read about new to me authors that I may not have read about in the past. I absolutely recommend this book. My TBR has definitely expanded by 27 stories!Also RIP to Toni Morrison who was represented in this book, before her passing, with her story Beloved. Thank you Netgalley and Quirk Books for an e-arc in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Laura Newsholme
    January 1, 1970
    This was such an interesting exploration of the women who paved the way in horror and speculative fiction. Ranging from some very well known names, such as Daphne du Maurier and Shirley Jackson, through to some almost forgotten authors, this gives us some insight into their writing and their lives and places each author in the wider context of the genre as a whole. The book is separated into roughly chronological sections, each of which focuses on a different sub-genre, including Gothic, hauntin This was such an interesting exploration of the women who paved the way in horror and speculative fiction. Ranging from some very well known names, such as Daphne du Maurier and Shirley Jackson, through to some almost forgotten authors, this gives us some insight into their writing and their lives and places each author in the wider context of the genre as a whole. The book is separated into roughly chronological sections, each of which focuses on a different sub-genre, including Gothic, haunting, vampires and others and I found it a really compelling read. The tone is light and the book is very informative without being too academic. Overall, I thought this was a well researched and interesting book and I would recommend it to anyone with a love of horror literature.I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
    more
Write a review