Spider-Man
In 1962's Amazing Fantasy #15, fifteen-year-old Peter Parker was bitten by a radioactive spider and became the Amazing Spider-Man! 57 years have passed in the real world since that event - so what would have happened if the same amount of time passed for Peter as well? To celebrate Marvel's 80th anniversary, Chip Zdarsky and Spider-Man legend Mark Bagley unite to spin a unique Spidey tale - telling an entire history of Spider-Man from beginning to end, set against the key events of the decades through which he lived! Prepare to watch Peter Parker age through 57 years of groundbreaking history - and find out what happens to him, and those he loves the most!COLLECTING: SPIDER-MAN: LIFE STORY 1-6

Spider-Man Details

TitleSpider-Man
Author
ReleaseNov 5th, 2019
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302917333
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Marvel, Spider Man, Comic Book

Spider-Man Review

  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    This is, without a doubt, the best thing Chip Zdarsky has ever written. A beautiful, heartfelt love letter to Spider-Man, a meticulously crafted labour of love from a devoted lifetime fan of the character, a wonderful tribute to one of comics' most iconic heroes. In Life Story, Chip takes the base starting point of Peter Parker in the 60's and imagines his life as he would grow, age and evolve as a person and as a hero throughout the decades right up until the 2010's. Peter goes through all the This is, without a doubt, the best thing Chip Zdarsky has ever written. A beautiful, heartfelt love letter to Spider-Man, a meticulously crafted labour of love from a devoted lifetime fan of the character, a wonderful tribute to one of comics' most iconic heroes. In Life Story, Chip takes the base starting point of Peter Parker in the 60's and imagines his life as he would grow, age and evolve as a person and as a hero throughout the decades right up until the 2010's. Peter goes through all the major Spider-Man milestone moments such as Clone Saga, Kraven's Last Hunt, Civil War, even Superior Spider-Man and many others, all seen through the lens of one finite lifetime. It's fantastic. The story humanises every character in a way that I don't think has been done before, and Zdarsky pulls some incredible twists that feel organic and genuine instead of feeling like regular superhero comics nonsense. Mark Bagley's art looks timeless, it was a brilliant move on Marvel's part to put one of the definitive Spider-Man artists on a book that is bound to go down as one of the all time greatest must-reads for the character. Overall, Spider-Man: Life Story is a triumph and one of the best things Marvel has published in years, and anybody who loves Spidey or wants to get into the character should read it.
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  • Anthony
    January 1, 1970
    When I need to recommend someone a single volume Spider-man story, along with Spider-man Blue, this is going to be one I’ll point to in the future. It’s pretty fantastic. Zdarsky takes decades of spider-man stories and weaves them into a 6 issue novel, covering some very familiar story beats while telling a story that feels new. Peter ages as he goes through the decades, along with everyone around him, which creates different takes on some classic stuff. And it’s really good! You could say that When I need to recommend someone a single volume Spider-man story, along with Spider-man Blue, this is going to be one I’ll point to in the future. It’s pretty fantastic. Zdarsky takes decades of spider-man stories and weaves them into a 6 issue novel, covering some very familiar story beats while telling a story that feels new. Peter ages as he goes through the decades, along with everyone around him, which creates different takes on some classic stuff. And it’s really good! You could say that this is ANOTHER version of spider-man in a time when we seem to be getting a new one every week, but I think this one deserves its place. Zdarsky and Bagley do something really good here and every Spider-man fan should read it.
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  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    Great Spidey book that spans Peter Parker's Spider-Man origin until his twilight years. Spider-Man: Life Story covers all of Spidey's greatest hits, but each has a slight twist due to Peter aging realistically along the way. Chip Zdarsky deserves a pat on the back for this comic. Not only does Chip write a great Peter, he also makes the decade-an-issue format work without it feeling like a gimmick. While, the story slows towards the final issue, the majority of this comic flies by. Furthermore, Great Spidey book that spans Peter Parker's Spider-Man origin until his twilight years. Spider-Man: Life Story covers all of Spidey's greatest hits, but each has a slight twist due to Peter aging realistically along the way. Chip Zdarsky deserves a pat on the back for this comic. Not only does Chip write a great Peter, he also makes the decade-an-issue format work without it feeling like a gimmick. While, the story slows towards the final issue, the majority of this comic flies by. Furthermore, finale is solid, if abbreviated. Mark Bagley's art is also strong. Each issue has touches of the prominent art style used in the decade in which the story is set. Spider-Man: Life Story could stand to shed some pages in the middle and gain some towards the end, but it's nothing that ruins the story. Overall, this is a very satisfying Spider-Man comic and the creators should be proud.
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  • Charles
    January 1, 1970
    Chip Zdarsky’s cover is worth the price of admission.I don’t know what it is about that monochrome cover that is just scratching some itch I never knew I had. Maybe I need to see a doctor.Full disclosure, I may be on the wrong side of my 30s, but this is the first, exclusively Spider-Man comic I ever read. Weird, huh?Ok, I lied. As a kid I got a copy of that issue where Spider-Man comes to Toronto and has to deal with the Ghost Rider and there’s like bike safe Chip Zdarsky’s cover is worth the price of admission.I don’t know what it is about that monochrome cover that is just scratching some itch I never knew I had. Maybe I need to see a doctor.Full disclosure, I may be on the wrong side of my 30s, but this is the first, exclusively Spider-Man comic I ever read. Weird, huh?Ok, I lied. As a kid I got a copy of that issue where Spider-Man comes to Toronto and has to deal with the Ghost Rider and there’s like bike safety stuff in it. REMEMBER THAT?! They handed it out at a Blue Jays game.I digress.Yeah, I may not have read much on our friendly, neighbourhood webslinger but I know enough about him to recognize the cues that Zdarsky and crew are hitting up in this issue.Super briefly, this is a re-evaluation of Spidey’s early days, set in the swinging Sixties with the Vietnam War set as the backdrop and main point of discussion.I’ve read a few of Chip’s books before and they can certainly humourous and at times off-the-wall. This however is a bit more sober. Not saying there’s no levity, but if you think of the topics being covered, it’s a bit heavier.It’s quite touching and offers some insight on what would happen in a world where super-powered beings could directly intervene in global conflicts. How would that affect the balance of power? What if some good guys had different ideas?Central to this story, is what if a good guy isn’t so sure about this war? Do they have a moral obligation to participate? Tony’s doing it, so I guess I should too…right? What if they have a lot on their plate? The draft was a spooky thing. Should Pete avoid it? He doesn’t want to die and Spidey has a crap tonne to do in NYC. Peter starts sorting things out, but then realizes that some may see his alter ego as a reason to act in an unfair situation. WWSMD?! Anyways, I feel like I might have said too much already, although some of this has already been covered in interviews and previews.Personally, this was an absolute delight and I didn’t feel like it was just rehashing of the same old same old i.e. Smithers yelling to the crowd of school girls “But she’s got a new hat!” in regards to Malibu Stacey. It was fun, it was cute, and it did tackle some strong topics with Peter having to do some serious soul searching.Anyways, I’m all ready for issue number two (again with a gorgeous monochrome cover) set in the 70s. What’ll happen next? Will Pete feel guilt about his decision? Will he finally sort things out with Gwen? WILL HE END UP AT THE MONTREAL OLYMPICS AND EAT A POUTINE?!!? I don’t know, but I’ll be first in line at my local to get it.
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  • Dimitris
    January 1, 1970
    A great solid story from Zdarsky that pretty much rounds up Spidey's life in comics from the start till now.Great artwork too!Highly recommended for Spidey fans!
  • Ondra Král
    January 1, 1970
    Ultimátní pavoučí pocta. Alternativní vesmír. Parker normálně stárne. Každý sešit reprezentuje jednu dekádu, do které Zdarsky zahrnuje ty nejzásadnější pavoučí příběhy, které se v ní staly. A v tom je trochu problém... na jednu stranu je to obrovské vyznání lásky pavoukovi a jeho příběhům, na straně druhé to ubírá prostor většímu příběhu.Zatímco první 4 čísla jsou naprosto geniální, v posledních dvou už se děje strašně moc věcí a chtělo by to minimálně dvojnásobnej rozsah. Závěr mi p Ultimátní pavoučí pocta. Alternativní vesmír. Parker normálně stárne. Každý sešit reprezentuje jednu dekádu, do které Zdarsky zahrnuje ty nejzásadnější pavoučí příběhy, které se v ní staly. A v tom je trochu problém... na jednu stranu je to obrovské vyznání lásky pavoukovi a jeho příběhům, na straně druhé to ubírá prostor většímu příběhu.Zatímco první 4 čísla jsou naprosto geniální, v posledních dvou už se děje strašně moc věcí a chtělo by to minimálně dvojnásobnej rozsah. Závěr mi přišel paradoxně nejslabší.Přesto je Life Story must-have, moje srdíčko několikrát zaplesalo a maximálně jsem si to užil.Objektivně 4*, jako Spideyho fanda musím dát 5*
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  • Anna Heidick
    January 1, 1970
    A great timeline of Spider-Man's life. The eras, events and stories he lived through. Very well done and it all tied together nicely.
  • M. Ihsan Tatari
    January 1, 1970
    Okuduğum en iyi Örümcek Adam hikâyelerinden biriydi. Peter Parker'ın çizgi romanlardakilerin aksine hep genç kalmadığı ve ilk kez ortaya çıktığı 1962'den beri gerçek bir insan gibi yaşlandığı maceralar var karşımızda. Sadece Peter değil, diğer kahramanlar da yaşlanıyor elbette. Ve hem Marvel'in hem de Örümcek Adam'ın hayatında yer eden en önemli olaylar bu pencereden bakılarak yeniden ele alınmış. Buna bir de gerçek hayatı, bizim dünyamızı etkileyen olaylar ve gelişmeler de eklenmiş. İç Savaş, K Okuduğum en iyi Örümcek Adam hikâyelerinden biriydi. Peter Parker'ın çizgi romanlardakilerin aksine hep genç kalmadığı ve ilk kez ortaya çıktığı 1962'den beri gerçek bir insan gibi yaşlandığı maceralar var karşımızda. Sadece Peter değil, diğer kahramanlar da yaşlanıyor elbette. Ve hem Marvel'in hem de Örümcek Adam'ın hayatında yer eden en önemli olaylar bu pencereden bakılarak yeniden ele alınmış. Buna bir de gerçek hayatı, bizim dünyamızı etkileyen olaylar ve gelişmeler de eklenmiş. İç Savaş, Klon Savaşları, Gizli Savaş, Venom, Vietnam Savaşı, teknolojinin ve şehirlerin gelişmesi... Baştan sona büyük bir keyifle okunan, müthiş bir deneyim. Umarım dilimize de çevrilir.
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  • James Hynes
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t cry but I didn’t not cry
  • Monsour
    January 1, 1970
    A great Spiderman story, possibly the best one I've read for a long while. The book is basically the whole story of Peter Parker to his first appearance in 1960's to the current real timeline in 2019 with the addition of he and the rest or the Marvel characters actually age in the right order, with the addition of real life events like Vietnam wars and so on. We gets to see the life story of Peter throughout the ages not just as a superhero but as a person.SPOILER:C A great Spiderman story, possibly the best one I've read for a long while. The book is basically the whole story of Peter Parker to his first appearance in 1960's to the current real timeline in 2019 with the addition of he and the rest or the Marvel characters actually age in the right order, with the addition of real life events like Vietnam wars and so on. We gets to see the life story of Peter throughout the ages not just as a superhero but as a person.SPOILER:Captain America helping Vietnamese instead of invading is the best portrayal of true patriotism.
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  • Billy Jepma
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, wow, this was exceptional. I've said this before on here, but I've had trouble getting into Spider-Man's comics, despite loving the character a lot. I know of his major comic plotlines but haven't read many of them. But "Spider-Man: Life Story" makes me feel like I did. It's a lovingly crafted story of Spider-Man from his college years through to old age. Chip Zdarsky starts the story in the 1960s and ends in 2019, and this strategy worked *far* better than I expected it to. Zdarsky covers m Oh, wow, this was exceptional. I've said this before on here, but I've had trouble getting into Spider-Man's comics, despite loving the character a lot. I know of his major comic plotlines but haven't read many of them. But "Spider-Man: Life Story" makes me feel like I did. It's a lovingly crafted story of Spider-Man from his college years through to old age. Chip Zdarsky starts the story in the 1960s and ends in 2019, and this strategy worked *far* better than I expected it to. Zdarsky covers many of the biggest, most crucial Spider-Man storylines throughout this series, and devoting each issue to a decade of Peter's life gives him a unique opportunity to take significant story risks and unlock some big emotional payoffs.While the structure of the series, by design, does mean some significant story developments occur in-between issues, Zdarsky never lets the consequences of those developments go unnoticed. Even if Peter's life goes through a major upheaval between issues, we still get to see him grapple with that upheaval and find a resolution to it––for better and for worse. I think what I most appreciate about this story is that it's a love letter to Spider-Man's character and history, but it never glorifies it the way "love letters" so often do. Zdarsky writes Peter as rash, impulsive, and almost always at wit's end. You can feel the weight of the world on Peter's shoulders with every line of dialogue Zdarsky gives him, and even when Peter makes the wrong decision(s), you feel for him. The tragedy and messiness of the character are on full display here, which means it's not a lighthearted read at all. Instead, it's a fiercely gripping and empathetic retelling of a character's iconic history and development that (almost) flawlessly encapsulates why Spidey/Peter continues to enjoy such longevity.The comic also looks great too, although not in an entirely "modern" way. Despite the series' modern storytelling sensibilities, the artwork (smartly, in my mind) retains the traditional comic book art style that defined the medium in its early days. Mark Bagley's pencil work is excellent, and he captures a beautiful range of emotion and energy in his characters. John Dell and Drew Hennessy's inks are also strong, and they give Bagley's lines impressive definition even in the most hectic of sequences. Frank D'Armata's colors, meanwhile, paint Zdarsky's story in a very classic, appealing palette. While the aging of the characters is a little hit-and-miss (sometimes Peter looks *really* old in later issues, and other times he looks not old at all, for example), it's not a glaring issue and only gave me pause a couple of time across all six issues. While I'd love to see Chip Zdarsky write more Spider-Man comics, after "Life Story" I almost feel like he doesn't have to. This is as exceptional a Spider-Man comic as I've ever read, and it works as both a stunning thesis statement for the character's iconic status *and* as a compelling examination of how a superhuman's greatest superpower is always going to be their humanity. This is an incredible comic, and I can imagine myself revisiting myself for years to come.
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  • Theo Sariklis
    January 1, 1970
    It's not perfect, but I seldom give anything five stars because it's perfect though. To condense several story arcs of one of the most prolific superheroes into six issues is no small feat and nobody would be able to do so completely seamlessly.Z'Darsky gets insanely close though. If I had to list my incredibly minor grievance, it would be that the format of this mini-series doesn't really allow Z'Darsky's story to breathe, leading to lots of overt exposition dumps and tonal shifts. It's not perfect, but I seldom give anything five stars because it's perfect though. To condense several story arcs of one of the most prolific superheroes into six issues is no small feat and nobody would be able to do so completely seamlessly.Z'Darsky gets insanely close though. If I had to list my incredibly minor grievance, it would be that the format of this mini-series doesn't really allow Z'Darsky's story to breathe, leading to lots of overt exposition dumps and tonal shifts. It's really a testament to how much I love the story being told that this doesn't end up bothering me in the long run.What I love about this series is that it strikes the perfect balance between novelty and nostalgia. Sure, I see things that take me right back to high school when I was reading Spider-Man comics instead of doing things like studying or sleeping, but there is a fountain of fresh ideas here that bring a whole new context and pathos to the character of Spider-Man.
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  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    A greatest hits of Spidey stories retold by Chip Zdarsky with art by the legendary Mark Bagley and with the added twist of Peter Parker actually aging. Fun and beautiful and his finale. Like his issue 310 of Spectacular Spider-man, I was in tears. Thoughtful and beautiful.A must read for all Spidey fans
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    "Spider-Man: Life Story" is a story with a clever concept and a solid execution. The six-issue series follows Peter Parker (with most of the greater Marvel universe as a backdrop) from the years 1966-2019, with Spider-Man and company aging in real time. Each issue covers a decade in Spider-Man's publishing history, including aspects of many of the most well-known stories from each respective decade of Spidey's comic book history. For example, you'll find variations of the original "Clone Saga" i "Spider-Man: Life Story" is a story with a clever concept and a solid execution. The six-issue series follows Peter Parker (with most of the greater Marvel universe as a backdrop) from the years 1966-2019, with Spider-Man and company aging in real time. Each issue covers a decade in Spider-Man's publishing history, including aspects of many of the most well-known stories from each respective decade of Spidey's comic book history. For example, you'll find variations of the original "Clone Saga" in Issue #2 (the '70s), "Kraven's Last Hunt" and "Secret Wars" in Issue #3 (the '80s), and a version of the infamous version of the "Clone Saga" that doesn't waste years of your life and money in Issue #4 (the '90s). And that's not even the half of it, folks.It's a treat to see how Chip Zdarsky weaves in elements of some of Spidey's most iconic stories without creating a 1:1 adaptation, instead utilizing the recognizable pieces of storytelling in surprising and unexpected ways. It practically goes without saying that the series is further elevated by the artwork of Mark Bagley (easily one of the greatest Spider-Man pencilers out there), who uses both subtle and noticeable visual cues to show the changing world around the aging characters in each issue. I wonder how much fun Bagley had drawing an aging Peter Parker after having drawn him as a perpetual high-school student for over nine years on "Ultimate Spider-Man."The best part about this series is its ability to transcend one of the greatest limitations of the comic book medium: the never-ending nature of the story. Because comic books are typically released monthly, with the end goal that the series will run indefinitely, characters can only age very slowly. In fact, Marvel's official ratio, per an early Stan's Soapbox article, is that roughly one year passes in the main Marvel universe for every three years of real-world publishing time; for most of the heroes who debuted in the Silver Age, only about 19 years have passed in their timeline, while the world around them has gone on for nearly six decades. In addition, characters are very rarely, if ever, given a proper "ending." With a few rare exceptions (such as Uncle Ben and Gwen Stacy), comic book characters in long-running series who receive a beautiful, tragic, and/or fitting end to their storyline may very well be brought back to life or out of retirement if it fits the desires of the newest monthly writer. Very rarely is a send-off ever considered perfect enough or untouchable enough for a writer to resist toying with it later on down the line.In "Life Story," however, we see Peter, his loved ones, and his enemies face the relentless onslaught of time's passage. We see Peter mature from a college kid still learning the ropes of being a superhero, to a young husband, to a middle-aged father, to a man facing a mid-life crisis, to a semi-retired man facing the debilitating effects of aging, to something of an elder statesman among superheroes. As the title implies, we follow Spider-Man through all the major stages of his life in a way that is simply not possible in a regular monthly comic book series. Best of all, the final issue gives Spider-Man gets a heroic and poetic send-off that reaches all the way back to 1962 and should stir the heart of any Spider-Fan.Unfortunately, "Life Story" is not perfect. Due to the need to represent an entire decades' worth of storytelling in a single issue, some of the twists and turns (especially the fights) seem rushed. Granted, this is a much more character-driven series than we'd typically find Spidey in, so the plot and conflict itself should often take a backseat; nevertheless, the Webhead is still one of the most fun superheroes to watch in a fight, so it was a somewhat disappointing problem for many of the fights to be over and done with so quickly.In addition, while the story includes a lot of the most important Marvel characters (think Reed Richards, Captain America, Iron Man, and the like), many of whom are featured in an amazing two-page splash page in the "Secret Wars" opening to Issue #3, there are still some noticeable absences. Daredevil is referenced but not seen, and there are hardly any X-Men running around. I understand that the canvas of this story is large enough as it is, but leaving out one of Spider-Man's closest allies and one of Marvel's biggest teams is still a glaring absence.Despite its few shortcomings, "Spider-Man: Life Story" is an excellent story for any Spider-Man fan wanting a panoramic tale of their favorite superhero. Check it out, and you might just find that you've hit the jackpot.
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  • Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    Finally got issue 6 so I could finish this series. Absolutely loved it, and how well thought out Peter's (and those around him) history has been weaved into one story through the decades. I loved seeing how Zdarsky was referencing pivotal moments in Spider history (even for characters like Gwen and then Miles and Otto in the final issue). My only wish was that the artwork for each issue had more references to the time periods (but thats only because I truly love 60s/70s settings/costumes/interio Finally got issue 6 so I could finish this series. Absolutely loved it, and how well thought out Peter's (and those around him) history has been weaved into one story through the decades. I loved seeing how Zdarsky was referencing pivotal moments in Spider history (even for characters like Gwen and then Miles and Otto in the final issue). My only wish was that the artwork for each issue had more references to the time periods (but thats only because I truly love 60s/70s settings/costumes/interiors etc and like to see more of it - I really loved the artwork in the tone of this story though!!)Would really recommend to all comic readers, a fun short collection to jump on to if you haven't read Spiderman before although I feel like it will be appreciated more if you are aware of key moments in his history 😊 A perfect story that truly showcases love for Spider-man, and provides beautiful justice to him and his history within the final pages.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    Collects Spider-Man: Life Story issues #1-6I will likely rank this as the #1 comic book series of 2019. It is a must-read for Spider-Man fans, and I think Marvel fans in general will appreciate the innovative story-telling. Peter Parker is 15-years-old when he is bitten by a radioactive spider in 1962, and the story progresses in real-time from there, as we see Peter aging over the decades. Each issue features a snapshot of Peter's life from a different decade, so:Issue # Collects Spider-Man: Life Story issues #1-6I will likely rank this as the #1 comic book series of 2019. It is a must-read for Spider-Man fans, and I think Marvel fans in general will appreciate the innovative story-telling. Peter Parker is 15-years-old when he is bitten by a radioactive spider in 1962, and the story progresses in real-time from there, as we see Peter aging over the decades. Each issue features a snapshot of Peter's life from a different decade, so:Issue #1 = The 1960sIssue #2 = The 1970sIssue #3 = The 1980sIssue #4 = The 1990sIssue #5 = The 2000sIssue #6 = The 2010sZdarsky uses elements from well-known storylines of the past, and puts a new twist on them here in "Life Story." I would give this my highest recommendation.
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  • Neyebur
    January 1, 1970
    La historia tiene un gran comienzo, jugando con los momentos más conocidos de la vida de Peter Parker, colocándonos en una cronología que de verdad avanza.Sin embargo, que estos cómics sean tan breves y se centren solo en el cabeza red juega en su contra, sobre todo en los últimos capítulos, donde solo nos cuentan lo que ha pasado entre capítulos. Casi desearía que este cómic diera pie a un universo alternativo.Tampoco soy muy fan de la caracterización de algunos personajes femeninos La historia tiene un gran comienzo, jugando con los momentos más conocidos de la vida de Peter Parker, colocándonos en una cronología que de verdad avanza.Sin embargo, que estos cómics sean tan breves y se centren solo en el cabeza red juega en su contra, sobre todo en los últimos capítulos, donde solo nos cuentan lo que ha pasado entre capítulos. Casi desearía que este cómic diera pie a un universo alternativo.Tampoco soy muy fan de la caracterización de algunos personajes femeninos o de Tony Stark.Sin embargo, hay algo que hace que ignore estos "problemas", y es que hacía tiempo que un cómic no me enganchaba tanto a un cómic, leyendo la primera mitad de un tirón en una noche, sin pausa, deseando saber qué pasaría a continuación.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    I'm reading Spider-Man: Similar to the Elseworld's "Superman/Batman: Generations" concept that has the characters age in real time.As such, this serves as somewhat of a encapsulation of Spider-Lore mashed into a succinct six-issue series. It's a bit similar to Ed Piskor's X-Men: Grand Design and I hope such "artistic editing/renditions" are allowed more often.I feel Spider-Man got a great ending with Spider-Man: Reign and this is another Imaginary/What If tale that has so I'm reading Spider-Man: Similar to the Elseworld's "Superman/Batman: Generations" concept that has the characters age in real time.As such, this serves as somewhat of a encapsulation of Spider-Lore mashed into a succinct six-issue series. It's a bit similar to Ed Piskor's X-Men: Grand Design and I hope such "artistic editing/renditions" are allowed more often.I feel Spider-Man got a great ending with Spider-Man: Reign and this is another Imaginary/What If tale that has some real feels and gravitas.
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  • Ramon
    January 1, 1970
    Easily Bagley's best work, and best Spidey work (which is saying something). But Zdarsky proved how good he could be with Spidey when he was writing Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man. This is of course an Elseworlds but it's smart, clever, funny, and surprisingly moving. It feels epic, with that conceit of him aging. He even gets to use the clone shenanigans in good ways.
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  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fairly interesting Elseworlds-esque take on Spider-Man that does manage some emotional resonance at the end. I just wish it had a more interesting artist than Bagley. Not Zdarsky’s best work, but still pretty good.
  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    Dramatic to a fault, poorly illustrated, an epic like nothing I've seen before and nothing I'll ever want to see again.
  • Andres Pasten
    January 1, 1970
    Solo por el dibujo de Bagley no lleva un 5. Gran homenaje a grandes historias de Spidey a lo largo del tiempo: Saga del Clon, última cacería de Kraven, Morlun, Spiderverse y final de Slott.
  • Miga Avalos
    January 1, 1970
    Chip Zdarsky is on his way to earn more Eisners.
  • Russell Bankston
    January 1, 1970
    The best Spider-man story I've read in a long time. A true masterpiece. Bravo!
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