Home Work
In this follow-up to her critically acclaimed memoir, Home, Julie Andrews shares reflections on her astonishing career, including such classics as Mary Poppins, The Sound of Music, and Victor/Victoria. In Home, the number one New York Times international bestseller, Julie Andrews recounted her difficult childhood and her emergence as an acclaimed singer and performer on the stage. With this second memoir, Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years, Andrews picks up the story with her arrival in Hollywood and her phenomenal rise to fame in her earliest films--Mary Poppins and The Sound of Music. Andrews describes her years in the film industry -- from the incredible highs to the challenging lows. Not only does she discuss her work in now-classic films and her collaborations with giants of cinema and television, she also unveils her personal story of adjusting to a new and often daunting world, dealing with the demands of unimaginable success, being a new mother, the end of her first marriage, embracing two stepchildren, adopting two more children, and falling in love with the brilliant and mercurial Blake Edwards. The pair worked together in numerous films, including Victor/Victoria, the gender-bending comedy that garnered multiple Oscar nominations. Cowritten with her daughter, Emma Walton Hamilton, and told with Andrews's trademark charm and candor, Home Work takes us on a rare and intimate journey into an extraordinary life that is funny, heartrending, and inspiring.

Home Work Details

TitleHome Work
Author
ReleaseOct 15th, 2019
PublisherHachette Books
ISBN-139780306845987
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Biography, Audiobook, Biography Memoir, Adult, Culture, Film

Home Work Review

  • Cam Kovach
    January 1, 1970
    It's always fun to read about our favorite personalities, and this book definitely delivers on that score. The writing is somewhat dry and unemotional, which is the opposite of what one looks for when reading a memoir. While life events and personal upheavals are discussed within the book, they are typically discussed in what seemed to this reader to be a detached and sometimes clinical manner. This style itself, though, may be an insight into Julie Andrews' personality -- she may possess an abi It's always fun to read about our favorite personalities, and this book definitely delivers on that score. The writing is somewhat dry and unemotional, which is the opposite of what one looks for when reading a memoir. While life events and personal upheavals are discussed within the book, they are typically discussed in what seemed to this reader to be a detached and sometimes clinical manner. This style itself, though, may be an insight into Julie Andrews' personality -- she may possess an ability to observe behaviors and her own thoughts and activities in a way that doesn't lend itself to emotionality. If you love Julie Andrews and want to learn more about her life, this is a good book for you. If you want to get "all the feels," this isn't for you.
    more
  • Linda Bond
    January 1, 1970
    If you’ve ever wondered what it was like to be Julie Andrews in Hollywood, making all those fine films, your answers are at hand. From Ms. Andrews herself comes this second memoir (follow-up to Home which dealt with her beginnings) with an insider’s view which only she could provide. It is thoroughly engaging and a must-read for her fans and anyone curious about the movie industry.
    more
  • Jaimedsworld
    January 1, 1970
    I’m not the hugest fan of memoirs, but learning about Julie Andrews was pretty cool. I learned like 1000 news things about her and maybe 1 or 2 about myself. Julie Andrews has had one heck of a life that could’ve easily been an excuse to be a person with bad habits and a attitude, but she kept at it and grew into the classy lady she is today. Great read.
    more
  • Felicity
    January 1, 1970
    Since I read Home last year I was hoping Julie Andrews would write a second memoir. I was delighted when I heard that Home Work was coming out and bought a copy the day it was published.Home Work covers the time that Andrews started filming Mary Poppins up until 1986. It goes into detail about what Hollywood was like and some of the characters she and her family had the pleasure and displeasure of dealing with. It also talks about her first marriage not working out and how she met he Since I read Home last year I was hoping Julie Andrews would write a second memoir. I was delighted when I heard that Home Work was coming out and bought a copy the day it was published.Home Work covers the time that Andrews started filming Mary Poppins up until 1986. It goes into detail about what Hollywood was like and some of the characters she and her family had the pleasure and displeasure of dealing with. It also talks about her first marriage not working out and how she met her second husband. The book continues to follow her parents and her Auntie Joan.It is incredible to me how she managed to balance her hectic work schedule with her family life and how she regularly moved for her filming. Just reading about some of her travelling made me exhausted! I can see why her daughter calls her the most resilient person she has ever known. There are some great anecdotes but it is an honest and straightforward memoir revealing the difficulties and fears that she had and how she decided the have therapy.Another fabulous memoir. Read Home first if you can but she does provide a brief recap at the start to help. I hope she writes another instalment in the next few years.
    more
  • Nikki
    January 1, 1970
    God bless the advent of Kindles and eBooks that allowed me to read this book whilst living internationally. And God bless what's-his-name.
  • Bookreporter.com Biography & Memoir
    January 1, 1970
    HOME WORK covers Julie Andrews’ years working in Hollywood on various movies, including Mary Poppins and The Sound of Music. Written with her oldest child, Emma Walton Hamilton, she reflects on her extraordinary film career and its effect on her personal life as she learns to navigate her meteoric rise to fame.The mother/daughter duo co-wrote Andrews’ first memoir, HOME, which focuses on her life growing up during World War II, her experiences with vaudeville in her teens and performing on Broadw HOME WORK covers Julie Andrews’ years working in Hollywood on various movies, including Mary Poppins and The Sound of Music. Written with her oldest child, Emma Walton Hamilton, she reflects on her extraordinary film career and its effect on her personal life as she learns to navigate her meteoric rise to fame.The mother/daughter duo co-wrote Andrews’ first memoir, HOME, which focuses on her life growing up during World War II, her experiences with vaudeville in her teens and performing on Broadway in her early 20s. In the Introduction to HOME WORK, Andrews offers a concise summary of the highlights of HOME to give readers the relevant details of her early life and to help them place family relationships and events in context when those people are referenced in the pages that follow.The book opens as Andrews is cast in Mary Poppins and heads to Los Angeles to meet with Walt Disney himself and other relevant people whose job it is to prepare her for the lead role. She recounts her steep learning curve as she adjusts to the process of filming a movie versus staging a Broadway show. These reminiscences are brimming with in-depth, fascinating glimpses into both the creation of the movie and the personalities of the actors with whom she worked, and she regales readers with stories that provide just the right balance between the two. Particularly intriguing are her descriptions of creating the special effects: “So often, the film called for something that had never been achieved before in terms of special effects. It was up to Walt’s brilliant technical crew to figure out how to make it happen.”Andrews’ discussion of the filming of The Sound of Music contains the same thoughtful recounting of behind-the-scenes tales, but she also addresses her initial reluctance to accept the role because she had not loved the Broadway production of the show and hated to be cast again as a nanny so early in her career. While the movie did not require the rigorous, occasionally dangerous and often time-consuming special effects that were necessary in Mary Poppins, The Sound of Music had its own challenges and initially was not well-received by the critics.As she continues to talk about her amazing film career during the time period covered in HOME WORK, Andrews’ grace, decency and devotion to her craft shine through on each and every page. And the fact that she wrote the book with her daughter lends an additional layer of genuineness and authenticity to her depiction of her life story.In her Epilogue, Andrews offers some advice to aspiring performers: “Learn your craft. Do your homework. Opportunity will come along when you least expect it, as it did for me. You may not even recognize it at the time. Your job is to be as ready as possible when that good fortune comes your way.” While she directs this guidance to those seeking to succeed in her profession, these wise words will benefit anyone who heeds them regardless of his or her job.HOME WORK traces Andrews’ career through 1986, focusing on both her personal life and her professional body of work during those years. It provides an unparalleled glimpse into these remarkable chapters of her life and will leave readers hoping for a third memoir in the not-too-distant future.Reviewed by Cindy Burnett
    more
  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    I was happy to see that Julie Andrews wrote her second memoir. I read her first memoir that she wrote from her birth to age 26. It ended with her on a plane to California to film Mary Poppins. Home Work continues with her career in the movies. It is from 1963 to the upper 1980s. It was nice for me to read of her experiences filming some of the movies I loved like Mary Poppins, The Sound of Music up to Victor Victoria. She writes about her divorce from her first husband and eventually meeting an I was happy to see that Julie Andrews wrote her second memoir. I read her first memoir that she wrote from her birth to age 26. It ended with her on a plane to California to film Mary Poppins. Home Work continues with her career in the movies. It is from 1963 to the upper 1980s. It was nice for me to read of her experiences filming some of the movies I loved like Mary Poppins, The Sound of Music up to Victor Victoria. She writes about her divorce from her first husband and eventually meeting and marrying Blake Edwards, Combining two families. Years later adopting two baby girls from Vietnam. She writes of her working with many famous actors and actresses but does not talk too much about them she is careful about what she says. She does have many nice things to say about her co- workers. I liked her memoir. I am a fan of hers so nice to read more about her life.
    more
  • Dale Wyant
    January 1, 1970
    This was on the one hand, a delightful read, and on the other, a very deep dive into the private and tumultuous world of an icon. While I enjoyed all the antidotes about Edward's professional career, her descriptions of her home life were heartbreaking at times. A very honest look at a true working woman's journey and trying to hold her immediate and extended family together. I hope she writes a third installment!
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Julie Andrews is so classy and optimistic. Her first memoir was captivating and this one continues along the same vein. I've heard Julie's daughter say, referring to her mother, that she has never met a more resilient person. Based on these books, I can understand why.
    more
  • Susie Stangland
    January 1, 1970
    Will love Julie Andrews forever! If you haven’t read her first memoir, Home, she includes a thorough recap at the start of the book and then heads straight into Mary Poppins. I loved learning how generous Walt Disney was with genuinely wanting to know what her husband Tony’s talents were and then hired him for the sets and costumes of MP. I felt the sets and costumes were as enchanting as Julie herself. This part of her life continues with an intimate invitation to her movie making, love with Bl Will love Julie Andrews forever! If you haven’t read her first memoir, Home, she includes a thorough recap at the start of the book and then heads straight into Mary Poppins. I loved learning how generous Walt Disney was with genuinely wanting to know what her husband Tony’s talents were and then hired him for the sets and costumes of MP. I felt the sets and costumes were as enchanting as Julie herself. This part of her life continues with an intimate invitation to her movie making, love with Blake Edwards and managing her home life. An important inclusion is her friendship with Carol Burnett—it’s one to envy. Read this book!
    more
  • Shaina Robbins
    January 1, 1970
    I love old Hollywood and I love Julie Andrews, so this was a must-read for me. For the most part, it was delightful. I suspect I would have liked this less had I read a physical copy instead of listening to the audiobook. Julie's writing style is very straight-forward, even when dealing with emotional moments, so hearing her warm, emotive narration made a big difference in how I experienced the book.
    more
  • Judith Hokanson
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent Julie Andrews has always been a favorite from the moment I saw Sound of Music. This book kept me captivated. We put movie stars on a pedestal and sometimes find ourselves envious of their lives. Julie wrote this book in such a great way proving their lives can be very hard and challenging. Thank you, Julie for sharing your story and sticking with your husband during those tough times. That's LOVE!!
    more
  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    I love some of Julie Andrews' movies and did read this book in its entirety. However for some reason I feel kind of ""Meh" about this. Maybe a bit of "wrong book at the wrong time" too, but I didn't love her writing style in this. Possible it would work fine for a different reader. I do still want to try some of her kids books though.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    We're so lucky to live at the same time as Julie Andrews.
  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting but not compelling.
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable read with some insights into the iconic movies that Julie Andrews made. The book takes a look at the years 1963 - 1986, so it seams there will be another book in the future.
  • Lady Brainsample
    January 1, 1970
    Julie Andrews' second memoir is everything I wanted and more.
  • C Bower
    January 1, 1970
    Parade Mag Oct 2019
  • Armando C.
    January 1, 1970
    This memoir is interesting but you will not learning anything dramatic.
Write a review