Chirp
From acclaimed author Kate Messner comes the powerful story of a young girl with the courage to make her voice heard, set against the backdrop of a summertime mystery.When Mia moves to Vermont the summer after seventh grade, she's recovering from the broken arm she got falling off a balance beam. And packed away in the moving boxes under her clothes and gymnastics trophies is a secret she'd rather forget.Mia's change in scenery brings day camp, new friends, and time with her beloved grandmother. But Gram is convinced someone is trying to destroy her cricket farm. Is it sabotage or is Gram's thinking impaired from the stroke she suffered months ago? Mia and her friends set out to investigate, but can they uncover the truth in time to save Gram's farm? And will that discovery empower Mia to confront the secret she's been hiding--and find the courage she never knew she had?In a compelling story rich with friendship, science, and summer fun, a girl finds her voice while navigating the joys and challenges of growing up.

Chirp Details

TitleChirp
Author
ReleaseFeb 4th, 2020
PublisherBloomsbury Children's Books
ISBN-139781547602810
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Mystery, Realistic Fiction

Chirp Review

  • Laurie Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book for its honesty, heart and tenderness. Keep your eye open for this one!
  • Mandy Stallard
    January 1, 1970
    Mia has just moved back to Vermont from Boston. She and her parents want to be closer to her grandmother who suffered a stroke a few months ago. Mia is really excited to be able to help her grandmother with her cricket farm. Unfortunately, things seem to be going mysteriously wrong left and right at the farm. Mia's grandmother suspects that someone is trying to sabotage the farm so she will be forced to sell it, but so far, there is no way to prove her theory. Per her mother, Mia has to pick two Mia has just moved back to Vermont from Boston. She and her parents want to be closer to her grandmother who suffered a stroke a few months ago. Mia is really excited to be able to help her grandmother with her cricket farm. Unfortunately, things seem to be going mysteriously wrong left and right at the farm. Mia's grandmother suspects that someone is trying to sabotage the farm so she will be forced to sell it, but so far, there is no way to prove her theory. Per her mother, Mia has to pick two summer activities: one for her body and one for her brain. She decides to participate in Launch camp (a maker space for kids) and Warrior camp so she can learn the tricks behind one of her favorite tv shows. Warrior camp happens to be right beside a gymnastics facility. We learn that Mia was a great gymnast in Boston, but after breaking her arm and undergoing surgery, she hasn't wanted to compete again. It's obvious that something bad happened to her at her old gym other than breaking her arm, but it takes a while to learn that her former coach was very inappropriate with her.After forming new friendships with girls and women who have also been the victims of sexual harassment or inappropriate touch, Mia finds her voice and finally confides in her mother. At the same time, these friends help her figure out who is the mysterious mishaps at the cricket farm. These friendships allow Mia to rediscover the joy in her life and regain a part of her old self.When I first heard that Kate Messner's upcoming novel was about a cricket farm, I thought that was really strange. I have loved every book of hers that I've read, but I couldn't see myself feeling super enthusiastic about this one. We all know the old adage "don't judge a book by its cover;" my new philosophy is going to be don't judge a book based on its setting or plot. Messner uses female crickets as a symbol for women who are scared to be vocal when men are misogynistic or inappropriate with them. She delicately unravels Mia's suffering for the reader without making it too graphic for her intended middle-grade audience. This book is so important for young girls to read. I imagine that every woman has been the victim of some type of sexual harassment during her life. We would love to think that it doesn't happen to girls in elementary school, but it does. I can say that confidently from my first-hand experience. It happened to me in first grade; a few boys touched my butt on the playground. In fourth grade, a male classmate asked me if I was a virgin. I, of course, had no idea what that meant, but I knew that it was a question he shouldn't be asking me. Now, I don't think those boys were being sexual predators; looking back on it now, I think they were probably doing things that they had seen or heard older boys or men doing, but it made me feel dirty, even though I had done nothing wrong. It's important for young girls to know that they are not in the wrong in these situations. This book is also important for young boys because they need to know that there are lines that should never be crossed. Messner does an excellent job of sensitively teaching both those lessons.Chirp needs to be in every elementary and middle school library, and I'm not just talking to librarians who have a robust budget. Buy this with your own money if you must; it's that important for our children to read.*Review based on an ARC given to #BookPosse.
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  • Gillian
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must-read for everyone who’s ever had their voice quieted, everyone who’s gotten an icky feeling from someone, everyone who’s struggled to speak up. Thank you Kate Messner for CHIRP. It’s going to inspire so many conversations! This is a must-read for everyone who’s ever had their voice quieted, everyone who’s gotten an icky feeling from someone, everyone who’s struggled to speak up. Thank you Kate Messner for CHIRP. It’s going to inspire so many conversations! 🦗💚
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  • MrsDogood
    January 1, 1970
    The fact that male crickets chirp while female crickets are silent provides an intriguing basis for a book on the #MeToo movement. It’s disappointing, then, that this clever premise receives a one-note execution. I know I am daring to find fault with a book about #MeToo but before I’m drummed out librarianship, note that my comments are on a book, not a movement.The writing is excellent; Mia’s voice rings true and her anguish is heartfelt and relateable enough to encourage young women to speak The fact that male crickets chirp while female crickets are silent provides an intriguing basis for a book on the #MeToo movement. It’s disappointing, then, that this clever premise receives a one-note execution. I know I am daring to find fault with a book about #MeToo but before I’m drummed out librarianship, note that my comments are on a book, not a movement.The writing is excellent; Mia’s voice rings true and her anguish is heartfelt and relateable enough to encourage young women to speak up if they find themselves in a situation similar to Mia’s. For me, the novel’s problems stem from Messner’s simplistic approach to her characters: females are unfailingly good and males are unfailingly bad. Three examples (there are many more but this post is already long enough):P.26 Why didn’t Mia enjoy maker spaces before now? At her Boston school “it was always full of eighth grade boys who didn’t look excited to share it.” P.86 Gram tells the story of female fireflies who signal to attract males they have no intention of mating with, then eat the males who respond to the signal. Messner’s next line: “All the moms applauded at that.”P.214 Even Mia’s devoted father falls short: Mia asks her mother to tell him about what’s happened to her because she doesn’t want to retell the story and “Dad wasn’t great about talking about things like that.” Acclaimed children’s authors (Kate DiCamillo, Lois Lowry) don’t write down to young readers as Messner does in this novel. Themes are driven home with a sledgehammer as if middle graders won’t get them otherwise. I’ll order this for my library due to its timeliness, success in encouraging young women to speak up and fine writing. But we’ll order only one copy.
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  • Jen Petro-Roy
    January 1, 1970
    I’m continually in awe of how Kate weaves together entertainment, education, and serious issues into a fabulous story.
  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    Due to a truly horrible digital ARC, I stopped trying to read this one. I think it will be a good middle grades choice for those that like a come back story with heart and a little mystery.
  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    “Sometimes courage is quiet. Sometimes getting up in the morning and being you, is the bravest most defiant thing a woman can do.” I really wasn’t expecting this middle grade novel to be anything more than friends spending the summer having fun with a little bit of mystery mixed in. While it is friendship and family, it is much more. It is overcoming your own fears, getting back in the ring, and speaking up when things don’t feel quite right. I think this book is going to open up a lot of “Sometimes courage is quiet. Sometimes getting up in the morning and being you, is the bravest most defiant thing a woman can do.” I really wasn’t expecting this middle grade novel to be anything more than friends spending the summer having fun with a little bit of mystery mixed in. While it is friendship and family, it is much more. It is overcoming your own fears, getting back in the ring, and speaking up when things don’t feel quite right. I think this book is going to open up a lot of conversations. And in the era of #metoo it is needed.
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  • Raven Black
    January 1, 1970
    Age appropriate (10-14). Heavy subjects but presented respectfully and accessible to all readers. A few bumps in plot for me, but overall decent and what you expect from the author.
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusMia's family moves from Boston back to Vermont, and she's happy to be back near her grandmother, who has a business raising crickets to sell for food. Her parents are both busy, so they make Mia go to two summer camps-- one is Launch camp, which she hopes will help with her grandmother's business, and the other is Warrior Camp, which Mia is glad is NOT gymnastics, since she had a troubling experience in Boston and is also recovering from a badly broken arm. Things E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusMia's family moves from Boston back to Vermont, and she's happy to be back near her grandmother, who has a business raising crickets to sell for food. Her parents are both busy, so they make Mia go to two summer camps-- one is Launch camp, which she hopes will help with her grandmother's business, and the other is Warrior Camp, which Mia is glad is NOT gymnastics, since she had a troubling experience in Boston and is also recovering from a badly broken arm. Things are not going well with the crickets, and she and her new friend Clover investigate why sea gulls are getting in, beetles show up in the feed, fruit flies infest the area, and the temperature controls are sabotaged. Through the Launch camp, Mia gets a lot of good ideas, and goes to businesses in the small town to try to get them interested in crickets as food, to some success-- even the mayor posts pictures of herself eating the crickets! Behind all of this activity, however, Mia is harboring a secret about uncomfortable experiences she had at gymnastics back in Boston; she manages to talk to a visiting women entrepreneur about them, and tells her parents when her young cousin is considering going to the same gym. The mystery of the sabotage is also uncovered, and her grandmother's business manages not only to survive but to thrive with the help of interested investors. Strengths: Messner does two things very well-- strong, supportive and engaged families, and small town settings. Add to that interesting characters who are involved in doing things, and her books are the gold standard for middle grade fiction. This is an interesting mystery that has elements of friend drama, and will go over well with students. The inclusion of #metoo topics will be well received by adults in the book community.Weaknesses: It was a bit hard to believe that an adult would go to such lengths to sabotage someone's business, but it makes for a compelling story. What I really think: Will definitely purchase, as this author is popular in my library.
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  • Pam Page
    January 1, 1970
    Kate Messner has an uncanny sense of what kids need and how to reach them through books. When a book ends, and I'm sad to say goodbye to the characters, I know it was a good one! This is true with Chirp, a book that includes a cricket farm, an aging parent, and a girl carrying a serious secret.
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  • Jacqueline
    January 1, 1970
    All around fun read I would recommend to any middle grade reader. In Chirp, Messner has done an excellent job of combining science, emotional growth, and mystery in the life of one very likable character named Mia.
  • Maddie☾✶
    January 1, 1970
    Chirp by Kate MessnerNever in my life have a read a middle-grade book as important as this one. Messner has made something so powerful and special to young readers in the #Metoo movement. Her writing is bold, courageous and the story is simply unforgettable.Mia has been a gymnast for a long time but after breaking her arm by falling off the beam she finds it's the perfect excuse to pack away her leotards and trophies. It's the summer after seventh grade and Mia is recovering from her broken arm Chirp by Kate MessnerNever in my life have a read a middle-grade book as important as this one. Messner has made something so powerful and special to young readers in the #Metoo movement. Her writing is bold, courageous and the story is simply unforgettable.Mia has been a gymnast for a long time but after breaking her arm by falling off the beam she finds it's the perfect excuse to pack away her leotards and trophies. It's the summer after seventh grade and Mia is recovering from her broken arm and she's moving to Vermont, and with that, she hopes to leave old secrets behind where they can be forgotten.With new friends, day camp, time with her grandmother and new sights to see Mia gets the hang of things pretty quickly. Mia’s beloved grandmother has a cricket farm and when Gram suddenly is convinced someone is trying to sabotage her cricket farm Mia jumps in to solve the mystery. While investigating Mia comes closer and closer to the truth. Will her discovery empower Mia to confront her own secrets and find the strength to finally tell her story? Will she finally be able to enjoy the sport that she once cherished again without fear?#Chirp is a noteworthy and unique book. Mia is relatable not only people her age, though I can see a lot of me in her when I was a younger gymnast. This story is absolutely stunning, I have no words to justify how truly special this is but I hope this gets the recognition it deserves. #Chirp has a 5 star rating from me :)!-Chirp comes out early 2020 andIf you guys want a copy you can preorder here: https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/chirp-9...
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  • Leah Moore Woods
    January 1, 1970
    So fun! Camp drama and family drama - and cricket drama!
  • Kate Waggoner
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher, Bloomsbury Children's Books, for sharing an advance copy of Chirp by Kate Messner with me. All opinions are my own. This book will be released in February 2020.During the summer after 7th grade, Mia moves back to Vermont so her parents can help her grandma with her cricket farm (though Mia's mom believes her grandma should sell the business, so she can relax). Mia's mom makes her choose two summer camps to enroll in, one for her mind and one for her Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher, Bloomsbury Children's Books, for sharing an advance copy of Chirp by Kate Messner with me. All opinions are my own. This book will be released in February 2020.During the summer after 7th grade, Mia moves back to Vermont so her parents can help her grandma with her cricket farm (though Mia's mom believes her grandma should sell the business, so she can relax). Mia's mom makes her choose two summer camps to enroll in, one for her mind and one for her body. Mia chooses to go to Launch Camp and Warrior Camp. Between her camp sessions, Mia helps her grandma at the cricket farm and learns that things just don't seem to be going her grandma's way. They're having issues with temperature control, bugs in the feed, and more. Mia quickly realizes that someone is trying to sabotage her grandma's dream and makes it her project at Launch Camp to create a business plan and way to innovate and expand the cricket farm. Mia and her friends start to investigate the mysterious incidents occurring at the farm. Will their discoveries and friendship empower Mia to share the secrets she's been keeping? I enjoyed this book for several reasons. To start, I love a mystery. This book has just enough of a mystery to pull you in. I became invested in the cricket farm and trying to figure out who was behind the sabotage. Additionally, I liked the message about empowerment and female entrepreneurs. I liked that the two camps that Mia chose might not be considered camps for girls, but both had multiple girls not only attending but excelling at what they were doing. The final thing I liked was Mia finding her voice and sharing with her mom about what happened to her at gymnastics. Mia knew something was wrong, but didn't believe that her voice would be heard or believed. I think it's incredibly important for young readers to know that if something is off or doesn't feel right to them, that they should share those feelings with a trusted adult. While I did enjoy this novel, my digital arc had several missing portions (random parts of sentences and paragraphs just weren't there) which did detract a little from my enjoyment as I wasn't getting the full picture and I had to infer several things.
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    “All summer she’d been hoping she might find her way back to that girl in the picture, but she’d been thinking about it all wrong. It wasn’t about finding her way back.…She’d have to find her way forward.” (226-227)Mia had been the type of girl that jumped off high rocks into the water, aiming for the Olympics in gymnastics, fearlessly trying new things. And then something happened that made her lose her voice, her confidence, her courage.When her family moves back from Boston back to Vermont, “All summer she’d been hoping she might find her way back to that girl in the picture, but she’d been thinking about it all wrong. It wasn’t about finding her way back.…She’d have to find her way forward.” (226-227)Mia had been the type of girl that jumped off high rocks into the water, aiming for the Olympics in gymnastics, fearlessly trying new things. And then something happened that made her lose her voice, her confidence, her courage.When her family moves back from Boston back to Vermont, Mia has a chance to help her grandmother with her cricket farm and business. As she observes the crickets and learn that “only the males chirp,” she wonders, “Was it that [the females] couldn’t chirp at all, no matter what? Or were the boy crickets so loud that they never got the chance?”With the help of new friends she meets in Launch Camp, Mia solves the mystery threatening her grandmother’s business and helps grow the cricket business. “Mia especially loved she had a new friend. One who was brave enough for both of them.” (88) Through Warrior Camp, she slowly regains her confidence and courage to tell her parents about what happened in Boston as she learns to chirp loud enough to be heard.Kate Messner's newest strong girl is the heroine of an important novel that teachers and librarians could pair with Barbara Dee’s new novel Maybe He Just Likes You for MG readers—girls and boys.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Give me more books about the new dawn of insects as protein-packed food of the future to save our planet and how appetizing they can truly be. Plus the feels of Vermont atmosphere that Messner does well and feels, well, close to home. This is a tried-and-true middle grade novel in which the main character is helping on the grandmother's cricket farm, one meant to raise thousands if not millions of crickets to supply for eating. There includes a Shark Tank-like competition on business and Give me more books about the new dawn of insects as protein-packed food of the future to save our planet and how appetizing they can truly be. Plus the feels of Vermont atmosphere that Messner does well and feels, well, close to home. This is a tried-and-true middle grade novel in which the main character is helping on the grandmother's cricket farm, one meant to raise thousands if not millions of crickets to supply for eating. There includes a Shark Tank-like competition on business and marketing including the chirp challenge to get people to try them and use them in food products, but also a mystery to solve as someone is trying to bring down the farm by planting diseases or other bugs in the food of the crickets and playing it off as the grandmother's craziness, but when the mystery is solved, we have a happier ending and have learned a lot in the process (as a reader). This is the kind of book that is both enjoyable to read but also fun to learn about with well-rounded characters and a great story about a girl coming back from a gymnastics injury to find her new place in the world (and highlights the new "gym" craze of ninja warriors).
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author and Bloomsbury Kids for sharing an ARC with our #bookexpedition group. The summer after seventh grade, Mia and her family move from Boston back to Vermont to be closer to her grandmother who’s suffered a stroke a few months back. Gram is recovering nicely but is concerned that someone is trying to sabotage her cricket farm business, and Mia vows to help any way she can. Mia’s mom has also told her that she must participate in two summer activities (one for her body and Thank you to the author and Bloomsbury Kids for sharing an ARC with our #bookexpedition group. The summer after seventh grade, Mia and her family move from Boston back to Vermont to be closer to her grandmother who’s suffered a stroke a few months back. Gram is recovering nicely but is concerned that someone is trying to sabotage her cricket farm business, and Mia vows to help any way she can. Mia’s mom has also told her that she must participate in two summer activities (one for her body and one for her brain). Mia chooses a Launch Camp (Maker space for kids) to help promote her Gram’s cricket business. She also picks a Warrior Camp so she can get stronger after last year’s gymnastics season ending injury when she fell off the balance beam and broke her arm. Later, the reader comes to learn that the broken arm was not the sole reason for Mia’s depart from gymnastics. This MG mystery has so much to offer readers. Friendships among strong girls, the science of entomophagy, the strength of family, and the courage of one girl to stand up and find her voice. Highly recommend for middle grade libraries. Publishes 2/4/20.
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  • Katrina Feraco
    January 1, 1970
    What I appreciated most about this story is that it deals with really hard, difficult subject matter, but doesn't bog the story down with it; at its heart, it's a fun mystery that allows the main character, Mia, to come to terms with past trauma and want to look forward to the future. There's a lot of girls who are smart, fun, and get involved with engineering and sports, which even I felt inspired by! I appreciated the down-to-earth writing style; Messner tells it like it is, with no frilly What I appreciated most about this story is that it deals with really hard, difficult subject matter, but doesn't bog the story down with it; at its heart, it's a fun mystery that allows the main character, Mia, to come to terms with past trauma and want to look forward to the future. There's a lot of girls who are smart, fun, and get involved with engineering and sports, which even I felt inspired by! I appreciated the down-to-earth writing style; Messner tells it like it is, with no frilly language, but it hits the balance of age-appropriate without being simplistic or condescending. I really appreciated the sense of unity all of the women and girls in this book had with one another. There was a (sometimes grim) sense of solidarity between multiple generations of women, but with so much hope for the youngest. I think a lot of kids will see themselves in Mia, especially those who have experienced some difficult, uncomfortable, or traumatizing experiences and don't know how or are afraid to talk about it. Lots of fun, so VERY Vermont!
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  • Lorie Barber
    January 1, 1970
    So. Wow. A little speechless in a good way. I’m a mom of a 17-year-old daughter. A woman. A teacher of 10- & 11-year-old girls. This book needs to be read all of us. But, more importantly (and just like Barbara Dee’s upcoming Maybe He Just Likes You,) Chirp needs to be read by *all* who care - or purport to care - about women (young & old) on this planet. And that includes parents of boys and young men, *and* those boys and young men. The narrative of Chirp was crisp with a great main So. Wow. A little speechless in a good way. I’m a mom of a 17-year-old daughter. A woman. A teacher of 10- & 11-year-old girls. This book needs to be read all of us. But, more importantly (and just like Barbara Dee’s upcoming Maybe He Just Likes You,) Chirp needs to be read by *all* who care - or purport to care - about women (young & old) on this planet. And that includes parents of boys and young men, *and* those boys and young men. The narrative of Chirp was crisp with a great main character voice, the plot kept me reading, caring, yelling, cheering. I loved the new friendships Mia made, the slow reveal of the central problem, and the response of her family to it. Messner is not afraid to tackle current topics like racism and sexism, and middle graders are not too young to read about them. Chirp is a must-add to all libraries: public, school, classroom, home.Many thanks to Bloomsbury Kids for sharing this relevant and excellent book with my reading group.
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  • Leigh
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from the publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.There's so much to love about this book. Mia's family returns to Vermont to help her grandmother who is struggling to keep her cricket farm afloat. Mia's parents think her grandmother should sell but Mia knows how much it means to her and wants to help in any way she can. She ends up at two camps (neither of which she is thrilled about) but through these camps she finds incredible friends and two very I received this ARC from the publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.There's so much to love about this book. Mia's family returns to Vermont to help her grandmother who is struggling to keep her cricket farm afloat. Mia's parents think her grandmother should sell but Mia knows how much it means to her and wants to help in any way she can. She ends up at two camps (neither of which she is thrilled about) but through these camps she finds incredible friends and two very different kinds of strength.It is the strength that is the biggest surprise to Mia, as it's what she feels she lost when she broke her arm at gymnastics. This book puts words and validation to the icky feeling from a situation that just doesn't feel right. It's a must read for so many kids.
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  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    This book packs a lot into a hair under 230 pages. I love Mia and her family, especially Gram. I've never been particularly tempted to try crickets but I kind of am now. (Probably the garlic and sea salt, but maybe maple? Probably barbecue.)I also love Mia's friends. They're smart and lovely people, and I especially love the way that they all cheer each other on. They're not even competitive or frenemies and it's a good change.As could be expected from Kate Messner's books, this is a fun and This book packs a lot into a hair under 230 pages. I love Mia and her family, especially Gram. I've never been particularly tempted to try crickets but I kind of am now. (Probably the garlic and sea salt, but maybe maple? Probably barbecue.) I also love Mia's friends. They're smart and lovely people, and I especially love the way that they all cheer each other on. They're not even competitive or frenemies and it's a good change. As could be expected from Kate Messner's books, this is a fun and good story that is an excellent time. (Expect some hard moments and maybe a few tears, but it's all worth it.) Highly recommended.
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  • Patricia Murphy
    January 1, 1970
    Again, Kate Messner is timely and adept in weaving together science, serious issues, and friendships into a compassionate story. Mia moves to Vermont to spend the summer with her grandmother, enrolls in a summer program, and solves a mystery. Here Mia meets other kids and befriends some girls to work on a STEM project, learns to speak up after encountering a situation that does not feel comfortable, and is introduced to entomophagy—the practice of humans eating insects as a healthy alternative.
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    Eye opening on several fronts, got me thinking about trying crickets (more protein!), and being aware of companies that are conscious about the environment and sustainability. Chapter 16 is where it’s at; the story from the bottom of the box. My heart. “Did every woman she knew have some awful secret story?” Yes, and this needs to change.
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  • Amber Webb
    January 1, 1970
    Kate Messner does a masterful job of writing a main character who overcome certain challenges by connecting with other girls and women and finding strength by speaking up. In this #metoo book girls share experiences through building a business together. The mystery that needs solving along the way adds one more element of fun you the book.
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  • Emily Myhren
    January 1, 1970
    Kate Messner is a rare breed of author who can write in many formats, topics, and age ranges. This story was captivating and unique. It beautifully tied together a girl's experience with sexual harassment with her desire to save her grandma's cricket farm. There is even a mystery to the story. A beautiful and original coming of age middle grade novel.
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  • Melinda
    January 1, 1970
    Extremely readable, and a little hard to categorize . It's a mystery, and a story about friendship and family, and a lesson in advocating for yourself and your own safety. Plus edible crickets and Ninja Warriors! Looking forward to handing this to kids when it comes out.
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  • Cassie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Honest and courageous. Kate has written a story that is timely in its nature, and something I am so grateful is out in the middle grade world. What a profound story wrapped up in good hearted friendship and fun mystery as well. I can’t wait to share with students.
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  • Hanna
    January 1, 1970
    Kate Messner has written a timely, honest, heart-filled story that will inspire and empower young readers. She explores current issues in the world and creates characters that you will root for. Definitely recommend!
  • Steph
    January 1, 1970
    So honest and sweet- but with plenty of action in the plot. Loved this story so much!“Sometimes courage is quiet... Sometimes getting up in the morning and being you, no matter what’s happened to you and no matter what anybody says, is the bravest most defiant thing a woman can do.”
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  • Meg
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to give this book a standing ovation when I finished it. Messner does a phenomenal job giving middle grade girls realistic examples of uncomfortable situations and how to deal with them. Beautiful novel.
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