Go with the Flow
Good friends help you go with the flow.Best friends help you start a revolution.Sophomores Abby, Brit, Christine, and Sasha are fed up. Hazelton High never has enough tampons. Or pads. Or adults who will listen.Sick of an administration that puts football before female health, the girls confront a world that shrugs―or worse, squirms―at the thought of a menstruation revolution. They band together to make a change. It’s no easy task, especially while grappling with everything from crushes to trig to JV track but they have each other’s backs. That is, until one of the girls goes rogue, testing the limits of their friendship and pushing the friends to question the power of their own voices.Now they must learn to work together to raise each other up. But how to you stand your ground while raising bloody hell?

Go with the Flow Details

TitleGo with the Flow
Author
ReleaseJan 14th, 2020
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781250143174
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Young Adult, Childrens, Middle Grade, Comics, Realistic Fiction, Feminism

Go with the Flow Review

  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel is pretty close to perfect. Scratch that - It IS perfect.We meet three best friends – Abby, Brit and Christine – who welcome the new girl – Sasha – into their group and develop a beautiful and strong friendship. These girls help each other and discuss topics deemed personal, more specifically menstruation, which is considered ‘‘taboo’’ in some places.When the girls discover that their school does not provide teenage girls with free pads or tampons and doesn’t even stock the This graphic novel is pretty close to perfect. Scratch that - It IS perfect.We meet three best friends – Abby, Brit and Christine – who welcome the new girl – Sasha – into their group and develop a beautiful and strong friendship. These girls help each other and discuss topics deemed personal, more specifically menstruation, which is considered ‘‘taboo’’ in some places.When the girls discover that their school does not provide teenage girls with free pads or tampons and doesn’t even stock the distributive machines, Abby in particular is angered by the situation and decides to change the way things are at her school. Her friends are there to support her as much as possible, but each friend is dealing with her own issue and Abby, passionate as she is, takes things a little too far…I say this graphic novel is perfect because there is nothing about it that I would change. Not the art. Not the art colour. Not the dialog. Not the characters. Not the storyline. Not even the mistakes that are made. Mistakes are important—people learn from them. Not only that, but sometimes unfortunate events can bring people together, like it did with Sasha and the other girls. I love, love, love this story and these girls. I wish I had this book when I first got my period. I was so confused and scared. This is a beautiful book. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    The nice thing about children’s literature is that it often replicates, on a smaller scale, themes and topics that you’ve find in more mature fare. Take, if you will, the protest novel. Which is to say, a novel in which the kids in the book decide to take a stand against an injustice. Examples that come immediately to mind vary from the fluffy (Frindle and The Homework Strike) to slightly more serious topics ( The Day They Came to Arrest the Book). For a long time that was pretty much as far as The nice thing about children’s literature is that it often replicates, on a smaller scale, themes and topics that you’ve find in more mature fare. Take, if you will, the protest novel. Which is to say, a novel in which the kids in the book decide to take a stand against an injustice. Examples that come immediately to mind vary from the fluffy (Frindle and The Homework Strike) to slightly more serious topics ( The Day They Came to Arrest the Book). For a long time that was pretty much as far as a book for children would go when it came to civil disobedience. Then came the election of 2016, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, the Women’s March, and any number of other factors that suddenly made those old "protest novels" look downright quaint. Since that time we’ve had book stunners like A Good Kind of Trouble by Lisa Moore Ramée, and other titles in the vein of The Hate U Give. But, Go With the Flow is different. Unusual. And it exhibits a kind of bravery, both on the part of the creators and, to a certain extent, the publisher, that is rather rare. Sometimes you don’t know what you’ve been missing until it’s arrived. I didn’t know I need a graphic novel for kids on period parity. And now, here we are.What’s your worst nightmare? There are so many to pick and choose between. How about the one where you get your period one day at school while wearing white pants and it feels like EVERYONE notices? Sasha’s worried enough about making friends at her new school and now this? Fortunately, her misfortune leads to meeting three amazing girls. Abby, Brit, and Christine are exactly the kinds of friends you wish you had in high school. They’re smart, funny, and passionate. Abby in particular sees Sasha’s problem and then starts to notice other issues. Why are the school’s machines in the bathrooms always empty of tampons and pads? What are kids who don’t have access to a lot of money supposed to do when they need them? Why doesn’t the administration care? What starts out as an annoyance quickly grows into a cause, but how do you get the world to notice something it simply doesn’t want to see? Let’s talk menstruation. I know I haven’t. In the field of children’s literature, if it gets mentioned then it’s a side note or a joke. Feeling cramps tends to be paired with the idea that the heroine is just stressing out about something else. I guess the most famous book for kids to feature periods is Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, particularly since Judy Blume had to update the sanitary napkin belt info in its more recent reprints. Even so, I can say with certainty that the idea of linking menstruation to the basic human right of having access to pads and tampons struck me as practically revolutionary. So too is the idea of turning this not into a nonfiction middle grade book (which would be the usual route) but a fun story set between four friends. You can teach the nonfiction book lovers all day long and they’ll howl for more, but comic fans? By the time they realize what the subject matter is, it’ll be too late. They’ll be hooked and (gasp!) learning. Such a smart battle strategy. The part of this that struck me as particularly keen, however, was that the book is not merely about raising the awareness of the existence of menstruation and the ways in which it can physically hurt those girls and women with endometriosis, adenomyosis, PCOS, and fibroids, but also how Williams ties all this into economic disparities. She makes the choice not to make any of the starring girls in this book lower income. They could afford those 50-cent tampons (if the bathrooms ever bothered to stock them). And everyone but Abby is fairly fine with this fact. She’s the only one consistently bothered that “there are kids here who can’t even afford lunch… How can they afford proper sanitary items for their periods if they cannot afford lunch?” Every woman I know has been in a bathroom where the tampon and pad machine was empty or, more often the case, missing entirely. And like Abby points out, who even carries around quarters all the time? This is one of those rare books that raises awareness not simply for the kids reading it but the parents, teachers, and librarians that find it as well. I’ll say it. I felt smarter after reading it.Many of us have had that friend like Abby. The one who cares so much about a cause that she brings it up in every conceivable situation (“But have you guys heard about Toxic Shock Syndrome?”) and then plunges forward with bold plans to right the wrongs of the world without thinking about how her choices might affect people closer to home. The authors make the opposition she faces shudderingly believable. When the principal says to her, “It’s not like the boys get free jock itch cream,” it can be mighty hard not to start screaming at the page. Now the real trick to the book, to a certain extent, comes when Abby writes a blog post and it goes viral. I think we’ve seen this plot twist before, and often it’s unbelievable. Due to the nature of the subject matter, I didn’t have that hard a time believing that Abby’s story would catch national attention … except that the blog post doesn’t appear to show any images from the shocking display she made in the school hallways. I can understand why, from a plot perspective, she didn't include photos of her act of disobedience, but the inclusion of a photo or two in the viral post would have made it MUCH more believable.So is it fun to read? I mean, face the facts, when I tell you I found this great book on menstruation rights, you’re not going to pick it up hoping for a chucklefest. That’s why it’s such a relief to discover that the book knows how to make a good joke. Long story short, it is very difficult not to fall in love with a comic that contains the line, “WALK AWAY! Ya big ol’ fart bag!” Or to enjoy it when Brit tells everyone that in the event that she can’t have kids, Sasha volunteered to have her children for her. Quoth Christine, “Totally normal high school thoughts.” Or, quite frankly, the sheer number of period puns. Interestingly, the Acknowledgments at the back are where some of the most egregious double entendres lurk. You gotta love a book that ends copious praise with the sentence, “You are all bloody awesome!” Hey, man. Commit to the bit.In children’s book publishing there’s a general rule out there regarding the age of characters in a book versus the readership. Long story short, if the kids in your book are teenagers then the book will not and cannot be marketed to kids. This rule applies to adult main characters as well, unless they are furry animals (don’t ask). So it was with great surprise that I found the characters in this book weren’t the usual middle school troupe but out and out high schoolers. Wow! I mean, kids love reading books about teens, but rarely are they allowed specifically to do so. And the subject matter being what it is, this book is going to get some adults upset. Sure it is. I mean, it’s about menstruation. There are adults out there that would tell you with a straight face that kids don’t need to know about that stuff when they MOST certainly do! What Go With the Flow does is show not just a range of body types, orientations, races, and belief systems, but it also shows how differently menstruation affects one person or another. If you have kids suffering seriously from cramps, this book is going to offer them some much needed information. They're going to need to know this and know it early. Honestly, there’s only one moment in the book that I actually found more in the YA sphere of things than anything else. In one scene Christine is studying with a swimming doofus named Ted. Ted digs Christine (Christine does not dig Ted) and as she preps for studying he hops onto the couch and then nonchalantly places a pillow over his crotch. It’s not a big obvious move but its visible enough that I raised one of my eyebrows a good quarter inch higher than its normal resting position. I wouldn't kick this book out of the kids section, but it sure seemed like a weird thing to just drop in the book casually like that.Alright. Enough of all that. Art time. Sometimes you can have a hard time following the narrative thread of a debut graphic novelist. Not here. Panels connect and flow expertly. But even more impressive to my mind is the color scheme. I don’t think I’m spoiling anything for you to say that it’s red. Red red red red red. Different shades, you betcha, but this isn’t one of those books where the color scheme shifts or adds a new color at a significant point in the proceedings. Williams’s drawing style is easygoing and enticing. Any fan of Raina Telgemeier, Shannon Hale, etc. is going to see this cover, completely miss the double meaning behind the title and the subtitle, and want to pick this up for a read. I should know. I’m basically that reader myself.When an author and artist release their book into the world, they don’t know what effect it may make on the general populace. In the back of this book is information on “How to be a Period Activist.” To a large extent Go With the Flow aims to remove the stigma surrounding periods, but I recall middle and high school really well. The girls who read this book and take it upon themselves to follow in its wake are honestly going to be extraordinary humans. Kids are less afraid these days to speak out and pursue various forms of activism, but this takes it to a whole other level. It opens you up to a new kind of personal shame and embarrassment hitherto unexplored. To those girls that read this book, embrace this book, learn from this book, and use this book, I salute you. And to the women that wrote this book and illustrated this book, I bow to you. You never know what you never know. Now though? No more excuses. This book is one in a million.For ages 9 and up.
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  • Bel
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful, beautiful, important, relevant graphic novel which is centered around menstruation, an often taboo subject. It is both approachable and grounded, and the author and illustrator have created a story that covers not only what it’s like to be a teenage girl but also manages to be utterly inclusive and diverse in equal and perfect measure. This book has the potential to become one of “those” books - one of the ones that *every* girl reads as a right of passage and boys read in order to A wonderful, beautiful, important, relevant graphic novel which is centered around menstruation, an often taboo subject. It is both approachable and grounded, and the author and illustrator have created a story that covers not only what it’s like to be a teenage girl but also manages to be utterly inclusive and diverse in equal and perfect measure. This book has the potential to become one of “those” books - one of the ones that *every* girl reads as a right of passage and boys read in order to understand girls.
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  • Lukas Holmes
    January 1, 1970
    Well that was just terrific. As a father of two girls who haven't had their periods yet, after I finished his I thought "I can't wait to share it with them!" so they won't be so mystified and scared. But then I realized, besides them, I have to share this with my son so he won't be a confused, rude idiot like I was in middle/high school. The characters are so terrific you not only really respond to the story itself and the subject matter, like Sasha, you want to know 'What's next?!'. I also Well that was just terrific. As a father of two girls who haven't had their periods yet, after I finished his I thought "I can't wait to share it with them!" so they won't be so mystified and scared. But then I realized, besides them, I have to share this with my son so he won't be a confused, rude idiot like I was in middle/high school. The characters are so terrific you not only really respond to the story itself and the subject matter, like Sasha, you want to know 'What's next?!'. I also really enjoyed all the factual details sprinkled throughout the blog and the notes afterwards. A fictional story is great, but giving real world information and facts for readers really helps propel this into a true actionable story. So, in summation, great for those who will get their periods, those who are having them, and those who never will because it's a great story with something for every single reader to relate to or learn from.
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  • Kales
    January 1, 1970
    I am so happy this book exists. I wish it was something I had when I was younger. This is a great book for preteens, teens, and adults. It is educational and entertaining. There is a diverse group of friends in this book that everyone can find something to relate to. They are such a wonderful example of female friendships. It's healthy and understanding. They go through trials. There is such a great example of communication and forgiveness, I just want to force it into everyone's hands. It's how I am so happy this book exists. I wish it was something I had when I was younger. This is a great book for preteens, teens, and adults. It is educational and entertaining. There is a diverse group of friends in this book that everyone can find something to relate to. They are such a wonderful example of female friendships. It's healthy and understanding. They go through trials. There is such a great example of communication and forgiveness, I just want to force it into everyone's hands. It's how we all should be treating each other, especially our friends. Additionally, this open and understanding conversation about periods. It should be talked about more. I didn't have an open conversation with someone other than my mom or sister about periods until I was in college. We can eliminate so much stigma and ingrained discrimination by having this conversation at early ages. I am so happy that I have read two graphic novels (GO WITH THE FLOW and GUTS) for young teens having conversations between girls about natural bodily functions that happens to every female.Thank goodness for these authors, artists, and publishers for putting these books out in the work. Conclusion: Keep
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  • Erin Cataldi
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I had this graphic novel when I was younger! It's not just about periods; it's about activism, friendship, and bullying. Three teenagers take a new kid under their wing after she gets her period at school and all her classmates start taunting her and calling her Bloody Mary because it went through her pants. The four of them quickly become close and realize how unfair it is that the pad machine is never stocked AND it costs money. They decide they want to try and change that but they I wish I had this graphic novel when I was younger! It's not just about periods; it's about activism, friendship, and bullying. Three teenagers take a new kid under their wing after she gets her period at school and all her classmates start taunting her and calling her Bloody Mary because it went through her pants. The four of them quickly become close and realize how unfair it is that the pad machine is never stocked AND it costs money. They decide they want to try and change that but they don't know how. A beautiful graphic novel that is a must read for teenagers, teachers, parents; and women of all ages. It's never to early to make a difference!
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  • Dani
    January 1, 1970
    Go with the Flow is a fun, feminist narrative paired with a friendship story, all delivered in a colourful and thoughtfully created graphic novel. This one will be great to put into the hands of young menstruaters so that they can learn to see their bodies (and others') without shame. The friendship element of the story was equally as strong as the feminist message. While each member of the foursome represents a different facet of young-womanhood, anyone who has been the new kid at a school will Go with the Flow is a fun, feminist narrative paired with a friendship story, all delivered in a colourful and thoughtfully created graphic novel. This one will be great to put into the hands of young menstruaters so that they can learn to see their bodies (and others') without shame. The friendship element of the story was equally as strong as the feminist message. While each member of the foursome represents a different facet of young-womanhood, anyone who has been the new kid at a school will be able to identify with Sasha's yearning to fit in. The wordless panels spoke just a loudly as the text-heavy pages from Abby's blog. I often found myself re-reading whole spreads just because they were so wonderful. Highly recommend!
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    This is the book I needed in middle school and high school and I’m so excited to have found this title! So many people will benefit from this. Young and old. The art work was very smooth and streamline, it flowed perfect with the story and portrayed emotions and situations in a way that made me feel them too! I learned somethings I didn’t know, and I plan to buy a copy to add to my collection.I’m proud of the authors for creating such a monumental and inspiring book! Thank you #Netgalley for This is the book I needed in middle school and high school and I’m so excited to have found this title! So many people will benefit from this. Young and old. The art work was very smooth and streamline, it flowed perfect with the story and portrayed emotions and situations in a way that made me feel them too! I learned somethings I didn’t know, and I plan to buy a copy to add to my collection.I’m proud of the authors for creating such a monumental and inspiring book! Thank you #Netgalley for this title!
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  • Rakisha
    January 1, 1970
    Go with the Flow is a delightful graphic novel about four best friends experiences during their second year of high school. They deal with crushes, artistic inspirations, trig, questioning their sexuality, being the new kid, menstruation and endometriosis. When one the new girl, Sasha, unexpectedly gets her period, a trio of girls--Brit, Christine, Abby--come to her rescue. Upon discovering that the girls' bathrooms has empty pad and tampon dispensers (again!), Abby starts a crusade to end the Go with the Flow is a delightful graphic novel about four best friends experiences during their second year of high school. They deal with crushes, artistic inspirations, trig, questioning their sexuality, being the new kid, menstruation and endometriosis. When one the new girl, Sasha, unexpectedly gets her period, a trio of girls--Brit, Christine, Abby--come to her rescue. Upon discovering that the girls' bathrooms has empty pad and tampon dispensers (again!), Abby starts a crusade to end the stigma surrounding periods and the school administration's belief that menstrual hygiene products in the girls' restrooms aren't that necessary. The story moves along nicely and captures the lives of each girl outside of school. The girls are of diverse races, body sizes, and family structures. There are single mom homes, two parent homes, and a single grandma. Although the girls are all different, they bind over the shared stress of menstruation. Abby, the super feminist of the book, is supported by her friends even when they disagree on which path of activism to take. Go with the Flow demonstrates a healthy female friendship that is supportive but not afraid of being honest. The book can be a little heavy handed with it's feminist message, but it doesn't take away from the main story of girls health and personhood being treated as less. Readers of all genders will see how entrenched sexism against women and Misogyny is in our everyday thinking. (For example, the principal equates the need for maxi pads with anti-jock itch cream or students who bullies Sasha with blood and period jokes.) The back material is what really makes this graphic novel needed in every middle school and high school library. Besides the historical perspective of how menstruating women have been treated throughout known history, it goes into the social aspects of period poverty (people who unable to afford menstruation products because they're homeless or living at or below the poverty line) and period and reproductive health issues like PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) and endometriosis) in accessible language for younger readers. Go with the Flow is colored in shades of red.I love this book. Go with the Flow
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  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    Work perk: Got to read an early edition of GO WITH THE FLOW and all I can say is it is fantastic. I wish it was a book I'd had growing up and the friendships in this one are some of the best I've seen in YA. Feminists, LGBTQ community, diversity advocates - put this on your radar for Winter 2020. You'll love it!
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  • Becs
    January 1, 1970
    Trigger Warnings: slight bullying, period talk, medical stuffWhen I received Go With the Flow from a book tour I participated in, I was firstly surprised that it was a graphic novel as I was not expecting that! I was then surprised when I actually started the book, that I couldn’t put it down. I was enthralled and rooting for all of the characters. I was living for all the feminism vibes and all of the talk of menstruation cycles, really made my heart soft!Okay, I have quite a bit of things to Trigger Warnings: slight bullying, period talk, medical stuffWhen I received Go With the Flow from a book tour I participated in, I was firstly surprised that it was a graphic novel as I was not expecting that! I was then surprised when I actually started the book, that I couldn’t put it down. I was enthralled and rooting for all of the characters. I was living for all the feminism vibes and all of the talk of menstruation cycles, really made my heart soft!Okay, I have quite a bit of things to say about this books because I wish I could give it one hundred million stars. *insert soft emoji* Go With the Flow makes a perfect example of the health issues many women, especially young women, and AFAB people have to deal with even to this day! Today, you see many, if not all, schools focusing on male-focused sports and neglecting the things that young women and AFAB people have to deal with. Like providing free feminine hygiene products to all of the students that are in need of it. And if feminine hygiene products are provided, some students may not be able to afford them or the machine may be out. These risks are not something that any woman and AFAB person should have to deal with.Within Go With the Flow, Abby and her friends decide to take charge with this issue by simply talking about it. But as their pleas go unheard, Abby takes bigger and more riskier actions in order to be heard. Meanwhile, the new girl Sasha struggles with being bullied because she unexpectantly started her first period and bleed through her pants. This issue was actually what originally started the whole crusade Abby and her friends take throughout Go With the Flow.Can we also talk about the rep that is included in here? Not only is there multiple of person of color main characters but also, all of the different types of period rep and LGBTQ+ rep! One of the main characters from the gang battles from really long, heavy and painful period cramps. Go With the Flow showcases how frustrating that not knowing what is going on with your own body can be as Brit tries to find a diagnosis and hopefully a treatment plan so she doesn’t miss as much school anymore or risk her future health. Then you have Christine who has been crushing on Abby and Sasha still being bullied for bleeding through her pants. Over the course of one single year, the gang goes through a variety of challenges regarding their health and social standing, while also giving history lessons about menstruation to the rest of the world via Abby’s blog.Not only is this entire graphic novel fun and entertaining, but it is also informative and is a must read for everybody no matter if they do or don’t get periods. Everybody seriously needs to read this book!! Go With the Flow had me devouring the entire book in one sitting because I just could NOT get enough of the gang’s journey. What really tied the bow on this masterpiece, was the art style being in shades of red and the multiple of mentions throughout the novel that AFAB, transgender, and non-conforming people still bleed as well. This novel really expressed that fact as it’s something the world needs to realize ASAP, so those dealing with menstruation problems can get the correct care that they need.Go With the Flow really is an amazing novel and is perfect for anybody of any age. The information, the art, the history, the message, it all ties together to create a novel that will be one of the best releases this year. And if that doesn’t make you pick it up right this instant, I hope this next bit does. GO WITH THE FLOW MAKES EVERYONE FEEL INCLUDED AND THAT YOU’RE NOT ALONE. That’s right, I said it. THE INCLUSION should be the only thing that makes you read this novel. Menstruation should be something that is talked about more and that isn’t this taboo topic. It happens to the majority of us in a variety of ways and comes in all shades of red and shape.I raise my glass of chocolate milk to Go With the Flow, to the path it has paved into the new year and decade, and to all of the people out there that doesn’t think fairness and feminism is the future. This is to you!
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    A cute graphic novel about bonding around periods in high school.And how tampons and pads are not free, and should be.And why it is a human right issue.And thought that sounds kind of heavy for a cute, funny graphic novel, it is also a serious issue.The authors said they wrote the novel they would have liked to have had when they were growing up.And if nothing else, it is a good conversation starter, and there is a lot of interesting information about periods in there.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    This is advanced reading copy of graphic novel that I would have loved to have had when I was twelve years old. It is so much better than the cartoon that we watched in gym to explain menstruation! The characters are Abby, Brit, Christine and Sasha. Even though it has been sixty-one years since I had my first period and ran to my mother to tell her that I must be "dying", I identified with all of this group of girls. I know what it is like to be Sasha. To be the new girl in the school and have a This is advanced reading copy of graphic novel that I would have loved to have had when I was twelve years old. It is so much better than the cartoon that we watched in gym to explain menstruation! The characters are Abby, Brit, Christine and Sasha. Even though it has been sixty-one years since I had my first period and ran to my mother to tell her that I must be "dying", I identified with all of this group of girls. I know what it is like to be Sasha. To be the new girl in the school and have a large red spot on my clothes and being sick with embarrassment.The many different aspects are covered in an informative way and the girls supported each other with love and respect. LBGTQ, different races and are all represented. The unfair situation of an empty pad or tampon machine when it is needed the most was even in this book. The pain and length of periods and the need for young women to discuss their periods and to see a doctor if the period is not normal, it is all in this book. I am going to hold onto this copy for my granddaughter to read.
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  • Jaclyn Hillis
    January 1, 1970
    This book is perfect. It is inclusive to different types of people that menstruate and different types of periods. Everyone needs to read this, and maybe period talk eventually won’t be so taboo anymore! This book is perfect. It is inclusive to different types of people that menstruate and different types of periods. Everyone needs to read this, and maybe period talk eventually won’t be so taboo anymore!🩸
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Really great graphic novel which gives the reader a lot to think about and a lot of good information at the end.
  • Beth Heltebridle
    January 1, 1970
    A youth graphic novel about period equity that recognizes trans women and is illustrated completely in shades of blood? I think I’m in love.
  • Finley
    January 1, 1970
    I received an Advanced Reader Copy of this graphic novel from the publisher through a giveaway hosted on GoodReads.Go With The Flow is an excellent example of the health issues that young girls and AFAB people face in their lives, especially in a school society where male-centric sports are often given preferential treatment over even student health. The main issue handled is the lack of feminine health products available in the characters’ school, and the fact that even when the machines are I received an Advanced Reader Copy of this graphic novel from the publisher through a giveaway hosted on GoodReads.Go With The Flow is an excellent example of the health issues that young girls and AFAB people face in their lives, especially in a school society where male-centric sports are often given preferential treatment over even student health. The main issue handled is the lack of feminine health products available in the characters’ school, and the fact that even when the machines are stocked, there is no guarantee that students who need them may not be able to afford them. Feminist artist Abby decides to take on this issue with the help of her friends Brit, Christine, and Sasha, starting with simply talking to the principal about the issue, but as her pleas are ignored, taking bigger and riskier actions in an attempt to be heard. Meanwhile, new girl Sasha is struggling with bullying after unexpectantly getting her first period and staining her pants, an issue that sparked the crusade in the first place and brought her together with her new friends. Brit, on the other hand, has been dealing with unusually long and painful periods for some time, and is frustrated with how difficult she is finding it to obtain a diagnosis, and hopefully, a treatment plan to improve them so that she is not forced to miss school and worry about her future health. Finally, Christine is harboring a crush in Abby, but is not yet ready to reveal her blossoming identity just yet. Over the course of a single school year, the quartet deals with many challenges with both their health and the social climate, while also learning and teaching others about many interesting facts about menstrual health throughout the world and history.This graphic novel is amazing. It is both entertaining and informative, and should be available to be read by all period-having people. I felt a deep connection with each of them, and at multiple points felt close to tearing up as I remembered similar experiences that I have had when I was a teenager. I particularly felt for Brit and her intense cramping, as I dealt with debilitating cramps for a long time until I was able to begin taking birth control. Fortunately, mine were not quite as bad as hers, but knowing how miserable I was, and how long it took for me to even realize my pain was not normal, much less have the opportunity to do something about it, I can at least begin to imagine the frustration of feeling like you’re dying two months out of every month and being told there is nothing that can be done about it yet. I was also quite happy with the LGBT+ representation, both through Christine’s crush on her friends as well as the mention in multiple places that AFAB trans and gender non-conforming people still bleed, and that it is important to acknowledge that fact so that they are able to receive the proper healthcare. This book made me so happy, and the way it presented the information in a way that is easy to understand but at the same time non-nonsense makes me feel that this will be one of the most important young adult releases in the coming year (I know I’ll be voting for it, if I see it come up in any end-of-the-year best-of lists). I mentioned earlier that I think all period-havers should read it, because it can provide so much useful information and a reminder that they are not alone. However, even people who do not bleed every month should also read it if they have the chance, because this is an issue that affects us all in some way, and something we should be talking about more to improve the lives of those who struggle with menstrual health issues of all types. Here’s to a better, more fair and feminist future, from a non-binary bleeder, and thank you so much for placing this masterpiece into the world!
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  • Charlotte Jones
    January 1, 1970
    *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.A graphic novel about periods. I didn't think this was going to be for me but I absolutely loved it. I think the messages that it gives to young girls, and women, all over the world about the right to safe and clean periods is amazing. The friendships in this are adorable and entirely realistic.I loved that all of the girls in this story had their own version of feminism and their own limits when it came *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.A graphic novel about periods. I didn't think this was going to be for me but I absolutely loved it. I think the messages that it gives to young girls, and women, all over the world about the right to safe and clean periods is amazing. The friendships in this are adorable and entirely realistic.I loved that all of the girls in this story had their own version of feminism and their own limits when it came to activism. It's important to show that young people can become great activists but I think it's equally as important to let everyone be themselves, and, let's be honest, not everyone has the confidence to do this kind of activism.Overall I really enjoyed this. It felt like other great comics I've read, such as Giant Days and Lumberjanes, but with discussions around a topic that still is mainstream. I would love to be able to get this book into the hands of so many people.5 out of 5 stars!
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    So well written for my students' age group - the way the authors handled so many aspects of menstruation candidly and reassuringly will be perfect for my junior high girls. They are also obsessed with graphic novels right now, so this is a definite add for me. Appropriate for 12 and up, but I’m getting it in to the hands of my own 10 year old when we get a copy.
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  • Cy
    January 1, 1970
    this was really cute, and i hope it inspires kids to become menstrual activists!! i feel like it's not going to appeal to kids who aren't already interested in feminism or activism, but at least it's doing the work of getting this info out there. it was definitely a little preachy at times, but it's a bit of an issue book, so i expected that.the activism plotline is really central to the story--the friendship/relationship stuff was very background, and most of the characters could be summed up this was really cute, and i hope it inspires kids to become menstrual activists!! i feel like it's not going to appeal to kids who aren't already interested in feminism or activism, but at least it's doing the work of getting this info out there. it was definitely a little preachy at times, but it's a bit of an issue book, so i expected that.the activism plotline is really central to the story--the friendship/relationship stuff was very background, and most of the characters could be summed up in one sentence. i was excited about the lesbian character but we don't get a resolution to her side-plot or really any outspoken feelings from her at all. just longing gazes and implied emotions. that all sounds really negative, but i did enjoy the book!! it's a cute story and i would have loved it when i was a baby feminist, so i know the audience is out there. i really do hope it starts conversations!!
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  • Kenna
    January 1, 1970
    I got this from the Goodread Giveaways and I was SO thrilled, because I think stories involving menstruation are so important and we need more of them!That being said, I need to be honest and I say I wish this had been better. The pacing felt off at times, and it wasn't always clear how each panel was leading into each other. The menstruation part of the story felt very 'after school special', sorta tacked on, like these characters only existed to teach us important life lessons about our I got this from the Goodread Giveaways and I was SO thrilled, because I think stories involving menstruation are so important and we need more of them!That being said, I need to be honest and I say I wish this had been better. The pacing felt off at times, and it wasn't always clear how each panel was leading into each other. The menstruation part of the story felt very 'after school special', sorta tacked on, like these characters only existed to teach us important life lessons about our bodies.All that said, I did really love the characters. They felt very believable to me, like people I knew in high school. This is definitely a book I'd want middle schoolers to read - those who menstruate and those who don't! I think the story, such as it is, does a good job of normalizing a normal body process, showing how to discuss it with your friends, and giving readers different health topics to think about without feeling as force-fed as a nonfiction health book would be
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  • Alyssa Black
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this graphic novel at San Diego Comic-Con this year, and while I didn’t know what it was about when I got it, I quickly fell in love with the premise. What I loved about this book is its design, its educational content, and its expectation of equality for what is a natural female process and the needs that go along with it. I struggled with the storyline, though. It sometimes felt like the story had too many separate threads that were not really developed, and then the I received an ARC of this graphic novel at San Diego Comic-Con this year, and while I didn’t know what it was about when I got it, I quickly fell in love with the premise. What I loved about this book is its design, its educational content, and its expectation of equality for what is a natural female process and the needs that go along with it. I struggled with the storyline, though. It sometimes felt like the story had too many separate threads that were not really developed, and then the actual period content seemed to be contrived. To have gone through a whole year of school in this one book was too fast, and the scenes felt abrupt. There are so many loose threads that don’t really feel resolved. While I’m all for open-ended endings that leave room for questions, it doesn’t quite feel like there has been resolution to all the plots. Regardless, what an important, frank discussion to build a story around. So glad to have had this shared with me.
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  • Meredith Ann
    January 1, 1970
    A great period primer/feminism 101 graphic novel for younger readers. While the characters are in high school, the book reads very middle grade, which I'd argue is a better intended audience. Some of the dialogue was a bit off and more fact filled than an average teenager speaks; still, it fit the story that is being told. It'll get kids thinking, and hopefully talking, about topics they may have otherwise thought of as something to keep private. Also, the characters are just delightful and A great period primer/feminism 101 graphic novel for younger readers. While the characters are in high school, the book reads very middle grade, which I'd argue is a better intended audience. Some of the dialogue was a bit off and more fact filled than an average teenager speaks; still, it fit the story that is being told. It'll get kids thinking, and hopefully talking, about topics they may have otherwise thought of as something to keep private. Also, the characters are just delightful and super likable. I often missed days of school due to extremely painful cramps so I found Brit especially relatable, even as an adult.
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  • Cassie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    There were a lot of thoughts the girls had in the story that I remember having growing up. I wish I had had something to make me feel less alone in my period life. I was the one with cramps going home and missing school. I completely understand that side of having a period. I teach 5th, but I will be handing this to anyone I feel like needs to understand periods and feel it’s normalcy. So many of my girls start theirs in my class, it’s scary for them. Thank you MacKids for sharing.
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  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    Where was this book when I needed it? “Talking about periods is the first step to taking that period power back.” First, I loved how the young women in this graphic novel were there for each other and lifted each other up. Secondly, I loved how issues of the pink tax, empty machines, heavy periods, cramps, endometriosis, and period history was covered in a classy, respectful way. “Going with the Flow” will definitely be a book that I share w my students.
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  • Jocelyn
    January 1, 1970
    This was a pretty sweet story about female friendship and menstruation. The color palette is limited mostly to reds and rusts - uniting the theme and the visuals - and follows a group of girls in their sophomore year of high school. The four are brought together because of a period accident, setting off discussions about free hygiene products and what their school can do to improve. The story is conscious of different experiences with periods, while also doing its part to send home the message This was a pretty sweet story about female friendship and menstruation. The color palette is limited mostly to reds and rusts - uniting the theme and the visuals - and follows a group of girls in their sophomore year of high school. The four are brought together because of a period accident, setting off discussions about free hygiene products and what their school can do to improve. The story is conscious of different experiences with periods, while also doing its part to send home the message that periods are normal and should be talked about without shame. Some of the scenes felt a little too PBS special for me, but I am also a grown adult who has had to deal with periods for half my life. I can see many young MG/YA readers enjoying it, even if I'm not sure if this is something you could have gotten me to read when I was in school.
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  • Jencarey1
    January 1, 1970
    Love books about girls making positive change in their community
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    I am SO happy to see this issue (and more) addressed so forthrightly in such an engaging way. The story itself is charming and appealing and perfectly written for its audience. And may I say, the audience here is far wider than I suspect the author's originally intended.The information is not only excellent it is reassuring and empowering and I truly wish this had been available sooner. What I especially appreciate is that menstruation information is not the only subject in the mix. Friendship, I am SO happy to see this issue (and more) addressed so forthrightly in such an engaging way. The story itself is charming and appealing and perfectly written for its audience. And may I say, the audience here is far wider than I suspect the author's originally intended.The information is not only excellent it is reassuring and empowering and I truly wish this had been available sooner. What I especially appreciate is that menstruation information is not the only subject in the mix. Friendship, bullying, activism, diversity, gender discrimination, cultural and family taboos and more are discussed with humor and heart. Loved the red palette, all the characters and this fresh and welcome story! All the stars!
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  • Michal
    January 1, 1970
    This book is magical.
  • Cass Moskowitz
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! I loved that each of the girls had a different story and a different way to contribute to the main plot of the stigma surrounding periods. I think this will resonate with any period-having people because of all the different points of view and different narratives that contribute to the dialogue. It's just a really fun, true to life friendship story, with an important topic. I can't say enough good things about this.
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