Jane Against the World
From award-winning author Karen Blumenthal, comes a deep and passionate look at the riveting history of the fight for reproductive rights in the United States.Tracing the path to the landmark decision in Roe v. Wade and the continuing battle for women's rights, Blumenthal examines, in a straightforward tone, the root causes of the current debate around abortion and repercussions that have affected generations of American women.This eye-opening book is the perfect tool to facilitate difficult discussions and awareness of a topic that is rarely touched on in school but affects each and every young person. It's also perfect for fans of Steve Sheinkin and Deborah Heiligman.This journalistic look at the history of abortion and the landmark case of Roe v. Wade is an important and necessary book.

Jane Against the World Details

TitleJane Against the World
Author
ReleaseFeb 25th, 2020
PublisherRoaring Brook Press
ISBN-139781626721654
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, History, Politics, Health

Jane Against the World Review

  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up Jane Against the World: Roe v. Wade and the Fight for Reproductive Rights by Karen Blumenthal because of the colorful cover. I stayed for the interesting take on how the history of abortions has shaped the modern viewpoints on this topic. On track to be published in February of 2020, this non-fiction book intended for younger and more liberal audiences gives a detailed play-by-play on the events leading up to and following the Roe v. Wade court case, as well as describing the events I picked up Jane Against the World: Roe v. Wade and the Fight for Reproductive Rights by Karen Blumenthal because of the colorful cover. I stayed for the interesting take on how the history of abortions has shaped the modern viewpoints on this topic. On track to be published in February of 2020, this non-fiction book intended for younger and more liberal audiences gives a detailed play-by-play on the events leading up to and following the Roe v. Wade court case, as well as describing the events of the actual case itself. Starting in the 1800s, the author, through inclusion of meaningful events from all throughout history, shows us just exactly how we got the point we are today with women’s rights. It turns out that if I hadn’t judged this book by its cover, I never would have chosen this incredible and informative read. The format of this novel is what made it particularly engaging for me. Although the book discusses true events, it is told as though it is a narrative, incorporating both facts and craft. I often find myself marveling at the power of some of the phrases in this book, and in more cases than one the narrative style has deepened the book’s impact. Furthermore, the author’s use of pictures in the text contributed greatly to my enjoyment of the book. Since all the “characters” mentioned are real, seeing what they looked like made them become even more real to me. A picture is worth a thousand words, and those thousand words saved from including a picture went to giving readers carefully researched and analyzed information, allowing them to formulate their own opinion about the issue based on the knowledge presented to them. As if a narrative format and images weren’t enough, the author included a recurring section entitled Pregnant Pause, in which the author provides extra information about the current topic she is discussing, usually bringing up a new historical figure or a different perspective on a given subject. The skillful use of unique formatting only contributes to the superior quality of this text. Because of how emotionally complex of a topic abortion is, I believe a non-fiction book with a narrative formate is defintely the best approach to get the necessary message across. It feels like a fiction book and you can connect and relate to the people mentioned, but you also get an abundance of information from many perspectives throughout history that a typical fiction book can’t provide. The theme and overarching ideas of this novel made it not only an interesting read, but an incredibly great one. The emphasis the author puts on discussing not only women’s rights, but the rights of women of different races and social statuses adds a layer of complexity to the issues discussed that usually isn’t brought up. The author believes that women have a right to make their own well-informed decisions about their bodies. It is abundantly evident after reading this book that the author put many hours into finding the most relevant and powerful information to support this theme. There are countless examples included detailing the history of how women’s voices were surpressed in abortion debates and how until about 50 years ago there was little to no access to reliable sex education and contraception. The theme is easily understood, and the main message gets across extremely clearly. The simplicity in how the theme is conveyed leaves plenty of time for the reader to reflect and think about their own opinions on the topics discussed. This book is extremely relevant and anyone looking to make themselves more well-informed should pick this book up. Abortion and women’s rights has been an extremely controversial issue in politics, and knowing about the history and causes of the issue lets me make my opinion based on facts. I never knew about the racial and wealth-related aspects of abortion before reading this book. As a teenage girl, I take the issue of abortion very seriously, and I like to seize every opportunity for educating myself. This book is the perfect way to make the complicated history of abortion and birth control accessible in one neat book. Reading this book made me better, more well-informed as a person, and I’m very glad that I was able to hear this story and learn more. Jane Against the World: Roe v. Wade and the Fight for Reproductive Rights by Karen Blumenthal was definitely one of the better books I’ve read. I found myself always excited to pick up this book. There’s something magical about being able to educate yourself and read about history. I would highly recommend this book to anyone willing to go on a journey through time and experience the hardships faced by women over the past 200 years. After all, putting yourself in someone else’s shoes is the only way to grow and become more empathetic as a human being, and books can act as an outlet in which to do so.
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  • Laura Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to MacMillanUSA for a free review copy to share with @kidlitexchange.This comprehensive nonfiction book will be great for research projects on the right to choose. Covering the history of abortion in America from the 1800s to present, the book features several abortion advocates including Madame Restell, various clergy who were part of the Clergy Consultation Service, doctors, Margaret Sanger and more. Occasional breaks in the text titled "pregnant pause" add more context with statistics, Thanks to MacMillanUSA for a free review copy to share with @kidlitexchange.This comprehensive nonfiction book will be great for research projects on the right to choose. Covering the history of abortion in America from the 1800s to present, the book features several abortion advocates including Madame Restell, various clergy who were part of the Clergy Consultation Service, doctors, Margaret Sanger and more. Occasional breaks in the text titled "pregnant pause" add more context with statistics, specific laws, etc. Blumenthal highlights how race and class have been a part of the inequity of access from the start, as well. As Planned Parenthood doctor Alan Guttmacher said, "abortion, above all else in American medicine, reeked of class privilege. Money could and still can, buy a safe abortion, but poverty purchases butchery and death." Includes a glossary, a timeline, a list of important Supreme Court cases, a Bibliography and Notes. There is no Index, however, which is strange. I hope one will be added!
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    14+ Some frank description of sexual matters as they relate to pregnancy and descriptions of abortion procedures. It's all very clinical.I somehow didn't look at the author name before I started this. I just happened to download a DRC a couple of months ago and was in the mood for a little nonfiction. Had I known this was by Karen Blumenthal (a true queen of YA nonfiction), I would have been better prepared for how amazing this was going to be. This is truly one of the best--if not THE 14+ Some frank description of sexual matters as they relate to pregnancy and descriptions of abortion procedures. It's all very clinical.I somehow didn't look at the author name before I started this. I just happened to download a DRC a couple of months ago and was in the mood for a little nonfiction. Had I known this was by Karen Blumenthal (a true queen of YA nonfiction), I would have been better prepared for how amazing this was going to be. This is truly one of the best--if not THE best--researched YA nonfiction books I've ever read. If it does not, at least, get an honor mention for the YASLA Nonfiction Award, I may throw things because it definitely deserves some accolades. I learned SO MUCH from reading this book. It's unlike any other book I've read on abortion. Blumenthal digs into the entire history of reproductive rights, specifically focusing on the legislative side. She brings to light that the moral debate around abortion wasn't really a thing at all until the late 1970s. She also sheds light on the fact that abortion laws disproportionately limit the choices of poor women and women of color. I mean, this book is EXTENSIVE and Blumenthal has the receipts. This is what research looks like. The last 20% of the book is LITERALLY all bibliography and notes. It was a JOY to read this book as a librarian. This is absolutely a must buy for any library serving young adults.
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  • Ava Budavari
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. What an incredible book. I learned so much about the history of the abortion rights movement while reading this. I know this is a book that I will continue to refer back to for the rest of my life. It is so important that we educate ourselves on this issue, and this book is an incredible tool for that. It is so well researched, and incredibly thorough, while also being accessible and easy to understand. Please pick up your own copy on February 25 of this year.
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  • Ms. Meghan
    January 1, 1970
    From the publisher: 'From award-winning author Karen Blumenthal, Jane Against the World isdeep and passionate look at the riveting history of the fight for reproductive rights in the United States.Tracing the path to the landmark decision in Roe v. Wade and the continuing battle for women's rights, Blumenthal examines, in a straightforward tone, the root causes of the current debate around abortion and repercussions that have affected generations of American women.This eye-opening book is the From the publisher: 'From award-winning author Karen Blumenthal, Jane Against the World isdeep and passionate look at the riveting history of the fight for reproductive rights in the United States.Tracing the path to the landmark decision in Roe v. Wade and the continuing battle for women's rights, Blumenthal examines, in a straightforward tone, the root causes of the current debate around abortion and repercussions that have affected generations of American women.This eye-opening book is the perfect tool to facilitate difficult discussions and awareness of a topic that is rarely touched on in school but affects each and every young person. It's also perfect for fans of Steve Sheinkin and Deborah Heiligman.This journalistic look at the history of abortion and the landmark case of Roe v. Wade is an important and necessary book.'Jane Against the World is a comprehensive review of the history of reproductive rights in the United States that led up to the landmark trial. In the early 1800s, abortion in the early stages of pregnancy was completely legal in the US. As had been the case throughout much of recorded history, a fetus wasn't considered alive or human until the woman felt it moving inside ('quickening'). Until this point, both the public and churches had little issue with abortion. The book follows the history of women's rights through the decades, through the work of Margaret Sanger and later the Clergy Consultation Service on Abortion, a group of religious leaders from various denominations who united to refer women for abortions. Jane Roe isn't even introduced until halfway through the book, underscoring the importance of laying the foundation of the legal and social framework that came before the trial. The case takes up the majority of the second half of the book with some space allotted for the impact of the decision.I found this book to be incredibly informative. Although marketed as a YA book, I never felt like the language or subject matter was watered down, and I especially appreciated the legal aspects of the cases being explained so well. The section dealing with the court case itself is (necessarily) dry. I do wish that the section detailing the 80s through today, when abortion protests became more violent and state's laws came under attack, was able to have more pages devoted to it. All in all, I highly recommend this book. This review originally posted at Books You Can Die in the Middle Of: http://lookgoodifyoudie.blogspot.com/...
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  • Monet
    January 1, 1970
    "Pushed, she said a womans constitutional right exists until a child is born, since the Constitution gives rights only once one is born."A vital and necessary read for any adult of the modern day. There is no more comprehensive history of women's healthcare and reproductive rights than in this book. It's full of important court cases, testimonies and personal opinions on equal rights. This book is informational and is necessary for any women's studies courses. The material is a little dry, which "Pushed, she said a woman’s constitutional right exists until a child is born, since the Constitution gives rights only once one is born."A vital and necessary read for any adult of the modern day. There is no more comprehensive history of women's healthcare and reproductive rights than in this book. It's full of important court cases, testimonies and personal opinions on equal rights. This book is informational and is necessary for any women's studies courses. The material is a little dry, which is to be expected of any nonfiction book. The prolonged court cases were difficult to read, but try to stick in there. This history can't afford to be forgotten!This book reflects on both the past, present and possible future of women's reproductive rights. I have very little critiques, only that I wish there hadn't been a sudden leap from the 1970s to current day. I would've loved more detail on the 1980s, another crucial period. All in all a fantastic and worthwhile read!
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    At a time when women are still fighting for autonomy when it comes to their own bodies, this book covers the history of that struggle. I'm sure this book will get more than its fair share of negative reviews, as it does name the Catholic Church as one of the leading opponents, and the interference of religious views into political issues. Still, it's interesting to read about these men and women who risked jail, physical punishment, and even death to provide a service that's one of the most At a time when women are still fighting for autonomy when it comes to their own bodies, this book covers the history of that struggle. I'm sure this book will get more than its fair share of negative reviews, as it does name the Catholic Church as one of the leading opponents, and the interference of religious views into political issues. Still, it's interesting to read about these men and women who risked jail, physical punishment, and even death to provide a service that's one of the most controversial in history.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusSuch a great book, and a topic about which I have been looking for something for a long time. I will suggest that my public library and high school libraries buy a copies, although I don't think I will purchase this for my middle school. Just don't have that much demand.
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  • Peter Z.
    January 1, 1970
    *continuing battle for the right to murder babies
  • Andréa
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.
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