The Phantom Twin
A young woman is haunted by the ghost of her conjoined twin, in Lisa Brown's The Phantom Twin, a sweetly spooky graphic novel set in a turn-of-the-century sideshow.Isabel and Jane are the Extraordinary Peabody Sisters, conjoined twins in a traveling carnival freak show—until an ambitious surgeon tries to separate them and fails, causing Jane's death.Isabel has lost an arm and a leg but gained a ghostly companion: Her dead twin is now her phantom limb. Haunted, altered, and alone for the first time, can Isabel build a new life that's truly her own?

The Phantom Twin Details

TitleThe Phantom Twin
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 3rd, 2020
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781626729254
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Young Adult, Comics, Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction

The Phantom Twin Review

  • Jasmine from How Useful It Is
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel was a fantastic read! I liked the realistic ways with sisters, how they sometimes argue and other times get along. I enjoyed the humor. The love story is cute. It's interesting to follow a Siamese twin's daily lives, how one person has to give in and do what the other person wants. Isabel and Jane often bicker, but I find it funny. The illustrations are fascinating and I spent too much time looking at it. My 8 year old son read this book in half of a day on 5/4/20 and loved This graphic novel was a fantastic read! I liked the realistic ways with sisters, how they sometimes argue and other times get along. I enjoyed the humor. The love story is cute. It's interesting to follow a Siamese twin's daily lives, how one person has to give in and do what the other person wants. Isabel and Jane often bicker, but I find it funny. The illustrations are fascinating and I spent too much time looking at it. My 8 year old son read this book in half of a day on 5/4/20 and loved it.
This graphic novel slashed comic book started with a prologue, told in the first person point of view following Isabel, 16 as she woke up afraid to open her eyes because it's the first time in her life where she will be without her twin sister Jane, 16. Then the story began with Isabel (Iss) and Jane (Jan) or both known as Jan-Iss, a conjoined twin also known as Siamese twins. They were three years old when their parents sold them to a sideshow. Iss talked about how Jan being older by a few seconds, was stronger and often Iss had to do what Jan wanted. From the show, a doctor met them and offered to perform a separation surgery so that they could each exist on their own. The surgery left one living and the other a phantom. This story is divided into four parts and ended with an epilogue.
The Phantom Twin is very well written and illustrated. A fast paced read and heartfelt story line. There were moments where I laughed and other times I cried. I'm glad to read about Siamese twins again because I haven't read one in a long time. The supporting characters are likable like Tommy, Harold, and Nora. I like looking at the half man half woman illustration. I really enjoyed the author's note and yes, as much as it's fascinating to see a freak show, I would definitely feel sorry for them being born that way and then to be put on display. I highly recommend everyone to read this book!xoxo, Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details Many thanks to First Second for the opportunity to read and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest.
    more
  • ✨Brithanie Faith✨
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 stars rounded up ⭐⭐⭐.5Early copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The Phantom Twin was a gentle reminder that I need to read more graphic novels, because I always end up devouring them in one sitting- and then waiting several months before picking another one up. What I loved the most about this particular graphic novel was Isabel's growth as she learns how to navigate life without her sister (and conjoined twin) Jane- and the beautiful art style that is used to 3.5/5 stars rounded up ⭐⭐⭐.5Early copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The Phantom Twin was a gentle reminder that I need to read more graphic novels, because I always end up devouring them in one sitting- and then waiting several months before picking another one up. What I loved the most about this particular graphic novel was Isabel's growth as she learns how to navigate life without her sister (and conjoined twin) Jane- and the beautiful art style that is used to tell their unique (and heartbreaking) story. This wasn't the first time that I've encountered a freak show in my reading, but it was the first where I could tell that the author really took the time and effort to share the good, the bad, and the ugly while remaining as respectful as they possibly could.
    more
  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    Graphic novels are always iffy for me because I feel like I need more, but I really like this one! Especially the carnival setting!The drawings were also beautiful and easy to follow along with the sometimes-heartbreaking story of these conjoined twins.I also loved getting to see the carnival acts as well as the emotion between sisters, etc. There was prejudice involved from some of the people that would see the acts but who really got the last laugh because those customers were out money? Very Graphic novels are always iffy for me because I feel like I need more, but I really like this one! Especially the carnival setting!The drawings were also beautiful and easy to follow along with the sometimes-heartbreaking story of these conjoined twins.I also loved getting to see the carnival acts as well as the emotion between sisters, etc. There was prejudice involved from some of the people that would see the acts but who really got the last laugh because those customers were out money? Very cute and touching graphic novel!
    more
  • Sheila Goicea
    January 1, 1970
    I received a finished copy of this book from the publisher, First Second, in exchange for an honest review. Thank you! In no way does this affect my rating or review.Content Warning: Exploitation, Death of a loved one, Prejudice, Attempted burglary The Phantom Twin is an incredibly easy story to get into. I read this graphic novel in one sitting, in less than an hour. I devoured it. Set in 1920s America, the travelling freak show was a major crowd-drawer. Back then, the world looked very I received a finished copy of this book from the publisher, First Second, in exchange for an honest review. Thank you! In no way does this affect my rating or review.Content Warning: Exploitation, Death of a loved one, Prejudice, Attempted burglary The Phantom Twin is an incredibly easy story to get into. I read this graphic novel in one sitting, in less than an hour. I devoured it. Set in 1920s America, the travelling freak show was a major crowd-drawer. Back then, the world looked very different than it does today, and was naive. Anything “abnormal” automatically drew both unwanted and wanted attention--hence, why the show was formed. It is also why the show had both real and fake “freaks” as people weren’t always the wiser. For two sisters, Jane and Isabel, also known as Jan-Iss, their condition was nothing but real. Born Siamese-twins, the Peabody sisters were attached at the side, sharing an arm and a leg. Jane, the outgoing, sassy, and domineering twin, wanted nothing more than to get out of the carnival to get married and have a family. Isabel, shy, quiet, and passive felt at home with the family they had created with the other members of the show. The two are approached one night after a show by a physician who believes he can “help” their situation. Jane eagerly jumps on the opportunity, and drags Isabel to a medical consultation to discuss their options further. The physician, believing their physical separation would be a seamless procedure, encourages the two to undergo the procedure for his own medical career and credibility. What comes of the procedure, however, is the exact opposite of the desired result. When the procedure is completed at the expense of Jane’s life, Isabel must now go on living for the first time, alone. She undergoes a lot of emotional turmoil and borderline depression, while trying to find her place in the world. Without her sister, and missing an arm and a leg from the procedure, Isabel finds herself having to relearn daily living, and how to compensate for what has been lost.In regards to the artwork, I found it fitting for the story told. The muted colors give the story an old-timey feel, which is obviously desired. There is also a certain harshness in the childlike artistry that conveys melancholy as well as isolation. The Phantom Twin is a quick read that easily submerges the reader into the cruel lifestyle on the darker side of the circus, accompanied with loss, but eventually, love.Vulgarity: Minimal.Sexual content: Minimal - cat calls, jeering, kissingViolence: Minimal.My Rating: ★★★★My Blog ¦ Bookstagram ¦ Twitter ¦ Pinterest ¦ Facebook
    more
  • kelly {BookCrushin}
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally published on BookCrushin.com.The Phantom Twin is one of those stories that is just really sad yet weird and you are so proud of the main character by the end. Such amazing growth. There are some tough plot points in this book, like exploitation and abuse, but I feel like the author took a lot of time and research to do the subject matter justice.Jane and Isabel were born conjoined twins and they were exploited for this fact. They were a part of a traveling sideshow This review was originally published on BookCrushin.com.The Phantom Twin is one of those stories that is just really sad yet weird and you are so proud of the main character by the end. Such amazing growth. There are some tough plot points in this book, like exploitation and abuse, but I feel like the author took a lot of time and research to do the subject matter justice.Jane and Isabel were born conjoined twins and they were exploited for this fact. They were a part of a traveling sideshow which was very common back in the turn of the century in America. One day a doctor decided that he would be famous if he could separate the girls. Jane wanted nothing more than to be her own person and get married and out of the carnival. Isabel was much more skeptical. She felt like the carnival was her home and her family, and she was also slated the be the twin to lose the shared limbs, which is a hard decision to make.When things didn’t work out as planned, and Jane dies from the surgery, Isabel is left haunted by her twin, and alone in the world for the first time in her life. The graphic novel format was so perfect to express the haunting and the loss of Jane. Isabel has such tremendous growth and explores the themes of what it take to move forward after loss and tragedy.The Phantom Twin is a totally bizarre and fantastic read and if you like historical fiction, gothic, and weird yet fascinating reads…I have a feeling you’ll love this one. The drawing style was perfect for this eerie story and the coloring was totally moody and I loved it.
    more
  • Sandy O'Brien
    January 1, 1970
    Im am always looking to add graphic novels to my class library because my students this year have been devouring them.The Phantom Twin is a story that will not only pull readers in but will also have them sharing with their peers.The story of conjoined twins that are a park of a traveling freak show who decide that they want to get surgery to be separated but only one survives. The story tells of the struggle that the remaining twin goes through all while having her phantom twin try to push her I’m am always looking to add graphic novels to my class library because my students this year have been devouring them.The Phantom Twin is a story that will not only pull readers in but will also have them sharing with their peers.The story of conjoined twins that are a park of a traveling freak show who decide that they want to get surgery to be separated but only one survives. The story tells of the struggle that the remaining twin goes through all while having her phantom twin try to push her around along the way and dealing with outside judgement. Definitely a one of a kid story!Can’t wait to share with my students Monday!
    more
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5⭐I enjoyed this mid-century-ish story about conjoined twins who work in a carnival. Its beautifully illustrated story about family (made and born into), normals and freaks, mistakes, loyalty and forgiveness.The word Siamese twin is used in period-context in the story, but the term is explained as being offensive to conjoined people now. If you liked Vera Brosgol Anyas Ghost, Ivy Noelle Weirs Archival Quality, or Hope Larsonss Mercury, youll enjoy this one too. 4.5/5⭐️I enjoyed this mid-century-ish story about conjoined twins who work in a carnival. It’s beautifully illustrated story about family (made and born into), ‘normals’ and ‘freaks’, mistakes, loyalty and forgiveness.The word ‘Siamese twin’ is used in period-context in the story, but the term is explained as being offensive to conjoined people now. If you liked Vera Brosgol Anya’s Ghost, Ivy Noelle Weir’s Archival Quality, or Hope Larsons’s Mercury, you’ll enjoy this one too.
    more
  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    Its been a while since Ive read a graphic novel in one sitting, but this one was gripping! It may have been the idea of a phantom twin, or the sideshow setting, or even the old-school tattoo parlor; most likely a combination of all of the above and the fact that I was drawn (pun intended) to all the characters. I have pre-ordered a physical copy and will count down the days until its release. It’s been a while since I’ve read a graphic novel in one sitting, but this one was gripping! It may have been the idea of a phantom twin, or the sideshow setting, or even the old-school tattoo parlor; most likely a combination of all of the above and the fact that I was drawn (pun intended) to all the characters. I have pre-ordered a physical copy and will count down the days until its release.
    more
  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 rating Thank you to Macmillan for providing me with the finish copy! I enjoyed this graphic novel. It touched topics such as prejudices, labor abuse, grieving, detachment, and overcoming your own demons. Super easy to read, would love to read more from this author.
    more
  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    Phantom Twin explores how a former conjoined twin makes her way forward in life after her sister dies on the operating table. Isabel was always the one being dragged along with her sister Janes ideas, and now she has to figure out what to do next. Even with Janes ghost for company, life is definitely a challenge.This wasnt quite what I was expecting, because it was more on the dark than cute side. The art had a retro feel to it, which fit right in with the carnival setting and clothing style. I Phantom Twin explores how a former conjoined twin makes her way forward in life after her sister dies on the operating table. Isabel was always the one being dragged along with her sister Jane’s ideas, and now she has to figure out what to do next. Even with Jane’s ghost for company, life is definitely a challenge.This wasn’t quite what I was expecting, because it was more on the dark than cute side. The art had a retro feel to it, which fit right in with the carnival setting and clothing style. I did love the representation of Isabel’s ghostly sister Jane; she provided a great contrast both visually and emotionally when both sisters were expressing their opinions.My main frustration was with the conflicts that are misunderstandings that could be easily fixed by characters having a conversation or refusing to look for other options and giving up. However, these conflicts made complete sense for the characters, especially Isabel. I can only begin to imagine what it must be like to try to start over when you’re not only missing limbs, but your literal other half. Despite their disagreements, Jane & Isabel were extremely important to each other. And Isabel wasn’t used to making decisions for herself, because Jane would win their arguments and make decisions for both of them. What do you do when you’ve only known one way of life? Only know one community of people? Who doesn’t make mistakes when they’re out on their own for the first time?If you’re looking for something similar, I recommend Spectacle by Megan Rose Gedris. It also features sisters working at a carnival, except they aren’t conjoined twins and it’s a murder mystery.*Thank you to NetGalley and First Second for providing a digital copy.*
    more
  • Lost in Book Land
    January 1, 1970
    Hello Again,It's been kind of a weird time (not just like the new weird with the virus) just a weird time where even when I can sleep in I am not (not for lack of trying, but something, most likely my internal clock, keeps waking me up). So during these few hours (when I am up before my husband and the cats and my responsibilities), I have been reading! I have been leaning towards picking up graphic novels because I can finish them in one sitting and usually in this weird amount of time I have Hello Again,It's been kind of a weird time (not just like the new weird with the virus) just a weird time where even when I can sleep in I am not (not for lack of trying, but something, most likely my internal clock, keeps waking me up). So during these few hours (when I am up before my husband and the cats and my responsibilities), I have been reading! I have been leaning towards picking up graphic novels because I can finish them in one sitting and usually in this weird amount of time I have before everything starts. One of the graphic novels I picked up during this time period was The Phantom Twin, a graphic novel ARC I was sent by the publisher (thank you so much for the opportunity to read this) which is out now!SPOILERS AHEADIsabel and Jane are twins but just not any twins! They are conjoined twins who make their living working in a traveling carnival. This is there home and all they have really known. One day a doctor approaches the twins and tells them he can separate them and give them a normal life. One twin is very hesitant (knowing the possible risks) the other is excited at all of the possibilities that this could offer. Isabel and Jane go through with the surgery however, things do not go as planned and Jane passes away during the operation. Upon waking up and learning this Isabel must now learn how to live without her twin and the carnival (which is her family/home).I really enjoyed my time with this graphic novel. I liked the art style (I honestly thought this graphic novel had a super unique style) and I enjoyed the story. I loved the final outcomes of this story (I saw some of them coming and others I definitely did not call but I am still super happy they happened). One other thing I really enjoyed about this graphic novel was the setting, not just the carnival setting (which was interesting to see) but also the town setting and the time period. Overall, I really enjoyed my morning with this graphic novel and want to give a big thank you to the publisher for the ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.Goodreads Rating: 4 Stars
    more
  • Carin
    January 1, 1970
    Isabel and Jane are so-called Siamese twins. conjoined along their sides, they are rejected by their parents and go to live at a circus, literally becoming part of the sideshow act. When they are young adults, Jane, who is by far the more opinionated and demanding sister, who wants to date (they do already but it's understandably awkward) and not be dragged down by her more reticent and reluctant sister, arranges for them to have separation surgery. This is a very new and experimental thing (I Isabel and Jane are so-called Siamese twins. conjoined along their sides, they are rejected by their parents and go to live at a circus, literally becoming part of the sideshow act. When they are young adults, Jane, who is by far the more opinionated and demanding sister, who wants to date (they do already but it's understandably awkward) and not be dragged down by her more reticent and reluctant sister, arranges for them to have separation surgery. This is a very new and experimental thing (I think this book is set in the 1930s?) Isabel goes along with it because she always goes along with what Jane wants.Isabel wakes up with one arm, one leg, and no sister. Jane did not survive the surgery. Except, well, she seems to now be a ghost, still attached to Isabel (sometimes). Isabel isn't familiar with making decisions for their lives and wasn't prepared for this outcome at all. She has to navigate a whole new world, learn how to be a single person, figure out her prosthetics, and decide if she wants to (or even can) stay part of the circus. In the mean time she meets a nice guy at a tattoo parlor, but he can't really be interested in a freak like her, can he?This book flirts with the fantastical but always does stay squarely in reality. The historical era makes it feel a little less real, but that was the height of the circus popularity not to mention, when this surgery first could be attempted, so it makes sense. I was truly worried at parts that Isabel wasn't going to find her way in the world alone. And Jane's ghost is sometimes malevolent. The only thing I wish was different was that the ghost part was both better explained and had more of an outcome. But this is a really cool book. The graphic novel format works especially well for a story so reliant of the physicality of the main character.
    more
  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    Superspeed readers like me can read 150 - 200+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book and many more today. LOL I received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. A young woman is haunted by the ghost of her conjoined twin, in Lisa Brown's The Phantom Twin, a sweetly Superspeed readers like me can read 150 - 200+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. LOL I received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. A young woman is haunted by the ghost of her conjoined twin, in Lisa Brown's The Phantom Twin, a sweetly spooky graphic novel set in a turn-of-the-century sideshow.Isabel and Jane are the Extraordinary Peabody Sisters, conjoined twins in a travelling carnival freak show—until an ambitious surgeon tries to separate them and fails, causing Jane's death.Isabel has lost an arm and a leg but gained a ghostly companion: Her dead twin is now her phantom limb. Haunted, altered, and alone for the first time, can Isabel build a new life that's truly her own?This may be one of the most bizarre and weird books that I have ever read - at least in comic book form. It is not gross per se, but it is haunting and, well how many ways can one say weird/ bizarre/ eerie/ creepy/ spooky/ macabre/ etc.? I think that the YA crowd will inhale this book - I would love to have read it as a novel form instead of this way, but that is just the way I am. A great book for the lover of graphic novels with a gothic twist in your life. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by "Social Influencer Millennials" on Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it (a rounded up from 3.5 to four 🎪🎪🎪🎪
    more
  • Rosemary
    January 1, 1970
    This eerie tale of twins, sideshows, and hauntings is perfect for tweens and teens who love their books on the creepier side. If you have readers who loved Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book and Coraline, or loved Mary Downing Hahn's books, this is the book to hand them. At the turn of the 20th century, Isabel and Jane are conjoined twins, sold to a sideshow by their family, where they find a family among the "freaks" in the freak show. The two sisters are opposites, with Jane being the dominant This eerie tale of twins, sideshows, and hauntings is perfect for tweens and teens who love their books on the creepier side. If you have readers who loved Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book and Coraline, or loved Mary Downing Hahn's books, this is the book to hand them. At the turn of the 20th century, Isabel and Jane are conjoined twins, sold to a sideshow by their family, where they find a family among the "freaks" in the freak show. The two sisters are opposites, with Jane being the dominant personality. Where Iss would rather stay home, Jane wants to go out, and since she has more motor control over their shared body, Iss finds herself dragged along. Jane starts dating a surgeon who wants to separate them; despite Iss's misgivings, Jane agrees: but doesn't survive the surgery. Iss is left to face life on her own, but feels the phantom of her sister ever-present, like a phantom limb. Iss returns to the carnival, desperate for familiarity and to rebuild her life. Jane, still the dominant personality, tries to assert herself, and Iss finds herself rebelling against her sideshow family and her sister's memory, as she tries to negotiate a life on her own and free of others' expectations.The Phantom Twin is fabulously creepy with an upbeat twist. It's a feminist tale and a story of life on the fringes as much as it's a story of grief, loss, and starting over. Back matter includes an author's note on sideshows, carnival lingo, and more resources for further reading.
    more
  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was a cute graphic novel about hope and finding yourself and strength. The author, Lisa Brown, has a note at the end about freak shows and their popularity, but also about the racism, ableism, and ethnocentrism that these shows supported. Brown researched some of the real life performers, and dove into the hard lives of these people. A lot of them were not treated well and used by the owners of these shows. As she researched, she also found that there were stories of among them I thought this was a cute graphic novel about hope and finding yourself and strength. The author, Lisa Brown, has a note at the end about “freak” shows and their popularity, but also about the racism, ableism, and ethnocentrism that these shows supported. Brown researched some of the real life performers, and dove into the hard lives of these people. A lot of them were not treated well and used by the owners of these shows. As she researched, she also found that there were stories of among them that were about hope and rescue. She found that some of these performers were actually able to make a living and have a better life as part of the show than stuck in an institution. When she wrote the story, she wanted to pull from both sides and created some characters based on those she had researched previously. I appreciated the note at the end and the work that Brown did before writing to book.*.This story is definitely on the darker side and does show us a glimpse of the type of life that some of these people had as part of these shows. I did find that the illustrations went well with the story and had that old time feel. Like I mention every time I read a graphic novel or manga, I do struggle a bit. I find that I don’t read the bubbles in order and I have to reread to have it make sense. This is of course a me thing though, not a reflection on the book.
    more
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Jane and Isabel (aka Janiss) are conjoined twins. After their father sells them into the circus, they find life difficult but they also find a family among the other freaks. Jane has always had more control over the twins' shared arm and leg and dreams of a non-freakish life, so when a doctor comes along promising that he can separate them, Jane forces Issa to undergo the operation. When Issa wakes up, she discovers that Jane died during the surgery, and now she has to go through life as a Jane and Isabel (aka Janiss) are conjoined twins. After their father sells them into the circus, they find life difficult but they also find a family among the other freaks. Jane has always had more control over the twins' shared arm and leg and dreams of a non-freakish life, so when a doctor comes along promising that he can separate them, Jane forces Issa to undergo the operation. When Issa wakes up, she discovers that Jane died during the surgery, and now she has to go through life as a literal half-person. Only Jane isn't completely gone. Jane lingers as a phantom limb and a phantom twin as Issa struggles to make her way in the world.This book was, as you might guess, a bit sad, although there is hope at the end. Issa's struggles are explored in a realistic way: as she was never able to trust anyone (not her parents, who sold her; not the carnival manager, who used her; not the doctor, who wanted fame for the operation), she struggles to trust a kind tattoo artist who seems to like her and accept her for who she is now. Jane is a bit of an antagonist throughout the story, but in the end she's redeemed. This is a great book for anyone interested in the life of a sideshow freak, as many controversial aspects of sideshows are explored and Issa's struggles are handled realistically.
    more
  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for an advance copy of this title in exchange for an honest review.This was a really interesting graphic novel that is a cross between paranormal and historical fiction. The author clearly researched a good deal about the early freak shows so this book never feels offensive or like she is looking down on the people who performed in these acts. The book begins with us meeting Isabel or "Iss" as she wakes up from surgery to remove her conjoined twin. Upon Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for an advance copy of this title in exchange for an honest review.This was a really interesting graphic novel that is a cross between paranormal and historical fiction. The author clearly researched a good deal about the early freak shows so this book never feels offensive or like she is looking down on the people who performed in these acts. The book begins with us meeting Isabel or "Iss" as she wakes up from surgery to remove her conjoined twin. Upon waking up she learns that her sister has died, from there we see how she and her sister came to join the circus as toddlers and how the choice of surgery came about. I loved watching the growth of Isabel as she is forced by her sister to leave the life she knew behind because after the surgery she has lost everything about herself -- she's no longer a conjoined twin or a freak as she was before.
    more
  • Steph Myers
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked it, but man that Jane was horrible. Poor Isabel is conjoined to a twin who is NOTHING like her. Jane is brash, adventurous, flirty, unrealistic and boy-crazy. Isabel is kind of along for the ride when all she really wants to do is sit quietly, hang out with the other freaks at the freakshow, and draw. She has control of one arm and one leg, whereas Jane controls the shared arm, her own arm and a leg. It doesn't sound like much, but when Jane convinces Isabel to allow a quack to I really liked it, but man that Jane was horrible. Poor Isabel is conjoined to a twin who is NOTHING like her. Jane is brash, adventurous, flirty, unrealistic and boy-crazy. Isabel is kind of along for the ride when all she really wants to do is sit quietly, hang out with the other freaks at the freakshow, and draw. She has control of one arm and one leg, whereas Jane controls the shared arm, her own arm and a leg. It doesn't sound like much, but when Jane convinces Isabel to allow a quack to separate them, Isabel is left with one arm and one leg and an obnoxious phantom twin sister still attached to her - AND no job to work at the freakshow. It sucks. But it ends well and that is all I will say. I like the illustrating and color scheme. If I had to guess, I would guess Lisa Brown was a graphic designer at some point.
    more
  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for the arc of this book I received in exchange for a fair and honest review.It was adorable.I know that sounds a bit condescending as some of the subject matternamely, the historical treatment of people with physical disabilities, or basically anything that othered thembut honestly, at its heart, this book was about something far more simple. It was about the struggle to find yourself when you feel lost, to learn to accept help when you need it, to Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for the arc of this book I received in exchange for a fair and honest review.It was adorable.I know that sounds a bit condescending as some of the subject matter—namely, the historical treatment of people with physical disabilities, or basically anything that “othered” them—but honestly, at its heart, this book was about something far more simple. It was about the struggle to find yourself when you feel lost, to learn to accept help when you need it, to trust the people that matter. It was a book that shows we all want the same things: a purpose, love, companionship, community. It was just a very, very sweet read for a quiet fall morning and I enjoyed it a lot.
    more
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Jane and Isabelle are conjoined twins whose parents have sold them off to a Freak Show. Jane desperately wants to be free and separated physically from her sister and opts to have surgery to make that happen. Unfortunately, the doctor takes a risk he is not prepared for and Jane dies, leaving Isabelle without her. Janes voice remains with Isabelle throughout the story and tries to help Isabelle when she is naive to the shenanigans of other people. The heart of this graphic novel is pointing out Jane and Isabelle are conjoined twins whose parents have sold them off to a Freak Show. Jane desperately wants to be free and separated physically from her sister and opts to have surgery to make that happen. Unfortunately, the doctor takes a risk he is not prepared for and Jane dies, leaving Isabelle without her. Jane’s voice remains with Isabelle throughout the story and tries to help Isabelle when she is naive to the shenanigans of other people. The heart of this graphic novel is pointing out the value of people who are trapped in the freak show culture. The author’s notes at the end add more empathy for the fictional characters of the book and for the real lives imbedded in the freak show culture.
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyable art, a heroine you root for, a humanizing view of people often forgotten or mocked. Better than Evelyn Evelyn: A Tragic Tale in Two Tomes. Isabel is haunted both literally and figuratively, making bad choices along the way that are at once very understandable and have you frustrated with her. Recommendations for further reading and some info about "freak shows" in the back are greatly appreciated. This is a bit difficult to review because for once I don't feel like I have a lot to say Enjoyable art, a heroine you root for, a humanizing view of people often forgotten or mocked. Better than Evelyn Evelyn: A Tragic Tale in Two Tomes. Isabel is haunted both literally and figuratively, making bad choices along the way that are at once very understandable and have you frustrated with her. Recommendations for further reading and some info about "freak shows" in the back are greatly appreciated. This is a bit difficult to review because for once I don't feel like I have a lot to say about it except that I liked it and I enjoyed the art style, so I recommend it.
    more
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I grew up learning about sideshows and the performers from my grandfather, who spent some time as an acrobat in the 40s, so I was immediately drawn to this title. Jane, Issy, and all of their performer friends are a lovely cast of characters with an intense sense of community, and Brown does a great job of giving us an insight into the ins and outs of life on the road where one is not often accepted. Issys journey throughout the title (Ill avoid spoilers here) also highlights the universality of I grew up learning about sideshows and the performers from my grandfather, who spent some time as an acrobat in the 40s, so I was immediately drawn to this title. Jane, Issy, and all of their performer friends are a lovely cast of characters with an intense sense of community, and Brown does a great job of giving us an insight into the ins and outs of life on the road where one is not often accepted. Issy’s journey throughout the title (I’ll avoid spoilers here) also highlights the universality of the struggle to find one’s place in the world. I particularly loved the illustration style, the colors were especially pretty and the characters beautifully drawn.
    more
  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Edelweiss+ provided me a DRC of this book in exchange for an honest review.This was original, haunting, and emotional. The story follows Isabel, a former conjoined twin trying to find her way in the world now that she and her sister are no longer connected. She doesn't feel like she belongs with the carnival "freaks" anymore, nor does she feel accepted in the "normal" world. The artwork is a little dark and and somewhat chilling, but it complements the mood of the story. There are a few somewhat Edelweiss+ provided me a DRC of this book in exchange for an honest review.This was original, haunting, and emotional. The story follows Isabel, a former conjoined twin trying to find her way in the world now that she and her sister are no longer connected. She doesn't feel like she belongs with the carnival "freaks" anymore, nor does she feel accepted in the "normal" world. The artwork is a little dark and and somewhat chilling, but it complements the mood of the story. There are a few somewhat mature moments, but I still think I will pick this up for my library...and I definitely recommend it.
    more
  • Christy Broderick
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very interesting graphic novel for young readers to adults. Thanks again to NetGalley and First Second for allowing me to read this ARC in exchange for feedback. Isabel and Jane are conjoined twins that are a part of a traveling carnival freak show. One day, Jane and Isabel decide to have surgery to separate them, but something tragic happens to Jane. Isabel now has to live life on her own, with the help of her friends from the freak show and a new friend who accepts Isabel as her own This was a very interesting graphic novel for young readers to adults. Thanks again to NetGalley and First Second for allowing me to read this ARC in exchange for feedback. Isabel and Jane are conjoined twins that are a part of a traveling carnival freak show. One day, Jane and Isabel decide to have surgery to separate them, but something tragic happens to Jane. Isabel now has to live life on her own, with the help of her friends from the freak show and a new friend who accepts Isabel as her own person. She still knows Jane is “with” her, but Isabel wants to make a better life for herself - this is a book that showcases what she does to make that happen. A good book overall.
    more
  • Jamie Lovett
    January 1, 1970
    The Phantom Twin is the story of Isabel, born a conjoined twin with her sister Jane. The two work in a freak show until separation surgery kills Jane. Isabel has to learn to move on even though she still senses her sister like a phantom limb. Lisa Browns graphic novel offers a look at what its like to live as part of an outsider family, and also what its like to grow apart from that found family. Its a satisfying tale full of triumphs and tragedies with artwork that captures the feeling of the The Phantom Twin is the story of Isabel, born a conjoined twin with her sister Jane. The two work in a freak show until separation surgery kills Jane. Isabel has to learn to move on even though she still senses her sister like a phantom limb. Lisa Brown’s graphic novel offers a look at what it’s like to live as part of an outsider family, and also what it’s like to grow apart from that found family. It’s a satisfying tale full of triumphs and tragedies with artwork that captures the feeling of the era.
    more
  • Chapter
    January 1, 1970
    Has the Lord's name in vain, as well as other swear wordsFROM GOODREADS SITE:a sweetly spooky graphic novel set in a turn-of-the-century sideshow.Isabel and Jane are the Extraordinary Peabody Sisters, conjoined twins in a traveling carnival freak showuntil an ambitious surgeon tries to separate them and fails, causing Jane's death.Isabel has lost an arm and a leg but gained a ghostly companion: Her dead twin is now her phantom limb. Haunted, altered, and alone for the first time, can Isabel Has the Lord's name in vain, as well as other swear wordsFROM GOODREADS SITE:a sweetly spooky graphic novel set in a turn-of-the-century sideshow.Isabel and Jane are the Extraordinary Peabody Sisters, conjoined twins in a traveling carnival freak show—until an ambitious surgeon tries to separate them and fails, causing Jane's death.Isabel has lost an arm and a leg but gained a ghostly companion: Her dead twin is now her phantom limb. Haunted, altered, and alone for the first time, can Isabel build a new life that's truly her own?
    more
  • Suzan Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    A unique coming-of-age story set in the early part of the 20th century in a freak show. Conjoined teenaged twins Isabel and Jane are separated with disastrous results, and Isabel must learn how to live on her own. Fascinating historical fiction that is also a warm and sweet love story and ultimately, a coming-of-age account about figuring out who you are and what you want to do with your life. Read my full review and see a sample page from the graphic novel: A unique coming-of-age story set in the early part of the 20th century in a freak show. Conjoined teenaged twins Isabel and Jane are separated with disastrous results, and Isabel must learn how to live on her own. Fascinating historical fiction that is also a warm and sweet love story and ultimately, a coming-of-age account about figuring out who you are and what you want to do with your life. Read my full review and see a sample page from the graphic novel:https://bookbybook.blogspot.com/2020/...
    more
  • Krys
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher I was able to read this in exchange for an honest review.***The Phantom Twin by Lisa Brown is a beautifully heartbreaking but also heartwarming graphic novel about Isabel being haunted by her conjoined twin Jane whom she loses when they attempt to separate.Raised in a freak show they knew nothing else and now without her other half Isabel now has to relearn who she is and what she wants.For as sad as the story was it was also hopeful, it was about family, Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher I was able to read this in exchange for an honest review.***The Phantom Twin by Lisa Brown is a beautifully heartbreaking but also heartwarming graphic novel about Isabel being haunted by her conjoined twin Jane whom she loses when they attempt to separate.Raised in a freak show they knew nothing else and now without her other half Isabel now has to relearn who she is and what she wants.For as sad as the story was it was also hopeful, it was about family, friends and learning to love yourself. Definitely enjoyed and would recommend.
    more
  • Meredith Ann
    January 1, 1970
    This was a spooky surprise. I wasn't sure what to expect - all I knew was the title and that conjoined twins were the focus. The story pulls you in immediately; it doesn't take much time to get right into the plot. The art is perfect for the time period and the story, very atmospheric. I appreciated the author's note at the end. It's obvious in her storytelling how much respect she has for the people she's writing about and how much care she took to be historically accurate as well. The Phantom This was a spooky surprise. I wasn't sure what to expect - all I knew was the title and that conjoined twins were the focus. The story pulls you in immediately; it doesn't take much time to get right into the plot. The art is perfect for the time period and the story, very atmospheric. I appreciated the author's note at the end. It's obvious in her storytelling how much respect she has for the people she's writing about and how much care she took to be historically accurate as well. The Phantom Twin will appeal not just to young adults but older readers as well.
    more
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    I don't read teen books, and I really don't read teen romance, so if I hadn't been shelving that day ( and the bookstore I work at, duh) I never would've seen this book. It caught my attention and stuck in my head. A few days later, I bought it on a whim and it took just a few hours to read it. Great story idea, interesting subject. I think the author could've gone deeper in some areas...but ...its quick and light and different and I liked it!
    more
Write a review