Ice Cream Lover (Baldwin Village, #2)
I hate ice cream. Ever since my fiancée left me at the altar and skewered me in her bestseller “Embrace Your Inner Ice Cream Sandwich: Finding the Positive You in a World of Negativity,” I haven’t been able to stomach the stuff.Unfortunately, my five-year-old niece is a budding foodie and her favorite place in the world is Ginger Scoops, a cutesy Asian ice cream shop. Since I’ve been looking after my niece a lot lately, I’ve spent too much time there, sipping black coffee, refusing to eat ice cream, and trying not to look at the owner, Chloe Jenkins. Chloe is obnoxiously cheerful, and I can’t stand her. Naturally, I end up kissing her.But I’ve sworn off women after the fiasco with my ex-fiancée, and I’m convinced I’m no good at relationships. Still, with Chloe I’m tempted to do the impossible: give love and ice cream another chance…

Ice Cream Lover (Baldwin Village, #2) Details

TitleIce Cream Lover (Baldwin Village, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 21st, 2019
PublisherJackie Lau Books
Rating
GenreRomance, Contemporary Romance, Contemporary

Ice Cream Lover (Baldwin Village, #2) Review

  • b.andherbooks
    January 1, 1970
    Drew's fiancee jumped out of a window to flee from their wedding, with not a world to tell him why, well no words until she published her tell-all memoir/self-help book entitled "Embrace Your Inner Ice Cream Sandwich." A book that lambasts Drew for "melting her ice cream sandwich" and for being a cross between Eeyore and Oscar the Grouch on steroids." Ouch.So now Drew hates ice cream. Can't stand it. Not even if the owner of the ice cream shop his foodie niece is currently obsessed with is also Drew's fiancee jumped out of a window to flee from their wedding, with not a world to tell him why, well no words until she published her tell-all memoir/self-help book entitled "Embrace Your Inner Ice Cream Sandwich." A book that lambasts Drew for "melting her ice cream sandwich" and for being a cross between Eeyore and Oscar the Grouch on steroids." Ouch.So now Drew hates ice cream. Can't stand it. Not even if the owner of the ice cream shop his foodie niece is currently obsessed with is also super cute and super intent on changing his mind. Ginger Scoops has been Chloe's dream since her mother died, even if her father doesn't believe it is a smart career choice. Chloe is intent on proving her father wrong and honoring her Chinese-Canadian mother's heritage, a heritage her White father seems intent on ignoring, with her Asian flavored delicacies. So when the deliciously grumpy Drew starts showing up with his adorable niece, Chloe doesn't much have time to spare for someone who is a self-described ice cream hater. But there just something about Drew, something about his instance he's a grump and not worth a relationship, that makes Chloe also want to prove him wrong. Even if it cuts into her time owning a small business.Lau does an amazing job of bringing these two melancholy souls together. Don't let the breezy title and cover fool you, this story has some angst and tackles tough subjects, including death of a parent, parental disappointment, and racial blindness that hurts. But, through the darkness shines so much sparkling light, including Drew's coming to realize he's lovable through his relationship with his six-year-old niece (much more than plot moppet), and a series of unicorns. There's also fabulously delicious sex scenes, and a celebration of Chloe's use of toys to achieve maximum pleasure (huzzah)!I always look forward to the next Lau tale!I received a free copy in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    Three random points of interest:* Jackie Lau writes such enjoyably grumpy characters and puts their grumpiness to the test in amusing ways.* There is a unicorn in this book named Havarti Sparkles. I won't tell you what the alpaca's name is, but it's also quite good.* I now know that mooncake flavored ice cream exists, and I desperately want to try it. (Along with all the other ice cream flavors mentioned in this book, though it's probably a nah on more than one bite of the durian.)Our protagonis Three random points of interest:* Jackie Lau writes such enjoyably grumpy characters and puts their grumpiness to the test in amusing ways.* There is a unicorn in this book named Havarti Sparkles. I won't tell you what the alpaca's name is, but it's also quite good.* I now know that mooncake flavored ice cream exists, and I desperately want to try it. (Along with all the other ice cream flavors mentioned in this book, though it's probably a nah on more than one bite of the durian.)Our protagonists are cheerful, striving ice cream shop owner Chloe and grumpy, stubborn Drew. Drew's job is something to do with a bank, but his important role here in the story is actually that of uncle. He's helping take care of his five-year-old niece, a pint-sized foodie whose pursuit of interesting cuisine leads Drew and Chloe to cross paths. Drew's still living under the shadow of being left at the altar a few years ago, when his fiancée climbed out a window at the church. He might have moved on by now, but his ex then went on to write a massively best-selling self-help book, Embrace Your Inner Ice Cream Sandwich: Finding the Positive You in a World of Negativity (and yes, it's just as ridic as it sounds), in which she absolutely lambasted Drew and the effect he had on her life. What I really liked was that the ice cream sandwich self-help metaphor might have been totally silly, but the subtitle--finding the positive you in a world of negativity--is actually a sweet reflection on Chloe's and Drew's personal journeys in this book. Chloe is stressed about launching her shop, because it's not just a shop: it's a connection to her late mother, and it's a way of connecting to her own biracial identity. She struggles with feelings of whether she belongs--and under what terms, and by whose perspective. (Another note: Chloe is bisexual, and her sexuality is treated with casual steadiness and acceptance throughout the narrative.) Drew's having a hard time shaking off his ex's perspective on him, especially since it seems like millions of readers around the world agree with her that he's a monster (or, um, ice cream sandwich melter). Both Chloe and Drew end up having to figure out who they are--and shift their perspectives and maybe that of those around them--to embrace that (and each other). So that made me smile, that the terrible, ridiculous (hilariously so) self-help book actually struck a chord of sincerity, in the end.I also want to give a few ♥♥♥ for the narrative's sensitivity about Chloe's feelings about her experience of her racial identity. Biracial and multiracial characters aren't exactly infrequent characters in romance novels, but there's a lot of terrible representation out there (heavy-handed angst-hammers or careless colorblindness, to cite top two offenders). But here, this is a really thoughtful portrayal, and I appreciated it SO MUCH. I don't share the same exact multiracial background as Chloe, but it's similar, and I felt a lot of moments of recognition. (And moments that were outside my own experience, too!) Chloe herself is thoughtful about her experiences and about why it matters to her. It's all grounded in her character and her life. I also very much appreciated that Lau included other biracial characters in the story, too, and Chloe also thought about how their experiences might differ from hers.I do want to give a heads-up for food pushing (Drew hates ice cream and refuses to try it, Chloe keeps making suggestions), although after a little while, they're both doing it teasingly.FTC Disclosure: I received an advance review copy of this book from the author.
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  • Maria Rose
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved this one! It's got lots of laughs, lots of ice cream and pie, and two characters with depth and heart who have their own unique life challenges. Full review to come!
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    This was absolute porn. Food porn, that is, and I savored every bit of the Vietnamese coffee ice cream, waffle cones, dark chocolate stashes, durian ice cream, even mooncake-flavored ice cream (please let this be real) goodness. Jackie Lau knows how to write delicious Asian men eating delicious Asian food. She conquered the world of pie in Book 1, The Ultimate Pi Day Party, and now ice cream. I can only hope she moves on to cookies, bread, noodles, dumplings...The cherry on top of this romance s This was absolute porn. Food porn, that is, and I savored every bit of the Vietnamese coffee ice cream, waffle cones, dark chocolate stashes, durian ice cream, even mooncake-flavored ice cream (please let this be real) goodness. Jackie Lau knows how to write delicious Asian men eating delicious Asian food. She conquered the world of pie in Book 1, The Ultimate Pi Day Party, and now ice cream. I can only hope she moves on to cookies, bread, noodles, dumplings...The cherry on top of this romance sundae (oh, how about a sundae-based book, Jackie Lau?) was that Chloe and Drew's story isn't just sugar and fluff. When a biracial, bisexual ice cream shop owner hooks up with an ice cream-loathing, grumpy Chinese-Canadian man who looks like Chris Pang yet was villain-ized in his ex's best-selling memoir, Embrace Your Inner Ice Cream Sandwich, there's going to be more than just sweet and humor - there was also deep dives into self-worth, acceptance, and bravery. Chloe and Drew each had internal struggles which I wanted to end with more public declarations by the people that hurt them - Chloe's dad, Chloe's aunt, and Drew's ex really should have groveled or apologized better. But in the end, what mattered was that they had each other and ice cream, glittery unicorns, unicorn onesies, and the best six-year-old foodie imaginable. She grins up at me. I make her smile like this. Me, Drew Lum. Aka Marvin Wong, terrible boyfriend extraordinaire, known for melting people’s ice cream sandwiches and stifling creative energy. But I want Chloe to have everything. I want her to make as much Vietnamese coffee ice cream and strawberry-lychee sorbet and bubble waffles as she likes, even if they’re not my cup of tea. I want her to feel like she belongs.The only thing is this book should come with a warning: don't read without a freezer full of ready ice cream - you will want to eat all the ice cream!4 starsNote: I voluntarily read and reviewed this ARC generously provided by the author.
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  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    I'm sort of over Jackie Lau's tendency for a stupid decision or miscommunication at roughly 75% in the book, but I really do like her relationships and characters, so I will continue to read and enjoy her books and just wish she wouldn't do that.(Also, this is another one that you shouldn't read hungry.)
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  • Nadine Jones
    January 1, 1970
    SOOOO much fun!! This is a new author for me, and I was completely won over by her ice cream posts on Twitter combined with the hot guy on the cover. Yes, I can be superficial. (Also, I would like to point out that in the book, Chloe’s ice cream shop gets a big boost from some Tweets by local bloggers. That’s kinda meta.)Chloe owns an ice cream shop in Toronto. Derek has some issues with ice cream, but he loves his niece and she wants ice cream, so he bravely enters the ice cream shop. Derek and SOOOO much fun!! This is a new author for me, and I was completely won over by her ice cream posts on Twitter combined with the hot guy on the cover. Yes, I can be superficial. (Also, I would like to point out that in the book, Chloe’s ice cream shop gets a big boost from some Tweets by local bloggers. That’s kinda meta.)Chloe owns an ice cream shop in Toronto. Derek has some issues with ice cream, but he loves his niece and she wants ice cream, so he bravely enters the ice cream shop. Derek and Chloe meet. Sparks fly. My favorite contemporary romances are (a) realistic (real people with real jobs and pastimes), (b) with appealing h/H plus appealing sidekicks, and (c) make me laugh. This book hits the trifecta. I actually laughed out loud. Plus, there’s ice cream! There is a sizzling sex scene in the middle of the book which I read at work during lunch and whoooo 😳 I’m glad nobody needed to talk to me just then.This book did get a little boring in the middle, but then the inevitable relationship troubles actually made me want to cry, so clearly these characters felt real to me.
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  • Eli
    January 1, 1970
    This book made me crave ice cream. I really want to try all these flavors!Drew Lum is a grump of a man who adores his niece, Michelle, and will do anything for her. He was left at the alter by his ex-fiancée, Lisa, who then wrote a self-help/memoir book on their relationship. This book paints Drew in a very unfair light and it soon becomes clear that he doesn’t feel like he deserves any kind of relationship with another woman for fear of crushing their spirits.Chloe Jenkins is a bisexual ice cre This book made me crave ice cream. I really want to try all these flavors!Drew Lum is a grump of a man who adores his niece, Michelle, and will do anything for her. He was left at the alter by his ex-fiancée, Lisa, who then wrote a self-help/memoir book on their relationship. This book paints Drew in a very unfair light and it soon becomes clear that he doesn’t feel like he deserves any kind of relationship with another woman for fear of crushing their spirits.Chloe Jenkins is a bisexual ice cream shop owner of a place called Ginger Scoops who loves bright colors and tries to always be peppy. She built the shop specializing in Asian flavors in memory of her mother who died in a car accident, dropping out of university to do so. She’s a biracial Chinese-Canadian and doesn’t feel like she quite belongs in her mostly-white family. Her father doesn’t see her or her mother as Chinese and this, obviously, puts a strain on their relationship.Mentioning the idea of “not seeing race”, this book talks about how little representation there is for people like Michelle or Chloe who are biracial and don’t quite feel like they belong in their families or in their communities. There are quite a few microaggressions that white people say in this book. For example, one old white woman asks Chloe “what she is” like she’s entitled to an answer just because Chloe isn’t white herself. On another account, Lisa calls flavors like green tea and black sesame seed “exotic”.Chloe has a complicated relationship with her family. After her mother passed away, her aunt didn’t visit Toronto for a long time and almost entirely stayed out of her life. Her father doesn’t approve of her dropping out of dentistry school and for much of the book, he doesn’t support her ice cream shop or understand why she chose the flavors she did. There are also scenes in the book where she fears she’s misremembering her mother and that maybe they didn’t always get each other like she thinks.I loved the chemistry between them. The grumpy hero/happy heroine is always going to be an all-time favorite trope for me! It was lust at first sight with plenty of sex scenes once they got together. We see that Drew isn’t always grouchy and is such a good person, especially with his niece and doesn’t mind looking silly to make her laugh.Sarah from The Ultimate Pi Day Party makes cameo appearances in this book and from what I’ve read on Twitter, Jackie Lau also plans on featuring a book where Valerie is the main protagonist! Definitely excited.I can’t wait to read more by this author and will definitely recommend it.Disclaimer: I received an ARC from the author in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Essie M
    January 1, 1970
    I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream! Book Two in the Baldwin Village series is out on May 21 and the focus is on ice cream! You don't need to have read the first book to enjoy Drew and Chloe's story, but you should because it's as good as pie😜 Jackie Lau is a writer who I know is going to give me a great story with food references that will make me crave said food along with a satisfying ending. She delivers again with this book♥ Word of advice, you will definitely crave ice cream I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream! Book Two in the Baldwin Village series is out on May 21 and the focus is on ice cream! You don't need to have read the first book to enjoy Drew and Chloe's story, but you should because it's as good as pie😜 Jackie Lau is a writer who I know is going to give me a great story with food references that will make me crave said food along with a satisfying ending. She delivers again with this book♥️ Word of advice, you will definitely crave ice cream during and after your reading and since the weather is finally starting to look up, you should totally go out and have a scoop or three!Drew Lum and Chloe Jenkins are two people battling insecurities who aren't looking for love or a HEA (happily ever after). They are very different with Drew hating ice cream while Chloe is the owner of an ice cream shop. Drew has his reasons for not enjoying the delicious treat and it isn't because he's lactose intolerant. Those same reasons are why he's shut himself off from the possibility of having a future with someone. Chloe is biracial and bisexual and is struggling with her identity, because even in a city as multicultural as Toronto, being of mixed heritage is hard because you feel like you never belong anywhere. These two characters have all these reasons for being single and yet when they meet, attraction is there, drawing them closer, like ice cream melting together in a bowl of love🥰This is another great book from Jackie Lau with a hero who kind of looks like Chris Pang and a biracial bisexual heroine who makes amazing ice cream. I wish she was real and I could visit Ginger Scoops when I'm in Toronto because the flavors all sounded amazing and these two would be so cute 🥰Get a copy and enjoy with ice cream and/or homemade pasta like adorable Michelle♥️🍦♥️🍦♥️
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  • Viper Spaulding
    January 1, 1970
    Such a sweet love story that will tug your heartstrings!Chloe and Drew have almost nothing in common except their mutual attraction and hearts that need healing. While Drew is definitely over his ex, her success at his expense has made him question everything about himself and what he can bring to a relationship. Chloe is still trying to find her safe space after losing her mother and her only link to half her heritage. This was a terrific romance that focused on how each partner brought out the Such a sweet love story that will tug your heartstrings!Chloe and Drew have almost nothing in common except their mutual attraction and hearts that need healing. While Drew is definitely over his ex, her success at his expense has made him question everything about himself and what he can bring to a relationship. Chloe is still trying to find her safe space after losing her mother and her only link to half her heritage. This was a terrific romance that focused on how each partner brought out the best in the other while giving them the emotional safety and security to find the answers they needed. I loved the soul-searching interactions with both MCs and their families. It's more family-oriented than action-packed, though there are plenty of steamy scenes that keep the heat on throughout. Their HEA was realistic and believable while still being swoony and romantic. I voluntarily reviewed an ARC of this book.
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  • Kristi (foxtail_too)
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series. Actually, I'm just really glad I found this author. There is a good amount of humor in this book, and I really truly want to find an Asian ice cream shop to try some of these flavors. (Actually, I want a Baldwin Street!) I like the natural diversity of the characters.The book begins with the hero finally reading the book his ex-fiancee wrote that describe him in unflattering terms-the book has become a best seller. (The ex jumped out a window while he was waiting at the altar I love this series. Actually, I'm just really glad I found this author. There is a good amount of humor in this book, and I really truly want to find an Asian ice cream shop to try some of these flavors. (Actually, I want a Baldwin Street!) I like the natural diversity of the characters.The book begins with the hero finally reading the book his ex-fiancee wrote that describe him in unflattering terms-the book has become a best seller. (The ex jumped out a window while he was waiting at the altar, though Drew's sister points out that the girl couldn't have been that bright, as there was a door right there she could have used.) Chloe, the heroine has just opened her sparkly ice cream shop (right across from Happy as Pie, the store in the first book of this series). The romance and the uncertainties between the couple are touching and believable. And, as I said, I love the humor, from Chloe's grandmother discovering texting and emojis to Drew's 6 year old foodie niece.
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  • Lauren loves llamas
    January 1, 1970
    Content warnings: (view spoiler)[death of a parent (prior to the book), racism (in the form of “colorblindness”) (hide spoiler)]There’s three things I’ve learned to expect from a Jackie Lau book. First off, there’s going to be delicious food, whether it’s Tim Horton’s donuts, dim sum, or durian ice cream (ok, that last one might be debatable!). Second, there’s going to be lots of humor, often very wacky humor. Third, there’s always an exploration of some serious subject – depression, introversio Content warnings: (view spoiler)[death of a parent (prior to the book), racism (in the form of “colorblindness”) (hide spoiler)]There’s three things I’ve learned to expect from a Jackie Lau book. First off, there’s going to be delicious food, whether it’s Tim Horton’s donuts, dim sum, or durian ice cream (ok, that last one might be debatable!). Second, there’s going to be lots of humor, often very wacky humor. Third, there’s always an exploration of some serious subject – depression, introversion, or, in this case, biracial identity – that’s handled thoughtfully and with respect. This one fits the bill!“So, yeah, I got skewered in an international bestseller that encourages people to find their inner ice cream sandwiches.Can you blame me for hating ice cream now?”Drew hates ice cream. It’s not that he’s always hated it, just after his fiancee left him at the altar and wrote a bestselling book about how he “melted her inner ice cream sandwich,” he can’t seem to look at ice cream without being a little queasy. Since the end of that relationship – and its dissection in his ex’s book – Drew hasn’t dated. So the last person you’d expect him to be interested in is Chloe, the owner of an Asian ice cream shop, who he meets while babysitting his foodie niece. Repeated trips prove that there’s a spark there, though, but can Drew overcome his fears of melting Chloe’s ice cream, and does Chloe want to risk distracting herself with someone who can’t seem to decide if he wants to be in a relationship?“Is this just because I’m amazing in bed?”“Oh, for God’s sake,” she says. “Stop being so insecure and cocky at the same time. I don’t know how you manage that combination.”Chloe views herself as frivolous – what else would you call someone who opens up a very pink and very cutesy ice cream shop? – so she’s the perfect foil for grumpy Drew. She’s used being busy with the ice cream shop as her reason for not dating, but it’s actually mostly because she struggles to feel connected to anyone. She’s biracial, and after the death of her Chinese mom, she’s felt like she doesn’t fit in to her white family and abandoned by her aunt, who’s really the only remaining relative on her mom’s side. Her (white) dad doesn’t understand why she left dental school after her mom died and has instead opened the ice cream shop. Even worse, Chloe feels like he doesn’t accept her Chinese-ness and never accepted her mom’s. One of her favorite memories with her mom was eating ice cream at the beach, so opening an Asian ice cream shop is partly a tribute to her. I really enjoyed the thoughtful exploration of biracial identity. Growing up, I was taught to be colorblind, and it took a while for me to understand why that’s so harmful. I thought Chloe’s explanation to her father was very well done.That covers the serious part, so what about the fun stuff? Well, Chloe runs an ice cream shop, so of course there’s so much delicious ice cream (Hong Kong milk tea! matcha cheesecake!), and even some pairings with Sarah-from-the-first-book’s pies. OK, actually, there’s a lot more food, but my brain pretty much stuck on all the delicious ice cream. As for the humor, well, a self-help book about figuring out what cookies and ice cream make up your inner ice cream sandwich? Plus, Drew’s niece is great for some laughs, especially after he gets roped into painting a unicorn at her birthday party. Who doesn’t love a unicorn with a heart on its butt that’s named after cheese?Overall, another wonderful book by Ms. Lau! The next one in the series is going to star Valerie (who also works at the ice cream shop) and apparently durian.I received this book for free from the author in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
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  • Christine Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Overall Rating: 4Quick Summary: Drew hates ice cream ever since his ex-fiancé ruined ice cream for him. However, he loves his foodie niece so winds up spending a lot of time in a newly opened Asian-style ice cream shop. Chloe opened the ice cream shop in memory of her mother and is working hard to develop unique flavors to keep her shop afloat. She doesn’t really have time to convince Drew that her ice cream is better than the bad memory of his ex-fiancé. But with her sugary sweet personality an Overall Rating: 4Quick Summary: Drew hates ice cream ever since his ex-fiancé ruined ice cream for him. However, he loves his foodie niece so winds up spending a lot of time in a newly opened Asian-style ice cream shop. Chloe opened the ice cream shop in memory of her mother and is working hard to develop unique flavors to keep her shop afloat. She doesn’t really have time to convince Drew that her ice cream is better than the bad memory of his ex-fiancé. But with her sugary sweet personality and Drew’s gruff exterior, their chemistry is unavoidable.First, I’d like to acknowledge that the characters in this book are not white. Drew is Chinese-Canadian and Chloe is half Chinese, half Caucasian. The flavors Chloe dreams up pay homage to that culinary background with green tea and durian making appearances. The connection between the flavors of Chloe’s ice creams and her mother’s culture is deeply compelling for me. Food is such a part of how I connect with my own culture, that I loved reading about characters who have similar experiences.Second, I’d like to acknowledge that Drew is a super-hot Chinese-Canadian hero. In a way he reminds me of the quintessential Victorian romance hero who is brooding and gruff, with a heart of gold. It’s fun to see some of those same characteristics wrapped up in a sexy Asian guy. Third, Chloe goes through much of the book coming to terms with the loss of her mother, her relationship with her father, and her own biracial background. This is not light and fluffy stuff folks! Sure there are sex scenes, humorous banter, and cute kids, but there is a lot going on in terms of character development. As a woman who is also biracial, Japanese-Caucasian American, I related a lot to Chloe’s turmoil. I am lucky that my mom is still alive, but it’s hard to navigate those waters when you feel isolated. The primary reason the book wasn’t rated higher for me was due to the pacing of the novel. The language and dialogue flow well, but there were parts of the novel that I really had to work up the energy to read it. I thought Drew’s resistance to ice cream went on a little long, and there was a gap in the middle of the book where the plot seemed to stall. This is the second book in a series, but you don’t need to read the first book in order to enjoy this one. I haven’t read the first book, although I intend to go back and read it, and I was completely satisfied with the way the secondary characters interacted with the hero and heroine of this novel; no backstory necessary. Is it worth buying? (Kindle $3.99) I really enjoyed this book and I think it’s worth the $4. If you’re on the fence, encourage your local library to buy the book (if they don’t already own it). It’s always nice for the library to stock diverse romance novels so more people can enjoy them.Something else you might enjoy:I also read He’s Not My Boyfriend by Jackie Lau and recommend it. It’s a completely different storyline, but it’s full of secondary characters that deliver a lot of humor.I received a copy of this book in advance of its publication. I enjoyed it and wanted to share my honest opinion.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    CW: mention/discussion of parental death.This one made me cackle a few times because first off the entire premise was so amusing: grumpy guy who doesn't like ice cream cuz his ex left him at the alter (she climbed out a window loool) and wrote a self help book about finding your inner ice cream sandwich and included a chapter about him. poor Drew.So right away i was intrigued by the idea that Drew would meet Chloe who runs an ice cream shop. perfect set up really! I loved how their romance unfol CW: mention/discussion of parental death.This one made me cackle a few times because first off the entire premise was so amusing: grumpy guy who doesn't like ice cream cuz his ex left him at the alter (she climbed out a window loool) and wrote a self help book about finding your inner ice cream sandwich and included a chapter about him. poor Drew.So right away i was intrigued by the idea that Drew would meet Chloe who runs an ice cream shop. perfect set up really! I loved how their romance unfolded. Drew is unsure of himself because of his break up. He hasn't seriously been with anyone since being left at the alter and is attracted to Chloe.Chloe is bi!! and biracial so intertwined with Drew's complicated feelings about what his ex wrote about him and how that affects his growing thing with Chloe we get Chloe's complex feelings about identity. About being biracial, about her mom's death, about being a 3rd generation Chinese-Canadian. Chloe constantly feels like she doesn't belong and has tried to feel close to her Chinese heritage but has a difficult time because of her mom's death. We also get to see her have a serious discussion with her white dad about him not seeing her as Chinese.We mostly get to see Drew's family early on in the book as he takes his 6 year old foodie niece to Ginger Scoops, C's shop and that's how they meet but I was glad we got to meet Chloe's aunt, who she does mention having not seen for a while. Chloe's aunt shows up with her wife and while Chloe is indeed surprised because she didnt know Anita got married, no one treats Anita having a wife as a big spectacle. in fact Chloe muses on how finding out her aunt was bi made her realize she was too. Drew's niece is a riot! Loved that kid and family always plays such a major role in Jackie's books. We always get some meddling and i love that! Because i can relate. Family always trying to find out if there's anyone special in your life or trying to match make >.> I was annoyed at Drew because he pulled the: im gonna break up with you because it's for your own good and i'm not good for you" thing buuuut i get it. He really got in his head after that incident at his ex's book signing. So i enjoyed this and can't wait for Valerie's book. I had to look up what durian was cuz i had no idea before and i doubt i'd ever try durian flavoured anything it cuz it sounds terrible lol
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the author for reviewJackie Lau’s latest romance pairs grumpy hero Drew with Chloe, a bi-racial Chinese Canadian woman who is opening an ice cream shop in her mother’s memory. Drew’s ex left him at the altar, then wrote a thinly veiled self help book/memoir called “Embrace Your Inner Ice Cream Sandwich: How to Find the Positive You in a World of Negativity.” (What?! LOL!!) So yeah, he hates ice cream.Ice Cream Lover is Lau’s funniest book yet. From Drew's precocious foodie niece ARC provided by the author for reviewJackie Lau’s latest romance pairs grumpy hero Drew with Chloe, a bi-racial Chinese Canadian woman who is opening an ice cream shop in her mother’s memory. Drew’s ex left him at the altar, then wrote a thinly veiled self help book/memoir called “Embrace Your Inner Ice Cream Sandwich: How to Find the Positive You in a World of Negativity.” (What?! LOL!!) So yeah, he hates ice cream.Ice Cream Lover is Lau’s funniest book yet. From Drew's precocious foodie niece to his run in with his ex at a book signing, you'll be laughing.But while I usually appreciate her exploration of bi-racial identity, this time it felt heavy-handed. Chloe struggles with the fact that her mom died and nearly all the family she has left in Toronto is on her dad’s side. She’s the only Asian in a sea of white people and her dad acts like he doesn't see color. As a bi-racial person, I get where Chloe is coming from, but for me, it bordered on obsessive. Then again, maybe that’s just being 25 and trying to figure out where you fit in the world.It’s a steamy, fun read, guaranteed to cause ice cream cravings, but if you haven’t read Lau before, He’s Not My Boyfriend would be my first choice. 3.5 starsP.S. Ice Cream Lover made me realize I'm over the grumpy hero. If you’re a dude, you can be surly, disagreeable, and insecure, and still find love. If you’re a grumpy woman, you’re a shrew, a bitch, a harpy or a pain in the ass. And the only way anyone puts up with it is if that heroine is hot. So I'm putting a pause on the "grumps."
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  • Beth ~ Panda & Boodle
    January 1, 1970
    I've really come to love the books of Jackie Lau over the last year or so, and Ice Cream Lover is yet another fun, diverse, and engaging book. I loved it from start to finish—it's pretty much as simple as that. But, well, it's not as simple as that, actually. Because that glosses over all the things that make this book so damn enjoyable. Little things like a five-year-old foodie, unicorn dreams, fruity ice cream that smells like natural gas, and stuffed alpacas to name a select few. There are a I've really come to love the books of Jackie Lau over the last year or so, and Ice Cream Lover is yet another fun, diverse, and engaging book. I loved it from start to finish—it's pretty much as simple as that. But, well, it's not as simple as that, actually. Because that glosses over all the things that make this book so damn enjoyable. Little things like a five-year-old foodie, unicorn dreams, fruity ice cream that smells like natural gas, and stuffed alpacas to name a select few. There are a plethora of adorable, seemingly insignificant things that made me smile and laugh throughout this book. And when they're added to the heart of the story—the struggle to accept oneself, flaws and all, and the struggle to find one's place in a world that isn't always accepting—it equals a book that everyone should be reading. Guys, Chloe and Drew are just . . . Look, neither of them are perfect, yet they're both so very likable that it's nothing at all to overlook Drew's grumpiness (kinda hot, honestly) or Chloe's habit of shutting down (totally understandable, BTW). Their story is one that embraces and celebrates the differences in people, that shines a light on just how easy it is to feel alone or to develop a skewed view of yourself, and one that does so without every becoming too heavy. Ice Cream Lover holds within its page a levity that doesn't ever detract from the seriousness at its core, and it does it with infinite charm. How could I not love it?
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  • Jinni
    January 1, 1970
    I'm giving this three stars.Let's start with the pros: Jackie Lau writes easy-to-love characters. The families are nuanced and I loved the heavy conversations Chloe had with her white dad about her deceased Chinese-Canadian mother. Drew's family was delightful.Let's move to the cons:I was disappointed that Chloe's bisexual identity never acknowledges nonbinary people's existence. At one point, there's even the word "both" used in reference to "men and women" which bugged me. They're not the only I'm giving this three stars.Let's start with the pros: Jackie Lau writes easy-to-love characters. The families are nuanced and I loved the heavy conversations Chloe had with her white dad about her deceased Chinese-Canadian mother. Drew's family was delightful.Let's move to the cons:I was disappointed that Chloe's bisexual identity never acknowledges nonbinary people's existence. At one point, there's even the word "both" used in reference to "men and women" which bugged me. They're not the only two genders. It's kind of tiring to see this in a book with a bisexual heroine in 2019. Moreover, there are a few ableist terms used that I wasn't quite in love with. The pacing tired me out a little at the end. I felt that the angsty "We have to break up" bit was unnecessary. I loved the book a lot more when Chloe and Drew were snarking over ice cream flavors and having fun together. Rep:Chinese heroChinese-Canadian bisexual heroine
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  • Katie Brookins
    January 1, 1970
    How is it that I love every new Jackie Lau book better than the last? Chloe runs Ginger Scoops, an Asian ice cream shop in Baldwin Village. Drew hates ice cream (bad association after his horrendous breakup), but he loves his niece and she loves Ginger Scoops. This wasn't the career Chloe would have had if her mom had lived, and it's not the one her family understands or approves of. She just wants to feel like she belongs. Drew doesn't want to believe that everything his ex wrote about him in h How is it that I love every new Jackie Lau book better than the last? Chloe runs Ginger Scoops, an Asian ice cream shop in Baldwin Village. Drew hates ice cream (bad association after his horrendous breakup), but he loves his niece and she loves Ginger Scoops. This wasn't the career Chloe would have had if her mom had lived, and it's not the one her family understands or approves of. She just wants to feel like she belongs. Drew doesn't want to believe that everything his ex wrote about him in her bestselling memoir is true, and he's not sure watching his niece every week and dating someone can prove otherwise. He just wants to know he'll be good for someone. I completely loved this sweet (ahem), fun romance with a lot of depth and relatability. They live in the real world, but I didn't ultimately feel disheartened by that. Bonus love for all the unicorns and for inspiring me to visit my local ice cream shop!
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  • Viki Meadows
    January 1, 1970
    Great readI had my doubts but I bought this because it has characters of Chinese heritage and I was curious. Well my gamble paid off. It was a super read. I loved the characters and also the insight into their life and the challenges they face ( I especially loved the hero's foodie niece) I think the premise was unusual ( oriental flavoured ice-cream shop) yet believable and at times I laughed out loud, at others I wept buckets (when my mouth wasn't watering at the ice-cream and pie references). Great readI had my doubts but I bought this because it has characters of Chinese heritage and I was curious. Well my gamble paid off. It was a super read. I loved the characters and also the insight into their life and the challenges they face ( I especially loved the hero's foodie niece) I think the premise was unusual ( oriental flavoured ice-cream shop) yet believable and at times I laughed out loud, at others I wept buckets (when my mouth wasn't watering at the ice-cream and pie references). I thoroughly recommend it and will definitely read more by this author.
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  • Phoenix
    January 1, 1970
    Read this while on vacay in Rome and it made me a little nostalgic for home with the mentions of Baldwin, Queen and Ossington.Really enjoyed this - the sexy times were spicy - I didn’t think Drew had the dirty talk in him but he did and it was #consentboner material to see him check in with Chloe to see that it was OK.His niece Michelle provided amazing comic relief, although I find it unbelievable that a 6 yo’s palate is so sophisticated that they can appreciate durian ice cream and be interest Read this while on vacay in Rome and it made me a little nostalgic for home with the mentions of Baldwin, Queen and Ossington.Really enjoyed this - the sexy times were spicy - I didn’t think Drew had the dirty talk in him but he did and it was #consentboner material to see him check in with Chloe to see that it was OK.His niece Michelle provided amazing comic relief, although I find it unbelievable that a 6 yo’s palate is so sophisticated that they can appreciate durian ice cream and be interested in making pasta from scratch. She was still my favorite though.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    The worst thing about this book is that I don't have black sesame ice cream in front of me, or green matcha cheesecake ice cream. I really really liked this one. Drew was left at the alter and his ex wrote an international bestselling self-help book which paints him as a villain, and thanks to the ice cream sandwich theme of the book, has left him hating both ice cream and relationships. Chloe owns an ice cream shop that his niece loves.This is funny and serious, and 100% adorable. There are uni The worst thing about this book is that I don't have black sesame ice cream in front of me, or green matcha cheesecake ice cream. I really really liked this one. Drew was left at the alter and his ex wrote an international bestselling self-help book which paints him as a villain, and thanks to the ice cream sandwich theme of the book, has left him hating both ice cream and relationships. Chloe owns an ice cream shop that his niece loves.This is funny and serious, and 100% adorable. There are unicorns. And so much talk about food that I think I gained five pounds just reading this book.
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  • Xan West
    January 1, 1970
    Content Warnings (view spoiler)[ Multiple references to parental death in the past; grief arc. Racist micro-aggressions, including from family and an ex. Incident where MC is chased and harassed by a group of people. MC's ex treating him terribly in a very public way after jilting him. Alcohol use. Low self esteem. MCs feeling isolated and alienated from others. Sex on the page. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Cute, quick romance between a grumpkin and an ice cream shop owner. The premise is absolutely fantastic and original. I've never read this one before! Low angst, lots of happiness. Jackie Lau again brings a great extended family along for the ride. There's no Ngin Ngin but selfie grandma was pretty great. Solid beach read.
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  • Sarah Webber
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. I loved every bit of it, from the gorgeous cover to all the flavors of ice cream I now desperately want to try. Chloe and Drew just fit and I really enjoyed watching them grow and understand each other better. And I now own all of Jackie Lau's books. I recommend you do the same.
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  • Louise ✨
    January 1, 1970
    RTC
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