The Pale-Faced Lie
Growing up on the Navajo Indian Reservation, David Crow and his siblings idolized their dad. Tall, strong, smart, and brave, the self-taught Cherokee regaled his family with stories of his World War II feats. But as time passed, David discovered the other side of Thurston Crow, the ex-con with his own code of ethics that justified cruelty, violence, lies—even murder.A shrewd con artist with a genius IQ, Thurston intimidated David with beatings to coerce him into doing his criminal bidding. David's mom, too mentally ill to care for her children, couldn't protect him. One day, Thurston packed up the house and took the kids, leaving her nothing. Soon he remarried, and David learned that his stepmother was just as vicious and abusive as his father.Through sheer determination, and with the help of a few angels along the way, David managed to get into college and achieve professional success. When he finally found the courage to stop helping his father with his criminal activities, he unwittingly triggered a plot of revenge that would force him into a showdown with Thurston Crow.With lives at stake, including his own, David would have only twenty-four hours to outsmart his father—the brilliant, psychotic man who bragged that the three years he spent in the notorious San Quentin State Prison had been the easiest time of his life.The Pale-Faced Lie is a searing, raw, palpable memoir that reminds us what an important role our parents play in our lives. Most of all, it's an inspirational story about the power of forgiveness and the ability of the human spirit to rise above adversity, no matter the cost.

The Pale-Faced Lie Details

TitleThe Pale-Faced Lie
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 7th, 2019
PublisherSandra Jonas Publishing
ISBN-139780997487176
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Crime, True Crime, Biography

The Pale-Faced Lie Review

  • Theresa Alan
    January 1, 1970
    This is a heartbreaking, utterly riveting memoir. The writing is absolutely fantastic. Crow describes growing up under circumstances I cannot image surviving. With an abusive father and mentally disturbed mother, his older sister became the de facto mother at the age of seven to him, who was then three, and little baby Sam. For a long time, his father wouldn’t let him get glasses that his teachers said he needed. Even when David could finally see, he was diagnosed with dyslexia, which his father This is a heartbreaking, utterly riveting memoir. The writing is absolutely fantastic. Crow describes growing up under circumstances I cannot image surviving. With an abusive father and mentally disturbed mother, his older sister became the de facto mother at the age of seven to him, who was then three, and little baby Sam. For a long time, his father wouldn’t let him get glasses that his teachers said he needed. Even when David could finally see, he was diagnosed with dyslexia, which his father decided meant that David was stupid, and there was no way that he was going to pay for his son to have any help learning to read.The violence and hideous living conditions David Crow describes growing up with are gut wrenching. What could it be like to know your father is a murderer with no remorse, someone who would easily kill you and actively tried to get you to help kill your mother (when you were ten years old) and then stepmother? The whole story is harrowing, but it makes for a fast, unputdownable read.For more reviews, please visit http://www.theresaalan.net/blog
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  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    This book is just as amazing as the author who wrote it. David is a life long friend - since we sat together in 7th period Science at Kensington Junior High over 50 years ago. David was always a good story teller. Kids would gather around his desk to hear stories of living on an Indian reservation in Arizona. Even our teacher would delay class so he could finish his latest story. When we ran track together at Walter Johnson High School he would have all the long distance runners roaring with This book is just as amazing as the author who wrote it. David is a life long friend - since we sat together in 7th period Science at Kensington Junior High over 50 years ago. David was always a good story teller. Kids would gather around his desk to hear stories of living on an Indian reservation in Arizona. Even our teacher would delay class so he could finish his latest story. When we ran track together at Walter Johnson High School he would have all the long distance runners roaring with laughter at his quick wit. When I lunched with him Congressman and Senators would interrupt us to ask his advice on pending legislation. Once an angry federal department head lashed out about how American Indians had taken over the Department of Interior and David calmly used his first hand experience of the conditions that they faced to both calm her and create sympathy for them. David uses this same skill in writing this book. I read this book day after day to my 95 year old dad who had suffered a broken hip. I read him many books, but this was his favorite. Both of us marveled at what deep, dark secrets from this man that we both thought we knew well. What I marveled at is how he not only faced down his vindictive and manipulative father, but also went on to create a highly successful lobbying business and father remarkable children. When you read his book you wonder if it is fiction. It is too exciting, too pathetic, too dramatic. You will wonder how David and his siblings survived. But he not only survived but he prevailed.
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  • Tedmunds
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing true story about a boys journey to survive and ultimately succeed dispite a horrific childhood. Raised by a monster of a father, the author overcame incredible hardships growing up on the Navajo Indian reservation in Arizona. This book is a page turner, full of action and adventure. It pulls no punches, literally and figuratively. As the story's timeline unfolds it spans the country from his fathers incarceration as a violent criminal in San Quentin , to the poverty stricken Navajo An amazing true story about a boys journey to survive and ultimately succeed dispite a horrific childhood. Raised by a monster of a father, the author overcame incredible hardships growing up on the Navajo Indian reservation in Arizona. This book is a page turner, full of action and adventure. It pulls no punches, literally and figuratively. As the story's timeline unfolds it spans the country from his fathers incarceration as a violent criminal in San Quentin , to the poverty stricken Navajo reservation and hardscrabble streets of Gallup New Mexico, to the green fairways of Burning Tree Country Club in Maryland and even the halls of the US congress. The book teaches many lessons. How to love, how to hate, how to survive and overcome disabilities. Ultimately it teaches us how to flourish and forgive. Thank you Dave Crow for having the courage and conviction to share your important life story with us.
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  • Paul Wohkittel
    January 1, 1970
    I know Dave personally and have worked with him professionally. Over the years we've attended social events, sporting events, business meetings, and have golfed together. In the course of our conversations I've picked up numerous snippets of his family relationships, hints of abuse, many stories of his childhood antics, and experiences of growing up on a reservation. I've witnessed, first hand, his present social values and work ethics. Yet, when I read the book I was absolutely dumbfounded. The I know Dave personally and have worked with him professionally. Over the years we've attended social events, sporting events, business meetings, and have golfed together. In the course of our conversations I've picked up numerous snippets of his family relationships, hints of abuse, many stories of his childhood antics, and experiences of growing up on a reservation. I've witnessed, first hand, his present social values and work ethics. Yet, when I read the book I was absolutely dumbfounded. The book was brutally revealing, shocking, and hilarious all at the same time. I was constantly "rooting for the good guys," completely forgetting that I already knew the end of the story. I read a lot and flew through this book. It was almost impossible for me to put down and I kept asking myself if I enjoyed it so much because I knew Dave or because it was an outstanding book. I came to the conclusion that Dave is a good friend and a great guy who happened to write an outstanding book that most people will enjoy.
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  • Bill Deoudes
    January 1, 1970
    Very riveting and fast moving...... couldn't wait to see what would happen next....... could have never imagined, having known the author for 45 years, he could turn out as normal and well rounded as he is today.......who could've known....
  • Martin H.
    January 1, 1970
    I can't fully comment about my reactions and emotions to David's autobiography. I have known him for 40 plus years as a Sigma Chi brother and close friend. I cannot write all I want to about my reactions to this true account of his life because I would give away too much background that would be a spoiler to a loving or tragic or bittersweet ending. As close to David as I am, I was shocked at events in the book. WOW! I grew up in such a loving family that was middle class and substantially I can't fully comment about my reactions and emotions to David's autobiography. I have known him for 40 plus years as a Sigma Chi brother and close friend. I cannot write all I want to about my reactions to this true account of his life because I would give away too much background that would be a spoiler to a loving or tragic or bittersweet ending. As close to David as I am, I was shocked at events in the book. WOW! I grew up in such a loving family that was middle class and substantially financially secure. I can't believe Dave grew up to be such a NORMAL friend, parent, husband, sibling, great fraternity brother and such a productive member of society from his work on Capital Hill to Big Brother and Big Sister programs. He is an amazing guy and great friend to all who know him. His book is a true testament of love of family, where he was abused, emotionally and physically, and him overcoming so much to be such a great friend to so many and a benefit to society.
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  • David Sandum
    January 1, 1970
    I was drawn into this book from page one. The memoir is well written, but it is his honesty that throws the biggest punch. You truly walk and feel with Mr Crow for the duration, a testimony that you are experiencing a great memoir. I felt fear, love, pain and the loyalty of a child. Issues of abuse and crude treatment felt hard at times. Yet the author manages to balance difficult topics with short and descriptive dialogues, even humor. Having said that, it is a miracle to me that the author has I was drawn into this book from page one. The memoir is well written, but it is his honesty that throws the biggest punch. You truly walk and feel with Mr Crow for the duration, a testimony that you are experiencing a great memoir. I felt fear, love, pain and the loyalty of a child. Issues of abuse and crude treatment felt hard at times. Yet the author manages to balance difficult topics with short and descriptive dialogues, even humor. Having said that, it is a miracle to me that the author has turned his life into a success. Truly any desperate situation can be turned around if we endure and keep on fighting.
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  • Jim Tarmann
    January 1, 1970
    David Crow has been a work colleague of mine for more than 15 years. During our tenure together I have watched in awe how people are drawn to him at the various events we mutually attend. Few people I have encountered in life can bring such interest and meaning to the simplest conversation. His real life story is no different. It's truly hard to believe someone could endure so much and continue to move forward and become so successful in life. I was truly sadden when I finished because I didn't David Crow has been a work colleague of mine for more than 15 years. During our tenure together I have watched in awe how people are drawn to him at the various events we mutually attend. Few people I have encountered in life can bring such interest and meaning to the simplest conversation. His real life story is no different. It's truly hard to believe someone could endure so much and continue to move forward and become so successful in life. I was truly sadden when I finished because I didn't want it to end!
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  • Evelyn Zorc
    January 1, 1970
    My daughter suggested reading this book. She is a published author and explained it may be a tough read because of the severe neglect and brutality that David, Lonnie, Sam and Sally endured. However this is an inspirational story of how mindset and hope bring resilience. I began reading and couldn’t stop until the end. It was engaging and had me cheering for David and his siblings all throughout the chapters.Thank you for having the courage to tell your harsh childhood story so others can learn My daughter suggested reading this book. She is a published author and explained it may be a tough read because of the severe neglect and brutality that David, Lonnie, Sam and Sally endured. However this is an inspirational story of how mindset and hope bring resilience. I began reading and couldn’t stop until the end. It was engaging and had me cheering for David and his siblings all throughout the chapters.Thank you for having the courage to tell your harsh childhood story so others can learn to have more love, understanding and empathy. We need more Evelyns, the Coach and good influencers in a young mans life to help make a difference! These angels touched his life with love and compassion when it was desperately needed. Bravo David Crow~
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    I devoured this book and was left wanting more. I would have loved to read about the people who intervened in Mr. Crow's life and how they saw through his destructive streak. I am thrilled that he was able to overcome this horrendous childhood, forgive and then give so much back to the community. I am humbled that I have accomplished so much less while having been given so much more. I have never felt moved enough to want to write an author, but this book has me tempted to reach out and express I devoured this book and was left wanting more. I would have loved to read about the people who intervened in Mr. Crow's life and how they saw through his destructive streak. I am thrilled that he was able to overcome this horrendous childhood, forgive and then give so much back to the community. I am humbled that I have accomplished so much less while having been given so much more. I have never felt moved enough to want to write an author, but this book has me tempted to reach out and express my admiration. I recommend this book to people who enjoy stories of those of triumph over extreme adversity.
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  • Tom Deoudes
    January 1, 1970
    This story of child abuse and mental torture perpetrated by a delusional father and husband who is both borderline genius and pure evil, reads like a Steven King movie. While emotionally drawn to the family's plight and wanting their torture to come to an end, you are still compelled to find out what happens next. A definite page turner. A cathartic tale that reveals how a son tries to cope with a demon for a father, his love of his family and how human spirit perseveres. Written so you can This story of child abuse and mental torture perpetrated by a delusional father and husband who is both borderline genius and pure evil, reads like a Steven King movie. While emotionally drawn to the family's plight and wanting their torture to come to an end, you are still compelled to find out what happens next. A definite page turner. A cathartic tale that reveals how a son tries to cope with a demon for a father, his love of his family and how human spirit perseveres. Written so you can actually live all the incredible challenges the author had to survive from miserable environments to emotional torment. It will touch a multitude of your emotions, from humorous to heartbreaking. The book tells a riveting and bizarre story of a childhood filled with fear, danger, hate, and lies, and how the writer reconciles it with the only answer that can bring it to an end: forgiveness.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Crow creates such vivid images. I was mesmerized by the tale but horrified that that had been his reality. His "angels" helped him develop his sense of self and give him the courage to push aside the demands of his tyrannical father. I greatly admire his ability to "age" his narration from childhood through adulthood. Not an easy task to bring the reader with him from domination to self determination.
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  • Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits)
    January 1, 1970
    See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsThe Pale-Faced Lie is a harrowing memoir of childhood abuse which includes several scenes of extreme violence. At times I was almost unable to keep on reading because what David and his brother endured was so upsetting. I would like to be able to believe that child protection services have improved considerably since David's experience in the 1960s, but sadly I know that there are still cases where children are forced to suffer in solence.As See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsThe Pale-Faced Lie is a harrowing memoir of childhood abuse which includes several scenes of extreme violence. At times I was almost unable to keep on reading because what David and his brother endured was so upsetting. I would like to be able to believe that child protection services have improved considerably since David's experience in the 1960s, but sadly I know that there are still cases where children are forced to suffer in solence.As an adult, David has penned an amazing and very readable memoir. I appreciated the contrasts between his child's eye understanding of his family's circumstances and his view from so many decades later. That his child self readily took on so much of the blame for his dysfunctional parents is heartbreaking. I felt strongly for his elder sister who lost most of her childhood to perform the role of surrogate mother to her three siblings. David's descriptions of living conditions on the Navajo reservations are just as sobering as those of his home life. How on earth can it be considered acceptable to reduce whole communities to such a degrading existence? At times The Pale-Faced Lie reads like a thriller, rather than a memoir. David has a great sense of a good story and knows just how to pace a narrative. I would have liked to learn information like what brought about his father's Cherokee claims, but overall this shockingly vivid memoir is a memorable read.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    This book is fantastic and the first book I finished in several years-- yes that's sad, but I have three little ones, so getting anything to hold my attention other than them is a challenge. My sister left The Pale-Faced Lie at my house after visiting recently and I was intrigued by the cover, so I picked it up. I was hooked after the first page and stayed up late to read it that week. I wanted to know how a little boy on an Indian Reservation with such cruel parents could turn out to be a This book is fantastic and the first book I finished in several years-- yes that's sad, but I have three little ones, so getting anything to hold my attention other than them is a challenge. My sister left The Pale-Faced Lie at my house after visiting recently and I was intrigued by the cover, so I picked it up. I was hooked after the first page and stayed up late to read it that week. I wanted to know how a little boy on an Indian Reservation with such cruel parents could turn out to be a successful lobbyist and author, and even more so, a kind and giving man, when he had every excuse to be bitter and angry. Aside from being extremely entertaining, it's encouragement to pick up your head and pull it together when you are faced with mess. His book is a reminder that we can be strong- and we can be resilient, but we have to care enough to find it within. I highly recommend this book!
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  • Felix F. Giordano
    January 1, 1970
    "The Pale-Faced Lie" is a riveting account of a world turned upside down, A very visual, engaging, and well-written book that will make the reader cringe, cry, and cheer for a boy on a treacherous journey to adulthood. Couldn't put it down - review by Felix F. Giordano, best-selling author of the Jim Buchanan Novels.
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  • Rainey
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t want to put this book down! It will make you look at your life circumstances with new eyes and appreciate your relationships. It’s phenomenal what he overcame, a true testament of grit.
  • Ross Swope
    January 1, 1970
    The Pale-Faced Lie. This book is riveting, amazing, emotional and bares a boys sole for all to see, feel, and experience through his eyes. The adversity faced by the author and laid out for the reader is overwhelming. The author's story literally grabbed me by the collar, poignantly directing me to listen to the words I read. I was particularly moved by the courage, determination and strength David displayed in overcoming circumstances that would have wreaked havoc on most others life. This is The Pale-Faced Lie. This book is riveting, amazing, emotional and bares a boys sole for all to see, feel, and experience through his eyes. The adversity faced by the author and laid out for the reader is overwhelming. The author's story literally grabbed me by the collar, poignantly directing me to listen to the words I read. I was particularly moved by the courage, determination and strength David displayed in overcoming circumstances that would have wreaked havoc on most others life. This is not a tall tail but an engaging story with a message to me that perhaps the nature of a person can trump the nurture of a dangerous, delinquent and cruel environment. Many will finish the book and think what an incredible story, like I did. Many will also finish the book with great admiration, appreciation, high regard and respect for the writer, as I did.
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  • Kahultine
    January 1, 1970
    The Pale-Faced Lie by David Crow is a captivating story! The author details his childhood growing up in a chaotic, unstable family on the Navaho Indian Reservation. His mother is mentally ill and his father is a violent con-artist who makes his children participate in his crimes. It was interesting to me to note the many neighbors and teachers who made a difference in his life. This is a very powerful story of a child and his siblings growing up to become resilient, successful adults. It's a The Pale-Faced Lie by David Crow is a captivating story! The author details his childhood growing up in a chaotic, unstable family on the Navaho Indian Reservation. His mother is mentally ill and his father is a violent con-artist who makes his children participate in his crimes. It was interesting to me to note the many neighbors and teachers who made a difference in his life. This is a very powerful story of a child and his siblings growing up to become resilient, successful adults. It's a story that every reader will be thinking about long after they finish reading.
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  • Karla Segundo
    January 1, 1970
    David Crow's book is definitely full of emotions. Reading the book is like watching a film, the details in the book are so vivid as if you were living the story in real life. I strongly encourage everyone to read this book. I can relate to this book in so many different ways and I am certain others can as well. Not only is it a relatable story, but it is also a very eye-opening experience. This book has made me want to cry a couple of times, but it has also made me laugh. David is genuinely a David Crow's book is definitely full of emotions. Reading the book is like watching a film, the details in the book are so vivid as if you were living the story in real life. I strongly encourage everyone to read this book. I can relate to this book in so many different ways and I am certain others can as well. Not only is it a relatable story, but it is also a very eye-opening experience. This book has made me want to cry a couple of times, but it has also made me laugh. David is genuinely a very charismatic, smart and brave person. I thank him for giving me the opportunity to read this amazing inspirational story.
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  • Melanie D'Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    Engrossing. Remarkable. The fact that the author lived this story, survived and not only got through it but did so after considerable pain, introspection and hard work is a true inspiration. He put his struggles behind him to use his experiences for the good. Well-written, interesting, and difficult to put down. Definitely should be on your list!
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  • Tianna Webster
    January 1, 1970
    The Pale-Faced Lie is wonderfully written; you feel so deeply David’s experiences and heartbreaking torment, but his will and desire to preserve are always present. This is a read that will leave you with tears welling from heart felt empathy and bursts of laughter from his youthful antics. A unique and worthwhile read!
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  • Bill Markley
    January 1, 1970
    After reading this book, I’ll never think of troubled kids the same way. Now knowing there may be forces in their lives that cause them to do the things they do and that they have no control over those actions has been a real eye-opener for me. This well-written book kept me so engaged that I could not put it down—but there were times when I just had to and walk away from it because of the disturbing things that happened to the Crow children. I highly recommend this book for all to read.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    A heartbreaking true storyNo child should have to endure the life that David managed to survive. Courageously, he broke the cycle of abuse, rather than follow in his parent's footsteps, he became an advocate for others in need.
  • Allyson
    January 1, 1970
    My girlfriend suggested this book as her friend and colleague is the author. She highly recommended it and I ordered it...mostly as a show of support to her. I was immediately glued to it and often thought about it when I was away from it. I was particularly struck by the illustration of the complex power abusive parents hold over their children. It was also a beautiful story of resilience. Highly recommend!
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  • Patricia Wilkinson
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy reading memoirs, maybe because I'm nosy and find people fascinating. Truly, The Pale-Faced Lie is the most amazing account of someone's life I've ever read. I gasped and cried, and occasionally burst out laughing. Mr. Crow's story of being raised by an ex-convict—a harsh, abusive parent, the worst kind of role model, yet who still looked out for his family in his twisted way—kept me eager to find out what would happen next, from the first to the final page. This author's honestly and I enjoy reading memoirs, maybe because I'm nosy and find people fascinating. Truly, The Pale-Faced Lie is the most amazing account of someone's life I've ever read. I gasped and cried, and occasionally burst out laughing. Mr. Crow's story of being raised by an ex-convict—a harsh, abusive parent, the worst kind of role model, yet who still looked out for his family in his twisted way—kept me eager to find out what would happen next, from the first to the final page. This author's honestly and attention to detail to create a visceral experience of his harrowing journey through childhood is not to be missed. Definitely a five-star read!
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  • Deborah Bass
    January 1, 1970
    What a childhood!Excellent book. Hard to put down. Excellent memoir. If you think you had a rough childhood read about this man's life.
  • Joel
    January 1, 1970
    (Note: I received a free copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways.)A memoir; primarily focusing on the author’s childhood in the 50s and 60s, but extending into his young adult years. Crow presents his boyhood self as an uncontrollable prankster and troublemaker, and his escapades are often hilarious. More often, though, the narrative is hair-raising: it’s dominated by Crow’s relationship with his father, a violent and abusive man who tried to murder his wife and forced his son to help him (Note: I received a free copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways.)A memoir; primarily focusing on the author’s childhood in the 50s and 60s, but extending into his young adult years. Crow presents his boyhood self as an uncontrollable prankster and troublemaker, and his escapades are often hilarious. More often, though, the narrative is hair-raising: it’s dominated by Crow’s relationship with his father, a violent and abusive man who tried to murder his wife and forced his son to help him commit robberies.Some of the details are so unpleasant that it’s a little hard to imagine how someone could be willing to step forward and say “Yes, these things happened to me.” And they’re just as hard to read about as they must have been to start talking about. But by the end of the book, as the author tells us about how he finally began to build his own life and stand up to his father, you’ll come to admire him.
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  • Bob Garrett
    January 1, 1970
    David Crow’s gripping memoir reminds that no matter how caught up in a cycle of domestic violence and dysfunction, children still fiercely love their parents—and vice versa. The only escape lies in locating other role models, summoning courage to confront abusers and finding safe spaces in which to heal. Crow grows up at the mercy of an explosive, ex-con father and battered mother in the desert Southwest and suburban DC. Running track and cross country, he literally logs thousands of miles to David Crow’s gripping memoir reminds that no matter how caught up in a cycle of domestic violence and dysfunction, children still fiercely love their parents—and vice versa. The only escape lies in locating other role models, summoning courage to confront abusers and finding safe spaces in which to heal. Crow grows up at the mercy of an explosive, ex-con father and battered mother in the desert Southwest and suburban DC. Running track and cross country, he literally logs thousands of miles to distance himself from their delusions. Though Crow miraculously escapes his parents’ snares, not until he’s in his early 50s does he find complete freedom: He forgives himself and those who injured him. This is an uplifting tale, told from the heart.
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  • Fermon Jones
    January 1, 1970
    Outstanding! Although it’s not quite a Jack Reacher thriller, this memoir was an extremely compelling read. I couldn’t put it down. There were several highly emotional moments when my eyes filled with tears and I had to stop and process the enormity of what David endured as a child. It’s a very revealing portrait of his personal journey. A first-rate memoir! I highly recommend it!
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  • Prescottl
    January 1, 1970
    Awesome close look at a psychopath from a son's perspective. The author's father was an abusive and violent man who warped his son's personality. The author's prose clearly explained and enhanced the traumatic experiences in his childhood and allowed the reader to feel his conflicting emotions. This true story is so well written that the reader could feel the angst that permeated the author's life.
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