Killing Quarry
The hitman hero of the acclaimed series Quarry on Cinemax returns with an all-new assignment. By Quarry's creator, the award-wining author of Road to Perdition! Quarry, star of 13 previous novels, a comic book and the acclaimed Cinemax TV series, returns in an all-new assignment that takes the hitman's hitman into uncharted territory, when he finds out that for the first time someone has taken out a hit on him. And is the mysterious killer assigned to hit the hitman someone from Quarry's past? Maybe even a past lover...?From TI 9781785659454 TR.

Killing Quarry Details

TitleKilling Quarry
Author
ReleaseNov 12th, 2019
PublisherTitan Books
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime

Killing Quarry Review

  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Quarry’s back in town and the fun is ready to start. Collins has mastered the short, witty, style of the Quarry and it seems that no matter how many he puts out, they are just tremendous fun. Originally conceived in the Seventies and then returned to decades later, Quarry was an ex-Vietnam war hero who returned stateside a few days early only to find the Dear John letter hadn’t been mailed yet. He was recruited by the legendary broker to do the only thing he had been trained to do: kill. As the Quarry’s back in town and the fun is ready to start. Collins has mastered the short, witty, style of the Quarry and it seems that no matter how many he puts out, they are just tremendous fun. Originally conceived in the Seventies and then returned to decades later, Quarry was an ex-Vietnam war hero who returned stateside a few days early only to find the Dear John letter hadn’t been mailed yet. He was recruited by the legendary broker to do the only thing he had been trained to do: kill. As the series went on, Quarry turned the tables on the Broker and, with his list of contacts, sought out targets and offered to get rid of the hitmen out to get them for a price. It’s now years later and Quarry is up to his same old tricks - only the target is a little too close for home. This novel is a race car rounding those tight curves and about the only complaint I have with it is that it’s over all too quickly, leaving the reader desperate for more of the same. The writing is tight. The humor is dry and witty. Violent, sexy, suspenseful. Definitely worth reading. The landscape around Lake Geneva is familiar to Quarry readers. And, if like me, you’ve already perused all the other Quarry books, you are not going to be disappointed at the twists and turns.
    more
  • Glen
    January 1, 1970
    The author sent me a copy of this novel in exchange for a review.First, I wonder how many people understood the title is a reference to the popular Bill O'Reilly series "Killing X"? This sly humor is what sets this series apart from other of this type. Quarry is on the case, surveilling and tracking a hitman, only to find that the target is himself! One of the hitters is a rare female assassin, one sharing a past with Quarry.The two assassins start investigating not really trusting one another, The author sent me a copy of this novel in exchange for a review.First, I wonder how many people understood the title is a reference to the popular Bill O'Reilly series "Killing X"? This sly humor is what sets this series apart from other of this type. Quarry is on the case, surveilling and tracking a hitman, only to find that the target is himself! One of the hitters is a rare female assassin, one sharing a past with Quarry.The two assassins start investigating not really trusting one another, but sleeping together anyway.Everything builds nicely to a great climax. The solution made sense, and the ending really swerved me. I was expecting something very different.Another great book in the series. Usually, I think Quarry works best in the Disco era, but this one, set in the 80s, is really good.
    more
  • Ron Panarotti
    January 1, 1970
    By now, fans of the “Quarry” series know that each new book will deliver a fast-moving plot with a mystery for their hitman hero to unravel – as well as plenty of dark humor coming from the first-person narration. What distinguishes the newest installment, “Killing Quarry,” are the ingredients it adds to this formula, one of which is hinted at in the title. (I received an advance review copy.)By my count, this is the 14th tale from Max Allan Collins about the former Vietnam veteran whose real By now, fans of the “Quarry” series know that each new book will deliver a fast-moving plot with a mystery for their hitman hero to unravel – as well as plenty of dark humor coming from the first-person narration. What distinguishes the newest installment, “Killing Quarry,” are the ingredients it adds to this formula, one of which is hinted at in the title. (I received an advance review copy.)By my count, this is the 14th tale from Max Allan Collins about the former Vietnam veteran whose real name we never learn, who makes his living as a hitman. But this is the first time Quarry himself has been the target of a contract by someone who wants him dead. Putting Quarry on the defensive is a welcome change, as the hunter becomes the hunted. The key question is who wants him dead – and why.The fun in these books is not the solution to the mystery so much; that would mean you’ve reached the end. It’s watching Quarry figuring everything out, and how the characters he meets along the way help or hinder him (sometimes both). What fans of the series will especially enjoy is that “Killing Quarry” brings back Lu, a female member of Quarry’s profession who tangled with him in a previous novel.Lu is one of the best-developed characters in this series. The dialogue between her and Quarry is especially well written. Collins gives us a number of quieter scenes in which it’s just Quarry and Lu having a conversation. These segments are as compelling as the more action-oriented scenes that drive the plot forward – largely because the inescapable question in the back of Quarry’s mind (and the reader’s) is whether Lu will turn out to be the one who wants him dead. That she’s every bit his equal in skill set makes the prospect of a final showdown between them suspenseful. That these two cold-blooded killers seem so … perfect for each other raises the stakes even more.Over the years, the books have been written out of chronological order. They fall into two general periods. The earlier stories, which take place during the 1970s, have Quarry working as a hitman for a shady character called “the Broker.” Later, Quarry becomes an entrepreneur of sorts. Having obtained a list of his fellow killers for hire, Quarry follows a hit man to his next job, plays detective to identify the intended target and offers his services (for a hefty fee) to remove the hitman and the person who hired him. (Think of Robin Hood as Martin Scorsese might have imagined him.) “Killing Quarry” takes place during the latter period. It’s one of Collins’ best, but if you’re new to this series, I’d recommend first reading “Quarry’s Deal,” the book that introduced Lu.
    more
  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    "Killing Quarry" is the 14th "Quarry" prose novel by Max Allan Collins. The author claims his was the first-ever hitman protagonist. The "Quarry" series, named after the hitman in question (code-named "Quarry" in the sense of a hollow hole dug deep into cold rock) began in the 1970s. And it's still going strong after many long hiatuses and a recent mediocre TV adaptation on Cinemax--which was canceled after one season. The continuation of the series of books is great news for Quarry fans like "Killing Quarry" is the 14th "Quarry" prose novel by Max Allan Collins. The author claims his was the first-ever hitman protagonist. The "Quarry" series, named after the hitman in question (code-named "Quarry" in the sense of a hollow hole dug deep into cold rock) began in the 1970s. And it's still going strong after many long hiatuses and a recent mediocre TV adaptation on Cinemax--which was canceled after one season. The continuation of the series of books is great news for Quarry fans like myself. I was concerned the failure of the "Quarry" TV show might end the book series as well.It's too bad there aren't more top-shelf Hard Case Crime novels like this one. Sadly, most of the Hard Case Crime novels I've read were from manuscripts left in a drawer somewhere by famous (and semi-famous) authors that should have been left in that drawer. Those drawers probably should have been nailed shut as well, to prevent the manuscripts from doing harm to humankind. But the Quarry novels are awesome. Let's not have any misunderstandings about that."Killing Quarry" is a kinda-sorta sequel to "Quarry's Deal," the third novel in the series. A character readers met in that novel, the alluring female hit-person, Lu, returns after a decade (in the Quarry timeline) for more sex and violence in Quarry's world. The complication? The "bad guys" know what quarry has been up to--killing his former hitmen colleagues and those who hired them. Eventually, this causes complications for Quarry. The deadly kind.Unlike most of the novels in this series, "Killing Quarry" takes place in Quarry's own backyard of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. This novel has a pretty decent "the story so far" chapter to start off with, which means even those new to the world of Quarry can jump in and not get too lost. And the edition I read also had the first chapter of "Quarry's Deal," where readers first met Lu. Quarry novels are ones I almost always devour quickly and are some of the (very) few books I read that I wish were longer instead of shorter. That's high praise from me. If you read my other reviews, you know what I'm talking about.
    more
  • Jonathan Sweet
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone’s favorite professional killer is back in Killing Quarry, the 15th adventure of the Vietnam sniper turned hitman by Max Allan Collins.This adventure falls into the “list” era of Quarry adventures when he is searching out other professional killers and eliminating them — for a fee. It’s a return to the early days of this series that first started in the 1970s, but with a twist. When Quarry tracks this killer, he ends up following him back to his Wisconsin stomping ground and finds that Everyone’s favorite professional killer is back in Killing Quarry, the 15th adventure of the Vietnam sniper turned hitman by Max Allan Collins.This adventure falls into the “list” era of Quarry adventures when he is searching out other professional killers and eliminating them — for a fee. It’s a return to the early days of this series that first started in the 1970s, but with a twist. When Quarry tracks this killer, he ends up following him back to his Wisconsin stomping ground and finds that he is the target. It seems someone has figured out his scheme and is tired of their killers and clients getting offed.As I wrote that last paragraph, I realized just how absurd this premise is. It requires a pretty big suspension of disbelief to accept that Quarry would just happen to track the right killer at the right time. In fact, that points to just what a skilled writer MAC is at this point. Yeah, it bothered me a little at the back of my mind as I read, but the story was moving at such a pace, it’s easy to toss that aside and follow the story.A female killer from Quarry’s past shows up at an opportune time to help Quarry, and there’s the typical death and sex to keep you reading. Still, what appears to be a relatively straightforward tale has enough twists and turns to keep the story going to a satisfying conclusion.The decision to have Quarry as the target pays off in some nice ways as it leaves Quarry off his game throughout the book and ups the stakes for our hero(?). That helps to keep the book feeling fresh, something that’s never easy to do in a series that has extended across this many books and more than 40 years.
    more
  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    Let me assure you at the outset of this review that Quarry does not get killed, the title and its fetching cover notwithstanding. I’m not giving anything away here, so no spoiler alert. In his Author’s Note, Max Allan Collins is quick to point out that while the Quarry series is sequential, his writing of the novels and their subsequent publication (by the absolutely indispensable Hard Case Crime imprint) are not. Thus, he notes, KILLING QUARRY takes place before the previously published QUARRY’ Let me assure you at the outset of this review that Quarry does not get killed, the title and its fetching cover notwithstanding. I’m not giving anything away here, so no spoiler alert. In his Author’s Note, Max Allan Collins is quick to point out that while the Quarry series is sequential, his writing of the novels and their subsequent publication (by the absolutely indispensable Hard Case Crime imprint) are not. Thus, he notes, KILLING QUARRY takes place before the previously published QUARRY’S VOTE.The trick here is to weave sufficient suspense into a story where readers know that everything is going to be all right. Collins pulls this off, and quite successfully. Of course, there are heaping doses of violence and explicit sexual situations peppered throughout the book, as if we needed incentive to keep going (we certainly don’t).For those unfamiliar with the series, Quarry, formerly a Marine sniper in Vietnam, uses his skill set in the book’s present --- the latter third of the 20th century --- as a paid hitman. He started off in the service of a mysterious entity known as the Broker, but eventually terminated their agreement (along with the Broker) and became a freelancer, utilizing the Broker’s files anonymously for his own benefit and creating his own clientele.Quarry is in the middle of scoping out a new target, a fellow assassin, when he discovers that he himself has been targeted. This sets up all sorts of intriguing situations, including one in which Quarry is reunited with an old and deadly flame who he cannot entirely trust, though it does not hinder either of them from giving that fire an extra flicker or two. It also allows Collins to set up a few scenarios that border on the fantastic, but in their setting --- ’50s-style pulp noir --- are not out of place at all. In addition, readers are provided with a lot of deep and interesting background into Quarry’s home and the surrounding environs.Along the way, there are plenty of twists, turns and double- and triple-crosses as we head toward an explosive conclusion --- which, for the reasons noted above, Quarry survives, though not everyone else does.At just under 200 pages, this instant classic has something for everybody. And I’d be remiss if I didn’t give a shoutout to Paul Mann, who designed the front and back covers and whose talent is exceeded only by his own imagination. I wouldn’t mind a bit if this series, which harkens back to a past and better era, went on forever.Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub
    more
  • Tim Field
    January 1, 1970
    I have read all the previous Quarry books and eagerly await each new novel, so I can't claim to be a totally unbiased reader. My favorite novels about the hitman are those where he is given an assignment which either takes him to an interesting location or mixes him with some unlikely characters. The least interesting books in the series are those that are set in Quarry's backyard or involve Quarry using the list of hitmen he obtained when he killed the Broker to track down potential victims of I have read all the previous Quarry books and eagerly await each new novel, so I can't claim to be a totally unbiased reader. My favorite novels about the hitman are those where he is given an assignment which either takes him to an interesting location or mixes him with some unlikely characters. The least interesting books in the series are those that are set in Quarry's backyard or involve Quarry using the list of hitmen he obtained when he killed the Broker to track down potential victims of hitmen and warn them of their peril and promise to eliminate the problem (for a price). The ''list" novels just seem so strained and unlikely that it affects my enjoyment.Killing Quarry is a "list" novel set in Quarry's neck of the woods in Wisconsin. It has a convoluted plot and the head slapping absurdity of a summit meeting of brokers for hired killers where they listen to spiels about Cayman Island money laundering. Early on, I was worried that this novel would go south and crash and burn.And then came a character from Quarry's past to save the day and save the novel. I don't want to spoil the novel, so let me just say that the novel comes to life when this character enters and the book manages to override the plot absurdities and come alive with some action, some mystery and copious plot twists.I salute Max Allan Collins for keeping the Quarry series alive and keeping it fresh with both new situations and variations on a theme. Killing Quarry doesn't rank with my favorite Quarry novels, but it does provide solid pulpy entertainment for the reader.
    more
  • Greg Trosclair
    January 1, 1970
    I think that I might be the wrong guy to reviews books like Killing Quarry. I like these type of books too much. I like a gray While I enjoy series like Jack Reacher, I find the character a little bland. Quarry, Parker, Michael Connelly's detective Harry Bosch or Robert Crais' Cole and Pike are all gray. They have a little willingness to do whatever is necessary. Quarry unlike Bosch or Cole and Pike is a bit darker, a former hit-man. He still has traces of a conscious. In Killing Quarry he is I think that I might be the wrong guy to reviews books like Killing Quarry. I like these type of books too much. I like a gray While I enjoy series like Jack Reacher, I find the character a little bland. Quarry, Parker, Michael Connelly's detective Harry Bosch or Robert Crais' Cole and Pike are all gray. They have a little willingness to do whatever is necessary. Quarry unlike Bosch or Cole and Pike is a bit darker, a former hit-man. He still has traces of a conscious. In Killing Quarry he is once again presented with a bit of an ethical dilemma. He ends up paired with Lu a return character from an earlier Quarry novel. I enjoy where the story goes and how the characters develop. I like the pacing and the fact that who is the 'bad guy' is in question the entire book. This is a super fast and easy read. If you like Max Allan Collins other books then you will like this. I love this. I hope Collins keeps writing Quarry for awhile longer.
    more
  • Marilyn Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    If you like hard-boiled crime fiction, you can't get anything better than Max Allan Collins. This is his latest book about a semi-retired hitman, called by some as Quarry. Others call him, Jack. Nobody really knows him, though. Yes, he has hard edges, but as the narrator, he can see the funny side of the situation. The author is masterful in describing details that make you actually see the setting in your mind. The action is riveting. If you haven't read any of the Quarry books, you don't need If you like hard-boiled crime fiction, you can't get anything better than Max Allan Collins. This is his latest book about a semi-retired hitman, called by some as Quarry. Others call him, Jack. Nobody really knows him, though. Yes, he has hard edges, but as the narrator, he can see the funny side of the situation. The author is masterful in describing details that make you actually see the setting in your mind. The action is riveting. If you haven't read any of the Quarry books, you don't need to start with the first one, just jump into this one. It is a stand-alone. But do read this one, and the others books, too. Quarry books are a little guilty fun. I was given an advanced review copy in order to write a review, but the opinions are mine.
    more
  • David Madara
    January 1, 1970
    The hit-man with a mission is back in a new adventure. The details of what Quarryhas been doing with the Broker's List is on someone's radar. Can Quarry figure outwhat's going on and escape?Some things I love are great Max Allan Collins' books and this ranks up there amongthem! Plot is believable and very entertaining. The less sittings the better. I couldn't stop turning the pages to see what would happen next. If Mr. Collins writes it, I'll be there reading!I was given a copy of this book for The hit-man with a mission is back in a new adventure. The details of what Quarryhas been doing with the Broker's List is on someone's radar. Can Quarry figure outwhat's going on and escape?Some things I love are great Max Allan Collins' books and this ranks up there amongthem! Plot is believable and very entertaining. The less sittings the better. I couldn't stop turning the pages to see what would happen next. If Mr. Collins writes it, I'll be there reading!I was given a copy of this book for my honest review.
    more
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    Great PulpQuick, fast paced violent and sexy in a seventies-eighties way, Collins Quarry novels are just pure fun. Read em all.
  • Rob Christopher
    January 1, 1970
    About as breezy and enjoyable as a novel that includes several murders can be.
  • Bruce Nieminski
    January 1, 1970
    7/10224 pages
Write a review