Coo
Ten years ago, an impossible thing happened: a flock of pigeons picked up a human baby who had been abandoned in an empty lot and carried her, bundled in blankets, to their roof. Coo has lived her entire life on the rooftop with the pigeons who saved her. It's the only home she's ever known. But then a hawk nearly kills Burr, the pigeon she loves most, and leaves him gravely hurt. Coo must make a perilous trip to the ground for the first time to find Tully, a retired postal worker who occasionally feeds Coo's flock and can heal injured birds. Tully mends Burr's broken wing and coaxes Coo from her isolated life. Living with Tully, Coo experiences warmth, safety, and human relationships for the first time. But just as Coo is beginning to blossom, she learns that the human world is infinitely more complex—and cruel—than she could have imagined.

Coo Details

TitleCoo
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 3rd, 2020
PublisherGreenwillow Books
ISBN-139780062955999
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy, Animals, Contemporary

Coo Review

  • Haydn
    January 1, 1970
    It's such a sweet story. I loved getting to lose myself in Coo's world. I would recommend this book to any middle-grade reader, and to any adult, for that matter. I think Coo is something that people of all ages can enjoy and learn from, and I hope that's exactly what happens.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    What a charmingly sweet debut novel! Coo has lived for ten years with the pigeons who rescued and raised her when she was left on the steps of an abandoned factory. But when her best pigeon friend is hurt and the winter gets rough, Coo has to learn to live among humans, with all their confusing rules! I think this will be a hit with fans of Katherine Applegate, and Cory Leonardo's THE SIMPLE ART OF FLYING.
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  • Stacy Hackney
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this unique and beautiful story. COO is about a young girl raised by a flock of pigeons. Coo (the main character) has never left the roof where she lives with her pigeons until one of her flock is injured and she must find her way into the human world to save her friend. Noel's realistic depiction of Coo's journey to trusting other humans and finding her voice is a joy to read. The concept of a girl raised by pigeons on a roof in New York City feels utterly real in Noel's I absolutely loved this unique and beautiful story. COO is about a young girl raised by a flock of pigeons. Coo (the main character) has never left the roof where she lives with her pigeons until one of her flock is injured and she must find her way into the human world to save her friend. Noel's realistic depiction of Coo's journey to trusting other humans and finding her voice is a joy to read. The concept of a girl raised by pigeons on a roof in New York City feels utterly real in Noel's capable hands. Not only are the human characters and their relationships well-developed, but Coo's pigeons each have their own personality, language (!!), and purpose, so much so that I could fully imagine living with Burr and Roohoo and all the rest of the flock. I especially loved some of the more cinematic images this book conjured up. I would list my favorite moments but don't want to leave any spoilers. Just trust me that Noel has a knack for making the spectacular seems possible in this hopeful, heartwarming novel. Best of all, Coo is a character you can't help but root for and love. I highly recommend this novel!! I will never look at pigeons the same way again!
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  • Tanya
    January 1, 1970
    Coo was one of the most beautiful MG reads I've read this year! I honestly can't stop gushing about this book, and I've added this to my list of all-time fave MG reads. I had zero expectations when I started reading this, but deep down, I knew I would connect to this story. The first thing I should mention is that there are parts of the story that read as completely unbelievable, for example, a dozen pigeons carrying a baby with a blanket from the street to a building rooftop, and then that baby Coo was one of the most beautiful MG reads I've read this year! I honestly can't stop gushing about this book, and I've added this to my list of all-time fave MG reads. I had zero expectations when I started reading this, but deep down, I knew I would connect to this story. The first thing I should mention is that there are parts of the story that read as completely unbelievable, for example, a dozen pigeons carrying a baby with a blanket from the street to a building rooftop, and then that baby surviving life for years with these pigeons eating scraps from dumpsters and staying in a dovecote thorough cold winters. BUT, the thing is, Kaela Noel's writing is so skillful, and so beautiful, that you can't help but suspend your disbelief and just go along with the story, cheering for the main character Coo. Another wonderful aspect of this story, is how Noel creates such unique and believable characters, starting with Coo's flock of pigeons, each with their own names and distinct personalities, (Burr being my favorite, and even the naughty and annoying Roohoo, somehow crept into my heart.) Then there is Coo, who is of course at the center of the story; she is loving and loyal, and curious, but also extremely fearful of the unknown. She's also strong, way stronger than any kid needs to be. I adored seeing her transformation, which was realistic in every sense, even as she navigates the human world for the first time. Perhaps my favorite part of the story though, are all the wonderful secondary characters, all of which have their own story arcs as well. Tully the retired postal worker, grieving the loss of her husband Ben. She copes through caring for the city pigeons, rescuing injured ones and bringing them back to health. As a cat and sometimes bird rescuer myself, I totally related to her and her love of hummus, avocado and sprout sandwiches, instant noodle soup and donuts. Then there is Aggie a neighbor who befriends Coo. Despite her own struggles of being kicked out of ballet school, she remains a kind and steadfast pal for Coo. And closer to the end of the book, we meet Nicholas, a Brazilian immigrant who is a veterinarian, but actually moonlights as a taxi driver so he can earn money to bring his family over from Brazil. This is the kind of quirky, three dimensional cast of characters that I LOVE in middle-grade. There is so much more I could say about this book, but I'll just end this review by saying that this reads like a classic, but with a fresh and contemporary feel. It's magical, yet grounded in reality through its characters and urban setting of Queens, NY. Oh, and I'm not at all ashamed to admit that I cried a bucketful of happy tears; MG books that bring out the happy tears are my faves. I hope that Coo will get more hype in the coming months because I would love to see it in loads of classrooms and libraries. I'm definitely purchasing a copy to donate to my daughter's school library. Go on and add this to your TBRs and pre-order. You won't regret it!
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  • Deb
    January 1, 1970
    This is such a cute book. I think it is geared for upper middle grades. The "bird speak" might be a little difficult and confusing for younger readers. Thanks to the author and publisher for an ARC of this book.
  • Arianne Costner
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! I don't have words eloquent enough to describe how I feel about this book. From the start, I was whisked away by the surreal, almost magical permise. The birds were a hoot (ha!), and each of the characters in the book were well-rounded and had character arcs of their own. Coo is extremely lovable and a great role model--she is compassionate, strong, brave. With its originality and beautiful writing, this one feels like an instant classic. There were sweet moments, bittersweet moment--you Wow! I don't have words eloquent enough to describe how I feel about this book. From the start, I was whisked away by the surreal, almost magical permise. The birds were a hoot (ha!), and each of the characters in the book were well-rounded and had character arcs of their own. Coo is extremely lovable and a great role model--she is compassionate, strong, brave. With its originality and beautiful writing, this one feels like an instant classic. There were sweet moments, bittersweet moment--you may just shed a tear at how much you feel. Can't recommend enough.
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  • Ellery Bloom
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful book.
  • Erin Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book so much!
  • Rick Buttafogo
    January 1, 1970
    Cute. Kids will love it and maybe some of us humans will even begin to love pigeons.
  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Sweet. Good for kids who like animals. Apparently pigeons sound just like Yoda. Who knew?
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    "Coo" is not just something a pigeon says-- it's also the name of a girl raised by a flock of them. Abandoned as a baby, these feathered friends took her to their rooftop, where she's lived the past eleven years. When her favorite pigeon, Burr, is injured, she leaves the roof in search of help; rumor has it there's a lady who helps sick pigeons. Coo is then thrust into the human world, with a language and customs that she knows nothing about. The pigeon healer, Tully, takes Coo under her wing, "Coo" is not just something a pigeon says-- it's also the name of a girl raised by a flock of them. Abandoned as a baby, these feathered friends took her to their rooftop, where she's lived the past eleven years. When her favorite pigeon, Burr, is injured, she leaves the roof in search of help; rumor has it there's a lady who helps sick pigeons. Coo is then thrust into the human world, with a language and customs that she knows nothing about. The pigeon healer, Tully, takes Coo under her wing, determined to bring Coo into a life she's missed out on. Fun, sweet, and thoughtful, Coo is bound to become a modern classic among beloved tales of children and animals.
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  • Cara
    January 1, 1970
    COO is a hopeful, imaginative story that can teach kids, and remind adults, about the power of community and being a good citizen. With the heart and charm of the very best middle grade novels, COO shows us what it means to care for our flock by standing up against short-sighted harmful policies, by asking for help from trusted adults, and by being willing to believe that our actions can make a difference in individual lives as well as our society at large. As Coo, a child who grew up among COO is a hopeful, imaginative story that can teach kids, and remind adults, about the power of community and being a good citizen. With the heart and charm of the very best middle grade novels, COO shows us what it means to care for our “flock” by standing up against short-sighted harmful policies, by asking for help from trusted adults, and by being willing to believe that our actions can make a difference in individual lives as well as our society at large. As Coo, a child who grew up among pigeons, learns about the human world, children and adult readers alike will also see many aspects of our world as if for the first time. What works here? What doesn’t work for having a healthy community? As Coo spends time living with Tully, a postal worker who takes on a parental role for Coo, and waits for Burr, her most beloved pigeon in her flock, to heal, she also learns of city plans which put her flock in harm’s way. Coo does take on the role of a heroine to tackle this challenge, but unlike many other stories of adventure and triumph, she figures out who can help her, who she can trust, and how she can keep the best parts of both her worlds.
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  • Terri M.
    January 1, 1970
    What a great start to 2o2o!Coo is a delightful uplifting read. (Yes, you do need to suspend your belief a bit, but it is worth it.) As a middle grade novel, it hits all right notes. I loved Coo and her amazing world. This book made me smile a lot.I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusCoo was abandoned by her mother as a newborn, and a flock of pigeons concerned for her safety flew her off to their abandoned dovecote on the roof of a building and cared for her. They fed her doughnuts and found plastic bags and newspapers to keep her clothed and warm. She can talk to the pigeons, and is especially fond of Burr. When Burr is injured, she goes down from the roof to seek out Tully, a retired postal worker who frequents the area, feeding the pigeons E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusCoo was abandoned by her mother as a newborn, and a flock of pigeons concerned for her safety flew her off to their abandoned dovecote on the roof of a building and cared for her. They fed her doughnuts and found plastic bags and newspapers to keep her clothed and warm. She can talk to the pigeons, and is especially fond of Burr. When Burr is injured, she goes down from the roof to seek out Tully, a retired postal worker who frequents the area, feeding the pigeons and occasionally taking them to be healed. At first, Coo hides from Tully, and the police are not all that interested in locating a feral child. Tully eventually finds Coo and brings her home, first feeding her to gain her trust, and helping her to get clean and be clothes. Coo does not speak English, and her interactions with Tully are realistic. Slowly, Coo learns that food doesn't always come out of a dumpster, she doesn't have to be cold, and there are marvels like television and the subway to be investigated. She also meets a neighbor of Tully's and becomes friends with the girl, learning to draw and to dance. Tully is understandably concerned about getting Coo a medical exam, but she is reluctant to alert the authorities, fearing that Coo will become an oddity, a "bird girl", and not have a regulated existence. With the help of a friend who was a social worker, Tully starts the process of alerting the authorities while protecting her legal rights. At the same time, Coo's flock is in danger; the mayor wants to clean up the city, starting with the pigeons. Rogue city workers are taking it upon themselves to poison the pigeons, and when Coo's flock is targeted, Tully's friend manages to save the birds. Coo is concerned about the future, however, and when the flock recuperates, she talks them into a grand plan-- fly to a forest in the north, carrying her, and living without humans. But can pigeons, and Coo, survive without humans?Strengths: I have to admit-- I was prepared to hate this, if only because of the pigeons talking in a Yoda-like dialect. However, I was soon sucked in, and Noel managed to address most of the concerns very realistically. The appearance of Tully sold me completely, and her care of not only Coo but the pigeons made this very charming. One Coo and I were comfortable with a new life off of the roof, the addition of an environmental mystery carried this to a strong ending. The cover is very attractive, and I enjoyed this tremendously. Weaknesses: One thing that was not addressed about Coo's care-- when she was an infant, how did the pigeons deal with the diaper issue? I'm imaging a lot of newspaper!What I really think: Bird books of any manner or description do not circulate well in my library-- no idea why. Still, I was so charmed by this that I will definitely purchase a copy, even if it requires hand selling!
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  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a little far fetched, I mean really a flock of pigeons saving a baby? They manage to carry baby Coo to a rooftop and feed her all sorts of deliciousness from the dumpster. Somehow she lives the life of a pigeon for 10 years. That being said I got sucked into its charm and fell in love with Coo. When disaster strikes, Coo is forced from the rooftop and meets Tully. Together Coo, Tully and her pigeon friends must find a way to navigate the complex world of humans and danger. A great This book was a little far fetched, I mean really a flock of pigeons saving a baby? They manage to carry baby Coo to a rooftop and feed her all sorts of deliciousness from the dumpster. Somehow she lives the life of a pigeon for 10 years. That being said I got sucked into it’s charm and fell in love with Coo. When disaster strikes, Coo is forced from the rooftop and meets Tully. Together Coo, Tully and her pigeon friends must find a way to navigate the complex world of humans and danger. A great story about family, love, friendship, and belonging.
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  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    A gently moving tale with depth, heart, and characters I won't soon forget. I absolutely loved it (as did my daughter, who insisted we buy the audiobook as well so she could re-experience it). One of my favorite middle grade novels of 2020!
  • Travess Smalley
    January 1, 1970
    Coo is a marvelous book, and I'm so proud to be married to the author. I've watched my wife work on it for many years and I am so excited that now others can read this incredible story about a very unusual girl finding her family, home, and place in the world. Coo is at once a fantastical book but also incredibly comforting and familiar in a classic way. Its been through so many changes, big and small, and Im so proud of her for writing it, crafting it, into something truly wonderful. I highly Coo is a marvelous book, and I'm so proud to be married to the author. I've watched my wife work on it for many years and I am so excited that now others can read this incredible story about a very unusual girl finding her family, home, and place in the world. Coo is at once a fantastical book but also incredibly comforting and familiar in a classic way. It’s been through so many changes, big and small, and I’m so proud of her for writing it, crafting it, into something truly wonderful. I highly recommend it!
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  • Miz Lizzie
    January 1, 1970
    Have you ever wondered about the lives of pigeons? Or how they have a symbiotic relationship with humans in cities? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be able to speak their language? Animal lovers and lovers of stories of children who are raised by wild animals may find some intriguing insights in this story of a girl named Coo who was raised by pigeons. Despite it's enormous length, this was a quick easy read, especially if you love character-driven stories. There is definitely a Have you ever wondered about the lives of pigeons? Or how they have a symbiotic relationship with humans in cities? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be able to speak their language? Animal lovers and lovers of stories of children who are raised by wild animals may find some intriguing insights in this story of a girl named Coo who was raised by pigeons. Despite it's enormous length, this was a quick easy read, especially if you love character-driven stories. There is definitely a animal-rights (or at least, pigeon-rights) slant to the story, which I appreciated. I loved the way Coo spoke the pigeon language and the different characters of the birds, though there was less of that than I would have liked. The bulk of the story takes place after Coo is rescued and focuses on all the realistic consequences of integrating a child with no identity (and, initially, no human language) into the human world and how to explain that to friends, police, social workers, etc. As a fantasy reader, I found it a difficult hybrid between the fantastical premise and the insistently realistic plot once Coo is rescued by a retired postal worker with a soft spot for pigeons. There are some serious logical faults -- for instance, exactly how does a baby rescued by pigeons toilet train herself to use plastic bags for her toilet? -- and Coo has an inconsistent (but convenient for the plot) understanding of the human world. I think it takes place in New York City and features a diverse cast of characters but the writing is so vague about it, I doubt any non-NYC kids would be likely to pick up on it. Would I have cared about these issues as a child reader? Possibly not. Though as I think back on the stories of wild children that I read and loved as a child, their interactions were almost exclusively with the animals that raised them or with children they encountered. In other words, it stayed more firmly in the realm of fantasy even if nominally in the real world. Still, readers who enjoy animal stories set in the real world and are open to suspending their disbelief will find an entertaining story.Book Pairings:The book references Jane Langton's The Fledgling about a girl who flies with geese for those who particularly enjoyed the pigeons and flying parts of the story.Kate DiCamillo's Flora & Ulysses for another fantastical premise in a realistic (and very funny) setting that I, personally, found less jarring.
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  • Baobablady
    January 1, 1970
    When I picked up this book, in my adult mind, I was skeptical and thought, "What???? A girl raised by pigeons?! How will I be able to relate to this book?!". I'm glad I continued reading. This was a delightful story and this book has three things that make it a book that kids will treasure and read for years to come. This book has suspense. A girl raised by pigeons is befriended by a dear lady (Tully) who comes to feed pigeons and nurse sick/injured ones back to health. She takes Coo under her When I picked up this book, in my adult mind, I was skeptical and thought, "What???? A girl raised by pigeons?! How will I be able to relate to this book?!". I'm glad I continued reading. This was a delightful story and this book has three things that make it a book that kids will treasure and read for years to come. This book has suspense. A girl raised by pigeons is befriended by a dear lady (Tully) who comes to feed pigeons and nurse sick/injured ones back to health. She takes Coo under her wing and introduces her to the warmth of her home, unlimited food, and unconditional love. But....will Coo be able to stay with Tully and why is she trying to keep Coo a secret? This book has mystery. Who and why is someone in the city trying to harm pigeons and will Coo's flock die?! Finally, and perhaps most important, is that this book has heart. The story is interwoven with the developing love between Tully and Coo and Aggie (Coo's first friend) and Coo. Love of animals (pigeons in particular!) and accepting and loving people and animals, unconditionally, as they are, are themes that permeate this sweet story. You will find yourself rejoicing with Coo when she is reunited with Burr and wondering about New Tiktik, Hoop, Roohoo, Ka, Pook, and others as you come to relate to Coo's first family. You will be holding your breath when Coo embarks upon the biggest adventure she has ever had! What is Coo's adventure? Will Coo get to live with Tully? Will Coo's precious pigeons survive? To find all the answers, you'll have to read this magical book and be transported to the beautiful world of Coo, Tully, Aggie and, of course, the flock!
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  • Kathie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for an eARC of this book.It's taken me several weeks to process this book and write a review as I generally struggle with anthropomorphic characters, but it has stuck with me all that time, and it's one that often comes to mind when I think about the 2020 debut releases I've read. Coo is a story with a unique premise about a girl who is raised by pigeons on the roof of a building until she is discovered by a woman named Tully when she seeks help for her Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for an eARC of this book.It's taken me several weeks to process this book and write a review as I generally struggle with anthropomorphic characters, but it has stuck with me all that time, and it's one that often comes to mind when I think about the 2020 debut releases I've read. Coo is a story with a unique premise about a girl who is raised by pigeons on the roof of a building until she is discovered by a woman named Tully when she seeks help for her sick friend. Coo is only able to speak pigeon, and has never had an encounter with humans before. Tully takes Coo in and wants to care for her, but Coo continues to worry about where she really belongs. This story explores what it means to be part of a family, and the risks we take to protect those we care about. Tully is my favorite character, because she has such a huge heart and desperately wants to do what she can to help Coo. I love watching Coo's loyalty to her pigeon community, while also expanding her world to the human community and becoming a more developed character. I think the beautiful cover of this book will appeal to many readers, and they will be treated to a lovely story.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Pigeons may not be the most prized of birds, but readers will view them with greater affection after partaking of Coo, by Kaela Noel, an endearing book about a little girl abandoned at birth whos raised by a flock that lovingly care for her.Burr, a pigeon with a distinctive white stripe, finds the baby the flock names Coo and instructs the birds to take her to the dovecote on the roof. Coo is raised there until shes 10, when Burr is attacked by a hawk. Frantic, Coo seeks help from Tully, a Pigeons may not be the most prized of birds, but readers will view them with greater affection after partaking of “Coo,” by Kaela Noel, an endearing book about a little girl abandoned at birth who’s raised by a flock that lovingly care for her.Burr, a pigeon with a distinctive white stripe, finds the baby the flock names Coo and instructs the birds to take her to the dovecote on the roof. Coo is raised there until she’s 10, when Burr is attacked by a hawk. Frantic, Coo seeks help from Tully, a retired postal worker, who takes the pigeon under her wing and Coo into her home.This isn’t an easy an easy transition for Coo, who only speaks pigeon, wears plastic bags as clothing, and forages for dumpster-food. Adjusting takes Coo and Tully some time and involves amusing and disheartening mishaps. Tully has some explaining to do to a friend who wonders where this strange child came from — and Coo also must clue in her buddy.When flocks of pigeons come under attack from city leaders, it’s Coo, Tully and their new friends to the rescue in this highflying fantasy adventure.
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author and publisher for sharing an early edition with our #bookexpedition group. Ten year old Coo is living on a rooftop in a dovecote with her family, a pigeon flock who carried her there when she was abandoned in an empty lot as a baby. Things have not been easy. Food is difficult to come by, and winters are very harsh. But its the only life Coos ever known, until her favorite pigeon named Burr becomes injured by a hawk. The flock convinces Coo to take her first trip to the Thank you to the author and publisher for sharing an early edition with our #bookexpedition group. Ten year old Coo is living on a rooftop in a dovecote with her family, a pigeon flock who carried her there when she was abandoned in an empty lot as a baby. Things have not been easy. Food is difficult to come by, and winters are very harsh. But it’s the only life Coo’s ever known, until her favorite pigeon named Burr becomes injured by a hawk. The flock convinces Coo to take her first trip to the ground, bringing Burr to Tully, a retired postal worker who feeds the flock seeds and takes care of injured pigeons. Tully takes in Burr (and eventually Coo, too), and Coo experiences life with humans for the first time. Things are going well until a horrible secret is exposed about what’s happening to the city’s pigeon flocks. So much to love about this MG novel. Well-developed relationships, both human and pigeon. Beautiful description of the city where Coo and her flock live. Themes of friendship, family, community cohesiveness, and hope. Preorder now. Publishes 3/3/20.
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  • Justine Ridder
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars*Goodreads Giveaway *Coo's mother left her at the doorstep during a storm. A flock of pigeons decided to save her and together flew her on top of a rooftop. There she lived for almost a decade living off scraps of food the pigeons would bring her. She used plastic bags as a romper and shoes. She spoke pigeon, so she could communicate with them. First of all, this book was so unrealistic. I couldn't get past it. A child would never survive in such conditions. The reason she climbed down 2.5 stars*Goodreads Giveaway *Coo's mother left her at the doorstep during a storm. A flock of pigeons decided to save her and together flew her on top of a rooftop. There she lived for almost a decade living off scraps of food the pigeons would bring her. She used plastic bags as a romper and shoes. She spoke pigeon, so she could communicate with them. First of all, this book was so unrealistic. I couldn't get past it. A child would never survive in such conditions. The reason she climbed down from the rooftop for the first time was to get help for one of her pigeon friends who had broken their wing. Eventually a retired mail women brings Coo home with her. She's afraid to bring her to the doctor or tell the police about her in fear that they will take her away. She learns how to speak English (way too quickly). It is a cute story, but I couldn't get past the unrealistic portions of it.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Kaela Noel's Coo is a dream of a read. Tender, poignant and wonderful, it is the story of ten-year-old Coo, who has been raised by pigeons in a rooftop dovecote. (Side note: the word 'dovecote' needs to be put into more regular usage by all of us). When one of the pigeons is injured, Coo must descend to the city below to find help. What follows is a beautiful story about what it means to be human: the importance of friendship; the perfection of a pink-sprinkled donut; the realities we face in Kaela Noel's Coo is a dream of a read. Tender, poignant and wonderful, it is the story of ten-year-old Coo, who has been raised by pigeons in a rooftop dovecote. (Side note: the word 'dovecote' needs to be put into more regular usage by all of us). When one of the pigeons is injured, Coo must descend to the city below to find help. What follows is a beautiful story about what it means to be human: the importance of friendship; the perfection of a pink-sprinkled donut; the realities we face in being part of a community; and most important, the constancy of love. There is magic in these pages, but it is blended so seamlessly with the rest of the story, even the magic feels real. Coo is a sweet and beautiful delight. A gift, from beginning to end.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Original, heart-warming and quirky! Coo was raised by pigeons and has spent her childhood living on a rooftop, never coming into contact with another human. That all changes when one of her flock is injured and she needs to get help. The author does a fantastic job of detailing Coo's world, from the unique language of the pigeons, to Coo's charming reactions as she starts interacting with humans. I read this aloud to my 9 and 12 year old and we all loved it! Perfect for grade 2 and up as a read Original, heart-warming and quirky! Coo was raised by pigeons and has spent her childhood living on a rooftop, never coming into contact with another human. That all changes when one of her flock is injured and she needs to get help. The author does a fantastic job of detailing Coo's world, from the unique language of the pigeons, to Coo's charming reactions as she starts interacting with humans. I read this aloud to my 9 and 12 year old and we all loved it! Perfect for grade 2 and up as a read aloud or grade 4 and up if they're reading it on their own.
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  • Lauren Watts
    January 1, 1970
    Seriously, could this book get any cuter?! Coo is a young girl who has been raised by pigeons. Her entire world view has been shaped by them and when she meets a kind older lady who feeds them regularly, she develops a deep bond with her. She must balance her new life with her responsibilities to her flock and keep nasty people from hurting her family. A must-read that will teach kids about compassion, family, responsiblity, and the world
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  • Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    This was a delightful, and surprising book by first time novelist Kaela Noel. The characters both human and pigeon were wonderfully developed. The story has a very satisfying push to the well thought out and depicted conclusion. A very, very good read for young and old. I will remember Coo, Burr and even Roohoo for quite a long time smiling
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  • Alexis
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from the author for the ARC-sharing group, the Lit Review Crew. What I loved:-the unique storyline of Coo, a girl raised by pigeons-Tully, such a beautiful character full of love -character development with Coo-description of the city -such tension in the last 3/4 of the bookOverall, it was a wonderful read. I look forward to reading more by Noel!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    A cute story, but a suspension of disbelief is really necessary to accept that an infant could be literally carried off by pigeons, who will manage to keep a child fed and warm, for a decade before she is discovered and introduced to the human world. An equally improbable ending, but the story will likely appeal to animal lovers and is a sweet story of love, friendship and pigeons.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    *Read during the pandemic which may have overshadowed openness to content.This book is about a girl, Coo, who was raised by pigeons and how she is then rescued by Tully (a wonderful character). She also befriends a girl named Aggie (a delight). I think I was too much in my adult mind with this book. I think as a child I would have found it quite magical!
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