The German Heiress
For readers of The Alice Network and The Lost Girls of Paris, an immersive, heart-pounding debut about a German heiress on the run in post-World War II Germany.Clara Falkenberg, once Germany’s most eligible and lauded heiress, earned the nickname “the Iron Fräulein” during World War II for her role operating her family’s ironworks empire. It’s been nearly two years since the war ended and she’s left with nothing but a false identification card and a series of burning questions about her family’s past. With nowhere else to run to, she decides to return home and take refuge with her dear friend, Elisa.Narrowly escaping a near-disastrous interrogation by a British officer who’s hell-bent on arresting her for war crimes, she arrives home to discover the city in ruins, and Elisa missing. As Clara begins tracking down Elisa, she encounters Jakob, a charismatic young man working on the black market, who, for his own reasons, is also searching for Elisa. Clara and Jakob soon discover how they might help each other—if only they can stay ahead of the officer determined to make Clara answer for her actions during the war.Propulsive, meticulously researched, and action-fueled, The German Heiress is a mesmerizing page-turner that questions the meaning of justice and morality, deftly shining the spotlight on the often-overlooked perspective of Germans who were caught in the crossfire of the Nazi regime and had nowhere to turn.

The German Heiress Details

TitleThe German Heiress
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 7th, 2020
PublisherWilliam Morrow Paperbacks
ISBN-139780062937728
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, War, World War II, Fiction

The German Heiress Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    Anika Scott writes a post WW2 piece of intriguing historical fiction from the unusual perspective of the defeated and humiliated Germans, now living under Allied occupation of the victorious forces. Germany is a ruined and devastated nation, with ordinary people facing poverty and starvation, whilst having to come to terms with their part in and complicity with the horrors and terrors of their recent past. The allied forces are looking for war criminals to arrest, and a British Captain Fenshaw Anika Scott writes a post WW2 piece of intriguing historical fiction from the unusual perspective of the defeated and humiliated Germans, now living under Allied occupation of the victorious forces. Germany is a ruined and devastated nation, with ordinary people facing poverty and starvation, whilst having to come to terms with their part in and complicity with the horrors and terrors of their recent past. The allied forces are looking for war criminals to arrest, and a British Captain Fenshaw is seeking justice in his hunt for Clara Falkenberg for war crimes. She is the German heiress, the Iron Maiden, the only daughter of a wealthy, privileged and corrupt Nazi supporting family that owned and ran factories that were supplied with slave labour by the Nazi regime with whom they were well connected. Clara was a celebrated figure for the fascists and served as propaganda for the Nazi Regime.It is 1946, and Clara is now living a very different life in hiding, having assumed another identity in her efforts to escape being caught. In her eyes she tried to do all that she could to help the horrendously treated slave workforce but is this true? She heads for her home industrial city of Essen, wanting to find and see what happened to her best friend, Elisa, and her son, Willy, who turn out to have unexpected connections to her family and its past. Willy is suffering from severe mental health issues, unaware that the war has been lost, still guarding a mine with its Wehrmacht supplies, unwilling and unable to relinquish his post. Jakob Relling is a former soldier who lost his leg in the war, now a black marketeer, trying to do the best he can to provide for his family. Scott writes a well researched atmospheric story of survival, family, secrets, complicity, guilt, conscience, love and redemption. She captures the hard and turbulent post war times, providing us with complex characters in this fascinating and insightful period of history. This is an intense, dark and twisted historical read that skilfully portrays the often common experiences, horrors and dilemmas of being on the losing side in a war for ordinary people. Many thanks to Random House Cornerstone for an ARC.
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  • Ash
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins Publishers for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.These days Im usually not tempted by World War II-era historical fiction. Its a crowded subgenre and most of it is historical romance... not my cup of tea. However, The German Heiress intrigued me because, as the name implies, it presents a German perspective, which is uncommon.Despite its unconventional approach, this book definitely suffered from comparison. Ive read many truly Thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins Publishers for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.These days I’m usually not tempted by World War II-era historical fiction. It’s a crowded subgenre and most of it is historical romance... not my cup of tea. However, The German Heiress intrigued me because, as the name implies, it presents a German perspective, which is uncommon.Despite its unconventional approach, this book definitely suffered from comparison. I’ve read many truly spectacular WWII books; next to them, The German Heiress was good, but not great. It didn’t pack the emotional punch I expected, although it had its moments. It was an enjoyable reading experience, and well-paced; when I sat down to read the book, I was surprised by how fast I flew through it.For the first half of the book, Anika Scott went out of her way to establish Clara as unequivocally “good,” a woman with virtuous beliefs who tried to do the right thing. Not only did I find this boring and flat, I also wasn’t buying it. Clara’s moral righteousness seemed all talk and little action. She was also surprisingly naive, considering who she was and her experience during the war, and acted recklessly for a woman on the run. This version of Clara was nothing like the calculating, morally gray, iron-willed woman I expected based on the book’s synopsis.Starting at around the halfway point, Clara finally begins to question the morality of her family’s actions during the war and grapples with feelings of guilt and regret. While this was a refreshing change of pace, it happened so abruptly it didn’t seem believable. The book had a few well-developed side characters – Jakob, in particular, was wonderfully complex and realistic – and I would have been more invested in the story if they had played a more prominent role from the beginning. The romance was better than most, which coming from me (a heartless cynic) is a significant compliment.The plot was interesting, and probably the highlight of the book. There were several narrative threads that Scott wove together seamlessly. She wrote from a third person point-of-view following three main characters: Clara, Jakob, and a third whose identity you’ll discover partway through the book. Each of these characters had multiple goals they were working toward, and there was even an element of mystery as Clara and Jakob searched for Elisa and Clara uncovered secrets about her family. The ending was perfect.If you go into this book knowing what to expect, I think you’ll enjoy it.This book contains a brief scene depicting animal abuse.
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  • Kylie Corley
    January 1, 1970
    I won an ARC through Goodreads, and I could not have been more ecstatic. I've always been obsessed with World War II historical fiction. This one had a German view.This had all of my emotions in overdrive. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and couldn't wait until I could get back to reading it.
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  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    1946 Post War, Essen.Clara Falkenburg is living under an assumed name. She is being hunted down for was crimes by Captain Fenshaw. Clara decides to look for her best friend, Elsia after returning home to find her city destroyed and Elisa and her young son missing. Clara's father is in prison waiting trial for war crimes. Thenstory touches slightly on her family and there is a shocking secret revealed. This story revolves around Clara's search for her friend, Elsia and her son. Clara is also 1946 Post War, Essen.Clara Falkenburg is living under an assumed name. She is being hunted down for was crimes by Captain Fenshaw. Clara decides to look for her best friend, Elsia after returning home to find her city destroyed and Elisa and her young son missing. Clara's father is in prison waiting trial for war crimes. Thenstory touches slightly on her family and there is a shocking secret revealed. This story revolves around Clara's search for her friend, Elsia and her son. Clara is also trying to elude capture and imprisonment. The story is well written. I liked Clara ut I also found her frustrating. It's also pretty dark in places. This book is different to most post war stories that I've read.I would like to thank NetGalley, Random House UK, Cornerstone and the author Anita Scott for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Faithtagada
    January 1, 1970
    i have loved this book so much! i was tensed while reading it anticipating the end.great historical novel set from a different point of view - german side and their role and choice during the second world war. strongly recommend it!
  • Missy
    January 1, 1970
    Clara Falkenberg, once Germany's heiress and nicknamed "the Iron Fraulein" during World War II. She's taken on another name, after running away, only to return two years after the war is over to discover her home town in ruins and her friend she's been in search of is nowhere to be found. Running from a British officer wanting to interrogate her for war crimes. This novel will keep you turning the pages until the end. I stayed up way past my bedtime unable to put it down until I finished.Thank Clara Falkenberg, once Germany's heiress and nicknamed "the Iron Fraulein" during World War II. She's taken on another name, after running away, only to return two years after the war is over to discover her home town in ruins and her friend she's been in search of is nowhere to be found. Running from a British officer wanting to interrogate her for war crimes. This novel will keep you turning the pages until the end. I stayed up way past my bedtime unable to put it down until I finished.Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for the eARC.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    The German Heiress by Anika Scott is a gripping post WWII historical fiction centered in Germany 1946. While the country lay in ruins and chaos, many were trying to create a sense of order and justice against the mayhem. This book centers around 31 year old Clara Falkenberg, the only daughter of an aristocratic and wealthy family that rose to high ranks through industrialism, slave labor, and important connections with the Fascists during WWII. While Clara herself did not believe in the cause The German Heiress by Anika Scott is a gripping post WWII historical fiction centered in Germany 1946. While the country lay in ruins and chaos, many were trying to create a sense of order and justice against the mayhem. This book centers around 31 year old Clara Falkenberg, the only daughter of an aristocratic and wealthy family that rose to high ranks through industrialism, slave labor, and important connections with the Fascists during WWII. While Clara herself did not believe in “the cause” and, in her own way, tried to help the suffering of her workers as much as she thought that she could, was still thrust into the evil workings of her corrupt parents until the war ended, and not in their favor. After fleeing, a cascade of incidents and consequences occur that alters many lives forever. This is a story about finding oneself, about acceptance, forgiveness, justice, redemption, love, family, and loyalty. It is a story about overcoming odds and changing oneself for the better. I liked Clara. I liked the positive changes that she went through despite the adversity and blows handed to her throughout the story. I also liked the chemistry of Jakob and Clara and how by being together, each one brought out the best in each other. I also enjoyed the surprise ending. It was the best part of all.Excellent book. 5/5 starsThank you NetGalley and HarperCollins for this ARC and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon and B&N accounts upon publication.
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  • Gloria Arthur
    January 1, 1970
    Finding Clara by Anika ScottFor those that love historical fiction, this was an unique and gripping plot that sees a German woman's perspective of post war. The characters were well developed and intriguing.Set in 1946, Essen, Germany, Clara Falkenberg has returned home and is trying to find her best friend Elisa, after the war. Clara is a wartime icon and German heiress who ran the family munitions factory during the war and is now wanted as a war criminal by the English allies.To survive Clara Finding Clara by Anika ScottFor those that love historical fiction, this was an unique and gripping plot that sees a German woman's perspective of post war. The characters were well developed and intriguing.Set in 1946, Essen, Germany, Clara Falkenberg has returned home and is trying to find her best friend Elisa, after the war. Clara is a wartime icon and German heiress who ran the family munitions factory during the war and is now wanted as a war criminal by the English allies.To survive Clara has been hiding who she really is. She finds her town is in ruins and nothing is as it was before.It soon becomes a waiting game as English Captain Fenshaw is closing in on her for an arrest. Clara finds help from an unlikely and crippled ex-soldier when their paths meet.A shocking family secret is exposed and Clara is trying to come to terms with her guilt about the part she played in the war.An excellent read, great pace and engaging.Thank you to Netgalley & Random House for the ARC in return for an honest review
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  • Jessica Gilmore
    January 1, 1970
    Germany 1946. A country coming to terms with a decade of evil, with a lost war, with deprivation and hunger, with occupation. Many citizens have secrets to hide, even if their guilt is just looking the other way, but some have culpability for real, serious crimes, and the forces occupying their destroyed country are determined to root them out. People like Clara Falkenberg, the Iron Maiden, Nazi poster girl who ran factories manned with slave labour. British officer Fenshaw is on a mission to Germany 1946. A country coming to terms with a decade of evil, with a lost war, with deprivation and hunger, with occupation. Many citizens have secrets to hide, even if their guilt is just looking the other way, but some have culpability for real, serious crimes, and the forces occupying their destroyed country are determined to root them out. People like Clara Falkenberg, the Iron Maiden, Nazi poster girl who ran factories manned with slave labour. British officer Fenshaw is on a mission to find Clara and see her brought to justice, tracking her down to a town far from her home city of Essen, living under an assumed name. But Clara has secrets of her own, and she's not prepared to submit. Her flight takes her back to her ruined home city, to a black marketeer who just wants to provide for his young sisters and to her best friend's son. Finding Clara is a book about secrets, the kind that tear families apart, the kinds that risk lives and the secrets we hide from and about ourselves. Nothing is as it seems in this twisty, dark expose of life in post war Germany. Fascinating, well researched and beautifully written this is a very readable look at a little talked about time in history and the burden of collective guilt.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    THE GERMAN HEIRESSBY ANIKA SCOTTThis was an excellent story of historical fiction of post World War II Germany that explores the German people's condition after the war. This novel takes place about eighteen months after the war has ended. The allied forces are occupying Germany. The Americans have gone and the British are hunting down who they consider to be war criminals. Margarete Muller is the name by which Clara Falkenberg is going by in Hamelin. She is proposed by Dr. Blum the small town THE GERMAN HEIRESSBY ANIKA SCOTTThis was an excellent story of historical fiction of post World War II Germany that explores the German people's condition after the war. This novel takes place about eighteen months after the war has ended. The allied forces are occupying Germany. The Americans have gone and the British are hunting down who they consider to be war criminals. Margarete Muller is the name by which Clara Falkenberg is going by in Hamelin. She is proposed by Dr. Blum the small town doctor who says to Margarete, something like he doesn't believe she is who she says she is. He goes on to tell her he thinks she is not really German and that he thinks she is really Jewish. Then he whispers to her that he has secrets also. He repulses her and discloses that during the war he worked in one of the Nazi camps that she knows did horrendous things to innocent people who we all know suffered unspeakably cruelties that are sickening. We all would do anything we could if we could magically undo what 6 million innocents suffered at the hands of Hitler and the Nazi regime. We must never forget the unimaginable horrors that so many innocent people suffered for being in Hitler's twisted mind the wrong ethnicity. I am sickened by how long this went on without the rest of the world not getting involved sooner.One of the things that I love about this novel it explores the protagonist's growth over the course of this story in that she always had a conscious but it evolves even more. This is about one German woman's journey on a quest to find her best friend after the war and she also is simultaneously on an inner journey to realize how her families empire indirectly hurt so many innocent people. Even though this family detested the Nazis they are considered war criminals because they built airplanes and other iron materials. I really liked Clara Falkenberg the youngest child and only daughter of a snobby and emotionally unavailable mother who is British and didn't work in the family business so doesn't get arrested after the war. However, the British Allied forces that are occupying their family mansion and Anne Health is appalled to be living in what she considers squalid conditions. She is luckier than most of the city of Essen to have a roof over her head with electricity and water to bathe and enough food to eat. The majority of the rest of the German people are starving and homeless because of the bombing of the city of Essen during the end of the war. I don't understand why Clara's mother wasn't considered a war criminal since she benefited from being married to Clara's father who ran the family business before asking a young Clara to take over for him. Her father Theodor had the philosophy that he hated the Nazi regime but he felt like it was okay to continue to produce goods that he had done before the war and that the Nazis were only going to be in power during the war and then things would go back to normal when they were not in power. In other words, their iron empire was his families legacy that was a business and how they earned their money and he felt that he had no choice but to keep the business going or to be arrested and shot by the gestapo or sent off to a concentration camp which would include his whole family. I can certainly see his reasoning in not wanting to have his own family shot or sent to their deaths in a concentration camp by running a family business that ran before the Nazis came to power because he saw them as a temporary regime. He really had no choice but to do what he he has always done or face death or take his family and flee Germany and emigrate where?In Theodor's efforts to save his family from getting shot, arrested and death in a concentration camp or emigrating and being homeless he has a young Clara fill in for him to keep the business going. She becomes known as the Iron Fraulein. Unlike her father she helps the refugees by demanding from Berlin more food and building more housing for the refugees forced into labor with the help of her best friend Elisa and her first love Max. She really had a conscious and tried to protect the refugees who worked for her. She tried her best to help the forced labor done by refugees. She couldn't stand to see anyone suffer or being treated inhumanely. At the end of the war she had to flee because the Allied forces considered her a war criminal for taking her father's place at the helm of the iron production and for manufacturing goods that helped Hitler fight the war. I thought that she was different than her father and she was highly misunderstood and I was routing for her. She is being hunted by a determined British Captain Fenimore and his troops whom despite her false identity papers, he knew he had captured Clara when he stopped the train while she was trying to return home. She tried convincing him that he was mistaken but he was resolute in arresting her. Her father was already arrested and failing in health.I really don't want to say too much but there is so much more to this novel. I loved Clara's character because she is not a war criminal at all despite the fact that she oversaw an iron factory that manufactured airplanes and military goods that the Nazis used to fight the war. She really helped so many of the refugees who were transported there by the Nazis. She didn't force them to work for her Hitler did. She was really only twenty years old and had so much compassion for them. She helped them to improve the quality of their lives by advocating for them by getting them more food and better housing. She got them medical care and never hurt them by informing on them she even hid them at her home and helped the ones who didn't want to work for her escape. Captain Fenimore is relentless in tracking her down and she is concerned about finding her best friend Elisa who is missing. This is so much more than a cat and mouse game.I loved this novel for so many reasons that I recommend highly to all readers who love historical fiction to give this one a try. I am really impressed that this is a debut novel. This is one that is already a favorite novel and five star reading experience that I plan to purchase it when it goes on sale in April of this year. I want the physical copy to add to my own personal collection. It is unique in its depiction of the dilemma of the double edge sword that the German citizens had to face with trying to survive a war that they had not wanted. Most of them were kind people who hated Hitler and the Nazis who abhorred anyone that participated in helping Hitler in his cause to wipe out an entire race of innocent people. What he did was evil and we must never forget it. This book was well written and it hooks you in at the beginning and never lets you go. I was sad when it ended. If you love this genre and love a strong female protagonist you will love this book. I will never forget Clara and some of the other characters in this book that I have not mentioned in this review.Publication Date: April 7, 2020Thank you to Net Galley, Anika Scott and Harper Collins Publishing for providing me with my ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.#thegermanheiress #anikascott #harpercollinspublishing #netgalley
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  • Sue Parker
    January 1, 1970
    I choose to read this book as I have a grandaughter who is named 'Clara'. I am glad I did although it was not an easy or leisurely read! An unusual book I would say coming from a different angle. I couldn't decide if I liked Clara or not but then that is real life isn't it, we rarely meet people who are wholly lovely or absolutely awful. Clara was born into a certain set of circumstances and she had to make of them what she could. Sitting on this side of the 20thC we see things in a certain way I choose to read this book as I have a grandaughter who is named 'Clara'. I am glad I did although it was not an easy or leisurely read! An unusual book I would say coming from a different angle. I couldn't decide if I liked Clara or not but then that is real life isn't it, we rarely meet people who are wholly lovely or absolutely awful. Clara was born into a certain set of circumstances and she had to make of them what she could. Sitting on this side of the 20thC we see things in a certain way but who is to say how we would behave given different circumstances. All in all this book is clever and thought provoking but not 'nice' or relaxing! Well done to Anika for doing a great job in writing and keep it up.
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  • Helen White
    January 1, 1970
    Set in Germany after the war, during the Allied occupation Clara is desperately trying to find her best friend Elisa and dodge the English military. She is a wanted war criminal after all, the Iron Fraulien. Daughter of a Nazi manufacturing family and a propaganda darling. Returning to her home time she finds help in the form of crippled former soldier and now black marketeer Jakob. He believes her motives during the war were not as clear cut as the English believe. This is a classic cat and Set in Germany after the war, during the Allied occupation Clara is desperately trying to find her best friend Elisa and dodge the English military. She is a wanted war criminal after all, the Iron Fraulien. Daughter of a Nazi manufacturing family and a propaganda darling. Returning to her home time she finds help in the form of crippled former soldier and now black marketeer Jakob. He believes her motives during the war were not as clear cut as the English believe. This is a classic cat and mouse chase mixed with post war survival. It's an interesting change to have the German perspective of post war circumstances. I would have liked less to-ing and fro-ing from the characters. Clara seems to go backwards and forwards not being caught on obvious places for quite a while. However the very unlikely friendship she develops with Jakob is a welcome light in the story as most of the characters are complicated and duplicitous. Thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for the review copy.
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  • Karen M
    January 1, 1970
    This story takes place in Germany during the post World War II period of rebuilding. The black market is the only way to purchase most items and is one of the more lucrative jobs a man or woman can have except it is illegal. People are starving and homeless and yet surviving by their wits.Clara Falkenberg, infamously known as the iron Fräulein, searches for her only friend, Elisa, and Elisas son. Clara had disappeared and gone into hiding just before the war was over and had deserted Elisa.This This story takes place in Germany during the post World War II period of rebuilding. The black market is the only way to purchase most items and is one of the more lucrative jobs a man or woman can have except it is illegal. People are starving and homeless and yet surviving by their wits.Clara Falkenberg, infamously known as ‘the iron Fräulein’, searches for her only friend, Elisa, and Elisa’s son. Clara had disappeared and gone into hiding just before the war was over and had deserted Elisa.This World War II story is told from a very different view point. This is the first one that I’ve read that addressed the terrible conditions in Germany after the war. So many men were dead or imprisoned and that left the women, who had to find ways to survive during the occupation by England, America and Russia. In the midst of starvation there was still decadence, going to clubs to dance and perhaps forget for a few hours how difficult life had become. The story started our slowly in the beginning but the more I came to know the characters the more interesting the story became. There are some dark secrets revealed and there are some strange alliances made. I really enjoyed this book.Thank you to The Book Club Girls and HarperCollins Publishers Inc. for an ebook ARC copy.
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  • Shirley
    January 1, 1970
    Who to TrustThe German Heiress takes place at the very end of WWII. The British are hunting and arresting the Nazis' and those Germans closely associated with them.One British captain captain Fenshaw was especially focused on finding Clara Falkenberg , once a famous heiress to the German steel factory empire and the daughter of a known Nazi sympathizer. This is the story of Clara, her memories of happy times before the war, during and after. It is also the story of her best friend Elisa, her Who to TrustThe German Heiress takes place at the very end of WWII. The British are hunting and arresting the Nazis' and those German’s closely associated with them.One British captain “captain Fenshaw” was especially focused on finding “Clara Falkenberg” , once a famous heiress to the German steel factory empire and the daughter of a known Nazi sympathizer. This is the story of Clara, her memories of happy times before the war, during and after. It is also the story of her best friend Elisa, her mother Anna, her ex boyfriend Max, Elsa’s son Willy and his canary Gertrude, and Clara’s new friend Jakob.It is not only the struggle to survive the war, or Clara’s many escapes from Captain Fenshaw, but a struggle within minds as to how they allowed the atrocities of the war to take place around them without doing something to stop them. It’s about choosing family or country. It’s about guilt and remorse for their own part in the war. It’s hard to know how one will react when faced with impossible choices.This book focuses on the feelings of the characters. They search for truth and honesty, but feel they can trust no one. It is in an atmosphere where you could be betrayed for a loaf of bread. Buildings are shells with people living in cellars, food is scarce and people are desperate.There are sad parts, exciting parts, tragic parts and some smidgen of human kindness. It was a good read and I would recommend it.Thanks to Anika Scott, Harper Collins Publishers and NetGalley for allowing me to read and review an advance copy of the book.
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  • Susan Collins
    January 1, 1970
    A really enjoyable WWII story told from the Germans' point-of-view! Plot was filled with twists from beginning to end. A must read to learn how the opposing people were treated after the war!
  • Katie Sparkes
    January 1, 1970
    Such a beautiful story, with such detail that puts you right into the middle of a strong woman on her quest for answers! All of the characters you meet continuously keep you intrigued. The story never goes off track into rambles or stories that do not coincide with the big picture. It was amazing to see a story where the woman was the main focus and the men did not overshadow her story of development and discovery. The ending will have you on the edge of your seat, and though you find the answer Such a beautiful story, with such detail that puts you right into the middle of a strong woman on her quest for answers! All of the characters you meet continuously keep you intrigued. The story never goes off track into rambles or stories that do not coincide with the big picture. It was amazing to see a story where the woman was the main focus and the men did not overshadow her story of development and discovery. The ending will have you on the edge of your seat, and though you find the answer to ‘Where is Elisa’ long before the end, the story continues leaving your heart pounding as you anxiously read faster!
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    It seems that everywhere you look lately there's another WWII era book with a strong female main character, and when I got the opportunity to read The German Heiress from Netgalley, I was wondering if I would be able to get into it. I think that even after reading so many in this subgenre there are still some great stories to tell, but they have to be special and stand out in some way. This one truly does! It's very well written and the characters are so complex. It's funny that the description It seems that everywhere you look lately there's another WWII era book with a strong female main character, and when I got the opportunity to read The German Heiress from Netgalley, I was wondering if I would be able to get into it. I think that even after reading so many in this subgenre there are still some great stories to tell, but they have to be special and stand out in some way. This one truly does! It's very well written and the characters are so complex. It's funny that the description compared it to The Lost Girls of Paris because I actually just finished that one and the two books have nothing in common other than the time period! I thought that The German Heiress was SO much better! I hope that people won't dismiss it as just another WWII story because they will really be missing out!It takes place in Germany, in 1946, and the main character is struggling to survive like everyone else. She is forced to come to terms with the choices she made during the war while she searches for her best friend that she hasn't seen since the night she fled her hometown and began living under a different name. Everyone seems to know her face though, in spite of how hunger has changed it. She was the famous "Iron Fraulein," held up as a symbol of strength in German propaganda. The British officers who have arrested her father for war crimes are hunting for her while she hunts for her friend, and decides who she wants to be when confronted with the truth about her wealthy family. I was drawn in from the very beginning and the ending did not disappoint. I will definitely look for more books by Anika Scott!
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley & Harper Collins Publishers for the opportunity to read an ARC of this title. WWII books have really come into their own but have you ever wondered about the aftermath of the war from the German perspective? Clara Falkenberg was a dutiful daughter & German despite her moral qualms with the Nazi party. She allows family loyalty to influence her actions & following the war she is on the run, not only from the authorities but also from her past. Destroyed by Thank you to NetGalley & Harper Collins Publishers for the opportunity to read an ARC of this title. WWII books have really come into their own but have you ever wondered about the aftermath of the war from the German perspective? Clara Falkenberg was a dutiful daughter & German despite her moral qualms with the Nazi party. She allows family loyalty to influence her actions & following the war she is on the run, not only from the authorities but also from her past. Destroyed by regret she reluctantly returns home to search for a friend & along the way must avoid capture by the determined Captain Fenshaw who is searching out war criminals. Along the way she struggles to survive in a country torn apart by war & uncovers a family mystery in the process. In a large pool of historical fiction of this era it stands out because of it's different perspective. It paints a picture of post war Germany that I haven't seen in a lot of fiction. It is a story worth telling & it is a perspective that has value. Well researched it painted a vivid picture of life during that time & was worth the read for that reason alone. I also found the story compelling & fast paced, a great quick read that may inspire additional reading on this subject. Where I felt the book came up short was in the depiction of Clara, the main protagonist. I found her unlikable which was truly unfortunate. She was billed as a strong & formidable woman but all I saw was a weak person who allowed her life to be directed by the whims of the men around her. First her father, who set her on a path she didn't want to follow by preaching family loyalty, then by a lover who lied & took advantage of her. After the war she runs from the former Nazi doctor who wants to marry her only to be pursued by the British officer right into the arms of another man who chooses to help her. All of her actions we in reaction to the men around her which really did her a disservice. In fact, I struggled to find any woman in this book that wasn't 100% motivated by a man in one way or another. Even the unnaturally happy ending was only possible because of the good graces of a man & not by a single action taken by Clara.I really think that had I liked Clara or found her more self determinate I would have enjoyed this book more completely.
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  • Lenore
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book and found it interesting and challenging to read. Although a story of fiction it portrays an environment of fear, and survival at the end of the second world war. It is set in an industrial area of Germany. It tells the story of a young women who during the war had tried to make the lives of those working in camps easier.alongside keeping herself in favour with the the Reich. Her journey at the end of the war tells of her attempt to find her closest friend and her son. The I enjoyed this book and found it interesting and challenging to read. Although a story of fiction it portrays an environment of fear, and survival at the end of the second world war. It is set in an industrial area of Germany. It tells the story of a young women who during the war had tried to make the lives of those working in camps easier.alongside keeping herself in favour with the the Reich. Her journey at the end of the war tells of her attempt to find her closest friend and her son. The story also touches on her family and reveals a shocking secret.I felt the author had worked hard at crafting her characters and quite often it was possible to sense the fear and deprivation that existed at the time. It kept me fully captivated until the end and although a work of fiction history suggests that there may well have been a lot of similarity to the main tenet of the s
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    This book is set in Germany following ww2 during the Allied occupation. It tells the story of Clara who is desperately trying to find her best friend Elisa. Problem is shes a wanted war criminal. The story is detailed and well told, exploring the nuances of right and wrong and of what people will do in order to survive. Her relationship with Jakob is by far the best in the book and brings some much needed light relief as the story gets pretty dark in places. I definitely cared about Clara but I This book is set in Germany following ww2 during the Allied occupation. It tells the story of Clara who is desperately trying to find her best friend Elisa. Problem is she’s a wanted war criminal. The story is detailed and well told, exploring the nuances of right and wrong and of what people will do in order to survive. Her relationship with Jakob is by far the best in the book and brings some much needed light relief as the story gets pretty dark in places. I definitely cared about Clara but I also found her frustrating in that she acts with a lack of consistency, she is best when interacting with other characters, the only weak point in a otherwise very enjoyable book.
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  • Zubeth
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting,tense read set in post world war 2 germany. It's a gripping read with a well drawn characters. It was an atmospheric read that held my interest.
  • D Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    This novel set in the period following the Second World War begins interestingly enough and gathers momentum as the main character attempts to evade capture as a war criminal. Scott's description and the inclusion of the other main characters enables the reader to become involved and we want to see her succeed in finding her friend.Although it was necessary to revisit places from her earlier life in her quest it sometimes niggled me that someone so desperate to evade capture was sometimes quite This novel set in the period following the Second World War begins interestingly enough and gathers momentum as the main character attempts to evade capture as a war criminal. Scott's description and the inclusion of the other main characters enables the reader to become involved and we want to see her succeed in finding her friend.Although it was necessary to revisit places from her earlier life in her quest it sometimes niggled me that someone so desperate to evade capture was sometimes quite so careless and hence so easily captured and re-captured. But, then again, that is wat provides the action and tension here.Generally, a historical novel well worth the read.Thank you to NetGalley and Hutchinson (Penguin Random House) for this copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sherry Chiger
    January 1, 1970
    An intriguing premiseGermany in 1946 from the POV of a German woman who ran a munitions plant and is therefore wanted as a war criminalthat doesn't shy away from big questions about guilt and culpability. It was a bit too black-and-white for my tastes, though. Yes, Clara ran an iron plant for the Nazis, but only because she had to, y'see, and she tried to make life better for the Eastern prisoners forced to work for her. She never subscribed to the whole Nazi philosophy, don't you know, unlike An intriguing premise—Germany in 1946 from the POV of a German woman who ran a munitions plant and is therefore wanted as a war criminal—that doesn't shy away from big questions about guilt and culpability. It was a bit too black-and-white for my tastes, though. Yes, Clara ran an iron plant for the Nazis, but only because she had to, y'see, and she tried to make life better for the Eastern prisoners forced to work for her. She never subscribed to the whole Nazi philosophy, don't you know, unlike her mother and her ex-sweetheart. I guess we're supposed to sympathize with her (imo, feeble) efforts to help the prisoners and with her prickling conscience, but I got a sense of "she doth protest too much" from both the writer and the character. I loved the character of Jakob, however, and the writing and pacing flowed. I just wish there had been more depth and complexity.Thank you, HarperCollins/William Morris and NetGalley, for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sarah Davalt
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an Advanced Reader's Copy (ARC) through NetGalley. It will be published April 7, 2020.Net Galley's description was that this book was "for readers of The Alice Network and The Lost Girls of Paris, an immersive, heart-pounding debut about a German heiress on the run in post-World War II Germany." BOOM I was sold!The book takes place after 2 years after WWII had ended in Germany. Clara Falkenberg has false documents saying she is Margarete Müller, but in reality she is an I received this book as an Advanced Reader's Copy (ARC) through NetGalley. It will be published April 7, 2020.Net Galley's description was that this book was "for readers of The Alice Network and The Lost Girls of Paris, an immersive, heart-pounding debut about a German heiress on the run in post-World War II Germany." BOOM I was sold!The book takes place after 2 years after WWII had ended in Germany. Clara Falkenberg has false documents saying she is Margarete Müller, but in reality she is an heiress to a pre-war iron working empire. She is in hiding because she is wanted for war crimes for her and her families support of the Nazi’s. Clara is trying to return to Essen to find her best friend Elisa and Elisa’s son Willy. The path she ends up following is full of twists and intrigue, and an ending that hits all the feels and surprises you too.The opening of the book paints such a bleak picture of post WWII Germany. That is something we rarely think about. We think about the Yay Nazi’s defeated, but what about the other Germans. The ones that weren’t in the military and weren’t necessarily Nazi’s but had to find a way to survive when the Nazi’s were in power. Did they get saved by Adolf’s defeat or were they punished for crimes they had no choice in? Wow this was just a wow book! I’m not sure I even have words, it was so well written and the story was so compelling. None of the characters turned out to be who you thought they were. The depth and breadth of the character development was fantastic, and as any good book should, made me feel all the feels.For additional reviews please see my blog at www.adventuresofabibliophile.blogspot...
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway.While it was difficult sometimes to have much sympathy for the main character, I did enjoy the story and the book was well-written. It did seem to drag a bit from time to time and I was ready for the ending quite a while before it happened, but with a bit of a faster pace this would have been a really solid story. It wouldn't be the first book I'd recommend to someone who was looking for good WWII fiction, but if you're interested in the I received a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway.While it was difficult sometimes to have much sympathy for the main character, I did enjoy the story and the book was well-written. It did seem to drag a bit from time to time and I was ready for the ending quite a while before it happened, but with a bit of a faster pace this would have been a really solid story. It wouldn't be the first book I'd recommend to someone who was looking for good WWII fiction, but if you're interested in the genre it's probably worth picking up.
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  • Jessica Sturm
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the historical detail and the seamless move between eras, pre-, during, and post- World War II. Clara Falkenberg is a fascinating character and an illustration of how "not knowing" can unwittingly, or wittingly, aid evil. Clara and the other characters are well-written, human, and believable. The resolution was not predictable, which I enjoyed. I'm a frequent reader of historical fiction, including time-hopping stories, and I think this one will stand up with Kate Quinn, Lauren Willig, I loved the historical detail and the seamless move between eras, pre-, during, and post- World War II. Clara Falkenberg is a fascinating character and an illustration of how "not knowing" can unwittingly, or wittingly, aid evil. Clara and the other characters are well-written, human, and believable. The resolution was not predictable, which I enjoyed. I'm a frequent reader of historical fiction, including time-hopping stories, and I think this one will stand up with Kate Quinn, Lauren Willig, Beatriz Williams, and their contemporaries.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    WWII era historical fiction is one of my favorite genres, so I was thrilled when I won an ARC of this book from Goodreads. I enjoyed the story and characters, but I never really felt hooked. Its a nice story, and Im glad I read it, but it isnt as memorable as other books in this genre. WWII era historical fiction is one of my favorite genres, so I was thrilled when I won an ARC of this book from Goodreads. I enjoyed the story and characters, but I never really felt hooked. It’s a nice story, and I’m glad I read it, but it isn’t as memorable as other books in this genre.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I won a Goodreads ARC copy of The German Heiress and I thoroughly enjoyed the novel! I have read many other books set during World War I & II, and this one stands out for its perspective and action sequences.
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    An incredibly touching account of German life at the end of WW2, 'Finding Clara' is exceptionally well thought out, beautifully written and enlightening. From the start, the story promises to challenge the readers moral judgement and has, as a result, made it a page turner. I have enjoyed the journey that Clara and Jakob have lead the reader on with the ever present Fenshaw trailing their movements. This makes it worthy of this five star review. Thanks to #NetGalley for a copy in exchange for an An incredibly touching account of German life at the end of WW2, 'Finding Clara' is exceptionally well thought out, beautifully written and enlightening. From the start, the story promises to challenge the readers moral judgement and has, as a result, made it a page turner. I have enjoyed the journey that Clara and Jakob have lead the reader on with the ever present Fenshaw trailing their movements. This makes it worthy of this five star review. Thanks to #NetGalley for a copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lisa of Hopewell
    January 1, 1970
    I learned of this book here: https://katiegilley.com/2020/01/15/we... received an advance copy of this book from Net Gallery. The opinions expressed here are mine. I was not paid for this, or any, review.My InterestWorld War II, as I've soft quiet often recently, is a huge interest of mine. The period immediately after the war through the end of the Berlin Airlift does not receive as much attention. This book caught my eye since it begins in soon after the war.The StorySay the name "Falkenberg" I learned of this book here: https://katiegilley.com/2020/01/15/we... received an advance copy of this book from Net Gallery. The opinions expressed here are mine. I was not paid for this, or any, review.My InterestWorld War II, as I've soft quiet often recently, is a huge interest of mine. The period immediately after the war through the end of the Berlin Airlift does not receive as much attention. This book caught my eye since it begins in soon after the war.The StorySay the name "Falkenberg" in Essen during the War and it would be like saying "Carnegie" in Pittsburgh at the turn of the century. Like their cross-town rival, Krupp, the fabled German Arms producer, the Falkenberg ironworks produced for the Reich. Headed by Theodore, the wealth of the Falkenbergs protected Theodore's English wife, Anne, and their children--the sons all in uniform,  leaving daughter Clara as her father's war-necessitated understudy.  Clara, who came to be known as the "Iron Fraulein," the Reich's most eligible heiress.The war is over now, and the British occupy Essen Captain Thomas Fenshaw has studied Clara since she attended a British Union of Fascists rally with her mother in England in the late 1930s. Unlike her father, who is in custody, Clara remains free. Fenshaw is determined to find her.Clara puts herself at risk trying to find her dearest friend, Elissa and Elissa's son, Willy. In the after-war chaos of stateless persons, homeless Germans, and occupying armies, this is a risky proposition.My ThoughtsForgive me if I spent part of the book giggling "Iron Mädchen" thinking of "Iron Maiden". Ok, that was silly. Clara's story reads like a thriller. There are turns and twists, secrets and lies--all the aspects of a well-told, suspense-filled thriller, with just enough romance thrown in to make it that much more interesting.I felt that while the suspense could have been heightened more for my taste, and that Clara was a bit too 007 once in a while, overall this book exceeded my expectations. One secret I never anticipated! My one moment of disappointment was "the pet." I won't explain this as it would be a huge spoiler, but "the pet" was my one big "oh, come on!" moment in an otherwise great read.My Verdict3.75 starsThe German Heiress by Anika Scott is available for pre-order, publishing on April 7.
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