Invisible Kingdom, Vol. 1
Hugo and World Fantasy Award-winning author G. Willow Wilson (Ms. Marvel, Wonder Woman) and Eisner winning artist Christian Ward (Black Bolt) team up for this epic new sci-fi saga!In a small solar system in a far-flung galaxy, two women--one a young religious acolyte and the other, a hard-bitten freighter pilot--uncover a conspiracy between the leaders of the most dominant religion and an all-consuming mega-corporation.On the run from reprisals on both sides, this unlikely pair must decide where their loyalties lie--and risk plunging the world into anarchy if they reveal the truth.One of AV Club's most anticipated comics of 2019!Collects Invisible Kingdom #1 - #5.

Invisible Kingdom, Vol. 1 Details

TitleInvisible Kingdom, Vol. 1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 5th, 2019
PublisherBerger Books
ISBN-139781506712277
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Science Fiction, Graphic Novels Comics, Fiction, LGBT

Invisible Kingdom, Vol. 1 Review

  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Wow.Just wow.Sometimes that's all I got.Somewhere in a distant galaxy two women are on very different paths. Vess has just taken her vows as a "none" of the Renunciation, the leading religion in her world. She has a brilliant mind and a firm belief that this is what she is meant to do with her life. Freighter pilot Grix has placed her faith in Lux, the Amazon of outer space and the most powerful corporation in the galaxy. She travels the stars making deliveries with a ragtag crew while trying to Wow.Just wow.Sometimes that's all I got.Somewhere in a distant galaxy two women are on very different paths. Vess has just taken her vows as a "none" of the Renunciation, the leading religion in her world. She has a brilliant mind and a firm belief that this is what she is meant to do with her life. Freighter pilot Grix has placed her faith in Lux, the Amazon of outer space and the most powerful corporation in the galaxy. She travels the stars making deliveries with a ragtag crew while trying to wrangle her baby brother who shes raising to spare him from their rotten parents. These two polar opposites are thrown together when they both discover a dark conspiracy by their superiors to defraud millions of believers in the path and patrons of Lux. Pretty soon they're trapped in Grix's woefully ill equipped freighter with her wild and crazy crew being pursued by enemies with enough power and money to blast them into stardust.This is a gorgeous acid trip of a book. I've never seen artwork quite like this. Its "Heavy Metal" by way of Michelangelo with the richest, most psychedelic colors I think I've ever seen in a graphic novel. And the trippiness doesn't stop with the artwork. This is an absolutely action packed, very sharp and funny space opera that barely gives the reader a chance to take a breath. I finished it in one sitting because I couldn't bear to put it down. I LOVED this and I cannot wait to find out what happens.
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  • delaney
    January 1, 1970
    3.5I got all 5 issues in a bundle (the bookstore put them all together as a set; total of $5), so I don't have this volume but I do have the 5 issues it will contain. Which, was a good thing because all 5 issues cover the first arc of this story.It follow nuns (Nones), space, embezzlement and government corruption. Also, space is gay, non-binary and pan. So I appreciate that the characters do not look actually female or male but a combination of the two and also very ambiguous...as space should 3.5I got all 5 issues in a bundle (the bookstore put them all together as a set; total of $5), so I don't have this volume but I do have the 5 issues it will contain. Which, was a good thing because all 5 issues cover the first arc of this story.It follow nuns (Nones), space, embezzlement and government corruption. Also, space is gay, non-binary and pan. So I appreciate that the characters do not look actually female or male but a combination of the two and also very ambiguous...as space should be. For me, the artwork is the star of this comic. The world is so intricately and brightly colored I loved that the colors were both vibrant and cool (not a harsh and bright coloring). It's what really drove the story for me and helped lift the plot where the plot felt unoriginal. The pacing and plot felt a little rushed for me. I wished there could have been a little more information thrown in with the dialogue...but I'm sure that those questions will be answered in following issues. Also, I sense some conflict in the romance that happened in here--which had no development, so it felt kind of random. I won't be continuing this series, but I am glad I checked it out!
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    All are on the path, but few are strong enough to reach the Invisible Kingdom. For the young Roolian Vess, joining the Nones is a dream come true, but her faith is tested almost immediately when she discovers her order's secret, an alliance between groups with seemingly opposing goals. This same secret is also discovered by the crew of a Lux delivery ship. Grix doesn't want trouble for her or her crew, but she's not one to back down from a fight that chooses her. By teaming up with Vess, they All are on the path, but few are strong enough to reach the Invisible Kingdom. For the young Roolian Vess, joining the Nones is a dream come true, but her faith is tested almost immediately when she discovers her order's secret, an alliance between groups with seemingly opposing goals. This same secret is also discovered by the crew of a Lux delivery ship. Grix doesn't want trouble for her or her crew, but she's not one to back down from a fight that chooses her. By teaming up with Vess, they all hope to survive the powerful, greedy organizations which hunt them, and reveal the truth to their solar system. Wilson and Ward have created a sci-fi feast, with wonderful worldbuilding, character-revealing dialogue, and visuals that are equally futuristic and wondrous. Space and space travel in particular have a distinct flare to them. Although the side characters have had little time to express themselves so far, the main pair have been sufficiently established. Vess and Grix have both had their dreams dashed by reality, but they are tough and principled, making them sympathetic underdogs with their own strengths. Through the illustrations we are drawn into exhilarating sequences where Grix displays her amazing piloting skills. There can be some confusion as to what she did exactly to win at times, however engagement seems to be prioritized over detailing specific actions during these scenes. The story itself is well-balanced between its character moments, action, and thought-provoking questions on faith and truth in a time where commercialism and materialism trump all. It's one tiny crew against an entire way of life, and there is plenty of the path still to trend in this intriguing new series.Copy provided by Penguin Random House, distributor of Dark Horse Comics.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Tackling alot of different difficult themes into one book is hard however thr author seems to do it well however, the sense if worldbuilding and compelling world at that gets lost amongst her message.
  • Rory Wilding
    January 1, 1970
    My introduction to G. Willow Wilson was reading her seminal run of Ms. Marvel with artist Adrian Alphona that introduced the world to the 16-year-old Muslim superhero Kamala Khan. Not only did this comic book push Marvel’s blend of heroism and domesticity to a whole new and modern level, it also pushed forward the presence of diversity and female characters in the medium. Through her Muslim background, Wilson has explored religion and diversity through her comics and with her first creator-owned My introduction to G. Willow Wilson was reading her seminal run of Ms. Marvel with artist Adrian Alphona that introduced the world to the 16-year-old Muslim superhero Kamala Khan. Not only did this comic book push Marvel’s blend of heroism and domesticity to a whole new and modern level, it also pushed forward the presence of diversity and female characters in the medium. Through her Muslim background, Wilson has explored religion and diversity through her comics and with her first creator-owned work at Dark Horse (under the editorial belt of Karen Berger), these ideas are projected in a galaxy far, far away.Please click here for my full review.
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  • Jesús
    January 1, 1970
    Brings much-needed energy to a tired genre. Yes, it is yet another sci-fi space adventure with a cynical, wry rogue captaining a crew of misfits on the run. But for all of its familiarity, G. Willow Wilson writes character relationships as good as anyone in the business, and Christian Ward is in his element here, drawing from his gorgeously trippy work in both Ody-C and Black Bolt.This doesn’t break any major aesthetic or thematic boundaries, but what it does (space adventure), it does very, Brings much-needed energy to a tired genre. Yes, it is yet another sci-fi space adventure with a cynical, wry rogue captaining a crew of misfits on the run. But for all of its familiarity, G. Willow Wilson writes character relationships as good as anyone in the business, and Christian Ward is in his element here, drawing from his gorgeously trippy work in both Ody-C and Black Bolt.This doesn’t break any major aesthetic or thematic boundaries, but what it does (space adventure), it does very, very well.[Read in single issues]
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5Total review score: 3.6
  • Amanda [Novel Addiction]
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent start to a new series. I'm going to need the second volume sooner rather than later.
  • ribbonknight
    January 1, 1970
    I read these issues as they were released. A union between G. Willow Wilson and Christian Ward makes for something breathtaking on every page. The religious Vess is one of the most interesting sci-fi characters I’ve met in a long time. I look forward to seeing where this leads, but for now, even this first volume and its focus on following (or not) the path before you was a beautiful meditation on faith.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    Look, after Ms. Marvel I'll probably follow G. Willow Wilson anywhere, but pairing her with Christian Ward is just begging me to get involved. Invisible Kingdom tells the story of two women, one a trainee priestess and the other an intergalactic pilot, whose worlds will come crashing together when they expose a conspiracy that implicates both the church and the state and threatens their very existence.Invisible Kingdom has a lot to say. It's got interesting views on religion and faith, from both Look, after Ms. Marvel I'll probably follow G. Willow Wilson anywhere, but pairing her with Christian Ward is just begging me to get involved. Invisible Kingdom tells the story of two women, one a trainee priestess and the other an intergalactic pilot, whose worlds will come crashing together when they expose a conspiracy that implicates both the church and the state and threatens their very existence.Invisible Kingdom has a lot to say. It's got interesting views on religion and faith, from both sides of the coin. It manages to be thought provoking without being preachy, and the world(s) that the story inhabit(s) unfold at a good pace, offering context for the past and clues about the future even as the story moves along. It's not too fast, not too slow, and it hits that final issue ending just right. I may not be able to remember all the characters' names just yet, but damn if I'm not invested in where their stories are going.I mentioned Christian Ward on art, right? If anyone was born for outer space antics, it's him. His art always has this otherworldly feel to it, and he ramps that up to 11 for the space battles and stuff, but it's the more personal moments that really surprise me. The amount of emotion he can instill in the priestess characters when 75% of their faces are covered is astonishing.Contrary to what it's name would suggest, Invisible Kingdom deserves to be noticed.
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  • Ambre Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Religion, corruption, domination, sexual norms, are a few of the big ideas tackled in the first volume: Invisible Kingdom: Walking the Path by G. Willow Wilson and Christian Ward. I hate to admit that I am often confused at the beginning of many stories and this was no different; however, I just kept reading and soon I couldn't go to sleep. Connecting immediately with Vess, the girl who defied her family, left her planet to walk as a blind person in search of the Invisible Kingdom, she Religion, corruption, domination, sexual norms, are a few of the big ideas tackled in the first volume: Invisible Kingdom: Walking the Path by G. Willow Wilson and Christian Ward. I hate to admit that I am often confused at the beginning of many stories and this was no different; however, I just kept reading and soon I couldn't go to sleep. Connecting immediately with Vess, the girl who defied her family, left her planet to walk as a blind person in search of the Invisible Kingdom, she represents what so many of us in this world want to obtain. Wilson never falters from the truth of human existence as she shows the corruption at each level of her world-building. Grix takes on the characteristics of rogue transport pilots such as Han Solo or Jim Holden from The Expanse except Grix is female. Kind of. Many of the characters do not seem to fit binary sexuality expectations and thus, romantic intrigues appear pansexual. There seems to be a freeing of the spirit in this representation since some of the characters are not trapped in their gender. At the same time, many of the characters still rely on gender representations to evolve and connect with the reader. I am curious to see how the character devolp and how the story unfolds. Unfortunately, there will be a long wait for Volume Two since I do not buy single comics.
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  • Sara I
    January 1, 1970
    I have yet to read anything from G. Willow Wilson that has disappointed me. This is a wonderful start to the series and I am eager to read more. It is very colorful, beautiful, imaginative, and reflective of current society. In the back she notes that she thought about how deliveries might work in a small solar system but the Lux company rings familiar with giants like Amazon in our present day. I found the world-building very interesting and it was also very natural how it developed. There are I have yet to read anything from G. Willow Wilson that has disappointed me. This is a wonderful start to the series and I am eager to read more. It is very colorful, beautiful, imaginative, and reflective of current society. In the back she notes that she thought about how deliveries might work in a small solar system but the Lux company rings familiar with giants like Amazon in our present day. I found the world-building very interesting and it was also very natural how it developed. There are still things readers have not learned, but I much prefer a few confusing moments or mysterious elements to information being dumped on me all at once to attempt to explain the world's mechanics. There are relationships developing between characters and familiarity grows between the characters and the readers throughout the volume. There's excitement and close calls too, which make for quick reading. Overall, I enjoyed it and will definitely be checking out the next volume when it releases!
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  • Dakota Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    I kept waiting for the big reveal in Invisible Kingdom and was somewhat disappointed to close this first volume with the knowledge that it really is just about Big Business and Big Religion teaming up to be the Big Bad. How original! The heavy-handed Amazon references were not my cup of tea. The space battles and Firefly-esque found family were much more appealing. Still, though, I really wanted a third act twist and the lack of one knocked my interest in Invisible Kingdom down a peg.Your I kept waiting for the big reveal in Invisible Kingdom and was somewhat disappointed to close this first volume with the knowledge that it really is just about Big Business and Big Religion teaming up to be the Big Bad. How original! The heavy-handed Amazon references were not my cup of tea. The space battles and Firefly-esque found family were much more appealing. Still, though, I really wanted a third act twist and the lack of one knocked my interest in Invisible Kingdom down a peg.Your interest in Invisible Kingdom might lie entirely on your ability to enjoy Christian Ward's art. It's bright and fast and very cool, but more often than not looks like an incomplete preparatory sketch that should have been relegated to the bonus materials. It mostly worked for me. Mostly.
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  • Neil
    January 1, 1970
    Starts off with big chips on its shoulder against both a future amazon.com-like monopoly and a cult religion (ok! i'm on board!), and hints that there's going to be some world-building... but it never really happens. There are a few scenes that feel like attempts at character development, but leave you with no additional identity or feeling for the characters.Also, it feels like the writing and art have somewhat of a nonbinary gender agenda, but poorly executed: humanoids with stereotypically Starts off with big chips on its shoulder against both a future amazon.com-like monopoly and a cult religion (ok! i'm on board!), and hints that there's going to be some world-building... but it never really happens. There are a few scenes that feel like attempts at character development, but leave you with no additional identity or feeling for the characters.Also, it feels like the writing and art have somewhat of a nonbinary gender agenda, but poorly executed: humanoids with stereotypically male features appear in several panels, then later on are identified as specifically female (I don't recall gender-neutral pronouns being used). I think diversity of all kinds is a good thing for sci-fi (else we'll never be able accept what is truly "alien"), but without any character context/exposition, this can feel like it's just a trick/deceptive test where you're continually presented with something ambiguous and being asked to make an assumption/read minds, only to get told you're wrong every time. It can get a little tiring.
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  • El_Commutador
    January 1, 1970
    I love Dark Horse, a publisher that usually takes risks with comic books. Unfortunately, these books don’t always deliver; but when one does deliver (as in this case), it does big way.Also, the fact that it is a comic book from (former Vertigo editor) Karen Berger's imprint, written by Ms Marvel’s G. Willow Wilson, with art by ODY-C’s Christian Ward, is a plus. I like solid sci-fi comic books like this one, where cool concepts and good storytelling, meet with solid world building, all tied I love Dark Horse, a publisher that usually takes risks with comic books. Unfortunately, these books don’t always deliver; but when one does deliver (as in this case), it does big way.Also, the fact that it is a comic book from (former Vertigo editor) Karen Berger's imprint, written by Ms Marvel’s G. Willow Wilson, with art by ODY-C’s Christian Ward, is a plus. I like solid sci-fi comic books like this one, where cool concepts and good storytelling, meet with solid world building, all tied together with nice art.
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  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    As with Ms. Marvel, the characters are stronger than the plot, but the whole thing is quite pleasant. We have a spaceship with a ragtag crew a la Firefly on the run from a big bad corporation and a corrupt religious organization. Wilson uses the sci fi setting to make some on-the-nose but valid points about Amazon, the gig economy, and rampant consumerism.
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  • Rana
    January 1, 1970
    So. I really struggled with this. The artwork and lettering were fabulous, the color palette used was really amazing. But the story seems to suffer from a classic graphic novel problem: not enough room to really provide depth or motivation to the characters. I'm left wanting a real novel, one with lots of words and pages.
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  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    The art was absolutely fantastic - and for once, I wasn’t completely lost in a story where the author is giving me very little information about the world I’m trying to fall into. I am extremely excited for vol 2
  • Caryn
    January 1, 1970
    Loved the art, but there were places where it was difficult to decipher what was going on. The story, while interesting, seemed very rushed; there was no time to really develop the characters or the plot. I would be curious to see where it's going though!
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Amazingly I was able to see G. Willow Wilson at the same time I was reading this. She is wonderful and I feel blessed to have met her briefly and heard her talk at the Portland Book Festival.Loved this graphic novel for its visual beauty and the interesting storyline.
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  • Lexi
    January 1, 1970
    Organized religions corrupted by intergalactic megacorporations and the space nun/space lesbian team-up determined to take them down. Plus Ward's trippy and deeply dimensional artwork. Need I say more?
  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    An entertaining space adventure that's prettier than it is substantial. The plot feels a little forced and as a result the big ideas are somewhat undercut. It is, however, genuinely alien and extremely colourful. Not sure I'll follow the series from here on though.
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  • Katie Florida
    January 1, 1970
    *read issue by issue* A creative and poignant story of corporate greed of both the consumer and religious variety. I love G. Willow's writing so much, but I was absolutely blown away by the artwork. The style and the colors added so much to the world building. A delight all around!
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  • Zachariah
    January 1, 1970
    Art, great as usual. Story, only okay. Characters, forgettable. Couldn't name a single person after finishing it. Not sure if I'll continue.
  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    It's just so PRETTY. The whole book. A really interesting concept, beautiful art, and lots to chew on. Looking forward to the rest of the story.
  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    With a ragtag crew on a freight hauler, the story seems familiar, but I am interested in following it to see where it goes. The art in this volume is beautiful!
  • Kevin Duvall
    January 1, 1970
    This series has a whole lot of two things that always do it for me in comics: G. Willow Wilson’s spiritual wrestling and a Christian Ward’s spaced-out psychedelia.
  • Cyndi
    January 1, 1970
    Well done start to a series. I want to see where it goes.
  • Erica McGillivray
    January 1, 1970
    If nothing else, the art is beyond beautiful. But I also thought the story was, and I'm looking foward to move.
  • Oliver
    January 1, 1970
    Some potential here, although the first volume doesn't present a compelling world; the web of character relationships in particular is too tidy and convenient to the plot.
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