Things That Art
Lochlann Jain's debut non-fiction graphic novel, Things That Art, playfully interrogates the order of things. Toying with the relationship between words and images, Jain's whimsical compositions may seem straightforward. Upon closer inspection, however, the drawings reveal profound and startling paradoxes at the heart of how we make sense of the world.Commentaries by architect and theorist Maria McVarish, poet and naturalist Elizabeth Bradfield, musician and English Professor Drew Daniel, and the author offer further insight into the drawings in this collection. A captivating look at the fundamental absurdities of everyday communication, Things That Art jolts us toward new forms of collation and collaboration.

Things That Art Details

TitleThings That Art
Author
ReleaseOct 3rd, 2019
PublisherUniversity of Toronto Press
ISBN-139781487570552
Rating
GenreArt

Things That Art Review

  • Etienne
    January 1, 1970
    A very unique kind of book/art. One page painting, all title, «Things that are...» and then a lot of little sketchy illustrations of stuff that are or aren’t. Original and kind of unique, but was is god or interesting in an artistic way... not in my opinion!
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    René Magritte is famous for painting a picture of a pipe that is labeled "This is not a pipe". Now you may ask how that makes sense. But, it does, because it isn't a pipe. It is a painting of a pipe, not not an actual pipe itself.This book goes further. It is a series of illustrious that are and aren't things. Lochlann Jain is trying to distrupt ways of knowing, with a slight kick of humor added.This book can be read as just plays on words, and you can skip the commentary, but if you do skip it, you will lose part o René Magritte is famous for painting a picture of a pipe that is labeled "This is not a pipe". Now you may ask how that makes sense. But, it does, because it isn't a pipe. It is a painting of a pipe, not not an actual pipe itself.This book goes further. It is a series of illustrious that are and aren't things. Lochlann Jain is trying to distrupt ways of knowing, with a slight kick of humor added.This book can be read as just plays on words, and you can skip the commentary, but if you do skip it, you will lose part of the deeper parts of his art.Jain takes ordinary things, and makes you think a little about them, in his series of drawings. For example, he draws things that are visible and not. These things include Light, Water, Beauty love and time.You can read this all in one sitting, but I found that I would stop and stare at someof the goopings, and try to figure out the message, onmy own.Recommend to art collections,and libaries. Could be a good starting point of conversation before the rains return.Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.
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  • Dasha Slepenkina
    January 1, 1970
    A big thank-you to NetGalley, the author, and publisher for giving me a copy of this book for an unbiased review.1.5/5 - It was okay, not my type of book. I was initially interested in this book because of the lovely illustrations on the cover and the concept of grouping things into categories with the ultimate goal of subverting categorical thinking. I realized very early on that the book would not be a pleasant, light read. The introduction had me googling words and concepts, takin A big thank-you to NetGalley, the author, and publisher for giving me a copy of this book for an unbiased review.1.5/5 - It was okay, not my type of book. I was initially interested in this book because of the lovely illustrations on the cover and the concept of grouping things into categories with the ultimate goal of subverting categorical thinking. I realized very early on that the book would not be a pleasant, light read. The introduction had me googling words and concepts, taking notes just to keep up. Okay. I like to think, I could switch gears. Except that the way this book is written is just tedious. I felt like I was at one of those fancy art functions where every brush stroke of a painting was up for scrupulous and obnoxious analysis. I forced my way through the essays, examined every index card painting with meticulous attention, and breathed a sigh of relief when I finished the book. The bottom line? This book is good for thinking and it may teach you a thing or two, but it's far from enjoyable. This being said, I did like the exploration of naming and categorizing things. I found the commentary on art and how it can blend distinctions between things interesting. Some drawings elicited a chuckle (things that have an *sshole - an office). I also appreciated the wider political commentary on how the propensity to categorize things and people has led to various injustices. Moreover, it was interesting to consider how things change their characteristics in relation to other things over time.
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  • Gemma
    January 1, 1970
    Curious is a good word for this book.basically a collection of illustrations, slightly strange and very unique.I found it quite amusing but it wasn't really my idea of art and I found I was not as interested by the end, and found it a little repetitive and boring.I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Judi Easley
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating concept and artwork, FRC closer to release date. 3-starsThings That ArtA graphic menagerie of enchanting curiosityLochlann JainUniversity of Toronto PressSep 17, 2019, 114 pagesArt & philosophy, languagesProvided by NetGalley⭐⭐⭐The cover initially drew me to the book with its macabre and whimsical artwork. This is the artwork the author uses throughout the book. The colors and the subjects don’t seem to go together Fascinating concept and artwork, FRC closer to release date. 3-starsThings That ArtA graphic menagerie of enchanting curiosityLochlann JainUniversity of Toronto PressSep 17, 2019, 114 pagesArt & philosophy, languagesProvided by NetGalley⭐⭐⭐The cover initially drew me to the book with its macabre and whimsical artwork. This is the artwork the author uses throughout the book. The colors and the subjects don’t seem to go together, but somehow, Jain makes it all work. The six things shown hanging on the cover are all art because they are all drawings of things and are hung for your observation. Thus, art. That’s the relationship for this group of items. Can you think of another relationship these items all share? Well, they are all drawn by Lochlann Jain. But they are unexpected. I certainly didn’t expect them. Nor did I expect what else I found between the covers of this book.First, let me take care of the unpleasant parts. I read and understood the author’s introduction and was really looking forward to the rest of the book. I started looking through the collections. Checking out the relationships and understanding the message the author/artist sent with each one. And while I’m talking about them at this point, I must say that this is not a children’s book. This has mature subject matter in it, both individual images and collections. Once through the first section of collections, I came to the first essay by another writer. Now, I have a BFA and read constantly, but I really felt like I needed a Ph.D. in English to understand what was in that essay, or maybe a translator. When I reached the point that I felt like I had to use the dictionary for seven words out of ten, I started skimming the essays. This is such a shame because I’m sure they had some interesting things to say. One of the essays had an explanation of a term that was used and I couldn’t even understand the explanation! It just was too much. Too high brow for my taste.I went on to enjoy the artwork in the collections and skim the essays. The art was really awesome for the most part. Having an art background, I’m always drawn to books like this with lots of artwork in it. This one didn’t disappoint in that aspect. This isn’t realistic art, but cartoon-style art. But the really fascinating part of it is the way the artist has grouped the pictures to change relationships to make us see things differently. To make us think about things differently. To make us think. And I’m pretty sure that’s what those essayists were saying with all their fancy vocabulary.I can’t say that I’d recommend buying this book for my own library. I would spend some time with it in a public or school library, though. It would be a great book to discuss in a group or a class. I’d just skip the essays and work with the intro and the art.
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  • Shruti Ramanujam
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful novel!Things That Art invites the reader to be a little more curious about the world and the concepts we learn in it. I did not expect a novel of art to make me think this much!Read the entire review on This is Lit.
  • Jason Muckley
    January 1, 1970
    “Things That Art: A Graphic Menagerie of Enchanting Curiousity” by Lochlann Jain is a very unique “art” book. It has a way of causing the reader to reconsider common expressions and representations of things that Jain categorizes in different sections by placing things together that both go together and then don’t really fit.It is an art book in that each page is a different collection of items or phrases illustrated by a picture all with a common theme or word that ties them togethe “Things That Art: A Graphic Menagerie of Enchanting Curiousity” by Lochlann Jain is a very unique “art” book. It has a way of causing the reader to reconsider common expressions and representations of things that Jain categorizes in different sections by placing things together that both go together and then don’t really fit.It is an art book in that each page is a different collection of items or phrases illustrated by a picture all with a common theme or word that ties them together. There are several sections that divides the book with commentary by Jain and others regarding the section that follows.As someone interested in art and books, this is an engaging read for me. I think how the parts are presented is thought-provoking and stimulating. One could read through the book in one sitting but also come back to it over and over and see new things each time through. In a way, this art book is almost like poetry in pictures. I found a lot of connections throughout the book that felt like poetry in a way.Don’t be tricked by the cover, this book contains mature pictures and themes and is intended for adults only.I received this eBook free of charge from University of Toronto Press via NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. I did not receive any fiscal compensation from either company for this review and the opinions expressed herein are entirely my own.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    This unique, non-fiction, graphic novel is clever and thought-provoking. Jain uses art to explore anthropology and the association of things, thoughts and expressions through groups of drawings. An interesting concept.I received a copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • J Aislynn d'Merricksson
    January 1, 1970
    In Things That Art Lochlann Jain invites the reader to pause a moment and ponder how we choose to classify and categorise. More than that, it is an invitation to expand ones way of thinking and viewing the world. Interspersed between the artwork are several essays that lend further insight to the art lists themselves. Some of Jain's categories fit with my own way of thinking, or only needed a mild adjustment in thinking. Others required more of a stretch of the imagination on my part. I enjoyed In Things That Art Lochlann Jain invites the reader to pause a moment and ponder how we choose to classify and categorise. More than that, it is an invitation to expand ones way of thinking and viewing the world. Interspersed between the artwork are several essays that lend further insight to the art lists themselves. Some of Jain's categories fit with my own way of thinking, or only needed a mild adjustment in thinking. Others required more of a stretch of the imagination on my part. I enjoyed the opportunity to learn and grow! Recommended if you enjoy art. This would make an excellent coffee table book. It should be noted, however, that some of the pictures within are mature content. This is not a book for children.***Many thanks to Netgalley and University of Toronto Press for providing an egalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Lara Lillibridge
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the art and the word association the groupings trigger.As a writer, this would be a great book to start the creative process flowing on those days when you don’t know what to write about. The wordplay and the linking of abstract yet related thought in each assemblage of images often spin-off in unusual directions that I really appreciate. I found the essays much less compelling and found myself skimming through them. I didn’t want someone else’s opinion on the art and artist, I loved the art and the word association the groupings trigger.As a writer, this would be a great book to start the creative process flowing on those days when you don’t know what to write about. The wordplay and the linking of abstract yet related thought in each assemblage of images often spin-off in unusual directions that I really appreciate. I found the essays much less compelling and found myself skimming through them. I didn’t want someone else’s opinion on the art and artist, and the insertions tended to feel either self-aggrandizing or promotional of the artwork. However, an artist or art major might really love the conversation these essays bring to the art. As is always the case, every reader brings their own experience to the work and therefore takes something different away.
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    One and a half stars.What does some tie dye, roadkill, and your nose have in common? They all might bleed. And here they are – formulated on tiny images and pinned to the category of 'things that bleed', along with others. There are lots of categories here, each with between six and a dozen things, and sometimes there is fun to be had in the surprising entry, where word play or a different sense has been used to cram the thing in. But that's it as far as this book goes – you can ditc One and a half stars.What does some tie dye, roadkill, and your nose have in common? They all might bleed. And here they are – formulated on tiny images and pinned to the category of 'things that bleed', along with others. There are lots of categories here, each with between six and a dozen things, and sometimes there is fun to be had in the surprising entry, where word play or a different sense has been used to cram the thing in. But that's it as far as this book goes – you can ditch the Pseud's Corner essays and introductions scattered through it, even if what is left behind is a bit of a pretentious one-trick gimmick itself. Worth a browse, but as for purchase? It's not in that category.
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  • Reading Tam Ishly
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so damn satisfying to read like how I would exactly feel after popping a damn annoying pimple on my nose. The cover is amazing and the description well to the point. Coming to the contents, the introduction is detailed and well connected to what's coming on in the later parts. The illustrations are concise and upto mark. This book can be read by anyone as it's just like a picture book but for an adult like me, you will well relate. It's like connecting your thoughts with the outside This book is so damn satisfying to read like how I would exactly feel after popping a damn annoying pimple on my nose. The cover is amazing and the description well to the point. Coming to the contents, the introduction is detailed and well connected to what's coming on in the later parts. The illustrations are concise and upto mark. This book can be read by anyone as it's just like a picture book but for an adult like me, you will well relate. It's like connecting your thoughts with the outside world. Sometimes it feels so silly reading this but I realised I was smiling all the time while I was reading this. Thank you #Netgalley for the book #thingsthatartYou need a break. Just pick up this book.
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  • Jennifer Muller
    January 1, 1970
    I  received a free digital copy of this book from Netgalley for an honest review.This book was definitely different. Not your average persons idea of art, for sure. Some of the pages include: "Things that are not things" (age, color, light), "Things with Resolution" (New Years, photography), and "Things that are traces" (ash, footprint). Each includes little pictures. It is definitely a unique concept for an art book.
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  • Smote
    January 1, 1970
    On the whole too repetitive and monotonous to rate more than a single star. The writing is far more interesting and while some of the connections provide an introspective view, on the whole, it's a silly play on words that goes on a bit too long.
  • J.D. DeHart
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful words combine with images in this volume. The result is strong, enticing, and just the kind of book to be valued and shared. I am glad I have the opportunity to preview Things That Art by Lochlann Jain. Recommended reading (and viewing).
  • Rachael Louise
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating work on the arbitrary categorizations which surround us, and the power they hold in our everyday existence
  • Ζωή Παππά
    January 1, 1970
    Even though I’m not an artist I was interested in this book and it didn’t disappoint. I’ll be honest I had some trouble following sometimes but I still enjoyed it. Especially the artwork.
  • Lianne
    January 1, 1970
    A quirky, edgy graphic novel! I found the juxtaposition of visual art and superb writing excellent! I recommend Things That Art by Lochlann Jain.
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