The Batman Who Laughs
Left rattled by the events of Dark Knights: Metal, Bruce Wayne must come face to face with the ultimate evil spawned from the Dark Multiverse. One part Batman one part Joker. The Batman Who Laughs."A Batman who laughs is a Batman who always wins."The mastermind behind Dark Nights: Metal, Scott Snyder, gives you a look inside the most terrifying version of Batman ever! He and superstar artist Jock (Batman: The Black Mirror) kick off a chain of events that makes Dark Nights: Metal seem like child's play.The Batman Who Laughs not only survived his fight with The Joker at the end of Dark Nights: Metal, but is now enacting a sinister plan across the Multiverse--something both terrifying and oddly familiar. When Bruce Wayne realizes the only way to stop this madman is to kill him, he must consider violating the very rule Batman can't ever break ... the rule that created this insatiable villain--the Batman Who Laughs!As Bruce begins to deduce that his current life is somehow wrong and that all the mistakes he's made are somehow connected, the Batman Who Laughs unleashes a brand-new evil. Enter one of the most punishing Batmen of the Dark Multiverse: the Grim Knight!Collects The Batman Who Laughs #1-7 and The Batman Who Laughs: The Grim Knight #1.

The Batman Who Laughs Details

TitleThe Batman Who Laughs
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 22nd, 2019
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401294038
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Dc Comics, Batman, Superheroes

The Batman Who Laughs Review

  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    In a way, Scott Snyder was seen as rescuing Batman from the horror-based Dark Knight that the eighties Frank Miller and Alan Moore created. Righting the ship, in a way.But Snyder himself had done horror in American Vampire and Wytches and his own version of Dark Knight Batman in Metal, and this is a continuation of that horror-fest, focusing on a character from Dark Knights: Metal, a demonic Batman-Joker villain. And that title from Ed Brubaker about Joker: Batman: The Man Who Laughs. And this c In a way, Scott Snyder was seen as rescuing Batman from the horror-based Dark Knight that the eighties Frank Miller and Alan Moore created. Righting the ship, in a way.But Snyder himself had done horror in American Vampire and Wytches and his own version of Dark Knight Batman in Metal, and this is a continuation of that horror-fest, focusing on a character from Dark Knights: Metal, a demonic Batman-Joker villain. And that title from Ed Brubaker about Joker: Batman: The Man Who Laughs. And this comic unites Snyder and Jock, who were the Black Mirror team, so it's in conversation with all of the above. I think it's solid, 3-ish stars, with great insane depictions of the villain from Jock.
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  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    So I was a little nervous with Scott's new Batman Who Laughs story. I thought Metal was okay and didn't love a lot of his All Star Batman. So I wasn't to eager to get this, especially since The Batman Who Laughs is easily one of the most uninteresting characters in Metal and his defeat was anti-climatic as can be. This is the story of The Man who Laughs, who recruits another Bruce named Grimbat, and together they tear down the regular universes Bruce. While that's happening we have Jim and his s So I was a little nervous with Scott's new Batman Who Laughs story. I thought Metal was okay and didn't love a lot of his All Star Batman. So I wasn't to eager to get this, especially since The Batman Who Laughs is easily one of the most uninteresting characters in Metal and his defeat was anti-climatic as can be. This is the story of The Man who Laughs, who recruits another Bruce named Grimbat, and together they tear down the regular universes Bruce. While that's happening we have Jim and his son James working together to stop the psycho known as The Batman who laughs. Part a sequel to Metal, part a sequel to Black Mirror. Will Bruce be able to overcome one of his greatest challenges? A man like him with no remorse or code? You'll have to read to find out! For the most part I really enjoyed it. For once I liked Alfred here and what he brought to the table. I enjoyed the villains enough, and their plans were pretty cunning. I also thought James and Jim together was brilliant and a nice closure for them. The art was also solid throughout. It did feel a bit stretched out and also some of the lettering, especially for Batman who Laughs is hard as hell to read. Overall though, it was a fun and breezy read and a solid sequel to black mirror. A 3.5 out of 5, but I'll bump it to a 4.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Just cant get into any snyders post 52 metal stories.
  • Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.Is happiness a state of complete release of all worries in the world? Is it an indicator of one’s own satisfaction with his behaviour and accomplishments in life? What happens when you live a life where you simply can’t indulge such a luxury? Writer Scott Snyder continues to develop the complex ramifications of his dark multiverse by looking into the mind of one of the deadliest villains to have ever been created. Drawing upon all of his work, from The You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.Is happiness a state of complete release of all worries in the world? Is it an indicator of one’s own satisfaction with his behaviour and accomplishments in life? What happens when you live a life where you simply can’t indulge such a luxury? Writer Scott Snyder continues to develop the complex ramifications of his dark multiverse by looking into the mind of one of the deadliest villains to have ever been created. Drawing upon all of his work, from The Black Mirror to The Court of Owls, he creates one of the most terrifying stories that pushes Batman on the verge of insanity looking for solutions to the impending end that is promised in this war where only one Batman comes out alive. This isn’t about revenge or about proving a point. This is a battle about winning or losing against one another. And Batman does not plan to go down gently.What is The Batman Who Laughs about? Following the events of Dark Nights: Metal, the dark multiverse is introduced to the DC Universe and paved the way for dark versions of Batman to reign havoc. Among these alternate evil creatures born from the fears of people is the Batman Who Laughs from Earth-22 who succumbed to the Joker’s toxin and lost his sanity. By far the most chilling version of Batman, he’s now enacting a sinister plan across the Multiverse and has Bruce Wayne right at the heart of it. Although the future now lies in Batman’s hands as he’s forced into contemplating breaking the one rule he’d never break, the Batman Who Laughs brings into play another Batman whose mere presence crushes all hopes of life: the Grim Knight. Facing these deadly threats, Batman now has to play a very perilous game and seek help in the dark corners of Gotham if he wants to win this war.Collecting The Batman Who Laughs #1-7 and The Batman Who Laughs: The Grim Knight #1, this limited mini-series is Scott Snyder’s most personal story as he looks into exploring the little voice in the back of everyone’s head, the one that reduces everyone into nothingness and irrelevancy. By far the most gruesome Bat-centric story—definitely rated R—the level of violence escalates to unprecedented levels. There are limbs sliced off, heads rolling down mountains of corpses, and an incredible amount of blood covering each page of this story. You just can’t help but fall into a never-ending loop of insanity as Batman struggles to find the right approach to taking down the Batman Who Laughs and the Grim Knight. As expected from Scott Snyder, this is what writer Grant Morrison would have created in his prime but with a bit more trouble gauging the pacing and the amount of exposition in his stories. It’s his ambition and endeavor that made me enjoy this more than I should’ve but the ideas explored remain sublime in every way possible.Throughout the story, Scott Snyder also explores the meaning of happiness: what is it and how do you attain it? With the Batman Who Laughs’s personal experience, Batman receives a whole oratory on his own perception of happiness and the symbolism behind the bat he wears honorably on his chest. He thus limps his way through the creature’s torturous plan and slowly realizes that he might indeed be the worse Batman in the multiverse and there’s nothing he can do about it. To accentuate the dread, the despair, and the chaos within himself, Scott Snyder leans onto artist Jock’s phenomenal visual style. Relying a lot on shadows, smudges, and vibrant contrasts, his artwork relays the horrors that Batman lives through as well as his continuous and strainful battle with insanity.Letterer Sal Cipriano also plays a big role in contributing to the overall theme of this volume as he utilizes a horror calligraphy in red for The Batman Who Laughs but also for Batman when he is pulled into the lunacy. He even leaves some letters in white, conveying a coded message that expresses the terror within Bruce Wayne and how he’s trying as well as he can to hold on to reality and remain sane. The colours by David Baron also give the story a peculiar and atmospheric tone. It’s safe to say that this creative team made sure to work in sync and explore the madness taking place right in Bruce Wayne’s mind.The Batman Who Laughs is a ghastly tale that mutates Batman into his worse nightmare to outplay a deadly scheme drawn by a monster straight from the underbellies of the Dark Multiverse.Yours truly,Lashaan | Blogger and Book ReviewerOfficial blog: https://bookidote.com/
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    Scott Snyder + Batman = Win.Scott Snyder + Batman Who Laughs = Win, but I'm frightened.The Batman Who Laughs is probably the best original character to come out of DC for a little while, and even though he's a simple idea, he's so well executed under Snyder's pen that he becomes far more than the sum of his parts. Snyder is all about deconstructing what it means to be Batman, what drives Batman, and being able to look at him through The Batman Who Laughs' lens makes for some su Scott Snyder + Batman = Win.Scott Snyder + Batman Who Laughs = Win, but I'm frightened.The Batman Who Laughs is probably the best original character to come out of DC for a little while, and even though he's a simple idea, he's so well executed under Snyder's pen that he becomes far more than the sum of his parts. Snyder is all about deconstructing what it means to be Batman, what drives Batman, and being able to look at him through The Batman Who Laughs' lens makes for some super interesting narration even as the fate of Gotham City is once more in the balance.We do lean a little far into undefeatable Batman territory, as he manages to outlast something that should have killed him for far longer than you'd expect, but that's a minor quibble - this is comic books, after all. Snyder even manages to rope in James Gordon Jr. for this story, taking what's been done to him outside of Snyder's stories in his stride. There's definitely a hint of 'this story was a prelude to something much larger' by the time this series is over, but it still works as its own complete thing on its own - you'll just definitely want to know what happens next.If you've read Wytches, you know Snyder and Jock can do some awful, awful things together. The atmosphere in The Batman Who Laughs is disgusting, and I love it. Everything from the constant jagged edges to the bloodspattered pages, right down to the creepy-ass font that The Batman Who Laughs talks in is perfect for creating the kind of fear that Snyder wants to inspire in his readers. I especially liked the little Easter eggs dotted through the dialogue - go back and just read the big red letters, and you'll get some additional insight into Batman's state of mind that puts things into even more perspective than before and adds an additional cliffhanger to the series that you (and Batman) weren't even aware of.The Batman Who Laughs is yet another showing in a long line that highlight why Scott Snyder is the Batman writer that has defined the character for the past five plus years; he always has new ideas and new ways to break the character, and he tells his stories with equal parts flair and terror.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Well, that was all kinds of creepy!
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    SO IMMERSIVE!! THE PLOT IS INSANE AND ALFRED IS BEST HUMAN ON EARTH!
  • Ryan Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    There are moments where the writing really shines, and the art is phenomenal throughout, really setting the tone perfectly. However, this is unbelievably convoluted and I just couldn't buy into any of the "stakes" because the story is so out-there. If you weren't a big fan of Dark Nights Metal, might as well pass on this. I really miss Snyder's New 52 run. I'm very over the "metal" stuff.
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  • Marco
    January 1, 1970
    So much needless babbling, I couldn't wait to finish reading this.
  • Rory Wilding
    January 1, 1970
    Following his work both Detective Comics and Batman, writer Scott Snyder haven't quite lived up to the brilliance of before, even with working alongside the artist Jock on some issues of All-Star Batman and Wytches for Image. Especially after doing DC's 2017 event Dark Nights: Metal, Snyder fell into the pitfalls of the typical event comic. However, if there is one thing to like about Metal was the evil Batmen from the Dark Multiverse, including the Batman Who Laughs, a Joker-like figure that could exist in the demonic world o Following his work both Detective Comics and Batman, writer Scott Snyder haven't quite lived up to the brilliance of before, even with working alongside the artist Jock on some issues of All-Star Batman and Wytches for Image. Especially after doing DC's 2017 event Dark Nights: Metal, Snyder fell into the pitfalls of the typical event comic. However, if there is one thing to like about Metal was the evil Batmen from the Dark Multiverse, including the Batman Who Laughs, a Joker-like figure that could exist in the demonic world of Clive Barker’s Hellraiser.Combining everything that makes the Caped Crusader a hero and the Clown Prince a killer, the Batman Who Laughs teams up with another evil version of Batman known as the Grim Knight, to turn Bruce Wayne's home of Gotham City into an incubator for evil. As Bruce and Commissioner Gordon struggle to stop these multi-versal forces, both compromise in their own way to stop this threat, from the former losing his insanity to the latter confronting his past.Reuniting the writer and one of the two artists behind The Black Mirror — one of the best self-contained Batman stories — Snyder and Jock presents their most demented Bat-tale, on the basis of its eponymous villain, showcasing Snyder's love of horror. Snyder's pushing of said horror is also evident in not only the appearance of the Joker, but our heroic Bruce Wayne slowly loses his mind, due to contacting with the Joker's toxin that will turn anyone into the next Clown Prince of Crime. Although you can see plot similarities to the 2015 videogame Batman: Arkham Knight, Snyder makes his story a psychologically scary one with Bruce becomes his own antagonist, as well as towards his allies such as Alfred and Gordon.Although The Black Mirror was a self-contained narrative that may evoke elements of Bat-history, The Batman Who Laughs juggles a lot more elements that heart back to previous DC titles that Snyder wrote, including a brief appearance from the Court of Owls, which seems padded on. Being a loose continuation of Snyder's run on Detective Comics, Gordon reunites with his psychopathic son James Jr. in order to stop the evil Batmen. Although the relationship between the two Gordons was the standout theme previously, there are echoes here that remind us of the tension between the father and the son, although the attempt of redemption towards the end feels unearned.Ever since reading The Losers, I have been an instant fan of Jock's artwork, which is gritty and applies well to the crime-ridden streets of Gotham, especially under Snyder's horror-based writing. Showing three different versions of Batman, Jock achieves each of these characters their own unique look, from our hero slowly becoming Jokerized, to the Grim Knight packing as many guns as he can, to finally the Batman Who Laughs looking more demonic than ever before. It also helps that the lettering by Sal Cipriano serves a device in capturing the language of several characters, including Bruce Wayne's word balloons becoming red and scratchy as the series goes on.In between the main series, Snyder and co-writer James Tynion IV do a one-shot issue about the origins of the Grim Knight, showing how Bruce's life (in another universe) was changed by not only the death of his parents, but also killing that mugger by his own gun. Presenting a more dystopian spin on Gotham City — stunningly drawn by Eduardo Russo, who references Frank Miller's two Bat-masterpieces from the 1980s — it really shows the worst scenario of Batman taking the laws into his own hands and bending the citizens to his will, much to the resistance of the former police commissioner.After the baggage of Metal, this miniseries reaffirms Snyder's strength by writing more self-contained tales, which have a more singular vision that does more justice to the Dark Knight, along with Jock's freakishly awesome art.
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  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    I hated Snyder's run on Batman but sort of enjoyed the Dark Nights: Metal limited series. This tie-breaker tells me I should stop reading anything by Snyder that actually has "Batman" in the title.The technobabble alone drove me crazy, justifying any needed plot development by chanting a string of pseudo-scientific words that might might as well have been magic spells. Comic book rubbish to the max.The homage in the middle to Batman: Year One was a bit interesting at least, but t I hated Snyder's run on Batman but sort of enjoyed the Dark Nights: Metal limited series. This tie-breaker tells me I should stop reading anything by Snyder that actually has "Batman" in the title.The technobabble alone drove me crazy, justifying any needed plot development by chanting a string of pseudo-scientific words that might might as well have been magic spells. Comic book rubbish to the max.The homage in the middle to Batman: Year One was a bit interesting at least, but then James Tynion IV helped co-write that little aside.
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  • Drew
    January 1, 1970
    This was amazing, easily my favorite of DC’s Black Label books that I’ve read. Scott Snyder has pulled off a wonderful magic trick with this story, distilling the true nature of Batman down to a perfect idea. The art, storytelling, and everything about this was top notch. I love this heavy metal aesthetic and the dark themes of the book. If DC shut down everything else they’re doing and just did this kind of thing, I’d happily branch out into similar stories about Supes, Green Lantern, etc.
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  • Alan
    January 1, 1970
    Was I disappointed in Metal, yes. Do I find this character annoying-yep. So why read this (in digital floppies)?I'm crazy enough to think that Snyder can pull out a good to very good story, despite his recent misses (Metal, JLA). This isn't great, but it is close to a better than average story about what drives Batman. There have been takes on that before, and there will probably be writer(s) who take on that portion of the character again.Combined with some nice Jim and Was I disappointed in Metal, yes. Do I find this character annoying-yep. So why read this (in digital floppies)?I'm crazy enough to think that Snyder can pull out a good to very good story, despite his recent misses (Metal, JLA). This isn't great, but it is close to a better than average story about what drives Batman. There have been takes on that before, and there will probably be writer(s) who take on that portion of the character again.Combined with some nice Jim and JAmes Gordon bits, and the steadfast Alfred, Snyder manages ot make me want to stay around to see how the story plays.
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  • Ramon
    January 1, 1970
    Overwritten, this could've been 5 issues, really, and everyone really hammers home points, no one wants to be subtle or mysterious, they really need backstories and motivations to be crystal clear to anyone within earshot? Jock's art is moody and pretty but sometimes flat. I like when he occasionally shades with smudges. But sometimes it's also just a hell of a lot of silhouettes and sometimes I wonder if deadlines were knocking. I really hope the Court of Owls is eliminated. I liked James' retu Overwritten, this could've been 5 issues, really, and everyone really hammers home points, no one wants to be subtle or mysterious, they really need backstories and motivations to be crystal clear to anyone within earshot? Jock's art is moody and pretty but sometimes flat. I like when he occasionally shades with smudges. But sometimes it's also just a hell of a lot of silhouettes and sometimes I wonder if deadlines were knocking. I really hope the Court of Owls is eliminated. I liked James' return, though, as Black Mirror was one of the better Snyder Bat-stories.
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  • Ed Barredo
    January 1, 1970
    Too many gimmicks, Snyder.
  • Albert
    January 1, 1970
    The Batman Who Laughs by Scott Snyder continues the havok dealt out by a hybrid of The Batman and the Joker. But this time, The Batman Who Laughs brings along an even darker and brooding character, The Grim Knight! After the events of Dark Knights: Metal, the Batman is aware that there are forces in the Multiverse that he needs to prepare for. Forces that target him in particular and forces that want to undo all the good he has done in Gotham. The worse of these is none other than the creature k The Batman Who Laughs by Scott Snyder continues the havok dealt out by a hybrid of The Batman and the Joker. But this time, The Batman Who Laughs brings along an even darker and brooding character, The Grim Knight! After the events of Dark Knights: Metal, the Batman is aware that there are forces in the Multiverse that he needs to prepare for. Forces that target him in particular and forces that want to undo all the good he has done in Gotham. The worse of these is none other than the creature known simply as the Batman Who Laughs. A Batman from another multiverse that is half Batman and half Joker. A sadistic and mad killer with the wits and cunning of the Batman.The Batman Who Laughs not only survived his duel with The Joker at the end of Metal but is now enacting an even more deranged and evil plan across the Multiverse. Bodies are piling up in Gotham, bodies that match the DNA of one Bruce Wayne. But some are younger and some are older than Bruce Wayne. So who are they and the pressing question for Batman and GCPD, is where did they come from when the real Bruce Wayne is very much alive. But that is not all, because the Batman Who Laughs has a partner with him. A Batman from the Multiverse who has a very different code, he is the Grim Knight and he is in Gotham to clean it up with deadly brutality. Now Batman must face off against both of them, but to defeat them, how far is he willing to go and at what cost?I, like most of the comic book and especially Batman geeks, looked forward to another story with the character that took the DC Multiverse by storm. The Batman Who Laughs is a stroke of genius from a writer that has owned the Batman franchise for the last few years. This character answers the question of what would happen if Bruce Wayne finally lost it. If the love he holds for Gotham turned to hate and if the sense of protection turned to a joy in torturing the city. If is a terrifying proposition and Snyder tells the tale so well.The introduction of The Grim Knight is an added bonus. This is a jaded and bitter Batman that closely resembles Marvel Comics, The Punisher.Overall this is a dark and gritty tale that is well written and has superb artwork. Very much worth adding to any Batman collection.
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  • Maik Krüger
    January 1, 1970
    Although it is a sequel of Metal, it stands on its own, so Metal is not required reading. I wished it had as much story about the origin of the Batman Who Laughs (show, don't tell, Mr Snyder!) as his other evil Batbuddy (who is, over all, rather forgettable) has. Snyder is always at risk of trying to spin this extremely intrinsic plot and getting lost in some details that lead nowhere and turn out to be meaningless and boring instead of creating this epic saga (at least that's what I think his i Although it is a sequel of Metal, it stands on its own, so Metal is not required reading. I wished it had as much story about the origin of the Batman Who Laughs (show, don't tell, Mr Snyder!) as his other evil Batbuddy (who is, over all, rather forgettable) has. Snyder is always at risk of trying to spin this extremely intrinsic plot and getting lost in some details that lead nowhere and turn out to be meaningless and boring instead of creating this epic saga (at least that's what I think his intention was). This book is much more compressed with a smaller scaled plot, which makes a better read and more comprehensible story. A classic good versus evil and overcoming your inner demons tale, which I like a lot. I do wonder however why the laughing Batman who gleefully destroyed whole worlds in Metal settles this time for conquering little old Gotham. It does make more or less sense in the end, but still seems odd.The artwork by Jock is also a bit of a mixed bag. I absolutely love his heavy blacks that make everything look very moody and his emotional expressions are excellent, but he's ridiculously bad at drawing action. Lucky for him, the book is 90% suspense and foreboding and figuring out evil plans, so it works out alright.The production department (I think Kate Durre is their boss) deserves a honorable mention: the book is printed on matte paper which makes it stand out in terms of printing quality. Very cool. The ugly: whoever thought it was a good idea to use a scribbly red font on black or dark grey should be fired. It's literally unreadable. You have been in the print and design business for how long? The little not-so-subliminal messages hidden with white letters do not save this mess.
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  • Will Brown
    January 1, 1970
    A very cool horror story examining why the original Bruce Wayne is the best Batman. The story pits Batman against the titular Batman Who Laughs, a version of Batman from an alternate reality who was corrupted by The Joker and is now keen on doing the same to Bruce and Gotham as a whole.There's a ton of great moments and parallels between the Bat-family and the Gordon family. The struggles these characters go through internally and with each other really tie into the theme of becoming A very cool horror story examining why the original Bruce Wayne is the best Batman. The story pits Batman against the titular Batman Who Laughs, a version of Batman from an alternate reality who was corrupted by The Joker and is now keen on doing the same to Bruce and Gotham as a whole.There's a ton of great moments and parallels between the Bat-family and the Gordon family. The struggles these characters go through internally and with each other really tie into the theme of becoming the ideal person, what that looks like, and whether that ideal is a set standard or just a case by case basis. Bruce and James Jr. start at different places, with one sane and the other in recovery, but both are trying to restrain their darker impulses and examining what their ideals are, whether they are something people should strive towards and whether it's possible to reach them at all.Jock excels at horror. His art is perfect and terrifying, capturing the character's movements and expressions as they experience and endure the horrors thrown their way. The lettering, while difficult to read at times, does a great job showing Bruce slowly losing himself to the Joker toxin and the effects it's having on his mind and perception of reality.I haven't always been a fan of Snyder's modern work, but I really enjoyed this story. If you're a fan of Batman and/or horror don't hesitate to pick this up.
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  • James Lawner
    January 1, 1970
    By far, Scott Snyder’s best Batman story since his 2011 run and All-Star Batman Vol. 3This was actually a lot better than Dark Nights: Metal, it was more focused, the story was more engaging and easier to follow, but if you haven’t read Metal, this might be a bit confusing for you. Batman Who Laughs proves to be a far more terrifying villain than even The Joker! He’s so twisted and messed up, and the fact that he is Batman doesn’t change how wholly of an original character he is, he By far, Scott Snyder’s best Batman story since his 2011 run and All-Star Batman Vol. 3This was actually a lot better than Dark Nights: Metal, it was more focused, the story was more engaging and easier to follow, but if you haven’t read Metal, this might be a bit confusing for you. Batman Who Laughs proves to be a far more terrifying villain than even The Joker! He’s so twisted and messed up, and the fact that he is Batman doesn’t change how wholly of an original character he is, he is his own character and Snyder writes him scarily well. My one criticism is the artwork by Jock, he’s never been my favorite artist, and I just don’t like his style, however on the bright side, the artwork works well with the tone and style of the story, but still, I can’t say I enjoyed it for the most part. Also the dialogue boxes with Regular Batman as he was transforming was hard to read at times, and even Batman Who Laughs’s speech balloons and dialogue boxes were hard to read as well. The Grim Knight one-shot was interesting, and it had better artwork than the miniseries, but his character was kind of one-note. What’s also odd is how graphic and gory this series is, but the swearing is censored, like what??Overall, I’m glad to see Scott Snyder on the right track to writing good stories again, but who know how long that will last.
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  • Michael Rivas
    January 1, 1970
    My first comic book I ever read, it was amazing. Id really give it a 4.5 because there were some wording structures I didn't like at ALL. BUT that may be just how comics are or how the flow of conversation happens in Batman comics. Maybe a mixture of both. If your a fan of Batman in ANY capacity you will like "The Batman Who Laughs). There are one or two aspects, maybe three, that you may not understand if you arnt an avid Batman follower of the comics. I didn't know them either, but you can get My first comic book I ever read, it was amazing. Id really give it a 4.5 because there were some wording structures I didn't like at ALL. BUT that may be just how comics are or how the flow of conversation happens in Batman comics. Maybe a mixture of both. If your a fan of Batman in ANY capacity you will like "The Batman Who Laughs). There are one or two aspects, maybe three, that you may not understand if you arnt an avid Batman follower of the comics. I didn't know them either, but you can get threw the book without the knowledge as it gives explanation and content throughout so you can understand. "The Batman Who Laughs" had amazing art work that belongs hanging on walls, intense action in the last 2-3 books ( the first couple did have action but needed to set things up also and not nearly as much) And there were also, battles of virtues throughout, word play, and parts where actions and beliefs come back full circle which is one of my favorites. Its a must read for Batman fans and is the reason why ill be reading more comics in the future.
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  • Ronald
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading this back as single issues but gave up the story was so bad. I had hoped the story would be better when read in a collection. But I was wrong. I do not understand the fetish of writers wanting to have a "BAD! and EVIL!" Batman. I mean there are already dozens in the DC Comics Universe there really no reason to make up a new one. I mean I read comics to find heroes as the real world is full of uncaring evil. I don't need to see Batman as evil or anything like that he is just Bat I started reading this back as single issues but gave up the story was so bad. I had hoped the story would be better when read in a collection. But I was wrong. I do not understand the fetish of writers wanting to have a "BAD! and EVIL!" Batman. I mean there are already dozens in the DC Comics Universe there really no reason to make up a new one. I mean I read comics to find heroes as the real world is full of uncaring evil. I don't need to see Batman as evil or anything like that he is just Batman if you can't tell a good Batman story without inventing an entire side universe that is dark and evil and the true mirror into the souls of man then you are not really trying.I guess the worst thing is the writing is sloppy and gets boring. The same story could have been told in just 4-5 issues without having to repeat itself a couple of times. How many times do we need to hear Alfred wail at Batman "Don't go evil, give up the fight, just find a cure." Sigh.
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  • Jin
    January 1, 1970
    I really love how Scott Snyder writes stand alone Batman stories. This one has the same creepiness like the great Black Mirror project they launched years ago. The plot twist of backing The Dark Knight into a wall where he has no other options left in defeating the Batman Who Laughs is mentally and emotionally charged. Like Alfred, I kept hoping and thinking that there're still other ways around to solving the dilemma (while reading this) but lo and behold, Bruce accepted that the only way to fi I really love how Scott Snyder writes stand alone Batman stories. This one has the same creepiness like the great Black Mirror project they launched years ago. The plot twist of backing The Dark Knight into a wall where he has no other options left in defeating the Batman Who Laughs is mentally and emotionally charged. Like Alfred, I kept hoping and thinking that there're still other ways around to solving the dilemma (while reading this) but lo and behold, Bruce accepted that the only way to fight this through was becoming like his enemy and eventually placing himself at risk of being an exact mirror image of the loathsome antagonist from the dark Multiverse. A really bold step in framing a deep character evolution for Batman. (My only complaint is the narrative letters in red while in a black box background color. It's difficult to read without lighting up a flashlight to it.)
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  • Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Convoluted (but hey, it's comics!)Dark & Disturbing (seemingly just for the sake of it)Alternate universes, mirror universes, dark multiverse - whatever you want to call it - these have been done before (and done well, such as in Morrison's JLA:Earth 2) but, I think, never as dark & disturbing as this. I'm aware that this story is happening 'in continuity' (for all that's worth, with reboots happening ever more frequently*), but I found myself considering it as a Tale f Convoluted (but hey, it's comics!)Dark & Disturbing (seemingly just for the sake of it)Alternate universes, mirror universes, dark multiverse - whatever you want to call it - these have been done before (and done well, such as in Morrison's JLA:Earth 2) but, I think, never as dark & disturbing as this. I'm aware that this story is happening 'in continuity' (for all that's worth, with reboots happening ever more frequently*), but I found myself considering it as a Tale from the Multiverse, just because my brain was refusing to suspend my disbelief: this just couldn't happen to the Batman I know...I read this on the strength of Snyder's & Jock's Black Mirror run (5 stars - look it up), but no, sorry, this isn't for me.* That's what reboots are, in fact: alternate universes.
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  • Jacob
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, the Batman who laughs looks stupid with the spiked visor. Like, real dumb. Second, this reminded me a lot of Synder’s other joker end story, Endgame, which I enjoyed until it got too large scale and incomprehensible, which is the same thing here. It does get to a kind of poignant point about hope, but it seems unconvinced about it for the sake of keeping things open for future issues, which sucks. That being said, it’s fun and has some interesting bits, it was nice to see Gordon in First of all, the Batman who laughs looks stupid with the spiked visor. Like, real dumb. Second, this reminded me a lot of Synder’s other joker end story, Endgame, which I enjoyed until it got too large scale and incomprehensible, which is the same thing here. It does get to a kind of poignant point about hope, but it seems unconvinced about it for the sake of keeping things open for future issues, which sucks. That being said, it’s fun and has some interesting bits, it was nice to see Gordon interact with James again after Black Mirror, and Jock does some pretty cool art when it’s not super exaggerated, but it does feel like a repeat of topics already covered in Synder’s early run, just with less humanity involved.
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  • Gautam Surath
    January 1, 1970
    And Scott draws me back to the world of the Bat once again. Dark, gritty and bloody it may be but the core essence remains. And despite the over abundance of batmen of different ages and realms there is no confusion about who is who. If I had to nitpick, I would say that vol 7 was not needed. It felt stretched too thin. Anyways another great addition to the annals of Batman. Highly recommended.
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  • Kira
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book in exchange for a honest review from NetGalley.Overall I liked this graphic novel. The writing is very solid. There are times that is gets a little convoluted and self involved but I liked it none the less. I have really been liking the DC Black Label offerings. Solid Batman variant.
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  • Jaye
    January 1, 1970
    After the events of the Dark Nights series, The Batman Who Laughs returns to Gotham City to torment Bruce Wayne again. He brings along another alternate Batman, one called the Grim Knight. It's another depressing story, and I'm sorry that I picked it up.
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  • Will
    January 1, 1970
    I know you're not supposed to take Batman seriously, and I know that Spiderman is doing the same thing with alternate hero versions, but this is turning from a style to a mixup to a "throw in all baskin-robbins 66 flavors at once and add sprinkles and hope" storytelling.
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  • JT
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book by Synder and Jock. A continuation of the aftermath of Metal. I love this whole dark multi verse that was created. I also love and need more of Grim Knight. I want a mini series of this character. So much potential.
  • El Neo
    January 1, 1970
    OMG! This was soooo good! I love a writer who writes in layers! Someone who's body of work really has a payoff if you pay attention. Scott Snyder is such a writer. Everything he started since he first wrote Batman falls together like dominoes and the end result is truly satisfying.
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