The Confession Club (Mason, #3)
In this uplifting novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Story of Arthur Truluv, good friends discover that the things we fear revealing to others can be the very things that bring us closer together. When a group of friends in Mason, Missouri, decide to start a monthly supper club, they get more than they bargained for. The plan for congenial evenings—talking, laughing, and sharing recipes, homemade food, and wine—abruptly changes course one night when one of the women reveals something startlingly intimate. The supper club then becomes Confession Club, and the women gather weekly to share not only dinners, but embarrassing misdeeds, deep insecurities, and long-held regrets. They invite Iris Winters and Maddy Harris to join, and their timing couldn't be better. Iris is conflicted about her feelings for a charming but troubled man, and Maddy has come back home from New York to escape a problem too big to handle alone. The club offers exactly the kind of support they need to help them make some difficult decisions. The Confession Club is charming, heartwarming, and inspiring. And as in the previous books that take place in Mason, readers will find friendship, community, and kindness on full display.

The Confession Club (Mason, #3) Details

TitleThe Confession Club (Mason, #3)
Author
ReleaseNov 19th, 2019
PublisherRandom House
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit

The Confession Club (Mason, #3) Review

  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    THREE, it’s good but not dramatic, heartbreaking, tear jerker, ugly crier or so memorable kind of story, I was expecting something more moving, shaking, captivating but I think this is too sweet, soft and fast reading for me STARS!I think I'm having a bad day as a grader. Lately I read five starred books so my likeness level reached to the top. With the fascinating and mind-bending releases of this month, my expectation level and satisfaction levels pushed up and hit the ceiling! THREE, it’s good but not dramatic, heartbreaking, tear jerker, ugly crier or so memorable kind of story, I was expecting something more moving, shaking, captivating but I think this is too sweet, soft and fast reading for me STARS!I think I'm having a bad day as a grader. Lately I read five starred books so my likeness level reached to the top. With the fascinating and mind-bending releases of this month, my expectation level and satisfaction levels pushed up and hit the ceiling!As soon as I saw the name Elizabeth Berg, the author of “The Story of Arthur Truluv”, I clicked the request button and next day I miraculously saw the book on my shelf, felt like NetGalley genies left their bottles to make my wish come true! I literally danced as a celebration. I have never been delightful so long from since I had seen my husband’s pale face when I’d ordered two hundred books online after having so much Chardonnay!But my dreams turned into sleepless, boring nights with frustration and disappointment after reading several pages. Concept is: a book club’s gatherings turns into a confession club. No they didn’t bring a priest and a booth on their meetings. They just share a meal and desert and then voila A SECRET!I had several books lately with the same concept. On “Never have I ever”: they were also sharing their dirty little secrets after several heavy drinks later which ended with the tragedy. And on “Rumor”: They also gossiped about a serial killer’s moving of their town at their book club meeting. As a thriller concept, this plot worked always better for me but as an emotional, women fiction, I had hard time to connect with the characters and their compelling stories. Only Iris’ story a little got my attention but it wasn’t so effective at least it was not effective enough to rip a piece of my heart like some emotional books had already did before! I think the writing style didn’t work for me, too. This reminded me of a book consisted of short, moving, remarkable life stories but I couldn’t focus on any of these characters. And sharing your big secret voluntarily without thinking a second after a desert instead of blurting out after too much Dirty Martini didn’t work for me, too. But that’s my opinion because in my personal life, I’m always good listener but not a good secret whisperer (of course this changes If I’d had gallons of Cabernet)It’s a smooth, fast, lack of edginess and angst book! Something darker and heart-wrenching is always my better fit but it doesn’t mean it’s a bad book. I was just expecting better one when I compare it with the author’s previous works. (So I danced and hurt my feet for nothing! Shame!)Thanks to NetGalley, Random House to share ARC COPY with me in exchange of my honest rev
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    This is a type of book I don't usually read but Elizabeth Berg's "The Story of Arthur Truluv" was pressed upon me by a lot of people like stones were pressed upon Giles Corey. Just the name "Truluv" broke my cute meter. But unlike poor Giles, I was left smiling. I was pleasantly surprised; I really liked it. Grading on a curve as always, I gave it four stars and noted that while Berg's writing is so simple it reads like a primer, the characters are loveable and it's a quick and satisfying read. This is a type of book I don't usually read but Elizabeth Berg's "The Story of Arthur Truluv" was pressed upon me by a lot of people like stones were pressed upon Giles Corey. Just the name "Truluv" broke my cute meter. But unlike poor Giles, I was left smiling. I was pleasantly surprised; I really liked it. Grading on a curve as always, I gave it four stars and noted that while Berg's writing is so simple it reads like a primer, the characters are loveable and it's a quick and satisfying read. This is #3 in the series she began with "Truluv" but it's not necessary to have read the other two, although if you're going to pick one, pick 1. This book is simple and sweet and there are fond reminders of Truluv and Lucille. The women of the Confession Club are kind and well-meaning. Their confessions made me feel like I've lived a life of unbridled hedonism since they're mea culping over stealing makeup or kissing a guy in high school who rode a motorcycle. And they say things like: "I learned what you've got to start with is you." Okay, they're sheltered. As long as I don't have to know who they vote for, that's fine.The book is like a marshmallow. I never want to be so cynical I can't let go and enjoy a heartwarming book with earnest characters who put money in a swear jar (I'd have to use direct deposit), who really care about macaroni salad and donating to the library, and take classes such as "When Chocolate Meets Peanut Butter." It's a nice book. "The Confession Club" will make a lot of women happy, give them the kind of escape they crave and make for some fun book club meetings where they recreate the cakes the ladies in the club serve. Heartwarming, here, is good.
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  • Tziggy
    January 1, 1970
    The story flowed well enough but I was a bit disappointed in the ending.
  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    There's a certain type of story or book that I classify as a "Good Housekeeping" tale. This moniker comes from my childhood, when I would read stories from my mother's magazines such as Redbook and Good Housekeeping. I haven't read either of those magazines in many years, so what I remember from way, WAY back then may not still hold true, but this is my memory: Redbook stories were often edgy, with subjects and endings that didn't conform to a set pattern, and although certainly not what I would There's a certain type of story or book that I classify as a "Good Housekeeping" tale. This moniker comes from my childhood, when I would read stories from my mother's magazines such as Redbook and Good Housekeeping. I haven't read either of those magazines in many years, so what I remember from way, WAY back then may not still hold true, but this is my memory: Redbook stories were often edgy, with subjects and endings that didn't conform to a set pattern, and although certainly not what I would call risqué, the themes were definitely adult. I loved them. Good Housekeeping stories, on the other hand, were usually much more predictable. The stories were mostly wholesome, romantic, boy-meets-girl tales, with tied-up-in-a-neat-little-bow endings. Entertaining enough, but a little boring and often sweet enough to set your teeth on edge. Can you tell where I'm going with this? This was my first Elizabeth Berg novel, and it's going in the "Good Housekeeping" stack. But don't get the wrong idea. I really did like the book. It was well-written, it kept my interest, and I finished it quickly. It was just slightly too sweet and neat for me.I didn't realize that this was number three in a series until after I had read it. To the author's and the book's credit, it was a good stand-alone story, with no need to know anything about the previous books to make this one readable. The story is set in the small town of Mason, Missouri. Several women from the town, ranging in ages from their 20’s to their 80’s meet once a month to have dinner and dessert and delight and disarm each other with secrets they want to “confess.” These confessions include predictable situations such as marriage woes and other “normal” indiscretions. A couple of admissions are a tad heavier and sometimes funnier. But the Confession Club isn’t really the focus of the book. The lives of the group members, their loneliness, their family problems and their love stories, or lack thereof, are the main themes. My favorite part of the novel revolved around a homeless man named John and his background. I found his story to be touching and thought-provoking. Unfortunately, the author didn’t delve deeply enough into John’s particular situation; there were teasers, but nothing substantial. He was a veteran with PTSD, yet this was glossed over so lightly, when it could have been a strong, substantial storyline itself. Ah, but that’s not the Good Housekeeping way. That would have made it hard to tie up everything in a neat package with a sparkly, sugary bow.I know I’m being extremely critical of a good, decent book. And I certainly don’t want to spread any negative vibes about Good Housekeeping magazine; it was, and still is, I’m sure, a wonderful publication, with much to offer besides my memories of stories from 55 or so years ago! I think this would be a good beach read, and I greatly appreciate Ms. Berg’s use of the English language. She is a wonderful writer, even if her story was not my style. I doubt that I’ll read any of her other books, but I do recommend this one to those who don’t want to dig too deeply into a story. If I could give this 3.5 stars, I would. It’s certainly better than a 3 star, but I just can’t push it up to a 4. Thank you to NetGalley and Random House for an ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Cheri
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars The Confession Club is a group of women located in the small community of Mason, Missouri, former home of Arthur Truluv, and includes some of the more notable characters that appeared in the first two books of this Mason trilogy, as well as new, equally unforgettable characters. For those who have not read The Story of Arthur Truluv: A Novel , or her follow-up book Night of Miracles: A Novel, the main connection making The Confession Club a part of this series are the people who knew and rem/> 3.5 Stars The Confession Club is a group of women located in the small community of Mason, Missouri, former home of Arthur Truluv, and includes some of the more notable characters that appeared in the first two books of this Mason trilogy, as well as new, equally unforgettable characters. For those who have not read The Story of Arthur Truluv: A Novel , or her follow-up book Night of Miracles: A Novel, the main connection making The Confession Club a part of this series are the people who knew and remember Arthur, and Arthur is only there in the memories shared by those people. The Confession Club was born out of what was originally a monthly gathering of the women in this town, a chance to catch up, vent, share stories, talk about books, and swap recipes for the most part. Until one day, when burdened by some personal crisis, one of them shares her story, and they gather round her to comfort her and reassure her that they, too, have their own struggles behind closed doors. And that changes everything, and all their stories come spilling out, every time a woman shares her burden, they circle around. Forgiveness. So hard to extend to others for some people, so hard to receive for others, the idea that someone could hear their worst fears and offer something so healing seems to be, these days, such a small-town value, swept aside in faster paced worlds, but so heartwarming to see it.I enjoyed this, perhaps not quite as much as the first two books but I’m still glad that I took the time to read this heartwarming and charming story. Pub Date: 19 Nov 2019Many thanks for the ARC provided by Random House Publishing Group – Random House
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  • Linden
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Berg is back in the small town of Mason, Missouri. There are familiar characters, but even if you haven't read about them before, its okay. Some of the women have started a "confession club," where they reveal their darkest and most personal secrets to each other. Maddie and Iris are new members, but they fit right in with this group, realizing that "all around are broken people, doing the best they can." Theft, insecurity, suicidal thoughts, and bedroom woes--there is such a level of Elizabeth Berg is back in the small town of Mason, Missouri. There are familiar characters, but even if you haven't read about them before, its okay. Some of the women have started a "confession club," where they reveal their darkest and most personal secrets to each other. Maddie and Iris are new members, but they fit right in with this group, realizing that "all around are broken people, doing the best they can." Theft, insecurity, suicidal thoughts, and bedroom woes--there is such a level of trust that no one holds back. Will Maddie get her marriage back on track? Will Iris find love with the mysterious stranger? Berg crafts her characters so meticulously that they seem like old friends. A book to savor--highly recommended.
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    "The Confession Club" is the third book in Elizabeth Berg's "Mason" series, and hopefully not the last. Though this book can be read as a stand-alone novel, I do suggest reading the other two books first, as they add depth to the characters and to the story. It is a quick read and is a perfect way to spend a chilly, rainy afternoon inside.In a nutshell, "The Confession Club" is about a group of women who meet monthly, in a manner similar to a book club. However, instead of discussing "The Confession Club" is the third book in Elizabeth Berg's "Mason" series, and hopefully not the last. Though this book can be read as a stand-alone novel, I do suggest reading the other two books first, as they add depth to the characters and to the story. It is a quick read and is a perfect way to spend a chilly, rainy afternoon inside.In a nutshell, "The Confession Club" is about a group of women who meet monthly, in a manner similar to a book club. However, instead of discussing a book, each month one of the women shares a personal story that she feels the needs to confess. The other women do not judge the storyteller for her "sin," but rather comfort and support her. Dovetailed with the stories of the Confession Club is the plot line of Iris, who teaches baking classes and John, a homeless Vietnam Veteran who wanders into Mason. We also learn more about Maddy and Nola, two familiar characters from the other books of the series. The three books of the "Mason" series are so heartwarming and lovely. I wish Mason was a real town so I could move there. "The Confession Club" is beautifully written and richly detailed with characters who come alive. Elizabeth Berg's books always make me smile and leave me with a warm feeling. I identify with her characters and her themes of friendship, loyalty, forgiveness, and the willingness to take some risks in life. Berg remains one of my favorite authors and I look forward to reading more about the residents of Mason soon!Many thanks to NetGalley, the publisher, and to Elizabeth Berg for the privilege of reading an advanced digital copy of this lovely little book. Five stars all the way!
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series about Mason, Missouri and the folks that live there. This is book #3 and I would highly recommend that you read them in order. The people that we revisit in The Confession Club will certainly have much more meaning to you in this very heartwarming series.I hope that Ms Berg is not quite done with Maddy, Nola, Iris, Tiny and all the rest.Many thanks to Netgalley and Random House for this advanced readers copy. The release date for this book is set for No I love this series about Mason, Missouri and the folks that live there. This is book #3 and I would highly recommend that you read them in order. The people that we revisit in The Confession Club will certainly have much more meaning to you in this very heartwarming series.I hope that Ms Berg is not quite done with Maddy, Nola, Iris, Tiny and all the rest.Many thanks to Netgalley and Random House for this advanced readers copy. The release date for this book is set for November 2019.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    "It's all well and good to congratulate someone on something good that they did, or to acknowledge what's wonderful or exceptional about them. And we should do that; we should never be spiritually stingy. But to say out loud our missteps or inadequacies - to _confess_ in an honest way and to be lovingly heard - well, that's the kind of redemption we need on a regular basis."Elizabeth Berg's novels are a joy to read. They are quiet and sweet and kind and wind their way through your he "It's all well and good to congratulate someone on something good that they did, or to acknowledge what's wonderful or exceptional about them. And we should do that; we should never be spiritually stingy. But to say out loud our missteps or inadequacies - to _confess_ in an honest way and to be lovingly heard - well, that's the kind of redemption we need on a regular basis."Elizabeth Berg's novels are a joy to read. They are quiet and sweet and kind and wind their way through your heart and soul. Her characters are richly layered and multi-dimensional and human. They have flaws, fears, delights and everything in between."Apparently, sometimes when you feel yourself done with something, you're not done with it at all."This lovely story is just like what we've come to expect from Berg, it's about women aged 20 to 70 who meet regularly for "confession club" where they confess to something they feel bad about. Something they are ashamed of or embarrassed to admit out loud. There are a wide range of confessions, from funny to sad to serious but they all have a lot of heart, of course."She envies Nola for the way she is always in a rush to do everything, the way she rises so quickly to the possibility of joy. Most of all, she envies Nola her default setting of goodwill toward man, beast, or weather."It's also about a homeless Vietnam Vet who is finding his way through and meets one of the main characters in the novel. I found him to be a great addition to the story, and really enjoyed his chapters, his journey, and his struggles."There are quite a few design flaws in us humans, you know. More than in animals and plants. And I guess we have to cope with them. Don't have to like them, just have to cope with them."There is some plot in this story but really it's about people, it's about getting old, it's about being lonely, it's about navigating life or marriage or motherhood or friendship. It's about what it means to be human."That's what life is, at its best. A confession club: people admitting to doubts, fears and failures."I am always left with a deep feeling of gratitude when I read Berg's novels. This one is no exception. They make me feel less alone, softer and kinder. "We forget how ready people are to help. You can talk all you want about the evil spirit of man. But I don't think it's true. I think most of us are just dying to be good. And one way we can do that is to forgive the bad in others as well as in ourselves."So many good reminders in this story, about taking risks, giving people chances, giving ourselves chances, and most of all about forgiveness. So grateful for writers like Berg.Huge thanks to netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kelly Long
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. I think this is the first book by Elizabeth Berg that I've read and I haven't read the previous two books in this series. I enjoyed this book so I definitely want to read the previous two. The characters were quite likeable and relatable. The storyline was easy to follow and held my interest. I suspect there will be a fourth book and I look forward to reading it.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    In telling your story you never know who you may be helping ....The takeaway here is we all have a story to tell no matter your age, your economic background, or your age.What matters is your heart and soul. Your ability to connect to others. Your ability to stay true and authentic while not losing sight of what matters most.For me I like the story and the characters and the varying stories each one told as the supper club becomes the Confession Club in which secrets are reveal In telling your story you never know who you may be helping ....The takeaway here is we all have a story to tell no matter your age, your economic background, or your age.What matters is your heart and soul. Your ability to connect to others. Your ability to stay true and authentic while not losing sight of what matters most.For me I like the story and the characters and the varying stories each one told as the supper club becomes the Confession Club in which secrets are revealed.A cute and charming new novel brought to us by the amazing Elizabeth Berg.
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  • Linda Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    For lovers of Berg’s Story of Arthur Truluv or Night of Miracles, The Confession Club is the third in this really sweet trilogy. With just a couple of recognizable characters from the first two books, this one can stand alone as a character driven story about recognizing people’s worth and how to find love in the world. Just what I needed after a couple of darker books.
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  • CloudOfThoughts_Books Keirstin
    January 1, 1970
    The Confession Club is another AWESOME novel by Elizabeth Berg and worth every star! Such a warm but intense book! I definitely recommend it!Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for an arc copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Berg is my most favorite author EVER and this lovely story doesn’t disappoint! It is beautifully written and several stories are told, not just one, in a way that is not confusing or chaotic. I loved the reappearance of Nola (and her mom) from Elizabeth’s previous two books. Iris and Johns story is quite compelling, and I read this one all the way through without stopping (almost... well, I did have to eat!). Elizabeth has such a keen eye and ear for detail and for helping us see each Elizabeth Berg is my most favorite author EVER and this lovely story doesn’t disappoint! It is beautifully written and several stories are told, not just one, in a way that is not confusing or chaotic. I loved the reappearance of Nola (and her mom) from Elizabeth’s previous two books. Iris and Johns story is quite compelling, and I read this one all the way through without stopping (almost... well, I did have to eat!). Elizabeth has such a keen eye and ear for detail and for helping us see each other’s failures and foibles with kindness and compassion, which is something we can always use a little more of in our lives!Thanks to, the author and publisher for an advanced reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Rachel Stansel
    January 1, 1970
    Another great story from small town of Mason. Follows in the wonderful path of the previous stories but is fine to read on it's own. This story focus on the multigenerational confession club. Couldn't put it down and finished it in a long afternoon. Bliss!Full disclosure- I received a copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • James Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Second book in a row in which the Vietnam conflict played a major role. This book was a bit of chick lit with some high drama and memorable writing moments. It almost felt like a cozy mystery without the mystery. I enjoyed it. This would be a good book club book--accessible with plenty of themes to discuss.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Berg has done it again! Everything she writes is perfection, and The Confession Club doesn't disappoint. As a continuation of The Story of Arthur Truluv, The Confession Club features characters of past books while introducing some new, not to be forgotten, people. The third book in this series focuses on Iris as she finds love in an incredibly unlikely place. A must read for fans of Elizabeth Berg.I received this book free from NetGalley in exchange for my honest and unbias Elizabeth Berg has done it again! Everything she writes is perfection, and The Confession Club doesn't disappoint. As a continuation of The Story of Arthur Truluv, The Confession Club features characters of past books while introducing some new, not to be forgotten, people. The third book in this series focuses on Iris as she finds love in an incredibly unlikely place. A must read for fans of Elizabeth Berg.I received this book free from NetGalley in exchange for my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    To put it simply, I loved this book.Elizabeth Berg doesn't sit down to write thrillers. She doesn't murder her characters, shove crazy twists down readers' throats, or attempt to keep you up at night. Her characters don't have obscene amounts of money, careers upon which the future of humanity rides, or beach houses on Nantucket. It could be argued that her books possess very few of the ingredients of bestselling novels. That isn't to say, however, that she doesn't have something bet To put it simply, I loved this book.Elizabeth Berg doesn't sit down to write thrillers. She doesn't murder her characters, shove crazy twists down readers' throats, or attempt to keep you up at night. Her characters don't have obscene amounts of money, careers upon which the future of humanity rides, or beach houses on Nantucket. It could be argued that her books possess very few of the ingredients of bestselling novels. That isn't to say, however, that she doesn't have something better.Berg writes extraordinarily ordinary characters who seldom face greater obstacles than those associated with normal human existence. Relationships of all varieties are common themes, but Elizabeth Berg’s secret sauce is her ability to put readers inside the heads of people going through any of life’s greatest joys or challenges. She pulls back curtains and ventures into territories where other authors won’t (or can’t) travel. The depth with which each character is written enables you to recognize bits of yourself in every paragraph. I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve said “I’m not the only one who thinks like that?” to myself as I read a Berg novel. Her characters’ internal conflicts often teach us more about human relationships than their external storylines, and I don’t know of any other authors with this unique talent. They leave you feeling more connected to the people around you and a little more at home in your own head. I never have trouble escaping into good books, but I received my ARC of The Confession Club during a bit of a reading slump. One of my parents received a terminal cancer diagnosis last month and the types of books I typically read aren’t thrilling me at the moment. The brain candy beach books I usually love are suddenly striking me as superficial and fluffy. I’ve been wanting to read, but nothing was holding my attention until I cracked open this latest Mason novel. I couldn’t put this gem down.I hope I haven’t given the impression that The Confession Club or any of Berg’s books are dense or depressing. You’ll laugh out loud twice for every time you’ll cry, and any tears you shed are of happiness and beauty. I’ve been lucky enough to hear her speak on multiple occasions and she always explains that brightening up this dark world is her goal. She accomplishes her mission every time and The Confession Club is no exception.I can't recommend it more highly.Definitely read The Story of Arthur Truluv and Night of Miracles before picking up The Confession Club in November. The sky won’t fall if you don’t - you just don’t want to miss them!
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  • Chelsea Hofmann
    January 1, 1970
    I will admit that when I heard the title I thought The Confession Club would be about some deep dark secret keeping a group of friends together. Maybe murder, intrigue, and thrills would surround some crazy act that is told in a hushed whisper after too much to drink. Then, I read the synopsis. The Confession Club was nothing like I thought but still everything that you could want in a book. A heartwarming story about lovely women in Mason, Missouri who start a dinner club, that turns into a con I will admit that when I heard the title I thought The Confession Club would be about some deep dark secret keeping a group of friends together. Maybe murder, intrigue, and thrills would surround some crazy act that is told in a hushed whisper after too much to drink. Then, I read the synopsis. The Confession Club was nothing like I thought but still everything that you could want in a book. A heartwarming story about lovely women in Mason, Missouri who start a dinner club, that turns into a confession club when one of the women shares an intimate confession. The women are empathetic and supportive and quickly realize their group is a safe place to talk. As I read about the confession club, I was jealous that I didn’t have one in real life. The community and friendship the women shared was lovely and heartwarming. Hearing what each woman was going through made me connect with the characters and invest in their stories. Elizabeth Berg is a fantastic writer and her characters worm their way into your heart. The story is really about the characters, and the part of life they are in and what they are dealing with. There are so many important points brought up, especially thoughts on forgiveness, friendship, and taking chances in life. This book was a great break from the thrilling type of book I thought it was, and I’m so happy I gave it a chance. Thank you so much to Netgalley and Random House for the opportunity to read this lovely book.
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  • Erin Kathleen (CTBookGirl)
    January 1, 1970
    I highly enjoyed this story which is book #3 in a series- however, I did not know that going in and have not read the other two but found no problem keeping up with the characters or the plot so this could stand alone- though people have said reading the other 2 books first gives you more insight into the town and community and people in it. The Confession Club is as it suggests- a group of women meet monthly to chat...with their discussions focused on personal confessions- with members rotating I highly enjoyed this story which is book #3 in a series- however, I did not know that going in and have not read the other two but found no problem keeping up with the characters or the plot so this could stand alone- though people have said reading the other 2 books first gives you more insight into the town and community and people in it. The Confession Club is as it suggests- a group of women meet monthly to chat...with their discussions focused on personal confessions- with members rotating who confesses to something each month. The purpose is to support one another through their confessions and be a neutral sounding board. I enjoyed the premise and the idea behind the book and found myself a little jealous I could not move to this fictional town of Mason and share in this experience. Elizabeth Berg is a beautiful writer whose themes often center around friendship so I am easily drawn to her work. This is a light and easy read with a beautiful ending. I will be going back to read the first two books and will look forward to book #4 in this series if there is one! Thank you to NetGalley and Random House for an ARC of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Amy Bez
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed going back to the little town of Mason, Missouri with Elizabeth Berg in THE CONFESSION CLUB. I thought centering the book around the confessions of a group of women was a great way to widen the character group; however, it also had the impact of creating a disjointed plot. I have found Berg's novels to tell stories of humanity - love, loss, and all the in-between - in short, easily digestible novels, and while CLUB did this, I liked her previous books more. Perhaps focusing on how the I enjoyed going back to the little town of Mason, Missouri with Elizabeth Berg in THE CONFESSION CLUB. I thought centering the book around the confessions of a group of women was a great way to widen the character group; however, it also had the impact of creating a disjointed plot. I have found Berg's novels to tell stories of humanity - love, loss, and all the in-between - in short, easily digestible novels, and while CLUB did this, I liked her previous books more. Perhaps focusing on how the Confession Club helped Iris find herself and her ability to shed her past, or John's PTSD, or Maddy and Nola's journey with MAtthew. But combining all of these, plus side characters, into the novel, while still entertaining, made me feel like I was missing the deep emotional impact that was prevalent in THE STORY OF ARTHUR TRULUV.
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  • Dianne
    January 1, 1970
    I really don't know what to say about this book -I loved it but in a small way I hated it too. Though I do have to admit the love part managed to win over the hate part.I found this book (third in a trio) to be a little'sweeter' than the first two and the first two books were quite 'sweet' but in a perfect way. This book-the sweetness was a tad unbelievable and dangerous too.The writing was still wonderful, the ladies in the Confession Club are perfect and I hope I can gr I really don't know what to say about this book -I loved it but in a small way I hated it too. Though I do have to admit the love part managed to win over the hate part.I found this book (third in a trio) to be a little'sweeter' than the first two and the first two books were quite 'sweet' but in a perfect way. This book-the sweetness was a tad unbelievable and dangerous too.The writing was still wonderful, the ladies in the Confession Club are perfect and I hope I can grow up to be just like them!I certainly do hope that there will be a fourth in this group of books (I don't want to quite say series yet!) but I can see the different generations picking up for what the original character's stood for.The Confession Club is inspiring, humorous and romantic.*ARC supplied by the publisher.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story about a group of friends in a quiet town called Mason.Years ago the women started a Book Club but organically it became The Confession Club.The women meet, they share a meal, a dessert and a secret.The secrets aren’t incredibly life changing and they aren’t always scandalous.This book isn’t really about a big whopper of a secret.It’s about the rare friendships where you’d actually tell anything and everything to another person. It’s This is a story about a group of friends in a quiet town called Mason.Years ago the women started a Book Club but organically it became The Confession Club.The women meet, they share a meal, a dessert and a secret.The secrets aren’t incredibly life changing and they aren’t always scandalous.This book isn’t really about a big whopper of a secret.It’s about the rare friendships where you’d actually tell anything and everything to another person. It’s not a simple thing. These women are neighbors, hypothetically one of them could turn on the others and spill everyone’s secrets. But they all know that won’t happen.In fact, they also know that if any of them needs support they will all be there.This is mostly Iris’ story.A new man moves to town with secrets of his own.He’s homeless, not a fact he keeps from Iris.He’s majorly wounded by his past.Neither him nor Iris expects to find each other.I haven’t read anything by this author before but I imagine I’ll look for the previous books set in this town. Some of the characters from previous books are mentioned but I don’t feel like it was necessary to read the prior books first.This book was sweet, fairly drama free and had nice characters.I got to read an early copy from NetGalley. Thank you!
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    My first Elizabeth Berg book ever and come to find out this is a series. Apparently I'm not alone! No wonder I was kind of lost!!I love Elizabeth's writing!! I will be reading more from her. Will there be a book 4? I hope so!! This story sort of reminds of Carla Laureano's supper club series.I love the idea of a group like this! What better way to make friends and support each other! I found myself waiting to see which lady would next confess her "sin"Overall I truly enjoyed re My first Elizabeth Berg book ever and come to find out this is a series. Apparently I'm not alone! No wonder I was kind of lost!!I love Elizabeth's writing!! I will be reading more from her. Will there be a book 4? I hope so!! This story sort of reminds of Carla Laureano's supper club series.I love the idea of a group like this! What better way to make friends and support each other! I found myself waiting to see which lady would next confess her "sin"Overall I truly enjoyed reading this book in spite of the fact that I didn't read the other 2 books. I believe I will now.My thanks to Netgalley for a copy of this book. NO compensations were received. All opinions are my own.
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  • amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I think I tricked myself with this book. With a name like The Confession Club I was expecting a thriller or suspense novel but this isn't the case at all. This is a contemporary fiction book about a group of women who meet once a month and talk. It was heartwarming and interesting but I often found myself drifting. This is a nice, easy read and it is cozy but ultimately it didn't do much for me and that's okay! It could just be my own preferences. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for thi I think I tricked myself with this book. With a name like The Confession Club I was expecting a thriller or suspense novel but this isn't the case at all. This is a contemporary fiction book about a group of women who meet once a month and talk. It was heartwarming and interesting but I often found myself drifting. This is a nice, easy read and it is cozy but ultimately it didn't do much for me and that's okay! It could just be my own preferences. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for this ARC, all opinions are my own.
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  • Missy
    January 1, 1970
    What a fantastic, feel-good story. The reader gets to drop in among friends in a small, rural town full of kind people. Each character could have a book of her own, and I hope some will.“That’s what life is, at its best . A confession club: people admitting to doubts and fears and failures . That’s what brings us closer to one another, our imperfections.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    I was disappointed with this book. First, I didn't find that the Confession Club was actually a huge part of the storyline. I was ready for a story about women building friendships through the sharing of stories, but the club was really minor plot point. Also, I was not excited to find some of the same characters from the Arthur Truluv books. I enjoyed the first two books with these characters, but am just not that interested in their journey at this point.
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  • Marsha
    January 1, 1970
    Super-enjoyable and uplifting intertwining stories about women who have suffered deep loss, but problem solve through friendship, honesty and great food. Reading this book was like taking a bubble bath while sipping prosecco - - just what the soul needs sometime.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Berg’s novels are always uplifting and hopeful and “The Confession Club” is no different. My only “complaint” with this novel is that it didn’t keep my attention and primarily I think that’s because this book is geared to a slightly older audience. Definitely a novel that can be enjoyed by all, but I think a certain age range would most connect with this story and these characters.
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  • Beth H
    January 1, 1970
    The Confession Club is a story about a group of women who meet regularly for dinner, and to confess secrets, concerns, or other items on their mind - kind of like a book club meeting. Iris and Mandy join the group and each have items in their life that they are struggling with. This book carries over characters from previous books by Berg, however it is easily read as a stand-alone book. For me, this book got a little slow, and there wasn't a strong enough character or main story line to keep me The Confession Club is a story about a group of women who meet regularly for dinner, and to confess secrets, concerns, or other items on their mind - kind of like a book club meeting. Iris and Mandy join the group and each have items in their life that they are struggling with. This book carries over characters from previous books by Berg, however it is easily read as a stand-alone book. For me, this book got a little slow, and there wasn't a strong enough character or main story line to keep me eagerly turning the pages. However, it is a pleasant story and plot.
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