Finna
When an elderly customer at a big box furniture store slips through a portal to another dimension, it’s up to two minimum-wage employees to track her across the multiverse and protect their company’s bottom line. Multi-dimensional swashbuckling would be hard enough, but our two unfortunate souls broke up a week ago.Can friendship blossom from the ashes of a relationship? In infinite dimensions, all things are possible.

Finna Details

TitleFinna
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 25th, 2020
PublisherTor.com
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, LGBT, Novella, GLBT, Queer, Fiction

Finna Review

  • Chaima ✨ شيماء
    January 1, 1970
    This was perfectly okay. Not the fun, page-turning romp about two exes who have to track an elderly woman through the multiverse after IKEA's maze-like interior punches a whole through space-time that I signed up for, but still okay. The plot plods along and the characters could emote more effusively, but the book's biggest strength lies in its razor-sharp critique of capitalism and the subpar treatment of retail workers.
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  • ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣
    January 1, 1970
    This store comes with a built-in 'creepy Scandinavian Narnia'. Yep, that's a multiverse take on IKEA, the modern corporate slavery, maskhål (aka mareji aka wormholes) and nonbinary ideas.They even have tutorials on this: 'Wormholes and You'. These tutorials come equipped with 'the most obnoxiously heterosexual blobs' flirting!The Rooms in here are hilarious:Q:Edgelord Rockabilly Dorm Room...The Nihilist Bachelor Cube... its cousins Coked-out Divorcée, Parental Basement Dweller, and Massage This store comes with a built-in 'creepy Scandinavian Narnia'. Yep, that's a multiverse take on IKEA, the modern corporate slavery, maskhål (aka mareji aka wormholes) and nonbinary ideas.They even have tutorials on this: 'Wormholes and You'. These tutorials come equipped with 'the most obnoxiously heterosexual blobs' flirting!The Rooms in here are hilarious:Q:Edgelord Rockabilly Dorm Room...The Nihilist Bachelor Cube—... its cousins Coked-out Divorcée, Parental Basement Dweller, and Massage Therapist Who Lived in Their Studio... Midlife Crisis Mom room... Other nice stuff:Q:To go where she wanted, she had to get lost, and it seemed almost instinctual to do that now. She’d been lost for a long time, rudderless. (c)Q:Heartache felt like a persistent hangover: lethargy, a headache, an unshakeable belief in the cruelty of the world, drifting outside of time. It was hard to keep up the bullshit facade of industriousness when she felt entirely dead inside. (c)Q:Each room was alien and strange relative to the one before it. Strung together, they resembled an ugly necklace designed by a child, picking out the most garish beads to thread. (c)Q:She managed to misgender me four times in two minutes,” Jules said. They bent down to pick up the books they’d knocked off the shelf. “Two different pronouns, completely ignored my nametag, eventually settled on calling me ‘the kid.’” (c)Q:Everything at work is part of a set with everything else, they’d explained. I don’t fit into any of those sets. (c)Q:“Seriously?... We find a wrinkle in time and you tell the manager?” (c)Q:Jules always wanted to run away. For a long time they’d talked about the two of them leaving together, moving or traveling. The destination changed, but the wanderlust remained the same. The last few weeks, they had more often talked about disappearing on their own. No destination in particular, just … away. (c)Q:... their exquisitely painful “sensitivity training.” She’d only gotten through the latter by focusing on her and Jules’s plans to get obliteratingly drunk afterward. (c)Q:“This video is making me gayer out of spite,” (c)Q:The bizarre zoetrope of Marks and Danas ended with the two actors in foam dinosaur costumes. (c)Q:“I’d rather face down a whatever-the-hell than constantly hear I’m a screw-up who can’t do obvious, simple tasks,” ...“That’s not what I think.” …“It’s what everyone thinks,”... “Like doing things my own way is the most ridiculous shit they’ve ever heard of, even though it’s the only way I’ve ever been happy. Nobody says it to my face, but everyone here treats me like it’s a miracle I’ve gotten this far on my own. I’m on my last warning before I get fired. Tricia would probably be thrilled if I didn’t come back.” (c)Q:The weirdest part about walking through the maskhål was that it wasn’t weird at all. (c)Q:They may have moved in a personal chaos field, but it made them more at ease with the unexpected and strange than anyone. ... Jules was the person you always, always wanted on your zombie apocalypse team. (c)Q:You ignore inconvenient realities like your girlfriend is fucked up in the head and there are giant spiders in other worlds! Then when the problems get too big to ignore, you run. (c)Q:She’d lived with fear and anxiety for so long, and fell into fits of dread and despair over the smallest things. Going to work. Making a dentist appointment. Grocery shopping. The light right after the sun went down, when she realized she’d accomplished almost nothing that day. All normal things that normal people could deal with, and she was never equal to the challenge of them. Catastrophe seemed to lurk around every corner, and she felt constantly out of control.Now Ava was literally at sea, in an alien universe, at the whim of her shitty retail job. She had no control. Her limbs were already drifting toward exhaustion. And she was calm. (c)Q:I would have happily gone down with my ship, but that would have meant losing a battle, and I was never very good at that. (c)Q:Getting lost for lack of a better option loses its appeal after a while. (c)Q:They turned the corner and walked into a nightmare. (c)Q:“You weren’t planning on coming back, were you?”...“Didn’t imagine it would be because I was holding back a swarm of violent sales associates, though.” (c)Q:Was this her world? If it was, why did it feel so strange? (c)Q:“My boss, Tricia, always said that we were a family. I should have realized she meant that I would have to put up with constant bullshit.” (c)Q:“You know what I loved about traveling by marejii?”...“It showed me that there were infinite possibilities, at all times. After I made captain of the Anahita, I worried over every decision, doubted whether I was brave or smart or strong enough to pull my mission off and protect my crew. I could remind myself that somewhere in the multiverse of possibility, there existed a world where I was all of those things. Maybe it was the world that I already lived in.” ...“Now the way I see it,” she said, “there are infinite universes where Jules died. And infinite universes where they’re alive. Similarly, there are worlds where you are too much of a coward to find out, and worlds where you are brave enough. So. It’s up to you: which of those worlds do we exist in right now?” (c)
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  • K.J. Charles
    January 1, 1970
    A very entertaining concept: IKEA(ish) stores are so confusing that they become portals to alternate worlds. When a customer wanders into a wormhole, two lowly retail grunts (who have just broken up, as well) are forced to go to the rescue. Monsters, pirates, adventure, and personal growth result. A delightful, deeply human/e story which is also a joy for anyone who's lost years of their life in blue and yellow retail hell.
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  • Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 StarsThis was such an entertaining science fiction novella that bought it elements of horror with some dangerous furniture. Yet despite the goofy synopsis, this was a surprisingly heartfelt story. I only expected a fun, light-hearted adventure, but I honestly didnt think I would love the story as much as I did. First, the IKEA-like setting was fantastic. The story reminded me a bit of Horrorstor by Grady Hendrix in how it explores the pains of retail employment. I also really appreciated 4.5 StarsThis was such an entertaining science fiction novella that bought it elements of horror with some dangerous furniture. Yet despite the goofy synopsis, this was a surprisingly heartfelt story. I only expected a fun, light-hearted adventure, but I honestly didn’t think I would love the story as much as I did. First, the IKEA-like setting was fantastic. The story reminded me a bit of Horrorstor by Grady Hendrix in how it explores the pains of retail employment. I also really appreciated reading about a non-binary character because it is an area of the LGBT+ community that I don’t see represented in most of the fiction that I read. I felt that the conversations surrounding identity and misgendering really added to the depth of the narrative. Overall, I really liked the characters and found myself becoming quite attached. I thought the ending was excellent and I will definitely re-read this one.I would highly recommend this one to readers looking for a kooky science fiction horror with some excellent diverse characters and emotional story. Disclaimer: I received a digital copy from the publisher, Tor.com.
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  • Fiona
    January 1, 1970
    In a world very similar to our own (but importantly legally distinct!) a separated couple must embark on a voyage to save that most important of people - a customer.Finna was a fun read, if a short one. There's always this dilemma with novellas - the most inventive and imaginative never quite seem long enough to properly explore what they offer the reader; that holds true here, but the worlds presented were so interesting and downright cool that I couldn't take a star away. But I would In a world very similar to our own (but importantly legally distinct!) a separated couple must embark on a voyage to save that most important of people - a customer.Finna was a fun read, if a short one. There's always this dilemma with novellas - the most inventive and imaginative never quite seem long enough to properly explore what they offer the reader; that holds true here, but the worlds presented were so interesting and downright cool that I couldn't take a star away. But I would absolutely love a follow-up that has the time to really get into some of these universes!A very fun read that I've rounded up from 3.5 stars, and hopefully one that will be followed with a sequel.
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  • The Captain
    January 1, 1970
    Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . .This novella answers the question about what would happen if a wormhole opened up in Ikea, I mean, LitenVärld (copyright issues!).  In this short but fun #ownvoices story, a grandmother wanders through the portal to another universe and gets lost.  Two employees have been tasked to find her . . . only they just broke up a week ago and are barely speaking.The Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . .This novella answers the question about what would happen if a wormhole opened up in Ikea, I mean, LitenVärld (copyright issues!).  In this short but fun #ownvoices story, a grandmother wanders through the portal to another universe and gets lost.  Two employees have been tasked to find her . . . only they just broke up a week ago and are barely speaking.The premise is awesome but I wasn't sure at first if I was going like this one.  The humor style took some getting used to and had quite a few pop culture references at the start.  Some of it entertained me like how each LitenVärld furniture room set-up had a nickname like "Nihilist Bachelor Room."  Other parts could be sarcastic but kinda felt painful and mean-spirited.  It was an odd juxtaposition but I got the hang of it.  Having worked in retail (ugh!) I could relate to commentary of working for a soulless corporation with arbitrary rules and conformity issues.The heart of the story lies with the two main characters, Ava and Jules, and how they are coping with the end of their romantic relationship.  It really does capture the feel of knowing that a partnership has to end but still struggling with conflicting emotions about the transition.  It doesn't help when ye be working at a job ye hate and seemingly have nowhere to go.  It was interesting to read about a very unhealthy relationship between two otherwise nice people.The major complaint I have about this one is that it was actually too short.  The relationship between Jules and Ava was excellent and obviously the main point of the story but I would have liked more world building.  I loved why the wormholes appeared and how the corporation dealt with them.  The commentary about diversity and relationships was excellent but I couldn't help but want more details about the strange lands.  The handful of other worlds felt lightly sketched in.No regrets here at all though.  I will certainly be looking for Cirpri's next work.So lastly . . .Thank ye Tor.com!
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  • Lisa Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    What fun! Finna is a story about wormholes opening up in an Ikea-like superstore, and it's also a story about relationships and heartbreak and healing. And did I mention the WORMHOLES in IKEA? This novella is fast-paced and funny, with quirky, snappy dialogue and weird as hell alternate universes. In a Swedish furniture store! Really a blast -- check it out!Review copy courtesy of the publisher via NetGalley.
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  • Thomas Wagner
    January 1, 1970
    (Closer to 3.5 stars.) For a novella, Nino Cipris FINNA is as ambitious as they come. Ive read entire trilogies that dont aim to cover as much storytelling ground as this little book. Like many other novellas Ive read from Tor.com, part of me thinks it needed to be longer to give all of its ideas room to breathe. But it is a highly entertaining, often very funny story with some really heartfelt queer rep, and you cant exactly criticize it for having a lot on its mind.Ava is an employee of (Closer to 3.5 stars.) For a novella, Nino Cipri’s FINNA is as ambitious as they come. I’ve read entire trilogies that don’t aim to cover as much storytelling ground as this little book. Like many other novellas I’ve read from Tor.com, part of me thinks it needed to be longer to give all of its ideas room to breathe. But it is a highly entertaining, often very funny story with some really heartfelt queer rep, and you can’t exactly criticize it for having a lot on its mind.Ava is an employee of LitenVärld (Swedish for “small world”), a cog in the machine of a sprawling corporate entity patterned only just a wee bit after a well-known Swedish big-box retailer of snap-together home furnishings. Work is stressful enough as it is, and the fact Ava’s ex-partner, non-binary Jules, also works at the same location isn’t helping. One day, a customer approaches Ava and her manager Tricia with an unusual emergency. Her grandmother has simply vanished without a trace somewhere within the vast labyrinth of the store.Cut to an emergency employee meeting, where we (and apparently the entire non-management staff of the store) learn that LitenVärld is an active hub for wormholes into alternate universes. It would appear the elderly lady got pulled into one of these. But no worries. Management has procedures in place for locating individuals who go missing through a wormhole, involving a handheld homing device called the FINNA (Swedish for “to find”). All that’s needed are two “volunteers.” You see where this is going.So, I’m gonna say right from the jump that FINNA is an absolute delight to read. But its ambitions do render it uneven. For one thing, there are essentially three stories competing for the reader here. The first is a wicked satire of big-box retail capitalism and how it not only reduces both its workers and its customers to mere drones, but how it finds a way to reduce everything — even individuality — to an aesthetic in a catalog. The second story is a breathless adventure through parallel timelines into other worlds, which has a kind of Peter Jackson sweep despite the overall shortness of the book. And finally, there’s a disarmingly intimate and personal relationship drama which serves as the book’s emotional engine. (continued...)
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  • Lauren Stoolfire
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.When an elderly customer at a Swedish big box furniture store but not that one slips through a portal to another dimension, its up to two minimum-wage employees to track her across the multiverse and protect their companys bottom line. Multi-dimensional swashbuckling would be hard enough, but those two unfortunate souls broke up a week ago. To find the missing granny, Ava and Jules will brave carnivorous furniture, swarms of I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.When an elderly customer at a Swedish big box furniture store — but not that one — slips through a portal to another dimension, it’s up to two minimum-wage employees to track her across the multiverse and protect their company’s bottom line. Multi-dimensional swashbuckling would be hard enough, but those two unfortunate souls broke up a week ago. To find the missing granny, Ava and Jules will brave carnivorous furniture, swarms of identical furniture spokespeople, and the deep resentment simmering between them. Can friendship blossom from the ashes of their relationship? In infinite dimensions, all things are possible.Finna by Nino Cipri is an all new favorite for me. Even though it's still only midway through the month of January I think this will be one of the best reads of 2020. The author's style and sense of humor is right up my alley. If you're looking for an epic and diverse sci-fi novella that you will want to devour in one afternoon, this is a perfect place to start. It was marvelous getting to spend time with Ava and Jules, but Captain Uzmala Nouresh was easily my favorite character. This novella is short and sweet, but it's more than worth your time. Overall, if you're a fan of Dark Matter by Blake Crouch, A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab, and even Horrorstor by Grady Hendrix, I can't recommend picking up Finna enough. I need to see more of this multiverse and these characters in the future - and they could be doing anything at all just so we get to see them all again. I can't wait to see what Nino Cipri does next.
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  • FanFiAddict
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 8.5/10Thanks to the publisher and author for an advance reading copy of Finna in exchange for an honest review. Receiving this eARC did not influence my thoughts or opinions on the novel.Multi-dimensional portal opens up in IKEA-like store that leads to a lionhearted adventure between two (2) low-waged co-workers who just broke things off. Oh, and did I mention they are going after someones grandma who just happened upon said portal? What more do you need?Like a majority of Tor.coms Rating: 8.5/10Thanks to the publisher and author for an advance reading copy of Finna in exchange for an honest review. Receiving this eARC did not influence my thoughts or opinions on the novel.Multi-dimensional portal opens up in IKEA-like store that leads to a lionhearted adventure between two (2) low-waged co-workers who just broke things off. Oh, and did I mention they are going after someone’s grandma who just happened upon said portal? What more do you need?Like a majority of Tor.com’s novellas, Finna can easily be finished in one to two sittings, depending on how well you become ingrained in the source material. Weighing in at approx 144 pages, it isn’t going to beat you over the head with complex prose or exposition. What you will find is a fun and engaging read with heavy emotions, sassy characters, and an ending that opens up so many more possibilities.Going in and never having heard of Nino Cipri, I definitely had my hesitations, but after getting used to the writing style, use of pronouns, and the direction in which the story was headed, I was all for it. Definitely recommend this for those who enjoy portal fantasy or multi-dimensional sci-fi reads.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    When a shopper's grandmother accidentally gets lost inside a wormhole that opens up inside of their furniture store, ex-partners Jules and Ava are sent into the abyss to bring her back. In Finna, Cipri perfectly captures the soul-sucking turdfest that is corporate retail while also giving us the all the feels - because c'mon, who hasn't been stuck working a shit ass job that you hate but can't afford to leave while also attempting to avoid your ex, who also works there? Right? It's the perfect When a shopper's grandmother accidentally gets lost inside a wormhole that opens up inside of their furniture store, ex-partners Jules and Ava are sent into the abyss to bring her back. In Finna, Cipri perfectly captures the soul-sucking turdfest that is corporate retail while also giving us the all the feels - because c'mon, who hasn't been stuck working a shit ass job that you hate but can't afford to leave while also attempting to avoid your ex, who also works there? Right? It's the perfect balance of sci-fi meets queer love story and, while it's not quite as stunning as his collection Homesick, if you're looking for something light and engaging you'd do well to grab yourself a copy.
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  • Sana
    January 1, 1970
    HELLO, MULTIVERSE WITH A SIDE OF CAPITALISM AND QUEERNESS. Also, this is written by a queer and trans author. GET IT, TOR.COM
  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    I mean, you had me at wormholes in Ikea, right??!!I havent been into sci fi since...well, lets just say its been sooooo long that Id probably need a wormhole myself in order to access those far reaches of my memory. Im old and jaded enough now that youth itself feels like a foreign planet. But, using a recent spate of dystopian literary fiction novel-reading as a sort of launchpad, I mysteriously and unexpectedly orbited into a modest dystopian-tinged sci fi reading binge at the beginning of I mean, you had me at “wormholes in Ikea,” right??!!I haven’t been into sci fi since...well, let’s just say it’s been sooooo long that I’d probably need a wormhole myself in order to access those far reaches of my memory. I’m old and jaded enough now that youth itself feels like a foreign planet. But, using a recent spate of dystopian literary fiction novel-reading as a sort of launchpad, I mysteriously and unexpectedly orbited into a modest dystopian-tinged sci fi reading binge at the beginning of this year. Little did I know just how prescient this would shortly seem. In any case, it has been therapeutic; just as the dystopian has become increasingly watercolor-blurred with the photorealistic, so has sci fi come to seem less...well, less “Fi.” And, given all this, it’s reassuring to explore creative, alternative visions of survival under challenging circumstances with humanity and humor.I think one of the best publishers to do so as of late is Tor.com, and if we are all going to be homebound for some time, then I would urge anyone seeking an efficient pick-me-up to try out some of their affordable e-novellas, of which Finna is one. And good news if this is a new and uncertain frontier for you! - as its premise both might and might not indicate, Finna isn’t a deep dark downer or a distant space-agey trip. It’s really more of a quickish/lightish love story that also...let’s say metaphorically and colorfully, if economically...explores the dark underbelly of retail commerce, being stuck in a unfulfilling rut of work, and finding and following one’s true heart and vocation.(If you are seeking something equally fun that explores some similar themes but a bit more deeply yet also hilariously, then by all means immediately obtain a copy of QualityLand, by Mark Uwe-Kling, likely my favorite novel of the year. Actually, everyone should go out - or, er, stay in - and read that right now, regardless, especially since many of us are probably a little more dependent on...”TheShop”...than ever these days.)Another great thing about Tor.com, as other reviews indicate, is that they seamlessly integrate characters with diverse gender and/or sexual identities and preferred pronouns — they are just humans, as they should be, and these human characteristics are NOT central to or even part of the plot, as they so often are — and it’s so very refreshing. This one is no exception.I owe my personal discovery of Tor.com largely due to the generous coverage it’s received (and deservedly so) from the community of Book Riot contributors, and in particular its excellent podcasts and their frequent “star,” Liberty Hardy...goddess of these dark times. Thanks for converting a sci fi nonbeliever!Some other Tor.com novels I’ve read recently, and enjoyed: Upright Women Wanted and, of course, the entire and beloved by many Murderbot novella series (#1-4) by Martha Wells, likely my favorite new-to-me discovery of 2020. Given that these, and Murderbot itself, keep getting better and better and more nuanced as we go along, I absolutely can’t wait until the (full-length!) #5 is released in a few months...if the world can just WAIT to go ahead and end AFTER May 5, 2020, when I’m sure I’ll be ripping through that one in a couple hours, that would be great, thanks!
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  • Claire Rousseau
    January 1, 1970
    This was delightful, in turns creepy and touching and rage-inducing, with some proper 'holy shit' moments. Will be keeping an eye on whatever Cipri writes next! My first 5-star read of the year!
  • Silvia
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe 3.5 stars, this was a lot of fun!
  • Crini
    January 1, 1970
    SO here for "what would a wormhole in IKEA lead to?" and "queer relationships and queer feelings, the everyday awfulness of low-wage work, wormholes, and carnivorous furniture."(source)
  • Matthew Quann
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun little novella in which a recently split couple are pulled into a multiversal mess in the heart of an IKEA stand-in. The wacky ideas come hard and fast, and the relationship-in-question material is also pretty endearing. There was a bit too much virtue-signalling for me, but a bit of preaching won't go astray for everyone. I would have been happy reading more from this world (or any of its infinite alternate worlds), but was still satisfied by this one's end. Giving this one a This was a fun little novella in which a recently split couple are pulled into a multiversal mess in the heart of an IKEA stand-in. The wacky ideas come hard and fast, and the relationship-in-question material is also pretty endearing. There was a bit too much virtue-signalling for me, but a bit of preaching won't go astray for everyone. I would have been happy reading more from this world (or any of its infinite alternate worlds), but was still satisfied by this one's end. Giving this one a solid 3.5 stars.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Wormholes, a missing grandmother, relationship drama and even some eldritch god horror infuse this short and lively novella with excitement and heart. Finna was a lot of wacky fun, with some surprisingly thoughtful emotional moments and commentary on identity. I wasnt sure all these disparate elements would mesh together, I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Wormholes, a missing grandmother, relationship drama and even some eldritch god horror infuse this short and lively novella with excitement and heart. Finna was a lot of wacky fun, with some surprisingly thoughtful emotional moments and commentary on identity. I wasn’t sure all these disparate elements would mesh together, but by the end of the story I was completely convinced. Nino Cipri is a nonbinary author, and they have written an insightful, #ownvoices story dealing with the challenges of navigating through life in a world where many people don’t understand how hurtful some labels can be. This is also a story about wormholes and multiple universes and takes place in an IKEA-like big box store, so don’t be scared off by any perceived heavy content, because heavy this is not .Ava and Jules just broke up, but unfortunately they still work together at big box store LitenVärld. One day as Ava is filling in for another coworker on her day off and trying to avoid running into Jules, an elderly customer goes missing in the store. Management seems to know exactly what’s happened and calls a meeting to inform the LitenVärld employees that a “maskhål,” or wormhole, has opened up in the store and the customer has most likely wandered through it. Because Ava and Jules are the two employees with the least seniority, they are “volunteered” to enter the wormhole and find Ursula, the missing customer. Armed with a strange device called a FINNA—which supposedly will lead them to Ursula—Ava and Jules set out on a wild adventure full of alternate universes, killer furniture and elder gods who demand payment in blood. Along the way, they try to work out their differences and get some sage advice from a ship’s captain who just might be another version of the missing Ursula.I couldn’t help but compare this story to Grady Hendrix’s Horrorstör , which is another tale set in an IKEA-like store where lots of bad things happen. Luckily, Cipri has a completely different take on the idea, and I enjoyed this so much. The idea of wormholes connecting the different display rooms in LitenVärld was so clever, and trust me when I say I’m going to be very careful next time I visit IKEA and wander through the store! I loved the idea of the FINNA, the device that can “find” missing people. It’s sort of a steampunk contraption that comes complete with instructions for use in every language EXCEPT the one you speak--and of course, a handy pictograph section as well, just like the ones for putting IKEA furniture together. And I love how Cipri pokes fun at how easy it is to get lost in the store, which explains why there are so many wormholes in LitenVärld. It all made sense in a crazy way!I was happy to find, however, that this story is more than just a fluffy, fun romp through universes. Cipri gives us an interesting love story as well—and when I say “interesting,” I mean that a lot of stories don’t tackle that awkward phase in a relationship where it seems to be over, yet both parties are struggling to turn it into something else, something new. Ava and Jules may have fallen out of love, but as most of us know, it’s just not that simple. It takes a couple of wormholes and a very wise ship’s captain to show Ava that perhaps there is life after a break-up, and the author does this in such a wonderful way.Cipri also did a great job of focusing on a nonbinary character who is, frankly, sick and tired of having to explain themselves. Despite the fact that Jules has pronoun information written on their LitenVärld name tag, customers are constantly misgendering them and their patience is wearing thin. Some of the dialog surrounding Jules’ ongoing frustration is really funny—”She managed to misgender me four times in two minutes”—but it’s that sad kind of funny where you just want to give Jules a hug. And Ava has anxiety, so there’s a bit of mental health rep in the story as well.This was a quick read that I managed to finish in only a couple of hours, and that would be my only complaint—it just seemed too short. Finna is fast paced and jumps from place to place with barely any time for the reader to catch their breath. A lot of things are thrown into the mix to create a weird mish-mash of weirdness: man-eating furniture, a restaurant where you have to pay with your blood, a Lovecraftian god called “Mother” who might be trying to destroy the world, and lots more. I have to admit all these elements together sort of made my head spin and I think a little more time with each one would have made the transitions smoother. But overall this was so much fun. Cipri has a biting sense of humor, the kind I love, but they also know when to inject their story with heart and emotion. I would be very interested to see what the author can do with a novel-length story, so here’s hoping Nino Cipri is hard at work on their next project!Big thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy.This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    The nitty-gritty: Wormholes, a missing grandmother, relationship drama and even some eldritch god horror infuse this short and lively novella with excitement and heart.Finna was a lot of wacky fun, with some surprisingly thoughtful emotional moments and commentary on identity. I wasnt sure all these disparate elements would mesh together, but by the end of the story I was completely convinced. Nino Cipri is a nonbinary author, and they have written an insightful, #ownvoices story dealing with The nitty-gritty: Wormholes, a missing grandmother, relationship drama and even some eldritch god horror infuse this short and lively novella with excitement and heart.Finna was a lot of wacky fun, with some surprisingly thoughtful emotional moments and commentary on identity. I wasn’t sure all these disparate elements would mesh together, but by the end of the story I was completely convinced. Nino Cipri is a nonbinary author, and they have written an insightful, #ownvoices story dealing with the challenges of navigating through life in a world where many people don’t understand how hurtful some labels can be. This is also a story about wormholes and multiple universes and takes place in an IKEA-like big box store, so don’t be scared off by any perceived heavy content, because heavy this is not.Ava and Jules just broke up, but unfortunately they still work together at big box store LitenVärld. One day as Ava is filling in for another coworker on her day off and trying to avoid running into Jules, an elderly customer goes missing in the store. Management seems to know exactly what’s happened and calls a meeting to inform the LitenVärld employees that a “maskhål,” or wormhole, has opened up in the store and the customer has most likely wandered through it. Because Ava and Jules are the two employees with the least seniority, they are “volunteered” to enter the wormhole and find Ursula, the missing customer. Armed with a strange device called a FINNA—which supposedly will lead them to Ursula—Ava and Jules set out on a wild adventure full of alternate universes, killer furniture and elder gods who demand payment in blood. Along the way, they try to work out their differences and get some sage advice from a ship’s captain who just might be another version of the missing Ursula.I couldn’t help but compare this story to Grady Hendrix’s Horrorstör, which is another tale set in an IKEA-like store where lots of bad things happen. Luckily, Cipri has a completely different take on the idea, and I enjoyed this so much. The idea of wormholes connecting the different display rooms in LitenVärld was so clever, and trust me when I say I’m going to be very careful next time I visit IKEA and wander through the store! I loved the idea of the FINNA, the device that can “find” missing people. It’s sort of a steampunk contraption that comes complete with instructions for use in every language EXCEPT the one you speak--and of course, a handy pictograph section as well, just like the ones for putting IKEA furniture together. And I love how Cipri pokes fun at how easy it is to get lost in the store, which explains why there are so many wormholes in LitenVärld. It all made sense in a crazy way!I was happy to find, however, that this story is more than just a fluffy, fun romp through universes. Cipri gives us an interesting love story as well—and when I say “interesting,” I mean that a lot of stories don’t tackle that awkward phase in a relationship where it seems to be over, yet both parties are struggling to turn it into something else, something new. Ava and Jules may have fallen out of love, but as most of us know, it’s just not that simple. It takes a couple of wormholes and a very wise ship’s captain to show Ava that perhaps there is life after a break-up, and the author does this in such a wonderful way.Cipri also did a great job of focusing on a nonbinary character who is, frankly, sick and tired of having to explain themselves. Despite the fact that Jules has pronoun information written on their LitenVärld name tag, customers are constantly misgendering them and their patience is wearing thin. Some of the dialog surrounding Jules’ ongoing frustration is really funny—”She managed to misgender me four times in two minutes”—but it’s that sad kind of funny where you just want to give Jules a hug. And Ava has anxiety, so there’s a bit of mental health rep in the story as well.This was a quick read that I managed to finish in only a couple of hours, and that would be my only complaint—it just seemed too short. Finna is fast paced and jumps from place to place with barely any time for the reader to catch their breath. A lot of things are thrown into the mix to create a weird mish-mash of weirdness: man-eating furniture, a restaurant where you have to pay with your blood, a Lovecraftian god called “Mother” who might be trying to destroy the world, and lots more. I have to admit all these elements together sort of made my head spin and I think a little more time with each one would have made the transitions smoother. But overall this was so much fun. Cipri has a biting sense of humor, the kind I love, but they also know when to inject their story with heart and emotion. I would be very interested to see what the author can do with a novel-length story, so here’s hoping Nino Cipri is hard at work on their next project!
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  • Carla B. Estruch
    January 1, 1970
    Beware! There are chairs that could eat you whole in one bite in this tale about a fictional Ikea.It was the first time I read something by Nino Cipri and I can assure you it will not be the last. I enjoyed FINNA a lot and, in fact, I read it in two days. The story's rhythm, the idea behind it and the characters that lived through it... For me, it all made a fabulous new constellation. I just hope it is not the last we heard from them. I want to travel eternally through this multiverse!The thing Beware! There are chairs that could eat you whole in one bite in this tale about a fictional Ikea.It was the first time I read something by Nino Cipri and I can assure you it will not be the last. I enjoyed FINNA a lot and, in fact, I read it in two days. The story's rhythm, the idea behind it and the characters that lived through it... For me, it all made a fabulous new constellation. I just hope it is not the last we heard from them. I want to travel eternally through this multiverse!The thing I enjoyed the most was the relationship between both main characters. It is not easy to see a break-up in fiction were the two people involved were still hurting and wishing so badly to seek normalcy again with the other person. It resonated a lot with my own experience and I underlined whole paragraphs that reflected my inner feelings.But I felt that I needed more traveling in order to get to know them more. Although this may be because I was enjoying it so much that I wanted it to be an eternal book. So congratulations, Nino Cipri, because I will want to read whatever you throw at me in the future.
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  • K.A. Doore
    January 1, 1970
    My first thought on reading about this book was it would be a bit like Grady Hendrix's Horrorstör - a humorous horror takedown of Capitalism and retail "culture" through the lens of our most favorite-to-hate Swedish retailer - and I was only half wrong. This book is about the unquiet horror of capitalism, yes, but it's also a poignant and hopeful take on identity, family, and the paths we choose - or sometimes seize - for ourselves.. When an elderly customer goes missing, Ava is volun-told to My first thought on reading about this book was it would be a bit like Grady Hendrix's Horrorstör - a humorous horror takedown of Capitalism and retail "culture" through the lens of our most favorite-to-hate Swedish retailer - and I was only half wrong. This book is about the unquiet horror of capitalism, yes, but it's also a poignant and hopeful take on identity, family, and the paths we choose - or sometimes seize - for ourselves.. When an elderly customer goes missing, Ava is volun-told to team up with her recent ex, Jules, to find and retrieve her. What follows is a series of laugh-out-loud retail moments, squirming, living wormholes, and an exploration of time and space that shows you just how far - and how close - home can be.I hesitate to say more because this is such a tight, excellently plotted novella and to reveal too much - while it couldn't possibly spoil its charm - might spoil its delightful surprises. If you like stories that are queer to their bones, sweet as a sunrise, and just a little scary, then you will love this novella.
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  • Casey the Reader
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Tor.com for the free advance copy of this book.Ava and Jules are sales associates at an IKEA-like store, and they have just broken off their relationship. The first day they see each other at work again, an elderly shopper wanders into a wormhole that has opened in one of their showrooms. Naturally, Ava and Jules are selected to travel the multiverse together to find her. FINNA is only about 100 pages long, but it packs a whole lot into those pages. It's hilarious while also taking aim Thanks to Tor.com for the free advance copy of this book.Ava and Jules are sales associates at an IKEA-like store, and they have just broken off their relationship. The first day they see each other at work again, an elderly shopper wanders into a wormhole that has opened in one of their showrooms. Naturally, Ava and Jules are selected to travel the multiverse together to find her. FINNA is only about 100 pages long, but it packs a whole lot into those pages. It's hilarious while also taking aim at capitalism, and it's effortlessly diverse in terms of gender, sexuality, and race. The parallel universes Ava and Jules find themselves in are wonderfully inventive, and the post-breakup arguments and conversations between them are heartbreakingly real. FINNA is full of love, action, and sticking it to the man. I do wish it was longer! I would have loved to spend more time on a few things referenced in passing, particularly Ava's anxiety and depression. I'm definitely looking forward to picking up HOMESICK, Cipri's collection of short stories from 2019.
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  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really fun and quick read. For some reason I just really like this new trend of setting horror or SFF books in knock-off IKEAs so I was on board from the start but it was also just a cool story with interesting characters. A fun inter-dimensional adventure with wormholes, the evils of capitalism, and some great non-binary rep. Would definitely recommend it!
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Cipri has the deft skill of weaving characterization into their plotting. I loved the banter, but that sarcasm does cut. Humorous and biting. Spend an afternoon or morning or night in this authors wickedly wacky world. I dont think you will be disappointed.5 out of 5 starsFor my full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2020/01/30/fi...For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog Cipri has the deft skill of weaving characterization into their plotting. I loved the banter, but that sarcasm does cut. Humorous and biting. Spend an afternoon or morning or night in this author’s wickedly wacky world. I don’t think you will be disappointed.5 out of 5 starsFor my full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2020/01/30/fi...For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog
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  • Jordan Shiveley
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished reading FINNA and I have to say the novella sized story is rapidly becoming one of my favorite lengths. Much like its minimum wage heartbroken protagonists Finna has little time to waste or words to mince before pulling you headlong into a lean, perfectly paced Swedish furniture tinged multidimensional horror romp.Oh also its a wrenching story of emotional trauma, queer romance and gender identity all mixed with carnivorous...well Ill let you find out what is carnivorous. Hint: I just finished reading FINNA and I have to say the novella sized story is rapidly becoming one of my favorite lengths. Much like it’s minimum wage heartbroken protagonists Finna has little time to waste or words to mince before pulling you headlong into a lean, perfectly paced Swedish furniture tinged multidimensional horror romp.Oh also it’s a wrenching story of emotional trauma, queer romance and gender identity all mixed with carnivorous...well I’ll let you find out what is carnivorous. Hint: it’s more than one thing...So you’re gonna want to run not aimlessly browse an ever more Byzantine system of modular shelving solutions your way over to smash that preorder button. This is one you’re going to want to give to friends...so maybe buy two?
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  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of Finna through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Finna is a whirlwind adventure set in a shocking environment. Written by Nino Cipri, this piece of speculative science fiction makes heavy use of wormholes, multiple dimensions, and the humbling nature that is minimum wage life. This novella takes a swipe at capitalism, all under the guise of science fiction and entertainment. Its a hilarious tale, yet carries with it several important messages, as well as a I received a copy of Finna through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Finna is a whirlwind adventure set in a shocking environment. Written by Nino Cipri, this piece of speculative science fiction makes heavy use of wormholes, multiple dimensions, and the humbling nature that is minimum wage life. This novella takes a swipe at capitalism, all under the guise of science fiction and entertainment. It’s a hilarious tale, yet carries with it several important messages, as well as a debate or two. Add in some brilliant representation and a touch of horror, and you’ve got yourself a unique and diverting read. Oh! And did I mention the pirates? Ava and Jules are just two ordinary minimum wage employees, stuck at a major store known for their confusing layouts. Okay, perhaps they’re not exactly ordinary. The adventure they’re about to take is certainly anything but. When a wormhole opens up in one of the departments, it’s up to the two lowest ranking members of the store to dive in and retrieve the lost customer. After all, it’s what a good employee does. And it protects the business. “We’re here to tell you what to do if a wormhole opens up on your shift! Oh my goodness. Finna was such an insane and entertaining read! I loved every minute of it. Actually, I read it twice before I even considered sitting down to write this review. And I had to resist the urge to read it a third time. So it is safe to say that I loved Finna. It was a scathing take on conglomerations and corporations. Yet it was highly satisfying to see. Especially all wrapped up in science fiction and humor. The tone of this novella was undoubtedly set by the snark and sass found within these pages. Honestly? This book had a little bit of everything, in just the right proportions. It was social commentary. It was science fiction. It was inter-dimensional space travel. It was a breakup story. It was a tale of friendship. It was representation. And it was full of aliens and pirates. Really, what more could you ask for? Along with being a totally unique read, it was also beautifully written. Nino Cipri is an author worth checking out. I know I’ll be adding their entire backlog to my TBR list, once I’m done writing this review. I absolutely adore their sense of humor, as well as their sense of adventure and character building. Check out more reviews over at Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • catLin
    January 1, 1970
    Have you ever got lost in IKEA and wondered if you haven't ended up in a different world? Well, in this story someone's grandma did just that and it's up to Ava(MC) and her ex to find the poor woman. This was so much fun. It's queer (the MC is a queer woman and her ex is non-binary). It has multidimensional travel. And the worlds visited are just fascinating (would live to elaborate but won't because spoilers).It's a quick read but I was still satisfied. Thought, if it was longer I also wouldn't Have you ever got lost in IKEA and wondered if you haven't ended up in a different world? Well, in this story someone's grandma did just that and it's up to Ava(MC) and her ex to find the poor woman. This was so much fun. It's queer (the MC is a queer woman and her ex is non-binary). It has multidimensional travel. And the worlds visited are just fascinating (would live to elaborate but won't because spoilers).It's a quick read but I was still satisfied. Thought, if it was longer I also wouldn't complain. I could read hundreds more pages about Ava and Jules just exploring different worlds.For something so short it actually gets pretty deep too, touching on mental health, relationships, and even touching on issues of capitalism. Highly recommend
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  • Lulu (the library leopard)
    January 1, 1970
    love some good bite-sized sff about the multiverses & how capitalism sucks!
  • Kristel
    January 1, 1970
    This was great!! Multiverse, super queer, an ikea of doom, diverse. I love sci-fi books!!
  • Tsana Dolichva
    January 1, 1970
    FINNA by Nino Cipri is an amusing novella set in a thinly veiled Ikea store in the US. It features wormholes to parallel universes, and two employees who recently broke up and have not yet worked through the awkward post-breakup period.I really enjoyed FINNA. As is my habit, I had forgotten what it was about (aside from thinking that it was vaguely Scandinavian which it was, emphasis on the vaguely). The opening of the book sets the scene with a focus on the protagonists general misery from her FINNA by Nino Cipri is an amusing novella set in a thinly veiled Ikea store in the US. It features wormholes to parallel universes, and two employees who recently broke up and have not yet worked through the awkward post-breakup period.I really enjoyed FINNA. As is my habit, I had forgotten what it was about (aside from thinking that it was vaguely Scandinavian which it was, emphasis on the vaguely). The opening of the book sets the scene with a focus on the protagonist’s general misery from her retail job and more specific misery from her recent breakup. It gave me just enough time to wonder what the speculative fiction element was going to be before introducing the wormholes. Then it turned into a fun and slightly absurd adventure story as Ava and Jules are forced to go on a rescue mission.Since this is a relatively short read, I'm not sure there's very much more I can say without skirting spoilers, so I will leave you with one final opinion. I really liked that this wasn't a romance story. Ava and Jules were a couple, now they're not and the story arc is absolutely not about them getting back together. I'm not sure I've come across this as a central focus of a spec fic book before. I highly approve of the depiction of healthy non-romantic relationships in books.I highly recommend FINNA if you enjoy universe hopping and/or slightly absurd science fiction. Or if you hate Ikea (personally, I don't get the Ikea hate, but whatever). I will certainly be keeping an eye on other books and stories I come across by Cipri.4.5 / 5 starsYou can read more of my reviews on my blog.
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