The Paris Library
Paris, 1939. Odile Souchet is obsessed with books and the Dewey Decimal System, which makes order out of chaos. She soon has it all – a handsome police officer beau, an English best friend, a beloved twin, and a job at the American Library in Paris, a thriving community of students, writers, diplomats, and book lovers. Yet when war is declared, there's also a war on words. Montana, 1983. Widowed and alone, Odile suffers the solitary confinement of small-town life. Though most adults are cowed by her, the neighbor girl will not let her be. Lily, a lonely teenager yearning to break free of Froid is obsessed by the older French woman who lives next door and wants to know her secrets. As the two become friends, Odile sees herself in Lily – the same love of language, the same longings, the same lethal jealousy. The Paris Library’s dual narratives explore the relationships that make us who we are – family and friends, first loves and favorite authors – in the fairy tale setting of the City of Light. It also explores the geography of resentment, the consequences of unspeakable betrayal, and what happens when the people we count on for understanding and protection fail us. The wit, empathy, and deep research that brings The Paris Library to life also brings to light a cast of lively historical characters and a little-known chapter of World War II history: the story of the American librarian, Miss Reeder, who created the Soldiers’ Service to deliver books to servicemen, and who later faced the Nazi ‘Book Protector’ in order to keep her library open. She and her colleagues defied the Bibliotheksschutz by delivering books to Jewish readers after they were forbidden from entering the library.

The Paris Library Details

TitleThe Paris Library
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 2nd, 2020
PublisherLaguna
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Cultural, France, Adult, War, World War II, Writing, Books About Books, Literature, 20th Century, Contemporary

The Paris Library Review

  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    This story brings “a little-known chapter of WWII history: the story of the American librarian, Miss Reeder, who created the Soldiers’ Service to deliver books to servicemen, and who later faced the Nazi ‘Book Protector’ in order to keep her library open. She and her colleagues defied the Bibliotheksschutz by delivering books to Jewish readers after they were forbidden from entering the library.”Montana, 1983. Lily, a lonely teenager, is working on a school project, a report on France. She goes This story brings “a little-known chapter of WWII history: the story of the American librarian, Miss Reeder, who created the Soldiers’ Service to deliver books to servicemen, and who later faced the Nazi ‘Book Protector’ in order to keep her library open. She and her colleagues defied the Bibliotheksschutz by delivering books to Jewish readers after they were forbidden from entering the library.”Montana, 1983. Lily, a lonely teenager, is working on a school project, a report on France. She goes to her French neighbor Mrs. Gustafson to interview her for the report. Mrs. Gustafson is defined as the epitome of solitude. And what starts as a school project, turns into a heartfelt relationship. As the relationship deepens, Lily starts wondering about certain things about Odile’s life in Paris.Paris, 1939. Odile Gustafson has just started working as a librarian at the American Library.When England and France declare war on Germany, requests for magazines and books from soldiers pour in. The library gets busy with fulfilling those requests.Once, the Nazis occupy Paris, Miss Reeder, the Library Directress, realizes that churches and libraries will not be spared as she previously hoped. Certain people and books are not allowed in the library. Thus, an idea of smuggling books to Jewish subscribers springs up. But there are checkpoints everywhere, thus carrying something suspicious puts one in danger.Then, the crow letters, most unsigned, informing on Jews, keep arriving at the police station. Deceit weaves its way into the story.Loved the portrayal of Odile’s French family. They come through as very human, always criticizing father, depressed mother. The bond she has with her brother is very endearing. Lily is also a very likeable character. Her tone is expressionless most of the time. She is not the most enthusiastic person, which reflects her loneliness. But her journey of discovering herself is engrossing. Usually, I don’t like to read stories through the voice of a teenager, but there is something special about her and the relationship with Odile. When the story was unravelling in Paris for a longer time, I started to miss the present time story. “You came into my life like the evening star.”Typically, I don’t like foreign words being mixed with English. But I actually enjoyed little lessons of French that Lily was getting from Odile. It makes so much more sense as in this case you know what you’re reading.It’s also interesting to learn about Dewey Decimal number system. 813 (American) + 840 (French) + 302.34 (friendship) = 1955.34 (worthy books).This book doesn’t detail the events of WWII. The purpose of this book is to shed light on the Library and its people who risked their lives to lift other people up.I enjoyed the story and writing thoroughly, but if you enjoy more of a descriptive writing, then this book may not be the right fit for you.Source: ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tea Jovanović
    January 1, 1970
    The reading completed, 4 blissful days of pure enjoyment... Good story, from start to finish, serious story lined with fine humour... My favourite city in the world, Paris, American Library, WWII, Jews, friendships, hardships, strong emotions, and many life situations that can't be watched as black or white... there is also a bit of grey... Only the true book lovers can understand passion for books and risks to save them... Two parallel stories, the one in Paris during WWII and another 40 years The reading completed, 4 blissful days of pure enjoyment... Good story, from start to finish, serious story lined with fine humour... My favourite city in the world, Paris, American Library, WWII, Jews, friendships, hardships, strong emotions, and many life situations that can't be watched as black or white... there is also a bit of grey... Only the true book lovers can understand passion for books and risks to save them... Two parallel stories, the one in Paris during WWII and another 40 years later in Montana are well led... With all the teenage ailings well-crafted :)If you liked “Sarah's Key” by Tatiana de Rosney you will love this book too... #mustread
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  • Genevieve Graham
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely delightful story - stories - from the first page to the last. Odile was a wonderful lead, with her contagious energy and insatiable curiosity, then her wisdom and generosity later in life. I adored the menagerie of colourful ‘subscribers’, those who, like Odile, put their lives on the line to preserve the sanctity of the library and every word contained therein from the unthinkable actions of the enemy. I 100% recommend this book to anyone who understands the magic of books, Absolutely delightful story - stories - from the first page to the last. Odile was a wonderful lead, with her contagious energy and insatiable curiosity, then her wisdom and generosity later in life. I adored the menagerie of colourful ‘subscribers’, those who, like Odile, put their lives on the line to preserve the sanctity of the library and every word contained therein from the unthinkable actions of the enemy. I 100% recommend this book to anyone who understands the magic of books, friendships, and love in the face of evil.
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  • Grumpybookworm
    January 1, 1970
    3.5Thoroughly enjoyed this new take on the tired WWII fiction genre, even if it was yet another with the exact same cover. If this wasn't about a library I wouldn't have picked it up.I was 100% engaged in the story and gobbled up every spare hour I could to keep reading. I absolutely loved Odile and how imperfect she was. She was very relatable and felt like someone I would have sought out a friendship with, either in her younger age or her older age.My criticism is that it felt a bit rushed at 3.5Thoroughly enjoyed this new take on the tired WWII fiction genre, even if it was yet another with the exact same cover. If this wasn't about a library I wouldn't have picked it up.I was 100% engaged in the story and gobbled up every spare hour I could to keep reading. I absolutely loved Odile and how imperfect she was. She was very relatable and felt like someone I would have sought out a friendship with, either in her younger age or her older age.My criticism is that it felt a bit rushed at times - not fully flushed out. Some of the dialogue, actions, and character motivations were impacted by this I think. I found myself thinking "Wait a second - that doesn't add up." But they were things I could overlook because this was such an interesting story that had characters I was invested in, and again, brought a new story to a tired genre.I've found myself thinking recently that I want to be more aware of how I'm feeling when I'm reading a book (am I excited to get back to it? Am I curious what's going to happen? Do I want to spend time with the book over mindless screens?). I want to be less hyper-aware of a book's imperfections, shortcomings, what-have-you. At the end of the day, it's about the experience of characters and a story, and with this I truly enjoyed the experience and spending time with these characters. I hope this author goes on a tour because I'd love to hear her talk about this book and the story behind it!
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  • Mindy Stone
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 rounded up to 4
  • Deidre Butkus
    January 1, 1970
    This book was fantastic! I absolutely loved the book of Odile and her journey. The writing was beautiful and the side story of Lily was also beautifully written. I would highly recommend this story to anyone.
  • Márcia
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsThe Paris Library was an enjoyable read, full of feelings, interesting characters and one of my favourite settings for a book: a library! I was happy to know that the inspiration for this novel came from reality and that most characters existed. However, I felt something was missing and the 80's timeline with Lily didn't add much to the story in my opinion. I would have prefered if Odile's character and timeline were more developed as well as the overall struggles of surviving during 3.5 starsThe Paris Library was an enjoyable read, full of feelings, interesting characters and one of my favourite settings for a book: a library! I was happy to know that the inspiration for this novel came from reality and that most characters existed. However, I felt something was missing and the 80's timeline with Lily didn't add much to the story in my opinion. I would have prefered if Odile's character and timeline were more developed as well as the overall struggles of surviving during World War II while being able to keep working at the American Library in Paris. The American Library in ParisThe American Library in Paris
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  • Viktorija Rutkauskaitė
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting story. Would highly recommend :)
  • Shari Suarez
    January 1, 1970
    Some may groan "Not another WWII historical fiction book!" This one however is different from the others you may have read. It focuses on the American Library in Paris and how the staff stayed open and served their subscribers throughout most of the war. They also risked their lives to take books to their Jewish subscribers when they were no longer allowed to come to the library. Odile, the main character is a new librarian working in the American Library. She is trying to balance her work with Some may groan "Not another WWII historical fiction book!" This one however is different from the others you may have read. It focuses on the American Library in Paris and how the staff stayed open and served their subscribers throughout most of the war. They also risked their lives to take books to their Jewish subscribers when they were no longer allowed to come to the library. Odile, the main character is a new librarian working in the American Library. She is trying to balance her work with taking care of her family, worrying about her brother and a new love interest. There is also an alternate storyline in Montana in the 1980's where Odile has settled and befriends a teenage girl who wonders about the mysterious Frenchwoman in their midst. The story is incredibly uplifting at times and incredibly sad at others. The characters are all flawed but realistic. This is a beautiful story about how books and a library can change the world.
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  • Meghan
    January 1, 1970
    This book was received as an ARC from Atria Books in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own.I so loved this book from beginning to end. The library was part of a resistance and books were used as weapons but books could also uncover some secrets that could make or break your well-being. That is the case for Odile as she joins the resistance fighting in World War II. Then 50 years later Lily finds the old scriptures Odile has kept This book was received as an ARC from Atria Books in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own.I so loved this book from beginning to end. The library was part of a resistance and books were used as weapons but books could also uncover some secrets that could make or break your well-being. That is the case for Odile as she joins the resistance fighting in World War II. Then 50 years later Lily finds the old scriptures Odile has kept during the war and later finds out Lily has a connection with Odile and realized she is more involved with this resistance than for what she knows. This was a powerful historical fiction novel that I could not get enough of. I know our community will appreciate the power in books this book demonstrated.We will consider adding this title to our Historical Fiction collection at our library. That is why we give this book 5 stars.
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  • RoseMary Achey
    January 1, 1970
    A dual time fictional account of an American Library in Paris during the Nazi Occupation The Paris Library will be a strong book club contender when it goes on sale in early June 2020. The overall theme of this novel was forgivenesses. In both the historical and a bit in the 1980’s portion the primary characters are faced with forgiving loved ones for major transgressions or abandonment. As with other reviewers, I enjoyed the historical portion of the novel more than the more modern segment set A dual time fictional account of an American Library in Paris during the Nazi Occupation The Paris Library will be a strong book club contender when it goes on sale in early June 2020. The overall theme of this novel was forgivenesses. In both the historical and a bit in the 1980’s portion the primary characters are faced with forgiving loved ones for major transgressions or abandonment. As with other reviewers, I enjoyed the historical portion of the novel more than the more modern segment set in the 1980’s. The character’s in the historical segment of the novel had greater depth (they were based on real people) than those in the modern portion.
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  • Stephanie Crowe
    January 1, 1970
    The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien CharlesCharles has penned an intriguing historical fiction which includes her own work at the American Library in Paris. She actually came to know the descendants of the characters she vividly portrays in her new novel. A riveting story and I loved Odile and all her pals at the library who cared about their readers and also of Lily who met Odile later in life. A memorable adventure during WWII which reveals heroism and the importance of family, friends and The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien CharlesCharles has penned an intriguing historical fiction which includes her own work at the American Library in Paris. She actually came to know the descendants of the characters she vividly portrays in her new novel. A riveting story and I loved Odile and all her pals at the library who cared about their readers and also of Lily who met Odile later in life. A memorable adventure during WWII which reveals heroism and the importance of family, friends and love of country. Loved this story!!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This will be one of my favorite books for a long time. There is so much to love and admire about the main character, despite her flaws, and I appreciate just how fully realized she and many of the other characters are. They have quirks, flaws, admirable qualities -- and are vividly brought to life in this novel. I want to work in their library, visit their apartments, and most of all discuss books with them all! For those who groan at the thought of yet another World War II novel, I urge you to This will be one of my favorite books for a long time. There is so much to love and admire about the main character, despite her flaws, and I appreciate just how fully realized she and many of the other characters are. They have quirks, flaws, admirable qualities -- and are vividly brought to life in this novel. I want to work in their library, visit their apartments, and most of all discuss books with them all! For those who groan at the thought of yet another World War II novel, I urge you to stop reading them AFTER you have read this one; it is a perspective I have not often encountered, that of someone skimming on the edge of things, affected by the war but not quite in the war, her life greatly altered in some ways but remaining stable in others. The additional glimpse into her later years, introduced through the secondary narrator, grounds the novel in a wonderful compromise between happily ever after and the grim aftermath of war. There is one element I particularly delighted in -- patrons of the library are often handed "just the right book" to soothe their soul or complement their mood. It reminded me a bit (in that facet only) of The Little Paris Bookshop, another favorite of mine. Read The Paris Library, and then give it to anyone you know who loves books and libraries.(Note: I was provided an ARC of this book by the publisher.)
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  • Allison Krulik
    January 1, 1970
    *Thank for to Atria Books & Goodreads for this giveaway*I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I thought the story was great and a lot different from other historical fiction I have read. The characters were very compelling and the story was well written. A perfect story for all my fellow book lovers
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    3 1/2 stars – It was a slow start for me, but I couldn’t put it down after a few chapters.Shifting between 1939 Paris and 1984 Montana, the story tells the tale of Odile Souchet. Odile works in the American Library in Paris during the World War II German invasion of France. The novel follows her relationships with family, friends, and colleagues as she struggles to keep the library and the lives of those she loves.Pros: Well-developed characters, descriptive writingCons: Too many references to 3 1/2 stars – It was a slow start for me, but I couldn’t put it down after a few chapters.Shifting between 1939 Paris and 1984 Montana, the story tells the tale of Odile Souchet. Odile works in the American Library in Paris during the World War II German invasion of France. The novel follows her relationships with family, friends, and colleagues as she struggles to keep the library and the lives of those she loves.Pros: Well-developed characters, descriptive writingCons: Too many references to the Dewey Decimal System; writing was a little cloying at times.Recommended for those who liked All The Light We Cannot See and The Nightingale.
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  • Beskeslien
    January 1, 1970
    I finished this book in a day and a half I loved the characters, the setting,I loved how this book made you want to know what would happen what had happened. If you want a wonderful read this is your book
  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed it and think it will make a great book club recommendation, but it wasn't 100% my thing.Four stars for the WWII-set portions, three stars for the 80s-set parts.
  • A Book Lover's Emporium Book Blog
    January 1, 1970
    What a captivating story this was. I became enthralled in the story of the American Library in Paris really quickly. It is really well written and evokes the life and times of Paris during World War Two, so much so that I felt I was there and could see through their eyes. I loved the additional story running through the book too, of Odile and Lily, it gave another perspective of seeing things from the more recent time, looking at the past in the present. Brilliant.I felt I knew the characters in What a captivating story this was. I became enthralled in the story of the American Library in Paris really quickly. It is really well written and evokes the life and times of Paris during World War Two, so much so that I felt I was there and could see through their eyes. I loved the additional story running through the book too, of Odile and Lily, it gave another perspective of seeing things from the more recent time, looking at the past in the present. Brilliant.I felt I knew the characters in the story personally, they were so well portrayed. The way they were woven into the backdrop of Nazi occupied Paris was very personal and I became very involved in their story. Odile was probably my favourite but I loved them all and wanted them to succeed and survive. It takes a good storyteller to take the facts and weave a story around actual people and places and make a fascinating story. However, Janet Skeslien Charles has definitely succeeded in doing just that. I struggled to put it down. I cannot recommend reading this book highly enough, you really will not regret reading it.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Atria Books for the ARC. This was a very entertaining book and a fresh take on a WWII novel. I enjoyed the timeline set in Paris the most, learning about all the habitués of the library, more than I enjoyed the 1980s sections. The heartbreak was anticipated enough that it didn’t actually pack the emotional punch I was expecting to feel. But overall, I would recommend for an easy fresh read.
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  • Bojan
    January 1, 1970
    The American Library in Paris is the BEST!
  • Pamela Aronson
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved "The Paris Library". It was an amazing story and well written. I was totally absorbed from the first page to the last, not wanting to put the book down. I found the novel to be a very powerful historical fiction story based on an incredible true story. I highly recommend this novel.
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  • Chris Markley
    January 1, 1970
    A story of finding your path in life even as the world collapses around you. Of learning when to speak and when to keep quiet and the consequences of action. Plus a celebration of libraries and the devoted librarians that will risk their lives for them.THanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing an ARC for my honest review.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful read, especially for librarians. Based on a true story about the American Library in Paris during World War II. Reminded me a bit of Orphan Train because it wove the past with the present. There is a also a bit of mystery added, who is writing the mysterious letters about the people in the library to the police?I highly recommend, I received a free copy from Netgalley in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! From the very beginning to the end, it was interesting and engaging. The characters are well imagined, and the pacing is spot on.
  • Rosemary
    January 1, 1970
    Fresh out of library school, Odile Souchet finds employment at the American Library in Paris (https://americanlibraryinparis.org) in 1939. She and her colleagues weather the hardships caused by the German occupation of France during World War II. They keep the Library open, defying the Nazis in order to help subscribers, including “enemy aliens” and Jews forbidden to visit. The author worked at the Library in 2010 and based the novel on actual people and events there, which makes it all the more Fresh out of library school, Odile Souchet finds employment at the American Library in Paris (https://americanlibraryinparis.org) in 1939. She and her colleagues weather the hardships caused by the German occupation of France during World War II. They keep the Library open, defying the Nazis in order to help subscribers, including “enemy aliens” and Jews forbidden to visit. The author worked at the Library in 2010 and based the novel on actual people and events there, which makes it all the more interesting.(I received pre-publication access thanks to Edelweiss.)
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  • Kelso McNaught
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic WWII story in the same vein as Resistance Women et. al.
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    An immensely satisfying novel about the American Library in Paris in 1939, sprinkled with Dewey Decimal notations for the life events that Odile Souchet encounters. Fast forward to 1983 Montana where Odile is living out her solitary years, when her next-door neighbor, Lily, seeks her out and, slowly, they become friends.Absolutely enchanting.I read this EARC courtesy of Edelweiss and Atria Books. pub date 06/02/20
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. I can't think of a more perfect novel to recommend to booklovers than The Paris Library! Not only does it bring to life the true story of the heroic librarians of the American Library in Nazi-occupied Paris, its interwoven narrative of a bereft teenager in 1980's Montana who finds a kindred spirit in her mysterious, reclusive, and book-loving French neighbor is a feat of extraordinary storytelling. THE PARIS LIBRARY is a testament to the everlasting power of literature and literary 4.5 stars. I can't think of a more perfect novel to recommend to booklovers than The Paris Library! Not only does it bring to life the true story of the heroic librarians of the American Library in Nazi-occupied Paris, its interwoven narrative of a bereft teenager in 1980's Montana who finds a kindred spirit in her mysterious, reclusive, and book-loving French neighbor is a feat of extraordinary storytelling. THE PARIS LIBRARY is a testament to the everlasting power of literature and literary places to bring people together and be a home for everyone, even during our darkest, most hopeless and divided times. (Indie Next Nomination)
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  • Ethel
    January 1, 1970
    Paris, 1939 we find Odile interviewing for a position at the American Library. Odile, having learned the Dewey decimal system thinks in terms of numbers, referring to the books in the library. This is a place where she feels comfortable, where she reveres books. Further this is where students, writers, diplomats and book lovers congregate. Odile is at home, where friendships were made among the many book shelves. Yet as important as the job the library is in her life, she has more...an English Paris, 1939 we find Odile interviewing for a position at the American Library. Odile, having learned the Dewey decimal system thinks in terms of numbers, referring to the books in the library. This is a place where she feels comfortable, where she reveres books. Further this is where students, writers, diplomats and book lovers congregate. Odile is at home, where friendships were made among the many book shelves. Yet as important as the job the library is in her life, she has more...an English best friend, her twin brother Remy, a boyfriend. Then war is declared in September, 1939... her twin brother Remy enlists leaving Odile lonely and worried. Parisians leave by the thousands and the city is occupied with German soldiers. The Paris Library remains steadfast, but now there are rules, some books are confiscated, no Jews may enter, the life you once led can no longer be taken for granted.. Montana, 1983 we find Mrs. Gustafson, Odile, now living in a the small town of Froid where she is called the "War Widow". Lily, a lonely teenager whose family lives next door to Odile and who is obsessed with the mysterious older French woman, asks her teacher to assign her with writing a paper on France. The friendship begins. She is there for Lily when her mother dies, while at the same time the young teenager is trying to find whatever secrets Odile has hidden in her past.We follow Oldile as she struggles through the war, as the books in the library become weapons. Surrounded by her friends and co-workers at the library, there is a sense of unease, insecurities as the Germans tighten their noose around the Parisians. Resentments build up, who do you trust, who are the betrayers, who are still your friends. Then there is Lily and we read as she learns the secrets of Odile's past. Yet, despite the difference in age between the two there is most definitely a connection there. What is it and how does it affect their relationship? As their friendship grows, as they become comfortable with one another, the older woman seeing similarities between them. Until one day, Lily makes a terrible mistake...the floodgates of the spill out.This book about friendship, love and loss all hold strong emotions. With a wonderful cast of characters, each with their own story it is hard to put down. This book isn't one that can be put aside...no, it won't let you. Highly recommended.My thanks to NetGalley and Atria Books for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Ethel
    January 1, 1970
    Paris, 1939 we find Odile interviewing for a position at the American Library. Odile, having learned the Dewey decimal system thinks in terms of numbers, referring to the books in the library. This is a place where she feels comfortable, where she reveres books. Further this is where students, writers, diplomats and book lovers congregate. Odile is at home, where friendships were made among the many book shelves. Yet as important as the job the library is in her life, she has more...an English Paris, 1939 we find Odile interviewing for a position at the American Library. Odile, having learned the Dewey decimal system thinks in terms of numbers, referring to the books in the library. This is a place where she feels comfortable, where she reveres books. Further this is where students, writers, diplomats and book lovers congregate. Odile is at home, where friendships were made among the many book shelves. Yet as important as the job the library is in her life, she has more...an English best friend, her twin brother Remy, a boyfriend. Then war is declared in September, 1939... her twin brother Remy enlists leaving Odile lonely and worried. Parisians leave by the thousands and the city is occupied with German soldiers. The Paris Library remains steadfast, but now there are rules, some books are confiscated, no Jews may enter, the life you once led can no longer be taken for granted.. Montana, 1983 we find Mrs. Gustafson, Odile, now living in a the small town of Froid where she is called the "War Widow". Lily, a lonely teenager whose family lives next door to Odile and who is obsessed with the mysterious older French woman, asks her teacher to assign her with writing a paper on France. The friendship begins. She is there for Lily when her mother dies, while at the same time the young teenager is trying to find whatever secrets Odile has hidden in her past.We follow Oldile as she struggles through the war, as the books in the library become weapons. Surrounded by her friends and co-workers at the library, there is a sense of unease, insecurities as the Germans tighten their noose around the Parisians. Resentments build up, who do you trust, who are the betrayers, who are still your friends. Then there is Lily and we read as she learns the secrets of Odile's past. Yet, despite the difference in age between the two there is most definitely a connection there. What is it and how does it affect their relationship? As their friendship grows, as they become comfortable with one another, the older woman seeing similarities between them. Until one day, Lily makes a terrible mistake...the floodgates of the spill out.This book about friendship, love and loss all hold strong emotions. With a wonderful cast of characters, each with their own story it is hard to put down. This book isn't one that can be put aside...no, it won't let you. Highly recommended.My thanks to NetGalley and Atria Books for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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